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Daniel G. Brinton collection on Spain and New Spain

Ms. Coll. 963

Daniel G. Brinton collection on Spain and New Spain

Ms. Coll. 963

Daniel G. Brinton collection on Spain and New Spain

Register

Ms. Coll. 963

Daniel G. Brinton collection on Spain and New Spain

Ms. Coll. 963

Daniel G. Brinton collection on Spain and New Spain

Ms. Coll. 963

Daniel G. Brinton collection on Spain and New Spain

Ms. Coll. 963

Daniel G. Brinton collection on Spain and New Spain

Ms. Coll. 963

Daniel G. Brinton collection on Spain and New Spain

A Finding Aid for its Meeting Records Deposited in Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College

Ms. Coll. 963

Daniel G. Brinton collection on Spain and New Spain

Ms. Coll. 963

Daniel G. Brinton collection on Spain and New Spain

Ms. Coll. 963

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the University of Pennsylvania. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Brinton, Daniel G. (Daniel Garrison), 1837-1899
Title:
Daniel G. Brinton collection on Spain and New Spain
Date [inclusive]:
1582-1854
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 963
Extent:
1.4 Linear feet (4 boxes)
Language:
English
Abstract:
Daniel Garrison Brinton (1837-1899) was a Philadelphia surgeon and anthropologist who created, collected, and donated collections of books and manuscripts related to anthropology, colonization of the Americas, and native American linguistics. This collection on Spain and New Spain documents, to a limited degree, Spain's relationships with its colonies and other European powers while struggling to maintain its empire.
Cite as:
Daniel G. Brinton collection on Spain and New Spain, 1582-1854, Ms. Coll. 963, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Title:
English legal documents collection
Date [inclusive]:
1592-1810
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 910
Extent:
1 box
Language:
English
Abstract:
This collection contains 52 assorted English legal documents. Most are brief transactional records attesting to land sales, contracts, or estate settlements. Though mostly unrelated, there are a few small groups of connected documents, such as the five certificates of payment by Captain Roger Martin to various parties executed during December 1685. Beyond these transactional documents are a 1679 record of arguments before the Privy Council as well as a 1770 warrant for the arrest of Nicholas Gwyn, an Ipswich medical doctor.
Cite as:
English legal documents collection, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Title:
Florentine documents and correspondence collection
Date [inclusive]:
1437-1804
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 761
Extent:
5 boxes
Language:
English
Language Note:
Materials are in Italian.
Abstract:
Collection concerning Florentine families, organizations, trades, and industries covering the years 1437-1804. The documents that compose the collection are divided into two broad sections, one dedicated to families and organizations, and the other to subjects. The former, arranged alphabetically by name, then chronologically for each family or organization, features documents pertaining to about 130 among the most important Florentine families, as well as institutions such as the Monte di pietà and the hospital of Santa Maria Novella (referred to as Spedale). The families that are best-known in the collection include the Acciaiuoli, Altoviti, Antinori, Corsi, Corsini, Guadagni, Rucellai, Salviati, and Strozzi; the best-represented families in the collection are the Amadori, Capponi, Cassi, Lapini, and Ricciardi. A small number of documents containing information on 3 ships is also present. The latter, arranged alphabetically by subject, and chronologically within each subject, is comprised, for the most part, of numerous kinds financial documents (including accounts, receipts, orders, payments, etc.), and documents related to different aspects of rural life and farm management (such as the purchase of cattle and grains). Other subjects include the guilds of Florence, especially the one of the lanaoioli, wool workers, and that of the setaioli, silk weavers; iron trade; and business relations between Florence and England and Florence and the Netherlands.
Cite as:
Florentine documents and correspondence collection, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Macauley, Francis Campbell, died 1896
Title:
Francis Campbell Macauley autograph collection and vocabulary notebooks
Date [inclusive]:
1479-1896
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 957
Extent:
0.6 Linear feet (2 boxes)
Language:
English
Language Note:
Material is in English, French, German, Italian, and Latin.
Abstract:
This is an autograph collection compiled by Francis Campbell Macaulay. The collection is composed of letters by scientists, politicians, and men of letters, and fragments with signatures. The collection reflects Macaulay's interest in Italian literature, and includes letters from Ludovico Ariosto, Fortunato Cavazzeni Pederzini, and Alessandro Torri. Other notable autographs in the collection are those of Alexandre Dumas, Robert Morris, and Millard Fillmore. The collection also includes several letters to Macaulay regarding the Dante Society, and five volumes of Macaulay's notes for a vocabulary of the dialect of Nice.
Cite as:
Francis Campbell Macauley autograph collection, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Furness Family
Title:
H. H. Furness Memorial Library manuscript collection
Date [bulk]:
1812-1930
Date [inclusive]:
1575-1991
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1356
Extent:
10 linear feet (20 boxes and one oversized folder)
Language:
English
Abstract:
The H.H. Furness Memorial Library focuses on the study of Shakespeare and other Tudor and Stuart dramatists. Horace Howard Furness (1833-1912) and his son Horace Howard Furness Jr. (1865-1930) founded and edited the Variorum Shakespeare and their library was donated to the University of Pennsylvania in 1932. This collection contains personal correspondence to and from Rev. William Henry Furness (1802-1896), Horace Howard Furness, and Horace Howard Furness, Jr., largely relating to Shakespearean study and the H.H. Furness Memorial library; notebooks; copies of speeches and articles; and other assorted items relating to Shakespearean scholarship or to the Furness family.
Cite as:
H. H. Furness Memorial Library manuscript collection, 1575-1991, MS. Coll. 1356, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Lea, Henry Charles, 1825-1909
Title:
Henry Charles Lea collection of Inquisition manuscripts
Date [inclusive]:
1533-1866
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 728
Extent:
0.8 Linear feet (3 boxes)
Language:
English
Language Note:
In Spanish with some documents in Latin, Italian, and French.
Abstract:
Henry Charles Lea was a Philadelphian publisher, civil and public rights activist, mathematician, and and ecclesiastical historian. This collection consists of original manuscripts including trial records, correspondence, a discourse, an edict, a royal proclamation and unidentified French documents.
Cite as:
Henry Charles Lea collection of Inquisition manuscripts, 1533-1866, Ms. Coll. 728, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Colbert, Jean-Baptiste, 1619-1683
Title:
Jean-Baptiste Colbert letters to Gabriel de La Reynie
Date [inclusive]:
1667-1678
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 578
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet (1 box)
Language:
French
Abstract:
Jean Baptiste Colbert served as the French minister of finance under King Louis XIV and achieved a reputation for his work of improving French manufacturing and bringing the economy back from bankruptcy. The letters deal with a variety of subjects ranging from trade regulations, licensing, taxes, and imprisonment to simple requests for the expedition of certain orders.
Cite as:
Jean-Baptiste Colbert letters to Gabriel de La Reynie, 1667-1678, Ms. Coll. 578, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
Quaker Meeting Records at Haverford College Quaker & Special Collections and Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College
Creator:
Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia (Hicksite)
Title:
Philadelphia Monthly Meeting Records
Date [inclusive]:
1677-1955
Call Number:
Ph.P460
Extent:
75 Linear Feet
Language:
English
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Southwell, Edward, 1671-1730
Creator:
Southwell, Robert, Sir, 1635-1702
Title:
Southwell family papers on Ireland
Date [bulk]:
1685-1715
Date [inclusive]:
1662-1977
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1084
Extent:
1 box
Language:
English
Abstract:
This collection consists primarily of documents concerning government administration in Ireland during the tenures of Sir Robert Southwell (1635-1702) and his son Edward Southwell (1671-1730) as Secretaries of State for Ireland. The documents here are largely miscellaneous in nature but are clustered around a few themes. Highlights include lists of rents and financial transactions from the period after Cromwell’s invasion and before the Williamite war in Ireland, a 1689 eyewitness letter recounting the battle of Derry, a series of documents related to admiralty, smuggling, and collecting maritime revenue in the first decade of the eighteenth century, an inventory of maps of Ireland, and a substantive series of petitions relating to Richard Blake of Ardfry.
Cite as:
Southwell family papers on Ireland, 1662-1977 (bulk: 1685-1715), Ms. Coll. 1084, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Title:
Sydney S. Keil collection of Latin Americana
Date [inclusive]:
1615-1863
Call Number:
Print Collection 23
Extent:
2.75 linear feet (6 boxes)
Language:
Spanish
Abstract:
The Sydney S. Keil Collection of Latin Americana contains broadsides and other printed material from Latin America dating from the 17th to 19th centuries with the majority dating from the 18th and early 19th centuries. The majority of these items were printed in Mexico, but the collection also includes material printed in Spain, Peru, and Columbia. The collection is particularly strong in printed novenas and other devotional work, as well as government decrees and laws.
Cite as:
Sydney S. Keil collection of Latin Americana, 1615-1863, Print Collection 23, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Biography/History

Daniel Garrison Brinton, born May 13, 1837, graduated from Yale University in 1858 and from the Jefferson Medical College in 1860. Early in his medical career, he served in the Union Army as a surgeon during the American Civil War, working both on the battlefields of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg and as superintendent of hospitals at Quincy and Springfield in Illinois. He continued his career in medicine in Philadelphia until his retirement in 1887 at the age of fifty.

From 1887 until his death on July 31, 1899, Brinton focused his attention on a "wide range of subjects, including mythology and folklore, the ethnography and linguistics of American Indians from South America to the Arctic, the prehistory and physical anthropology of native North America, indigenous American literature and writing systems, among others," (Weeks, page 167). He served as professor of ethnology and archaeology at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia and as professor of archaeology and linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania. Over the years of his own study, research, and writing, he created, collected, and donated collections of books and manuscripts related to anthropology, colonization of the Americas, and native American linguistics.

Brinton collected material which documents, to a limited degree, Spain and its colonial empire, which, by the end of the 15th century, was called "the empire on which the sun never set." Spain controlled this vast area until the first half of the 19th century, when the colonies began fighting for their independence. The colonies were important economically for trade and resources and played roles in Spain's religious, political, and military development.

Works referenced:

Chamberlain, Alex F., "In Memoriam: Daniel Garrison Brinton." The Journal of American Folklore, Volume 13, Number 46 (July-September 1899), pages 215-225.

Weeks, John M. "The Daniel Garrison Brinton Collection," The Penn Libraries Collections at 250 (online exhibit: http://www.library.upenn.edu/exhibits/rbm/at250/anthropology/jw.pdf).

Biography/History

The Age of the Medici

The centuries that preceded the ascendancy of the Medici were marked by a state of perpetual tension between the two opposing factions of the Guelphs and the Ghibellines for the control of Florence, as well as of other contiguous territories. The distinction between Guelphs and Ghibellines dates back to Frederick Barbarossa’s reign in the 12th century. Guelphs were supporters of the papacy and tended to come from mercantile and banking families, whereas Ghibellines were the imperial party and came from rural aristocracy. Moreover, a city tended to be predominantly Ghibelline if its independence was threatened by the Papal States, or mainly Guelph if it was the Emperor that intimidated them. Small cities were often Ghibelline if in the area there was a large city that supported the Guelph party. It was rare, however, to find a city that, in spite of its professed support for either faction, presented no internal antagonism between individual families, neighborhoods, or districts that took opposite sides. Some small and more vulnerable cities often supported the enemy of any large and potentially dangerous city nearby, especially if it had previously attempted to extend its jurisdiction over them.

Florence, like many other Italian cities, was not immune to the perennial antagonism between the two factions. Over the years, both obtained temporary political success by overthrowing one another’s supremacy. In addition to the conflict with the Ghibellines, the Guelphs split into Guelfi Bianchi (White Guelphs) and  Guelfi Neri (Black Guelphs), the former representing the interests of the working class, and the latter those of the aristocracy. Although these internal differences were never resolved, on 11 June 1289 the Black and the White Guelphs had to join their forces to fight the Ghibellines in the battle of Campaldino, after a period of mounting tension. The Guelphs won, but the conflict between the Black and the White, culminating in the exile of the latter in 1301, prevented the party from retaining control of the city. During the last years of the 13th century and the beginning of the 14th, the power shifted from the nobility to the mercantile class, resulting in decades of stability. The plague outbreak of 1348 decimated the Florentine population and had an extremely severe impact on all social and political dynamics. In 1378, the  ciompi (wool carders), who were not represented by any guild, revolted against the oligarchic governing body, the  Signoria. However, after a brief period during which the working class was granted unprecedented levels of power, the  ciompi were defeated and the privileges revoked. After the revolt was suppressed, the aristocratic family of the Albizi held sway over Florence until the early 15th century.

The Medici family’s rise to power began in 1434, when Cosimo de’ Medici (later known as Il Vecchio, The Elder) overthrew the rival faction of the Albizi. Under Cosimo, who invested conspicuous amounts of the family fortune to promote the development of culture and the arts, Florence became the epitome of the Renaissance, as well as experiencing a rapid economic surge. Medieval fears and preoccupations were gradually replaced by a growing interest in banking and trade, and with an a more audacious attitude towards investing in a wide range of industries, both in Italy and abroad. The city also benefitted, materially and culturally, from having the Medici act as bankers to the pope. But the Medici bank was not the only credit institution of Florence and, although undoubtedly the most famous, it was probably not the most important. Many other commercial banks were either founded, or reached unprecedented levels of growth, sometimes with numerous branches in Florence and Italy. Two examples are the Strozzi and the Capponi banks, whose trading and commercial operations often surpassed that of the Medici.

Cosimo was succeeded by Piero in 1464, who was only in power for four years before being succeeded by his son Lorenzo, known as Il Magnifico (The Magnificent). Under Lorenzo, Florence reached its political, cultural, and economic apogee, and his death marked the end of the Golden Age for the Tuscan city. However, he ruled as a despot, often exacerbating the conflict between his family and their opponents. The tension between the Medici and their enemies culminated in the Pazzi Conspiracy (1478), in which Lorenzo was almost killed and his brother died. The Medici and their faction promptly repressed their enemies, and the Pazzi were exterminated, which resulted in Lorenzo’s excommunication and in Florence being put under interdict by Sixtus IV. The years that followed were characterized by a precarious equilibrium between the opposing parties, and although successful in its maintenance, Lorenzo did not keep peace without effort. At his death in 1492, his son Piero was exiled, together with other members of his faction, and the first part of the Medici era ended with the restoration of the republic in Florence by the Dominican Girolamo Savonarola. The Medici bank was shut down in 1494, after many of its branches reported serious losses. Savonarola, however, enforced a regimen of widespread repression of the supposedly immoral lifestyle and pleasures of the Florentine citizens. His policies were not well received, and he rapidly lost support of the government and was burned in 1498.

The Medici did not return to power until 1512, when Giovanni de’ Medici (later Pope Leo X) regained control over Florence. With the exception of the years between 1527 and 1530, when the republic was restored again, the Medici firmly governed Florence for almost two centuries. Shortly after the failed republican coup, the newly-reinstated Alessandro de’ Medici was proclaimed duke of Florence by the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V in 1531. Alessandro’s successor, Cosimo, was proclaimed grand-duke of Tuscany in 1537, after supporting Charles V in the Italian Wars. The Medici ruled as grand-dukes until the last member of the house, Gian Gastone, died in 1737 with no heirs. The Medici were succeeded by the Habsburg-Lorraine dynasty. Although the years of Cosimo the Elder and Lorenzo are often regarded as the highest point in the history of Florence, and the splendor of that period was never emulated, the grand-ducal era represented a crucial time for the growth and development of the city. The Tuscan grand-duchy established its presence in the Italian and European political scenario, created alliances in order to expand its territory and protect its growing power, and strengthened its economic structure both in terms of public and private finance. During those years, Florence made the transition from being a Renaissance republic, still highly relying on medieval values, to an early modern state, whose interests were projected into an international panorama. The Medici were the family who singlehandedly guided their city in this transition, being able to understand political and economical change and adapt to it. However, the transformation undergone by Florence can only be fully understood by looking at the context that made it possible, and a large component of it consists of the families who, some operating in the shadow of the Medici, some working with them as political officers, diplomats, and business counterparts, participated in the evolution.

Illustrious families of Florence

The Medici were not absolute rulers of Florence. Not only had their official title of grand-duke been granted by Pope Pius V in 1569, on the condition that Tuscany would be in vassalage under the Holy Roman Empire, but they would not have been able to establish and maintain their supremacy without the favor and support of the aristocracy and upper middle class. Many families of noble descent, as well as powerful entrepreneurs whose fortune and power matched those of the aristocracy, were crucial to the history of Florence. A partial list of those who played an active role in the political and economic evolution of Florence follows, highlighting some of dynamics that come into play between the 16th and the 18th century and that are reflected in the present collection.

Acciaiuoli family: Originally from Brescia, in northern Italy, they moved to Florence in 1160, where they joined the  Arte del Cambio (guild of exchange brokers and bankers) and engaged in the trade of metals (the name  Acciaiouli probably derives from  acciaio, steel) and other commercial activities. They were extremely successful businessmen and lent money to some of the most important Italian rulers, including the King of Naples. In Florence, they held a number of important political and religious offices, such as  priori, gonfalonieri di giustizia and  consoli delle arti. They were related to the Medici and the Albizi after the marriage of Laudomia Acciaiuoli and Pierfrancesco de' Medici.

Altoviti family: The origin of the family is not clear, but it seems plausible that they originated from Fiesole, a town outside Florence. They moved to the city in the 12th century, and quickly established themselves in the political scene. Between the 13th and 18th century they were consuls,  anziani al Comune, gonfalonieri di giustizia, priori di libertà alla Repubblica, members à of the  XII Buonuomini and  XVI di Compagnia. During the grand-ducal years, they were  senatori del granducato. They were also very powerful members of various military religious orders, such as the  Cavalieri Professi dell'Ordine di Malta, the  Ordine di Sant'Iacopo, and the  Cavalieri di Giustizia. One member of the Altoviti family was  gran cancelliere and one  bali Gran Croce di Devozione of the Ordine di Santo Stefano Papa e Martire. The Altoviti lost the favor of Cosimo I, who perceived them as having gained too much financial power and exiled them, but they were allowed to return when Cosimo II came to power in 1609.

Antinori family: After having their large country estates in Val di Sieve, northeast of Florence, repeatedly damaged during the prolonged conflict between the Guelphs and the Ghibellines, the Antinori moved to the city in the 13th century. They joined the  Arte della Seta (guild of silk weavers) and, thanks to their large capital, were able to secure a leading position in the national and international silk trade. Moreover, they were pioneers who fully grasped the importance of the emerging markets of France and Belgium, and who established two branches of their corporation in Bruges and Lyon. They emerged unscathed from the financial crisis of the 14th century that affected most large banks and enterprises in Florence, and exploited the situation to their advantage. In fact, being one of the few families that had copious amounts of funds at their disposal, they began their rise in the political sphere, and many members of the family became  priori and  gonfalonieri. The Antinori often participated in business activities with the Medici, both in the silk trade and in the banking industry, and the two families enjoyed friendly relations with one another for many centuries. In the late 16th century, however, Bernardo Antinori engaged in a liaison with Leonora di Toledo, wife of Pietro de’ Medici. When Pietro found out about the affair, he murdered Leonora and imprisoned Bernardo, and the ties between the two families were abruptly severed.

Corsi family: The family had lived in Florence since the Middle Ages, and had joined the  Arte dei Fornaciari (guild of the bakers, one of the minor guilds of the city), gradually improving their financial situation, purchasing numerous estates, and taking an active role in the political life of Florence. The family counted 28  priori di libertà and 9  gonfalonieri during the republican years alone. A branch of the Corsi moved to Naples, which proved to be a very successful move that earned them great profits and the title of marquis. When they returned to Florence they consolidated their position in the textile trade as well as in the financial industry. They also were powerful patrons of the arts, and the first Italian melodrama,  La favola di Dafne, was staged in the Palazzo Tornabuoni, property of the marquis Jacopo Corsi, who later converted the residence into the Accademia fiorentina. Various Corsi married into other aristocratic families, such as the Salviati and the Guicciardini. They were always close to the Medici and, during the grand-ducal years, they frequently served as  senatori.

Corsini family: Neri Corsini moved to Florence from the rural town of Poggibonsi in the second half of the 12th century. Like many other families of merchants, their fortune began with the creation of textile and silk enterprises in the early 14th century, followed by the launching of credit institutions in Florence and abroad. In spite of the large losses reported by the Corsini bank in 1370, they were able to recover financially and save the business, which continued to operate for many centuries. They also pursued investment opportunities in England, where they founded a very successful branch. The Corsini held several offices both in the republic of Florence and in the grand-duchy of Tuscany, but their political ambition often caused friction with the Medici, who considered them potential threats to their hegemony. This concern was also exacerbated by the growing favor of the Pope for the Corsini, and their ascent in the religious scene of Florence: Pietro Corsini was bishop of the city and cardinal; Andrea became bishop of Fiesole in 1349, remained in office until his death in 1373, and in 1624 was sanctified by Pope Urban VIII as Saint Andrea Corsini; and Amerigo served as the first archbishop of Florence. The Corsini were also aggressive real estate investors, who owned many of the most prestigious properties of Florence. When the last Medici grand-duke died without heirs, the Corsini nominated themselves as potential successors, but could not compete against the Habsburg-Lorraine.

Guadagni family: They moved to Florence in the 11th century and joined the Guelph party shortly thereafter. The family enjoyed a period of relative prosperity until 1260, when they were exiled from the city by the rival faction of Ghibellines after the battle of Montaperti. They were allowed back in 1281, and promptly entered the commercial and financial network that Florence shared with northern Europe. They were also politically influential and held numerous offices, such as  consoli, priori and  gonfalonieri di giustizia. Bernardo Guadagni, instigated by Rinaldo degli Albizi, signed an edict in 1443 to exile the rival Cosimo the Elder, who temporarily left Florence. He returned in 1444, and the Guadagni, together with other political opponents, were expelled. They settled in France, where they accumulated substantial wealth working as bankers in Paris and Lyon. The family was very close to the French monarchy, and Guglielmo Guadagni repeatedly fought for Francis I. Ferdinando I de’ Medici took an interest in Guglielmo and invited him to Florence to lead the fleet of the military religious order of Santo Stefano. The move by the Guadagni back to Italy in the 17th century marks the culmination of their political and economical rise, and numerous members of the family are appointed as diplomats to the grand-dukes.

Rucellai family: The Rucellai were a patrician family who had been heavily involved in the textile industry of Florence since the 12th century. According to tradition, the merchant Alamanno Rucellai fortuitously discovered how a very powerful red wool dye could be extracted from a small plant that abounded in the Mediterranean region. This resulted in considerable profits for the family business and allowed them to join the political scene of the Comune, which culminated in 85 Rucellai being appointed  priori and 14  gonfalonieri di giustizia over the course of the years. In addition to their numerous public offices, they devoted themselves to cultivating their increasing interest in the arts. Sophisticated philanthropists, they were among the patrons of Leon Battista Alberti, who designed several buildings, the façade of Palazzo Rucellai and of Santa Maria Novella, the marble-clad shrine of the Holy Sepulcher, and perhaps also the Capella Rucellai. Annibale Rucellai was the private counselor of Caterina de’ Medici, and followed her to the French court, as did Luigi Rucellai with Maria de’ Medici. Bernardo Rucellai was, with Cosimo de’ Medici, one of the founders of the Platonic Academy. He also married Nannina de’ Medici, older sister of Lorenzo, further strengthening the already solid alliance between the two families.

Salviati family: The family moved to Florence from the countryside in the 13th century and rapidly entered the textile and banking industries, which helped them secure a key role in the economy of the Comune. Their commercial and financial supremacy lead to political advancement and, with 91  priori, 21  gonfalonieri di giustizia, and 6 other high officers, the Salviati contributed more statesmen to their city than any other family. Their appetite for power, however, collided with the interests of the Medici, who were not prepared to share their leadership with potential rivals. The hostilities reached their peak in 1478, when the archbishop of Pisa, Francesco Salviati, was among the instigators of the Pazzi conspiracy. The plan failed and Francesco was hung from the Palazzo della Signoria with the other traitors. After this episode, however, the tension between the two factions partly dissolved, and the Salviati joined the large group of families who, at least publicly, supported the Medicean court. In 1486, Jacopo Salviati married Lucrezia de' Medici, daughter of Lorenzo il Magnifico and, in the beginning, the Medici and the Salviati both profited from the newly-established relationship. In particular, the Salviati bank benefitted from the election of the Cardinal Giulio de’ Medici as Pope Clement VII, who became one of their largest patrons.

Strozzi family: The Strozzi were a Florentine aristocratic family of very ancient origin, who had resided in the Comune since the 14th century. Although they were involved in the political life of Florence, especially during the republican age with 93  priori and 16  gonfalonieri di giustizia, their main focus was the development of their banking enterprise, one of the most powerful and influential of the time, that counted monarchs and popes among their patrons, and had branches all over Italy, France, Spain, and Flanders. Until the 15th century, the Strozzi bank amply surpassed the Medici in wealth, capital, and level of operations. The rivalry between the two families lead to an open conflict which reached its apex when Palla Strozzi, a philologist, philosopher, and art collector, as well as banker, accused Cosimo the Elder of being a tyrant and despot, and of being a danger to the Florentine  libertas. Together with Rinaldo Albizi, he succeeded in exiling Cosimo in 1433. The following year, however, Cosimo returned, and the Strozzi and the Albizi had to flee the city to avoid persecution. The relationship between the Strozzi and the Medici improved briefly when Filippo Strozzi married Clarice de’ Medici in 1508, but the peace that ensued was short-lived, as Filippo was among the anti-Medicean conspirators in 1527. After the republic was overthrown and the hegemony of the Medici restored, the Strozzi were forced to acknowledge the supremacy of their adversaries, but never supported them, preferring to devote themselves to the banking industry.

Biography/History

Francis Campbell Macauley (sometimes spelled "Macaulay") was an American lawyer, literary aficionado, and archaeological advocate of the 19th century. Macaulay came to reside in Philadelphia in 1888. The following year he proposed to Dr. William Pepper and other leaders of the University of Pennsylvania the creation of an archaeological museum associated with the university. His efforts led to the foundation of the Museum of American Archaeology, which is now the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Macaulay's great interest in Italian literature resulted in an extraordinary collection of early editions of Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, and Torquato Tasso, as well as assorted autographs and vocabulary notebooks, which he bequeathed to the University of Pennsylvania in 1896.

Biography/History

The H.H. Furness Memorial Library is devoted to the study of Shakespeare and other Tudor and Stuart dramatists. Horace Howard Furness, a Shakespearean scholar responsible for the New Variorum, and his son, Horace Howard Furness, Jr., who continued to work on Variorum Shakespeare after his father's death, accumulated a library that was donated to the University of Pennsylvania in 1932. In the process of their research and work on Shakespearean scholarship, they corresponded with many other scholars. This collection consists largely of material related to Shakespeare studies and the Memorial Library, but also contains some Furness family correspondence and material, in particular the correspondence and writings of William Henry Furness, father of Horace Howard Furness. This collection should be used closely with the Furness family papers (Ms. Coll. 481), as there is significant overlap.

William Henry Furness (1802-1896) was a Unitarian minister, abolitionist, and biblical critic. The son of William Furness (a bank clerk), and Rebecca Thwing, he was born and educated in Boston. While he was a student of the Boston Latin school, Furness met Ralph Waldo Emerson, with whom he developed a friendship that he would cultivate for the rest of his life. He graduated from Harvard College in 1820, and from the Harvard Divinity School in 1823. In the spring of 1824, Furness moved to Baltimore to work as an assistant to Rev. W. H. Greenwood. A few months later, the Unitarian Society of Philadelphia (which had remained without a designated minister since its foundation in 1796) invited Furness to preach, and in January 1825, he took charge of the Society, becoming its only pastor. That same year, William married Annis Pulling Jenks, with whom he would have four children: William Henry Furness, Jr. (1827-1867), a portrait painter; Annis Lee Furness (1830-1908), an author and translator; Horace Howard Furness (1833-1912), a Shakespeare scholar; and Frank Heyling Furness (1839-1912), an architect. Furness maintained his position as a pastor of the Philadelphia Unitarian Church for fifty years, until he resigned in 1875. Shortly after, however, he was appointed minister emeritus until his death in 1896. Furness was a staunch supporter of the antislavery cause, and, in 1859, he participated in a Philadelphia public prayer vigil for abolitionist John Brown. He authored several books on the gospels and the figure of Jesus, whose miracles are discussed according to rational principles. Among his most notable works are Notes on the Four Gospels (1836),  The History of Jesus (1853),  The Blessing of Abolition (1860), and  Jesus, The Heart of Christianity (1882).

Horace Howard Furness (1833-1912) was born in Philadelphia and graduated from Harvard in 1854. After graduation, he undertook a two-year tour of Europe, Asia, and Africa with Atherton Blight, his former college roommate. Upon his return to Philadelphia, he became involved in the abolitionist movement. He was admitted to the bar in 1859, and he married Helen Kate Rogers (1837-1883) the following year. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Horace attempted, with his brother Frank, to enroll in the army as a volunteer. While Frank joined the Sixth Pennsylvania Cavalry, Horace was rejected because of a growing deafness that developed after contracting scarlet fever in Europe. During the war, however, Furness joined the U.S. Sanitary Commission, a war relief organization created in 1861 to provide support to wounded soldiers and their families. During this time, Furness's deafness began to negatively influence his career as a lawyer, which he eventually abandoned to begin studying and collecting Shakespearian texts. In November 1860, he became a member of the Shakspere Society of Philadelphia, and in the following years, he gradually created his own working library of Shakespearian texts. In 1871, he produced the first volume of the New Variorum Shakespeare, an edition of Romeo and Juliet. The series was designed to bring together all known information about the plays’ textual variants, sources, and critical reception. During his career, Furness published sixteen additional Variorum volumes, establishing an international reputation as a Shakespeare scholar. In 1880, he became a trustee of the University of Pennsylvania. Furness received honorary degrees from many institutions, including Cambridge University, Columbia, Harvard, Yale, and University of Göttingen (Ph.D.). Furness died in 1912 in Wallingford, Pennsylvania, where he had permanently resided since 1894. Furness's family shared his enthusiasm for Shakespeare. His wife, Helen Kate Furness, was responsible for compiling  A Concordance to Shakespeare's Poems (1874), and his son Horace Howard Furness Jr. (1865-1930) took up the project of editing subsequent Variorum editions after his father’s death. Besides Horace Howard Jr, Horace and Helen had three children: Walter Rogers Furness (1861-1914), who in 1896 became a partner in the architecture firm of his uncle, Frank; William Henry Furness III (1866-1920), an explorer and ethnologist; and Caroline Augusta Furness (1873-1909), an ethnologist. For more information on Horace Howard Furness, see the article "Horace Howard Furness: Book Collector and Library Builder," and the biography  The Philadelphia Shakespeare Story: Horace Howard Furness and the New Variorum Shakespeare (New York: AMS Press, 1990), both by James M. Gibson.

Horace Howard Furness, Jr. (1865-1930) graduated from Harvard in 1888, but before approaching the Variorum project, he studied music at the University of Pennsylvania and taught physics at Episcopal Academy from 1891 to 1901. Macbeth, the first revised edition in the Variorum series under his editorship, was produced in 1903. He became a trustee of the University of Pennsylvania in 1929. Furness donated his family’s collection of books, letters, and memorabilia to the University of Pennsylvania, at the time of his death. With the gift came funds to build a space on campus to house the collection. Dedicated on April 23, 1932, and originally housed in the main library building (now the Anne & Jerome Fisher Fine Arts Library), the Memorial Library was moved to Van Pelt Library in 1962 and reconstructed in the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts in 2013.

Biography/History

Henry Charles Lea was a Philadelphian publisher, civil and public rights activist, mathematician, and and ecclesiastical historian. He was born to Isaac Lea, a publisher in Philadelphia, and Frances Anne Carey, the daughter of his partner at his publishing firm, on September 19, 1825. Mr. Lea was tutored by the theoretical mathematician Eugenius Nulty and under his tutelage wrote several papers on various topics in science and mathematics at a young age. On May 27, 1850, Henry Charles Lea married his wife Anna Caroline Jaudon, who was also his first cousin. Together they had two children, Nina Lea and Arthur Henry Lea. At a young age, Mr. Lea had begun working at his father's publishing firm, which underwent many name changes throughout its existence. During these years he suffered a nervous breakdown and abandoned his study of science and mathetics. Eventually, after reading through some medieval French memoirs, he became interested in medievil history and ultimately decided to become a historian. He focused on ecclesiastical history of the Middle Ages and became a leading scholar on the Spanish Inquisition. He wrote several books on these topics, many of which are still renowned for their research today. During his time as a historian, he also earned honorary degrees from Harvard, Princeton, and the University of Pennsylvania, as well as from the Giessen in Moscow.

During the Civil War, Henry Charles Lea was a member of the Union League of Philadelphia and oversaw its publication committee. Under the Enrollment Act in 1863, he was appointed as one of the Bounty Commissioners and, through this position, became involved with recruiting African American regiments for the Union. In 1881, he was chosen to be the president of the National Republican League and the next year, he was president of the Association of Republicans and Independents. He was also an active civil and public rights activist, involved in issues such as the placement of City Hall in Philadelphia and in the opposition of opening of a slaughterhouse along the Schuylkill River.

On October 24, 1909, Henry Charles Lea died in Philadelphia and was buried at the Laurel Hill Cemetery.

Source: "Henry Charles Lea and the Libraries within a Library," by Edward Peters.

Biography/History

Jean Baptiste Colbert served as the French minister of finance under King Louis XIV and achieved a reputation for his work of improving French manufacturing and bringing the economy back from bankruptcy. He created a favorable balance of trade and increased France's colonial holdings by advocating the policy of mercantilism.

Gabriel Nicolas de La Reynie was selected to fill the new position of Lieutenant-General of the French Police in 1671. The duties of his post were vast, and by the end of his term he managed to transform Paris, improve tremendously urban law enforcement, restructure the Paris Police Force, reduce dueling, and increase state control over prostitution.

Biography/History

A monthly meeting at Philadelphia was established along with Philadelphia Quarterly Meeting in 10mo 1682/3. In 1772, this meeting was divided, resulting in two additional monthly meetings: Philadelphia Monthly Meeting for the Northern District and Philadelphia Monthly Meeting for the Southern District. The original meeting was then sometimes referred to as the "Middle District." In 1814, a further division created Philadelphia Monthly Meeting for the Western District.

At the time of the Separation, the Orthodox Friends held the meeting at 4th and Arch Streets. This meeting was the forerunner of the current Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia at Arch Street. In 1827, Abington Quarterly Meeting (Hicksite) re-established a monthly meeting in the city for Friends of Philadelphia and Byberry. It became part of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting (Hicksite) in 1828. From 1828 to 1857, this meeting held its sessions at a meeting house on Cherry Street.

A Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia held at Spruce Street, also known as Spruce Street Monthly Meeting, was set off in 1833; this meeting was discontinued in 1903, its remaining members transferred back to the Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia (Hicksite).

In 1957, Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia (Hicksite) merged with Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia for the Western District to form Central Philadelphia Monthly Meeting of Friends.

Biography/History

This collection consists primarily of documents concerning government administration in Ireland during the tenures of Sir Robert Southwell (1635-1702) and his son Edward Southwell (1671-1730) as Secretaries of State for Ireland. Because of their nineteenth and twentieth century collection history, the documents here are largely miscellaneous in nature but are clustered around a few themes. Highlights include lists of rents and financial transactions from the period after Cromwell’s invasion and before the Williamite war in Ireland, a 1689 eyewitness letter recounting the battle of Derry, a series of documents related to admiralty, smuggling, and collecting maritime revenue in the first decade of the eighteenth century, an inventory of maps of Ireland, and a substantive series of petitions relating to Richard Blake of Ardfry.

The collection Archibald Cameron Elias Jr. (1944-2008) was a literary scholar who wrote extensively on the writer Jonathan Swift and his circle. Dr. Elias' books include Swift at Moor Park (1982) and the Memoirs of Laetitia Pilkington (1997). His collection reflected his interest in 17th and 18th century Irish and English literature and in addition to the materials listed here he also owned a number of bound manuscript volumes which are cataloged separately.

Biography/History

Jeffrey Keil, a 1965 graduate from the University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School of Business, purchased a portion of the collection of Bernardo Mendel, a Latin Americana collector and dealer. In 1986, Keil donated the collection to the University of Pennsylvania in memory of his father, Sydney S. Keil (a 1933 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania). In addition to the collection, which consisted of about 1,450 items, Jeffrey Keil also established the Sydney S. Keil Collection fund, which is used to acquire additional materials on Latin American history.

The broadsides described in this finding aid may also be searched in the Franklin Catalog along with the remainder of the Sydney S. Keil Collection.

Scope and Contents

The Daniel G. Brinton collection on Spain and New Spain documents, to a limited degree, Spain's relationships with its colonies and other European powers while struggling to maintain its empire. The collection is arranged into five series: I. House of Abrantes y Linares, II. The Spanish Court, III. Private correspondence, IV. Official documents, and V. Miscellaneous. The physical arrangement is presumed to be Brinton's own arrangement and has therefore been maintained. The first series, House of Abrantes y Linares, contains correspondence, accounts, genealogical records, and legal documents relating to the Dukes and Duchesses of Abrantes of Portugal, dating from the late 1600s to the early 1800s. The Abrantes y Linares were Grandees of Spain (Grandes de España), the highest ranking members of the Spanish nobility, and their correspondence reflects their status in society. They corresponded with other Grandees, with people who asked them for favors, and with their bookkeepers who managed their accounts. From the records, it appears that the family business included shipping goods, as receipts for goods from owners of ships are frequently found within the material. Frequent correspondents, in addition to the Dukes and Duchesses of Abrantes, include Juan de Carvajal y Sande, Maria Micaela de Carvajal y Lancaster, Jose de Carvajal y Lancaster, Francisco Carrasco, Gonzalo Carrasco, Conde de la Enjarada, Ambrosio de Arnedo Marin (bookkeeper to the Duke de Abrantes y Linares), Juan and Rosa Cano Moctezuma, and Pedro Anselmo Sanchez de Tagle. Intellectually, these files are arranged alphabetically.

In the 1760s, after the Seven Years’ War, the Spanish government and Court's relationship with Great Britain was tense. Materials in this series, The Spanish Court, document Spain's diplomatic relationship with Great Britain and the Spanish Court's trade relationships. Within the British-Spanish diplomatic relationship records, researchers will find translations of letters and documents from Jose I, the king of Portugal, Carlos III, the king of Spain, and George III, the king of England; lists of Spanish warships and British subjects seeking protection; and letters of British ambassadors and consuls in Cadiz, Malaga, and Sardinia. Of particular interest may be the nineteen letters that are presumed to be authored by Jean Joudet, a British spy and Maris of Esquilache's secretary, written to Lewis de Visme, secretary to the British embassy. Materials within the trade records document shipping, customs, orders, and taxes. The miscellaneous records include poems, list of promotions granted by Carlos II, and a report about the French settlement in Cayenne. When duplicates are listed in the contents, they are hand-written copies of the same period. Materials within this series are intellectually arranged in chronological order.

The third series, Private correspondence, 1582-1843, is intellectually arranged alphabetically by author of letter, when known, or recipient when author is not known. Frequent correspondents include Faustino de la Cruz y Bahamonde, Nicolas de la Cruz y Bahamonde, Martin Antonio de Huici, the Marquesa de Villafranca, and Ignacio Zavaleta y Zavaleta.

The fourth series, Official documents, consist of trading records, accounts, requests for favors, reports, and military records coming from cities. Some of them reflect the strained atmosphere in New Spain at the beginning of the 19th century. A good number of these documents relate to Peru and, in particular, Lima. These documents are intellectually arranged in chronological order.

The final series, Miscellaneous, includes documents that do not relate to Spain or New Spain. Included is a report on a mission of Capuchin monks in Africa at the end of the 17th century, and the incomplete draft of a novel relating to the adventures of Juan Dudas.

Scope and Contents

This collection contains 52 assorted English legal documents. Most are brief transactional records attesting to land sales, contracts, or estate settlements. Though mostly unrelated, there are a few small groups of connected documents, such as the five certificates of payment by Captain Roger Martin to various parties executed during December 1685. Beyond these transactional documents are a 1679 record of arguments before the Privy Council as well as a 1770 warrant for the arrest of Nicholas Gwyn, an Ipswich medical doctor.

Scope and Contents

The collection of Florentine documents and correspondence at the University of Pennsylvania contains numerous types of documents that were originally part of large bundles of miscellaneous manuscripts within Gondi-Medici Business Records. These documents have been arranged according to which Florentine family or organization they pertain to. This process has resulted in the creation of several single-family collections (e.g. the House of Medici papers, the Gondi family papers, and the Sangalletti family accounts) on one hand, and of the present collection on the other. Unlike the single-family collections, it incorporates miscellaneous documents and correspondence pertaining to numerous Florentine families and industries. Moreover, none of the families that have their own separate collections will appear in the Florentine Documents and Correspondence. Nonetheless, it offers a unique and multifaceted account of almost four centuries of the history of the Tuscan city-state through diversified types of manuscripts, making it an original source of information on financial, commercial, and political activities of the time.

The collection consists of over a thousand documents organized in 220 folders and two series. The first is the Family and Organization series, in which approximately 130 families are represented, consisting of 172 folders in alphabetical order. Within individual families, for large numbers of documents pertaining to various members, they are organized alphabetically and chronologically for each member. In case of numerous documents of the same type (e.g. receipts) pertaining to a single family, those are organized chronologically and located at the end of their respective family series. Items of ingoing and outgoing correspondence between various families are also included in the collection. Together with the roughly 130 families, there is a small number of documents that pertain to the Monte di Piet and to the hospital of Santa Maria Novella, the only two institutions that appear in the collection. The Monte was not family-run, but its creation was only possible thanks first to the donations, and then to the loans, of many Florentine families, and the relationship between them and the Monte was very significant for the entire economy of the city-state. Santa Maria Novella was a church which also offered medical help to pilgrims and those in need. There are also a few brief financial documents concerning three ships, filed by the name of the ship.

The Monte was an institutional pawnbroker, originally created to offer an acceptable alternative to the moneylending by the Jews that displeased the Church. Various Monti were created in many Italian cities starting in the mid-15th century. The Florentine Monte, however, was not set up until 1495, under the ruling of Savonarola. The Medici, in fact, had been quite supportive of the Jewish enterprises, having relied heavily on the profits derived from taxing them, and were not ready to encourage an institution that would limit their activity. The first Monte was structured as a charitable institution, that rejected public funding in favor of private donations and free loans from wealthy private benefactors. At first, no interest was offered for these payments, which were to be perceived as simple expressions of altruism. The role of interest in the money market had been underestimated, and donations fell significantly over the course of the first few years of life of the Monte. Around 1540, after Alessandro de’ Medici allowed the Monte to include interest in its operations, the Florentine institution started attracting large volumes of deposits, and its business grew significantly. At the same time, it slowly transformed itself from a simple pawn bank to a savings-and-loan bank, offering loans to those who would have normally not been granted credit, but also funding various expenses of the government.

The Subject series, which incorporates financial, notarial, and other miscellaneous documents, is also organized alphabetically and comprises 48 folders. The financial documents, sorted by type, are the most numerous of the Subject series. Documents pertaining to rural life are also present in considerable number. Other topics include trade, Florentine guilds, and notarial and legal documents.

Institutions of medieval origin that operated between the 12th and the 16th century, the guilds organized most aspects of Florence’s economic life by creating a network as strong as family ties between professionals who worked in the same industry. There were three kinds of guilds, the Arti Maggiori (major guilds), the Arti Mediane (intermediate guilds), and the  Arti Minori (minor guilds), according to their power within Florence. The first major guild was the  Arte di Calimala (cloth-merchants' guild), followed by the  Arte della Lana (wool merchants), the  Arte dei Giudici e Notai (judges, lawyers, and notaries), the  Arte del Cambio (bankers), the  Arte della Seta (silk weavers), the  Arte dei Medici e Speziali (physicians and pharmacists), and the  Arte dei Vaiai e Pellicciai (furriers). Entry to a guild was regulated by a complex set of rules and requirements, and each guild had its own statutes that governed the activities of its members. Guilds were not just corporations that promoted the welfare of their members and controlled the quality of the manufacturing process, but oftentimes the members themselves had prominent political roles (for example as  priori) alongside the aristocracy. The power of the guilds experienced a great decline after 1534, when Alessandro de’ Medici reformed their statutes, reducing them to professional associations with minimal political influence.

Scope and Contents

The collection comprises the autographed manuscripts of various literary, political, and intellectual figures from the 15th to 19th centuries collected by Francis Campbell Macaulay, as well as five vocabulary notebooks on the dialect of Nice compiled by him. The collection is accordingly divided into two series. The first consists of sundry manuscripts, mostly letters, but also a few clippings, poems, and other documents, featuring individual autographs. The autographs are arranged alphabetically. The second series comprises the vocabulary notebooks, which were completed before Macaulay's donation of the complete collection to the University of Pennsylvania in 1896.

Highlights of the collection include autographs of U.S. presidents James Buchanan, Millard Fillmore, Thomas Jefferson, and Martin Van Buren; founding father and financier Robert Morris; Chief Justice of the Supreme Court Roger B. Taney; Italian Renaissance poet Ludovico Ariosto; and French author Alexandre Dumas. Also present are several documents pertaining to events in the career of Charles Stewart McCauley, an American naval officer of the War of 1812 and the Civil War, and several letters of American naval hero Charles Stewart; both ancestors of Francis Campbell Macaulay. This collection includes items that may be of incidental interest to a variety of researchers, in particular those interested in Italian literary and intellectual figures from the 15th through 19th centuries and French dialects.

Scope and Contents

The Horace Howard Furness Memorial Library manuscript collection consists mainly of personal correspondence to and from Rev. William Henry Furness; Horace Howard Furness; and Horace Howard Furness, Jr. It also includes several notebooks, copies of speeches and articles, and other assorted items relating to Shakespearean scholarship or to the Furness family. The collection was divided into four separate series. Series I-III include materials relating to William Henry Furness (series I), Horace Howard Furness, Sr. (series II), and Horace Howard Furness, Jr. (series III). Series IV includes letters between other correspondents, and additional materials including ephemera, clippings, images, and writings on Shakespeare and on other subjects. Researchers are encouraged to perform keyword searches for individual names or organizations. For more information on each group of materials, please refer to the descriptive notes associated to each series.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of original manuscripts previously stored with copies of manuscripts made for Henry Charles Lea at various archives in Europe. The majority of the documents in the collection are from Inquisition trials, arranged by the name of the defendant, including records of the trials of 13 women and one man accused of heresy, held in Toledo; the trial of Francesco Barozzi, accused of witchcraft, held in Venice in 1587; and the trial of Friar Thomas Maldonado, accused of fornication, held in Mexico City in 1594.

A small amount of correspondence follows, arranged by name of author, comprising a 1533 letter from Fiscal Miguel de Galbe to the Inquisitor General; 1807 correspondence between the viceroy of Mexico, José de Iturrigaray, and the Mexican Tribunal of the Inquisition by which the viceroy sought to determine the actual boundaries between the Spanish territory of Texas and the territory of Louisiana, recently acquired by the United States; and a 1773 letter from the chaplain of Quechula, Josef Nicolás Marqués, reporting a denunciation to the inquisitor Juliàn Vicente González Andia.

A small number of other manuscripts are arranged alphabetically: a discourse (discorso) by Angelo Gioccatana (anagrammatic pen name for Gaetano Niccolò Ageta) on the history and role of the Inquisition in the Kingdom of Sicily and Naples, given in Naples in 1691; a 1579 edict (edicto) of the Inquisition in Mexico stating its authority, purpose, and expectations of the public; a highly calligraphic document (Escrito curioso) consisting of a short theological treatise in Spanish followed by religiously themed illustrations, acrostics, poems, odes, and elegies, all in Latin; and a 1767 royal decree (real cédula) proclaiming royal jurisdiction (as opposed to ecclesiastical jurisdiction) over bigamy in Spanish America. The remaining documents are miscellaneous French documents related to the balance of power between the Pope and European monarchs and to the Kingdoms of Aragon and Navarra, including references to Moors and Christians in the 8th and 9th centuries; and an unidentified index of Italian books.

3 oversize items are stored with the collection: a letter (prior to 1728) of Juan de Archederra, Bishop of Nueva Segovia (Philippines), to Francisco Garzarón, inquisitor of Mexico, concerning a edict of the Emperor of China; a 1724 denunciation to the Inquisition of a Jansenist in China; and a papal brief of 1692 from Innocent XI listing the powers and permissions granted (facultates concessae) to Guglielmo Basserio in his post as apostolic vicar.

Scope and Contents

Signed from St. Germain-en-Laye and later on from Versailles, the letters deal with a variety of subjects ranging from trade regulations, licensing, taxes, and imprisonment to simple requests for the expedition of certain orders. The correspondence brings clarity to La Reynie's wide range of responsibilities, since his position entailed not only jurisdiction over the security of the city and its environs but also control of food supply and prices, elections of masters and wardens of the merchant guilds, publishing, printing, and book selling, and reports of surgeons. At the same time La Reynie was in charge of police organization, which he managed to restructure in order to improve its efficiency. It becomes evident from the letters that both Louis XIV and Colbert himself left to the Lieutenant of the Police a high degree of independence in his work. A large part of the correspondence puts Colbert in the role of the King's messenger to La Reynie, often reinforcing the confidence that the two had in each other, while demanding evidence, elimination of privileges, and even imprisonment of certain subjects.

Scope and Contents

Minutes of the men's meeting and later, of joint sessions with women; registers of births and deaths; marriage certificates; membership lists and registers; removals issued and received, and other vital records; women's minutes; ministers and elders' minutes; financial and property papers; minutes and other papers of the Race Street First Day School; records of the Library Association of Friends of Philadelphia; and other miscellaneous papers.

Scope and Contents

This collection was formerly owned by Archibald Cameron Elias Jr. (1944-2008), a literary scholar who wrote extensively on the writer Jonathan Swift and his circle. Elias purchased this collection at Sotheby’s (London) in their 4 April 1977 sale, as lot 140. The documents contained within had almost certainly been sold, re-sold, and reorganized in the 150 years since they left the possession of the Southwell family. The Southwell family papers were purchased in bulk by London bookseller Thomas Thorpe and dispersed in a series of sales in the 1830s. Nearly all of these papers were purchased by the famous manuscript collector Sir Thomas Phillipps and many of his distinctive manuscript numbers appear on the documents and volumes in the collection. Phillipps’ collection was sold in an extended series of sales over nearly a century from the 1890s onward and it is clear that the present collection consists of the remains of once larger sets, with material removed and sold by bookdealers over the years. Many of the documents have penciled page numbers or other annotations which indicate the presence of other materials not preserved here.

This collection includes documents bearing annotations from the following sales and lots:

Thomas Thorpe: 137, 690, 752

Sir Thomas Phillipps: 10,018; 10,020; 10,035; 10,060; 10,070; 24,227; 24,274; 24,523; 26,291; 29,013

For the catalogs of the Southwell papers sold by Thorpe see

Catalogue ... containing the Greater Portion of the United Libraries of Sir Robert Southwell ... his Son, the Hon. Edward Southwell, and the Late Lord De Clifford (London: Thomas Thorpe, [1834])

Catalogus Librorum Manuscriptorum Bibliothecae Southwellianae ([London]: Thomas Thorpe, 1834)

Catalogue of Ancient Manuscripts .. Several Volumes Relating to Ireland, (Omitted in former Catalogue of State Papers,) from the Southwell Collection (London: Thomas Thorpe, 1835)

Catalogue of upward of Fourteen Hundred Manuscripts…Paston, Sidney, Ormond, Orrery, Southwell, and other Family Papers (London: Thomas Thorpe, 1836)

Supplement to Thomas Thorpe’s Catalogue ... and another Portion of the Southwell Papers (London: Thomas Thorpe, 1836).

Scope and Contents

The Sydney S. Keil Collection of Latin Americana contains broadsides and other printed material from Latin America dating from the 17th to 19th centuries with the majority dating from the 18th and early 19th centuries. The majority of these items were printed in Mexico, but the collection also includes material printed in Spain, Peru, and Columbia. The collection is particularly strong in printed novenas and other devotional work, as well as government decrees and laws.

Arrangement note

These documents were loosely contained in three volumes, often without discernible order or any clear arrangement. They have been organized here according to their physical volume of origin and then by shared provenance to a given Phillipps collection if recorded.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2014 April 30

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  11.28.2013

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2009

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2014 March 24

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2018 September 19

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2015 April 1

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2015 May 12

Publication Information

Quaker Meeting Records at Haverford College Quaker & Special Collections and Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2015 June 12

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2018 July 23

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Aleth Tisseau De Escotais

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Mitch Fraas

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Claudia Scala Schlessman

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Kevin Stuart Lee

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Siel Agugliaro

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Nicole Love

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Clémence Scouten

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Mitch Fraas

Revision Description

This electronic finding aid was updated in Summer 2016 by Abdulrezak Kemal in preparation for importing into ArchivesSpace, to conform to current markup standards and the ArchivesSpace data model.  2016

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research. Access is through microfilm, if available.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright has not been assigned to the Repositories All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted to the individual Meeting or its successor. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the Repositories as the holder(s) of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by reader.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Custodial History note

Purchased as a lot by the University of Pennsylvania Libraries from the Symmachus Trading Company of Boston in 1957.

Custodial History note

Gift of Francis Campbell Macauley, 1896.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Daniel G. Brinton, 1899.

Source of Acquisition

Purchased from Bernard M. Rosenthal, 1963

Source of Acquisition

The bulk of the collection was donated by the Furness family after the death of Horace Howard Furness, Jr. in 1930. The collection was later expanded through further acquisitions, the latest in 2013.

Source of Acquisition

Purchased, 1962.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Deposit

Source of Acquisition

Gift of the Archibald Cameron Elias, Jr. (1944-2008) estate.

This collection consists of manuscripts and papers relating primarily to the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in Ireland and Great Britain formerly owned by A.C. Elias. Archibald Cameron Elias Jr. (1944-2008) was a literary scholar who wrote extensively on the writer Jonathan Swift and his circle.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Jeffrey D. Keil, Wharton '65, in memory of his father, Sydney S. Keil, College '33.

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Related Materials

Related Archival Materials note

In the Rare Book Collection of the Rare Book and Manuscript Library at the University of Pennsylvania: Dante Scrapbook

Related Archival Materials note

At the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania:

Furness family papers, 1765-1937, MS. Coll. 481

James M. Gibson research collection on Horace Howard Furness, 1882-1985 (bulk: 1975-1985), Ms. Coll. 1331

Miscellaneous manuscripts, Misc Mss. Including:

Furness, Horace Howard (1833-1912), letters to George Park Fisher, undated. 2 items (2 leaves), Box 7, Folder 32

Sumner, Charles (1811-1874), letters to James T. Furness and William Henry Furness (1802-1896), 1854-1861. 8 items (8 leaves), Box 18, Folders 29-30

At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania:

Horace Howard Furness collection on the Great Central Fair, collection 0224, 1861-1867, undated

Separated Materials

Records before 1827 have been described in the finding aid of the Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia. Records after the reunification are with those of Central Philadelphia Monthly Meeting.

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Accounts
  • Correspondence
Geographic Name(s)
  • New Spain----Politics and government
  • Peru--Politics and government--1548-1820
  • Spain--Colonies--America
  • Spain--Foreign relations--Great Britain
Personal Name(s)
  • Carvajal y Lancáster, José de, 1698-1754
  • Cruz y Bahamonde, Nicolás de la, 1757-1828
  • Grimaldi, Girolamo, 1710-1789
  • Squillace, Leopoldo de Gregorio, marqués de, -1785
Subject(s)
  • Nobility--Spain

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Deeds
  • Estate inventories
  • Leases
  • Legal documents
  • Manuscripts, English--17th century
  • Manuscripts, English--18th century
  • Manuscripts, English--19th century
  • Seals (artifacts)
Geographic Name(s)
  • Great Britain--History
Personal Name(s)
  • Gwyn, Nicholas, Dr., died 1798
  • Martin, Roger, Captain, died 1687
Subject(s)
  • England and Wales. Privy Council.
  • Real property--England--Early works to 1800

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Controlled Access Headings

Family Name(s)
  • Acciaiuoli family
  • Altoviti family
  • Amadori family
  • Antinori family
  • Capponi family
  • Cassi family
  • Corsi family
  • Corsini family
  • Guadagni family
  • Lapini family
  • Ricciardi family
  • Rucellai family
  • Salviati family
  • Strozzi family
Form/Genre(s)
  • Accounts
  • Credit records
  • Genealogies (histories)
  • Inventories
  • Legal documents
  • Manuscripts, European
  • Manuscripts, Italian--15th century
  • Manuscripts, Italian--16th century
  • Manuscripts, Italian--17th century
  • Manuscripts, Italian--18th century
  • Manuscripts, Italian--19th century
  • Manuscripts, Renaissance
  • Notarial documents
  • Statutes and codes
Subject(s)
  • Accounting--Italy--17th century
  • Accounting--Italy-16th century
  • Ambassadors--Italy--Tuscany--16th century
  • Ambassadors--Italy--Tuscany--17th century
  • Banks and banking--Italy--Florence--Early works to 1800
  • Civil law--Italy
  • Dyes and dyeing--Italy--Early works to 1800
  • Farm life--Italy--History
  • Farm management--Italy
  • Finance--Italy--Early works to 1800
  • Florence (Italy)--Commerce
  • Florence (Italy)--Foreign relations--1421-1737
  • Florence (Italy)--Politics and government
  • Florence (Italy)--Politics and government--1421-1737
  • Florence (Italy)--Social life and customs
  • Inheritance and succession--Italy
  • Iron industry and trade--Italy
  • Italy--Rural conditions
  • Law--Italy--Florence
  • Marriage--Italy--Florence
  • Merchants--Italy
  • Nobility--Italy--Early works to 1800
  • Real property--Italy--Florence
  • Silk industry--Italy--History
  • Taxation--Italy--Florence
  • Textile industry -- Italy -- Early works to 1800
  • Woolen and worsted manufacture--Italy--History

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Autographs (manuscripts)
  • Etymological dictionaries
Subject(s)
  • Autographs--Collections
  • French language--Dialects--France

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. Libraries.
Family Name(s)
  • Furness Family
Form/Genre(s)
  • Clippings
  • Correspondence
  • Essays
  • Journals (accounts)
  • Notebooks
  • Photographs
  • Poems
  • Programs
  • Speeches
  • Travel journalism
Personal Name(s)
  • Furness, Horace Howard, 1833-1912
  • Furness, Horace Howard, 1865-1930
  • Furness, William Henry, 1802-1896
  • Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616
Subject(s)
  • Literature--Study and teaching
  • Theater
  • Theater--United States--19th century
  • Theater--United States--20th century
  • Theater--United States--History--19th century
  • Theater--United States--History--20th century

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Government records
  • Legal documents
  • Manuscripts, European
  • Manuscripts, French--16th century
  • Manuscripts, French--17th century
  • Manuscripts, Italian--16th century
  • Manuscripts, Italian--17th century
  • Manuscripts, Renaissance
  • Manuscripts, Spanish--16th century
  • Manuscripts, Spanish--19th century
  • Notarial documents

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
Geographic Name(s)
  • France--Politics and government--17th century
Personal Name(s)
  • La Reynie, Gabriel Nicolas de, 1625-1709

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia
  • Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia held at Spruce Street (Hicksite : 1833-1903)
  • Central Philadelphia Monthly Meeting of Friends
  • Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia
  • Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia held at Spruce Street (Hicksite : 1833-1903)
  • Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia (Hicksite)
Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.) -- Genealogy
Subject(s)
  • Society of Friends -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Financial records
  • Petitions
Geographic Name(s)
  • Great Britain--History
  • Ireland--History
  • Ireland. Court of Admiralty
Personal Name(s)
  • Blathwayt, William, 1649?-1717
  • Van Homrigh, Bartholomew, -1703
Subject(s)
  • Tariff

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Catholic Church.
  • Distrito Federal (México).
  • Mexico.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Broadsides (notices)
  • Government records
  • Novenas
Geographic Name(s)
  • Latin America--History
  • Mexico--History
  • Mexico--Politics and government
  • New Spain
  • Spain--Colonies--America
Subject(s)
  • Law--Mexico
  • Political science
  • Religion

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Other Finding Aids

For a complete listing of correspondents, do the following ns2:title search in Franklin: Florentine Documents and Correspondence Collection, 1437-1804

Collection Inventory

Series I. House of Abrantes y Linares (alphabetical), 17th-19th century.

Box Folder

Abrantes, Duque de, letter to (unknown author), 1745 August 20.

1 9

Abrantes, Duque de, letter to (unknown author), 1790 May 12.

1 19

Abrantes, Duque de, accounts with and letters to and from Vriarte, Salazar, Villa, and Melon, 1790-1793.

1 10

Abrantes, Duque and Duquesa de, accounts of the money earned and letters to and about Conde del Valle and the incident concerning both parties, 1681-1808.

1 16

Abrantes, Duquesa de, letters and duplicates of letters to and from, correspondents include: Duque de Casa Flórez, José María Fagoaga, Josepha María Gutiérrez, Miguel Ozaeta, Juan Antonio de Martínez, 1805 December 24, 1806 August.

1 17

Abrantes y Linares, Duque de, letter to Miguel Capettillo, 1744 December 12.

1 9

Alarcón, letter to Juan de Carvajal y Sande, 1668 August 14, 1674 February 20.

1 4

Alles, Alonso de, letter to María Micaela de Carvajal y Lancáster, 1784 August 27.

1 17

Almandoz, Félix Francisco de, owner of the la Esperanza, receipt for goods for Duque de Abrantes y Linares, 1788 October 27.

1 10

Arambarri, Miguel de, Andrés de Jáuregui, and Cristobal de Arrozarena, letter to (unknown author), undated.

1 19

Arnedo Marin, Ambrosío de (Duque de Abrantes y Linares’s bookkeeper), accounts, receipts for goods, and letters to and from, correspondents include: Francisco Ignacio de Lardizábal y Elorza, Duque Abrantes y Linares, Juan Manuel Pacheco, Félix del Duque (owner of the el Glorioso), 1726-1747.

1 6

Basave, Pedro de (Duquesa de Abrantes’s intendant), letters and copies of letters to and from, correspondents include: José Lopez, Duque de Abrantes, and Duquesa de Abrantes, 1792-1800.

1 11

Blasco, Francisco Xavier de, letters to and from, correspondents include: Duque de Abrantes y Linares, Duquesa de Abrantes, María Michaela Carvajal, José Lopez, and Juan Miguel y Garcia, 1783-1796.

1 12

Burriel, Pedro Andrés, letters to Duque de Abrantes,, 1773 May 19, May 26, 1778 February 4.

1 19

Calderon, Juan, letter to Bernardino de Carvajal y Vivero, Conde de Orizaba, 1686 October 24.

1 4

Carrasco, Francisco, accounts and letters and copies of letters to and from, correspondents include: Francisco Gallego y Sandi, Juan de Carvajal y Sande, Conde del Valle, Conde de la Quinta de la Enjarada, Theresa de Moctezuma, Antonio de Machuca, and Duque de Abrantes, 1679-1684.

1 2

Carrasco, Gonzalo, accounts of, 1788.

1 10

Carrasco, Gonzalo, receipt and letters and duplicates of letters to and from, correspondents include: Juan de Carvajal y Sande, Francisco Gallego y Sandi, Francisco Arroniz, and Bernardino de Carvajal y Sande Moctezuma y Vivero, 1685-1689.

1 3

Carvajal, Alvaro de, letter to (unknown author), [1721] November 1st.

1 9

Carvajal, de (father of Alvaro de Carvajal), letter from (unknown recipient), 1722 April 18.

1 9

Carvajal y Lancáster, José de, accounts compiled by Pedro Gonzales de Sevallos, 1750 April 24.

1 6

Carvajal y Lancáster, José de, documents designating representatives to defend his nephews’ interests, 1747 August 11, 1752 March 23, June, undated.

1 9

Carvajal y Lancáster, José de, document obtaining a charge of judge in the Valladolid Chancillería, undated.

1 9

Carvajal y Lancáster, José de and others, letters about Encomienda of Valdepeñas, undated.

1 9

Carvajal y Sande, [?] de, letter from (unknown author), 1674 April 14.

1 4

Carvajal y Sande Moctezuma y Vivero, Bernardino de, documents about lineage and patrimony (includes information on José de Carvajal y Lancáster, and Fernando de Noroña, 1727, undated.

1

1

5

1

Carvajal y Sande, Juan de, account of, 1675-1677, after 1679.

1 4

Carvajal y Sande, Juan de, letter from Conde del Valle, 1678 January 30, 1681.

1 4

[District attorney], letter to His Highness, about the royal document given to Duque de Abrantes, 1787 October.

1 19

Emparán y Orbe, Agustín, letter to (unknown author), 1792 June 18.

1 18

Emparán y Orbe, Agustín, letters to (unknown authors), 1790 September 20, October 17.

1 19

Enjarada, Conde de la, accounts of, compiled by Agustín Francisco de Machuca, 1686 May 31.

1 4

Enjarada, Conde de la, letter to (incomplete and unknown author), after 1681.

1 4

Enjarada, Conde de la, letters to Juan del Castillo, 1721 February 8, March 15.

1 9

Enjarada, Conde de la, letter to (unknown author), about an action, undated.

1 9

Father Guardian, of the convent of San Francisco in Mexico, letter to (unknown author), 1792 March 22.

1 18

Gálvez, José de, letter to Duque de Abrantes, 1777 February 20.

1 19

Gamboa, Francisco Xavier, letter to Duque de Abrantes y Linares, 1777 August 27.

1 18

Güemes y Horcasitas, Juan Francisco, letter to Gaspar Saenz Rico, Hijo y Compañía, 1749 October 8.

1 6

Imaña, Atanasio de, letters to Duque de Abrantes y Linares and Duquesa de Abrantes, 1817 May 1, undated.

1 13

Imaña, Ventura de, accounts and letters and copies of letters to, correspondents include: Duquesa de Abrantes, José Lopez, Pedro de Basave, and Manuel José Urrutia, 1800-1814.

1 13

Jauregui y Olea, José de, captain of the Nuestra Señora del Rosario, receipt for goods belonging to Santillán, José Francisco de, coming from Carrasco, Gonzalo, 1788 June 10.

1 10

Lorcasitas, Manuel José, letter to Duque de Abrantes y Linares, 1808 January 27.

1 18

Marin Lopez, Victores, letters and copy of letter to Duque de Abrantes y Linares, 1818 July, September 2.

1 18

Martínez, Juan Antonio, letter to (unknown author), 1791 August 23.

1 18

Martínez, Juan Antonio, letter to Duque de Abrantes, 1790 January 29.

1 19

Martínez, Juan Antonio, letter to, (unknown author), 1790 May 13, August 19.

1 19

Moctezuma, Conde de, letter to Bernardino de Carvajal y Sande Moctezuma y Vivero, 1686 December 5.

1 4

Moctezuma, Conde de and Marqués de Astorga, sentences from the trial between, 1771 April 9, 1775 March 9.

1 14

Moctezuma, Diego Antonio, letter to Abrantes y Linares, Duque de, 1741 September 5.

1 9

Moctezuma, José Audelo Cano, letter to, (unknown author), 1796 February 24.

1 14

Moctezuma, Juan Cano, letters to and from, correspondents include: Duque de Abrantes y Linares and Duquesa de Abrantes, 1776-1791.

1 14

Moctezuma, Rosa Cano, letters to and from: correspondent includes Duque de Abrantes, 1788.

1 14

Morales, Pedro de, letter to Duque de Abrantes, 1778 May 13.

1 19

Pacheco, Juan Manuel, document assigning powers of José Hurtado de Mendoza and co-defendant neighbors from Mexico to Juan Manuel Pacheco as agent of Duque de Abrantes y Linares; letters from Miguel [Liujan], Pablo Madrid, and Pedros Andrés Burriel; and letter to Antonio Pimentel, 1746-1753.

1 7

Palazio y del [Hoyo], Francisco Antonio de, letter to, (unknown author), 1726 April 6.

1 9

Peredo Hurtado de Mendoza, José Diego, letter to José de Carvajal y Lancáster, 1744 October 25.

1 9

Quíjano Zevallos, Francisco, captain of the Nuestra Señora de las Mercedes, receipt for goods belonging to José Francisco de Santillán, coming from Gonzalo Carrasco, 1788 June 10.

1 10

Río, Antonio Francisco del, letters and copies of letters to and from Duque de Abrantes, 1777-1782.

1 15

Río y Romero, Antonio Francisco del, letter to Carlos, III, the King of Spain and letters from unknown author, 1776, 1781, undated.

1 15

Saenz Rico, Gaspar, Hijo y Compañía, letters to José de Carvajal y Lancáster, 1749 October 18, July 30.

1 6

Sánchez de Tagle, Pedro Anselmo, letters and duplicates of letters to José de Carvajal y Lancáster and Juan Manuel Pacheco; and letters from Duque de Abrantes y Linares, 1745-1747.

1 8

Sánchez de Tagle, Pedro Anselmo, letter to José de Carvajal y Lancáster, 1744 September 16.

1 9

San Esteban de Gormaz, Conde de, letter to, (unknown author), 1716 July 1st.

1 9

Soverón, Angel José, owner of the Diligencia, receipt for goods for Duque de Abrantes y Linares, 1790 February 23.

1 10

Torre, Joaquín José de la, owner of the la Caridad, receipt for goods for Duque de Abrantes y Linares, 1788.

1 10

Treviño y Gutiérrez, José Alejandro de, letter to Duque de Abrantes y Linares, undated.

1 18

Unknown authors and recipients, incomplete letters (four), undated.

1

1

9

19

Valdés, Antonio Blanco, letter to Duque de Abrantes, 1783 November 26.

1 19

Valle, Conde del, letter from (unknown recipient, incomplete), 1681 June 27.

1 4

Vassals, letter from, (unknown recipient), 1716 July 1st.

1 9

Vázquez y Morales, Joaquín José, letter to José de Carvajal y Lancáster, 1750 July 20.

1 9

Verde and anonymous, letters to His Excellency, undated.

1 19

Series II. The Spanish Court, 1760s.

a. British-Spanish diplomatic relations (chronological), 1750-1768.
Box Folder

Shaftoe, James, British consul to Sardinia, letter from, (unknown recipient) and patent, 1750 August 12, December 23.

2 4

José I, King of Portugal, translation of a decree from, 1750 December 9.

2 4

English code with explanations, circa 1760.

2 4

Bañuelos, Joaquín, translation of a letter to Felipe del Villar y Mier, 1761 April 14.

2 4

Wall, Richard, letter to James Slipper, 1763 May 1st.

2 3

List of the Spanish ships of war, 1763 November.

2 3

Carlos III, King of Spain, translation of a letter to the governor of Cádiz, 1764 January 9.

2 3

List of British subjects in Cádiz who ask for the King’s protection, 1764 January 10.

2 4

Consul of England in Malaga, letter from, (unknown recipient), 1764 January 14.

2 4

Brunswick-Lunebourg, prince of, letter from, (unknown recipient), 1764 February 5.

2 4

George III, King of Great Britain, copies of letters to Carlos III, the King of Spain, 1764 March 9.

2 4

Tilson, Diego, British consul in Cádiz, protest (includes translation), 1764 April 18.

2 3

Aranda, letter from, (unknown recipient), 1764 September 26.

2 3

Boudet, Jean [probably], British spy and Marquis of Esquilache’s secretary, letters to Lewis de Visme, secretary to the English embassy to Carlos III, the King of Spain (19 letters), 1764.

2 1

Earl of Rochford [probably: William Nassau de Zuylestein, 4th Earl of Rochford, who served as Ambassador of Spain], letters to and from, correspondents include: Blake, Felix Devese (receipt), John Dowling, Marquis of Esquilache, Félix Gonzales Pursiano, Marquis of Grimaldi, Edward Hay, Johnston, Conde de Lascasas, W.H. Lyttelton, Príncipe de Masserano, Juan Gregorio Muniaín, Porten, Lewis de Visine, 1764-1777.

2 2

Ariaga, letters to, (unknown authors), 1765 April 8, October 11.

2 3

Gamoneda, Marqués de, letter to, (unknown author), 1765 November 23.

2 3

Merry, Anthony, British diplomat, duplicates of letters to, (unknown authors), 1765 November 29, December 3, December 24.

2 3

George III, King of Great Britain, copy of a letter to Carlos II, King of Spain, and Queen of Spain, 1765 December 31.

2 4

Pardoe, John, duplicate of a letter to, (unknown author), 1766 January 31.

2 4

Múzquiz, Miguel de, letter to the foremen of the realm of Spain (duplicate), 1766 April 7.

2 3

Porten, letter from, (unknown recipient), 1766 June 9.

2 4

Santiago, Marquesa de, letter from, (unknown recipient), 1768 August 10.

2 4

Laxe, Manuel de, lackey of Conde de Melhor, letter to Conde de Melhor, undated.

2 3

Merry, Anthony, British diplomat, considerations about the pending action between him and the Quinlin family, undated.

2 3

Poninski, Count, copy of a letter to the ambassadors and foreign ministers in Madrid, undated.

2 4

Rivera, letter from, (unknown recipient), undated.

2 4
b. Trade (chronological), 1713-1765.
Box Folder

Treaty of Utrecht, excerpts from, 1713.

2 5-6

Lists and reports of ships at Cádiz, Carloforte, Minorca (including quarantine), and Tortosa; illicit trading in Spanish port; letters regarding customs, correspondents include: Luis de Ibarra y Larrea and Francisco de Cuellar, directors of customs, and José Juan Ladrón de Guevara, governor of Alicante; statement by Martin Sybrons, owner of the Hopestill; and report of George Glass, captain of the  Hillsborough in the Canary Islands, circa 1750-1761.

2 6

Carlos III, King of Spain, translation of an order about trade with England, 1760 December 17.

2 5

Ibarra y Larrea, Luis de and Cuellar, Francisco de (directors of the customs), translation of an order to Pelegrín de Borgoñon, Ignacio, 1761 January 2.

2 5

Duplicate of a power sent to Beawes, Wyndham, to receive the effects saved out of a British ship, 1764 March 26.

2 5

Potter (messenger of the cabinet), reports in English, French, and Italian about his treatment by customs officers in Vitoria, 1764 July.

2 5

Esquilache, Marquis of, letters and copies of letter to and from, correspondents include: Aranda, Ignacio Pelegrín de Borgoñon, Consul of England in Alicante, Luis Ferrari, and unknown authors, 1764-1765.

2 9

Merchants at Leghorn, letter to, 1765 September 3.

2 5

Grimaldi, Marquis of, letters to and from, correspondents include the Ambassador of Portugal, the Consul of England in Cádiz, Marquis of Esquilache, Lewis de Visine, and unknown authors; and a memorial regarding Grimaldi, 1765-1766.

2 7-8

Considerations about trade between Spain and Barbary, undated.

2 5

Consul of England in Barcelona, orders to all masters of ships and their crews that come to Barcelona and report about the tax on letters exchanged between Barcelona and Minorca, undated.

2 5
c. Miscellanea, 1764, undated.
Box Folder

Carlos III, King of Spain, list of promotions granted by, 1764 February 16.

2 10

2 poems, undated.

2 10

Report about the French settlement in Cayenne, undated.

2 10

Series III. Private correspondence (alphabetical), 1582-1843.

Box Folder

Alles Díaz, Pedro Alonso de, letters and duplicates of letters to, (unknown authors), 1774 February-October.

3 3

Alles, Pedro, letter to, (unknown author), 1774 May 31.

3 3

Alles, Pedro Alonso de, letter to, (unknown author), 1783 July 22.

3 4

Altamira, Marqués de, letter to, (unknown author), 1721 February 8.

3 4

Astorga, Marquesa de, letters to and from Manuel de [Parías] (prior of the convent of Lepe), 1741 May 6, August 19, 29.

2 11

Atrisco, Duque de, accounts of, compiled by Manuel Antonio Therán (with an explanation by Andrés Perez de Garnica), 1771-1776.

2 11

Attuna, Manuel Ignacio de, letter to Conde de Tepa, 1781 September 15.

1 16

Barata, Antonio and Torre, Diego de la, letter to Bartolomé Muñoz, 1814 October 8.

3 5

Barba, Antonio, letter from, (unknown recipient), 1688 January 18.

3 1

Bazán Mendoza, José de, letter to an archbishop and the cousin of Marqués de Montealegre, 1739 March 15.

2 15

Bazán Mendoza, José de, letter to Marqués de Montealegre, 1739 March 15.

2 15

Belttran, Bernardo, letter to a lady, 1704 March 11.

3 3

Carrión y Andrade, José de, letter to Antonio Valdés y Bazán, 1785 October 20.

3 2

Carvallo, Juan Antonio, letter to Medina, Duque de, 1700 October 15.

2 15

Casasola, Gaspar de, letter to Joaquín García, 1794 July 12.

3 4

Castillo, Juan del, letter to, (unknown author), 1707 May 29.

3 4

Cienfuegos, Nicolás, letter from, (unknown recipient), 1767 February 3.

3 4

Colon de Larreateguí, Mariano, letter from, (unknown recipient), after 1774.

3 2

Cruz y Bahamonde, Faustino de la, letters and duplicates of letters to and from, correspondents include: José Vicente Calderón, priest of Curecto; Pedro Pablo de la Carrera, priest of Villa San Agustín de Talca; Thomás de Gutierres, priest of Rauquien; Nicolás Moran, priest of the Santiago cathedral; and letters regarding his genealogy, 1792-1794.

2 12

Cruz y Bahamonde, Nicolas de la, letters to and from, correspondents include: José María de Alós, His Excellency (draft of a letter), and unknown recipient, 1798, 1802, 1820.

2 12

Cruz y Bahamonde, Vicente de la, draft and duplicate of a letter to Carlos IV, the King of Spain, 1802.

2 12

Díaz de Bracamonte, Juan, letter to, (unknown author), 1710 July 8.

3 4

Díaz y Muro, Francisco, letters to Zavaleta y Zavaleta, Ignacio, 1843.

2 18

Diego García de Fovar, statement by, in the name of Martín Antonio de Huici, director of the Compañía de Filipinas, against Ramón Antonio Sierra, 1809 April.

2 14

Elosua Abarretegui, Juan Antonio de, letters and copies of letters to, (unknown authors), 1774 February-October 25, 1779 April 24.

3 3

Escalzo, José, letter to, (unknown author), 1783 December 2.

3 4

Feran, Antonio Alonso de, and Francisco de Feran, letters to, (unknown authors), 1800-1807.

2 13

Filisola, Vicente, letter to Miguel Moreno, 1823 April 11.

3 5

Flórez, Manuel Antonio, letters to and from Marqués de Montealegre, 1777 December 15, 1778 April 30.

2 15

[Forrex], Domingo de, duplicate of a letter from, (unknown recipient), 1821 March 8.

3 5

Gamboa, Francisco Xavier de, letters and duplicates of letters to, (unknown authors), 1774 February 23, March 21, October 25.

3 3

Gandia, Duquesa de, letter to, (unknown author), 1642 Marzo 30.

3 1

His brother to Gutierrez, Catarina, 1614 May 25.

3 1

Herrera, Miguel de, will and anonymous letter regarding the will, 1794 July 15, undated.

3 3

Herrera, Vicente, letter to, (unknown author), 1783 July 23.

3 4

Heras, Francisco de las, duplicate of a letter to, (unknown author), 1686 April 30.

3 1

His Excellency, incomplete letter to, (unknown author), undated.

3 4

Huici, Martín Antonio de, official request to seize all the properties of Pedro Bernardo de Casamayor, and letters and duplicates of letters to and from, correspondents include: José Antonio Caballers; Intendente Corregidor; Gabriel Iturve e Iracta; José Munárriz and Julián de Fuentes, Compañía de Filipinas; Ramón Antonio Sierra; and Conde de Villar de Fuentes, 1802-1821.

2 14

Inguanzo, Antonio de, letter to Marqués de Gastañaga, 1768 December 19.

3 3

Laguna, Marqués de la, incomplete letter to, (unknown author), 1686 January 12.

3 1

Lanuza, Agustín, letter to Díaz y Muro, Francisco, 1843 July 16, 23.

2 19

Lecároz, Juan Antonio, letter from, (unknown recipient), 1721 October 14.

3 4

Lezo y Pacheco, Thomás, Capitán General, receipt of a sum of money paid by Pacheco in the presence of the mayor Diego Bazán (duplicate of), 1779 June 22.

3 2

Lopez, letter to [Hermino], undated.

3 2

[Maena], B. de, letter to, (unknown author0, 1837 April 16.

3 5

Manzano, Nicolas, letter to Pedro Ric y Egea, undated.

3 2

Martínez, Juan Antonio, letter to, (unknown author), 1790 December 24.

3 2

Medina, Juana de, widow of Alonso Rodríguez, letter to, from her son, 1600 February 7.

3 1

Medina Sidonia y de las Torres, Duque de, letters to, (unknown author), 1708 October 6, October 7.

2 15

Medina Sidonia, Duque de and Duque de las Torres, accounts of, 1698 September 20.

2 15

Melgarejo, Ambrosío, duplicate of a letter to Duque d Béjar, 1729 December 20, 1730 April 9.

3 3

Mena, Francisco Manuel de, letter to, (unknown author), 1746 February 22.

3 4

Miranda, José Francisco de, letter to, (unknown author), 1706 October 15.

3 4

Montterde, Jerónimo de, letter to, (unknown author), 1709.

3 2

Muñoz, Juan, letter to the director of the Real Compañía Maritima, 1790 November 30.

3 4

Murueta Otalora, José de, letter to Marqués de la Laguna, 1687 July 26.

3 1

O’Gavan, Juan Bernardo and Quintano, Juan, letter to Miquel Moreno, 1812 September 17.

3 5

Oyeregui, José Domingo, original and duplicate letters to Pedro Xavier de Vera, 1814 May 11, 181[?] July 30.

3 5

Oreytio, Antonio Santos de, letter to Condesa de Torrepalma, 1769 February 22.

3 2

Paza, Antonio de, duplicate of a letter to, (unknown author), 1582 February 9.

3 1

Pinedo, Agustín Fernando de, duplicates of 2 letters to Thomás de Lezo y Pacheco, 1779 July 22, August 19.

3 2

Porlier, Antonio, letter to Conde de Revillagigedo, 1790 November 30.

1 16

Revero y Lagos, José de, letter from, (unknown recipient), 1684 October 8.

3 1

Revillagigedo, Conde de, letter to Juan Eugenio Santelices Pablo, 1790 June 8.

1 16

Reyna, José, letter to, (unknown author), 1843 July 7.

2 19

Ric y Egea, Pedro, letter to Manuel de Roda, [?] October 16.

3 2

Rivafrecha, Juan de, letter to José del Castillo, 1704 August 4.

3 4

Robles, Mariano, letter to Ambrosío Guerrero, 1843 May.

2 19

Román y Mendoza, Luis, letter to Duquesa de Medina de las Torres, 1717 August 13.

2 15

[Sebane] de los Santos, Antonio, Diego Bazán, and Francisco y Suárez, duplicate of a letter to Thomás Lezo y Pacheco, 1779 July 19.

3 2

Tarragona, Francisco de, letter to Benito Ignacio de Salazar, Bishop of Barcelona, 1683 December 22.

3 1

Tepa, Conde de, letter to, (unknown author), 1731.

1 16

Tovar, Baltasar de, duplicate of a letter to, (unknown author), 1702 May 13.

3 3

Ursúa, Francisco de, duplicate of a letter to, (unknown author), 1702 May 13.

3 3

Vena, Antonio, incomplete letter to, (unknown author), 1810 July 14.

3 5

[Vernz de] Serrano, Miguel, letters to Marquesa de Astorga, 1758 April 20, April 23, May 12.

2 11

Viana, Jaime de, letter to Juan Francisco Solano, 1791 November 12.

3 4

Viara, Antonio de, letter to Conde de Tepa, 1794 July 9.

1 16

Villafranca, Marquesa de, letters and copies of letters to and from, correspondents include: Francisco Alaejos, Alonso de Alles, Juan Cano Moctezuma, and Manuel Dionisio Urruela, 1784 July 26.

2 17

Villarreal Ariceta, Pedro de, letter to José Pardo de Figueroa, 1658 May 20.

3 1

Zavaleta y Zavaleta, Ignacio (mayor), letters to and from, correspondents include: Ignacio Arroyo; José M. Castro; Pedro Cortazar; C. Delgado; Francisco Díaz y Muro; Gamiño; Rafael Evangelista García; José de la Luz Rosas, and Luis Palacios, Junta Patriótica de Guanajuato; [Magallanes]; Nicolás Peñaranda; Jerin Rodriquez; J. Villas, 1843.

2 19

Zevallos, Agustín de, letter from, (unknown recipient), 1687 March 3.

3 1

Letter, (unknown author or recipient), [1710] August 28.

3 4

Letter, (unknown author or recipient), 1745.

3 3

Letter, (unknown author or recipient), 1803 February 19.

3 5

Letter about a parish, (unknown author or recipient), undated.

3 4

List of letters and documents received, 1666 September 7.

3 1

4 incomplete documents “valueless” [sic], circa 1810.

3 5

Series IV. Official documents (chronological), 1612-1854.

Box Folder

List of a duke’s records about his land of Torremayor, 1612.

3 6

Megia, Juan, certificate regarding his service to the Spanish Army, 1627 December 24.

3 6

Laguna, Marqués de la, Capitán general of New Spain, writ from, 1682 January.

3 6

Carlos II, King of Spain, letter and duplicate of letter to, (unknown author), 1684 August.

3 6

Villavicencio, Juan José de, certificate regarding service to the Spanish Army, 1694 June 16.

3 6

Calderon, Pablo, wood merchant in Mérida, letters to Juan Antonio Gomez and Manuel de Herrera; Francisco Silvera; and unknown recipient, circa 1700.

3 7

Calderon, Pablo, letter to José de Herrera, 1700 [March or May] 20.

3 7

Vitoria, Diego de, letter to Luis de Salazar y Castro, 1700 February 2.

3 7

Felipe V, King of Spain, duplicate of a letter to Duque de Albuquerque, 1706.

3 9

Pellícer family, document about the merit and achievements of, 1726 August 9.

3 9

Convent of Bernardin recollect nuns, two accounts of, 1729-1761.

3 7

Martínez Calisto, Andrés and José Martínez Astor, document regarding sale between, Santiago, 1731 October 28.

3 8

Ponce de León, Manuel, brigadier in the infantry regiment of Córdoba, charge granted to, 1743 February 4.

3 9

Audiencia of Mexico, letter about, circa 1747.

3 8

Gabriel Gutiérrez de Ferán, document about his accounts, 1783 September 2.

3 7

Domínguez, Bernardo, letter to His Majesty, 1786 February 3.

3 9

Criminal Chamber of Mexico City, documents ratifying sentences, 1788 April 17, 22.

3 8

Rentas Generales, represented by the district attorney José Ibarra and the Compañía de Filipinas, represented by the captain Juan Pedro de Goycoechea, records of an action between, 1790.

3 7

A district attorney, letter to His Excellency, about the political and social situation in Chile, after 1790.

3 16

General rule for the observance of the royal decree of 1794 August 17, Mexico City, 1795 January 16.

3 8

Vértiz, Juan José de, account of, circa 1798.

3 7

Santiago, copies of official documents from the city, 1799.

3 8

Don Manuel Marquez Tovel, consultant of the Inquisition in the archbishopric of Santo Domingo, documents about merit and achievements of, 1802.

3 15

Junco, Manuel María de, from the Royal Council of Madrid, statement of, 1806 October 15.

3 11

[Trauza], Miguel José de, letter to the chairman of the council, 1808 May 20.

3 11

Manuel Castellanos, priest of Santa, archbishopric of Lima, documents about merit and achievements of, 1808-1813.

3 13

Echavarri, Cristóbal, pilot, certificate regarding his service to the Spanish Army, 1809 August 12.

3 15

José I, King of Spain, letter to about the tax labors of the Indians with the review of a book about the Indians, after 1809.

3 16

Titles (four), granted by José I, King of Spain, Lima, document recognizing, 1810 December 4.

3 11

Don José Tomás Carrillo, archivist of the secretary’s office of the chamber of the viceroyalty in Lima, documents about the merit and achievements of, 1810 December 4.

3 12

Don José Antonio Cobian, archivist of the town council, justice and regiment in Lima, documents about merit and achievements of, 1810 December 29.

3 12

Pichardo, Cayetano, documents regarding his nomination as supernumerary regidor in Havana, 1810 December 7.

3 11

Lima Town Council, document regarding the meeting of, 1811 July 23.

3 11

Arroyo, José Francisco, priest of Guadalupe, document regarding merit and achievements, 1812 January 28.

3 15

Moreno, Miguel, accounts of, 1812 January 28.

3 10

Villa Urrutia, Antonio de, Souza Viana, Juan José, from the Royal Audiencia in Guadalajara, letter to José I, King of Spain, to send him the official document about merit and achievements of José Francisco Arroyo, 1812 February 13.

3 15

Water judge of Lima, document regarding, 1812 May 12.

3 11

Castellanos, Manuel, accounts of and copies of letters to and from, correspondents include: José Joaquín Aguirre, Juan Antonio Llorente, and Pedro Xavier de Vera, 1812-1819.

3 13

Don Gabriel Antonio Garcia Vallecillos, lawyer in the national courts of Spain and mayor in the province of Atitan and Tepam-Atitan, Guatemala, documents about merit and achievements of, 1813 March 20, 1814 December 18.

3 15

Zavala, Pedro, captain, royal dispatches to, 1813-1841.

3 14

Lardizábal y Uribe, Miguel de, duplicate of a letter to the Capitán General of Cuba, 1815 July 13.

3 11

Gracia y Justicia de Indias, letter to His Majesty, about unoccupied prebends, 1818 January 4.

3 15

Don Manuel Mariano Urrutia, presbyter and canon of the Popayán Cathedral, document about merit and achievements of, 1818 September 4.

3 15

Fernando VII, King of Spain, duplicate of a royal order about Pedro Zavala’s nomination as second lieutenant in the infantry regiment of New Spain, 1818 October 14.

3 14

Appeal against customs duties on wealth originating from America and pensions of the descendents of Moctezuma, 1819.

3 16

Robinson, Guillermo David, translated duplicate of a letter about General John Devereux, 1820 January 22.

3 16

Spanish War Department, decision about people originating from America, 1822 April 18.

3 16

Mella y Barbeito, Ignacio, regidor of the city of Betanzos, letter from, 1823 August 25.

3 11

Zavala, Pedro, captain, certificate regarding his service to the Spanish Army and service record for the Capitán General of Galicia and the Capitán General of Santiago and letters to a Capitán General and the Capitán General of Cuba, 1823-1834.

3 14

Rent weighing on the land of Yura-Yura, documents regarding, 1833 May-July.

3 16

Julián Cerulia, from Baracoa, Cuba, document conferrring title of public notary to, 1833 September 30.

3 15

Court of first instance in Madrid, documents regarding cases taken to the court, 1837 March 18.

3 11

Project and decree to establish an overseas assembly to look over the laws of Indias, 1841-1854.

3 16

America, certificate about dimensions of the ship, Havana, 1848 May 9.

3 10

Sierra, José Ignacio, from the Real Armada, consideration about two navigations by the Canal Viejo and the Gran Banco de Bahama, incomplete, undated.

3 16

[Carro], Juan de, report to His Majesty, about trade between Spain and New Spain, incomplete, undated.

3 9

Castro, Manuel de, letter to Manuel de Herrera, undated.

3 7

León, Antonio de, from the Inquisition in Santa Fé de Bogotá, letter to the General Inquisitor, undated.

3 11

Royal Hacienda, judicial report validating a decree of the Royal Audiencia in Indias, previous year December 7, undated.

3 8

Series V. Miscellaneous, undated.

Box Folder

Report about a mission of 14 Capuchin monks in Africa, end of the 17th century.

4 1

Draft with comments of a novel relating the adventures of the graduate Juan Dudas, 72 p., incomplete, undated.

4 1

Collection Inventory

Dated Documents, 1679-1688.

Box Folder

Indenture between Robert Tylden and Bartholomew Hamden involving a plot of land in Kent, 1623 November 3.

1 1

Edward Ashe and John Moore. Transaction involving sale of lead. London, 1655 April 24.

1 2

Document wrapper noting that the enclosed deals with lands bought by John Lowe from William Bixby [enclosure not present], 1659 April 30.

1 3

William Howes gives up right to a house in Kingstone (Wiltshire] Small seal of Howes with witnesses including the wife of Anthony Mundy who signs with a mark, 1661 October 19.

1 4

Acknowledgment of receipt of payment by Samuel of New Windsor (Berkshire) to Reginald and Jane Horne . With signature of Reginald and mark of Jane, 1665 July 6.

1 5

Receipt for money paid by John Clay to Thomas Gibbons in completion of a mortgage against two parcels of land in Essex, 1675 July 24.

1 6

Edward Lyde, a joyner notes receipt of payment from Richard Winter of Oxfordshire. With small seal of Lyde., 1678 May 10.

1 7

Edward Noyes et al. Petitioners vs. William Wimbledon et al. Respondents. Hearing on the Andover corporation dispute at the Privy Council, 1679 September 29.

1 8

“The apprasyment of the goods of a Mr. Pratt by Matthew Podder and Francis Stylman..” Valued all together at 19.8.7, 1681 August 16.

1 9

A further inventory of household goods of Mr. Pratt, 1681 September 3.

1 9

Certificate of payment by Capt. Roger Martin to Henry Paramore. With signatures and seals, at Kent, 1685 December 22.

1 10

Certificate of payment by Capt. Roger Martin to Richard and John Pettit. With signatures and seals, at Kent, 1685 December 22.

1 10

Certificate of payment by Capt. Roger Martin to John and Sarah Bennett. With seals of the Bennetts and signatures, at Kent, 1685 December 22.

1 10

Certificate of payment by Capt. Roger Martin to Katharine Stephens. With her mark and other signatures, at Kent, 1685 December 22.

1 10

Certificate of payment by Capt. Roger Martin to Edward Taylor. Signatures and seals of parties, at Kent, 1685 December 23.

1 10

Certificate of payment by Sarah Driver to Nicholas Hamby. Signatures, seals and marks of parties, 1686 June 18.

1 11

Transaction between Bartholomew Hester and Edward Bradford in Oxfordshire.Signed and sealed, 1688 June 17.

1 12

Henry Wheeler of Cranford to his brother in law. Agreement to give forty pounds, 1688 November 12.

1 13

Agreement between Jeremiah Geary of London, joyner and Daniel Geary of Chesham, Berkshire, Master - transferring land in Berkshire from Jeremiah to Daniel., 1690 February 28.

1 14

Rent agreement between George Gold and the Duke of Norfolk. Signed by George Gold and witnessed with the mark of George Gold sr., 1692 March 23.

1 15

Document relating to a dispute between the town of Andover and William Drake and others over the manor of Ramridge and revenues. In Latin, 1694 September 4.

1 16

Defendants’ plea in a dispute in the Norfolk Assizes including a history of title for a local property. Case of Francis Bransbury v. Thomas Hinde, 1695 July 15.

1 17

Copy made in 1746 of an indenture conveying land in Rye, 1698 March 5.

1 18

Disbursement from the estate of John Bydes, Hertford to Sarah Halfhead of Essex. With original signatures, 1708 June 3.

1 19

Rent agreement for a house in Thames st. and Garlick Hill in the parish of St. James Garlickhythe between Henry Wood Sr., lighterman and Thomas Wickham citizen and distiller of London., 1713 September.

1 20

Work contract signed by two men [perhaps in Durham], 1714 May 26.

1 21

Mortgage signed by John Wright involving Dr. Jonathan Law, 1718 October 9.

1 22

Excerpt from the will of Thomas Bond relating to his children's portions of the estate, 1727 April 12.

1 23

Certificate that the Book of Common Prayer had been read by Charles Gale rector of Barningham, 1729 April 20.

1 24

Copy of an enumeration of lands given into the hands of the manor of Wheathampstead, 1729 May 28.

1 25

Indenture tripartite between Christian and John Paine of Kent transferring ownership of a smithy, 1737 January 18.

1 26

Disposal of a land case in Dareford involving Thomas Newsome and John Tasker, 1737 February 20.

1 27

Promise to pay interest on a mortgage between Esther Wills and John Bishop of Devon. Signed by Wills, 1738 January 28.

1 28

Agreement between Walter Wade of New Grange in Yorkshire and Thomas Walker of Boldon in Yorkshire on tenancy and agricultural matters (torn), 1758 October.

1 29

Foul copy of longer articles of agreement between Walter Wade of New Grange in Yorkshire and Thomas Walker of Boldon in Yorkshire on tenancy and agricultural matters, 1758 October 30.

1 29

Release in a lease between Richard Barker, coachman and John Howell Original signatures, 1760 April 11.

1 30

Trust of property in Southampton for the minor James Hill, 1766 September 30.

1 31

Lease of farmland by William Dobell of Cranbook from John Baker, 1766 October 18.

1 32

Warrant on an indictment for nuisance passed at the Norfolk circuit assizes (Suffolk) for the arrest of Nicholas Gwyn “Doctor of Physic” George Osborne laborer, William Wade laborer, Arthur Evans laborer, 1770 March 20.

1 33

Copy of a letter of administration to the estate of Felicia Harding of Northampton granted to her sister Anna Maria Griffiths on 8 January 1772 and copied, 1794 December 20.

1 34

An account of the several Buildings erected on the Ground let to Edward Oliver on a Building Lease which expires on Lady Day 1785, undated.

1 35

Chirograph agreement John Woodhams v. William Swamie. Dispute over several hundred acres of land in Sussex and thirty acres in Old Romney in Kent. Copy of agreement signed 8 Hilary 26 George II (1753) and copied, 1789 January 29.

1 36

Sale of land by John Creasy of Fordham, Norfolk to John Thurlow Dering of Denver, Norfolk, 1801 March 30.

1 37

Agreement between John Pybus and Paggen Hale for a piece of land in Lancaster, 1805 August 9.

1 38

Chirograph statement Samuel Reader v. Thomas Beach et al. a judgment in a dispute over lands in Sandhurst, Cranbrook, Biddendon, and Appledon, 1808.

1 39

Lawford, Essex. Valuation by William Cook of a plot of land in Lawford, Essex and terms of rent for 14 years. Approved by “Principal landholders” and Churchwardens, and overseers of Lawford. Original signatures, 1810.

1 40

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Undated Documents.

Box Folder

Three undated documents in secretary hand, circa 1592-1620.

1 41

Two undated documents. One from the reign of James II, the other an eighteenth-century copy of an earlier document., after 1685.

1 42

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Collection Inventory

I.  Families and Organizations.

Series Description

Arranged alphabetically by name, then chronologically for each family or organization. Families in the collection include, but are not limited to, the Acciaiuoli, the Altoviti, the Amadori, the Capponi, the Cassi, the Corsi, the Corsini, the Guadagni, the Guicciardini, the Lapini, the Martelli, the Mannelli, the Parenti, the Quartesi, the Ricci, the Ricciardi, the Risaliti, the Rucellai, the Salviati, the Strozzi, and the Verrezzano. Some of these were among the most powerful and prominent of Florence. The families that present the most papers are the Amadori, the Capponi, the Cassi, the Lapini, and the Ricciardi. For each of these families, the collection contains a variety of documents, including private correspondence, letters concerning business activities and negotiations and, in certain cases, journals and inventories. Two institutions and three ships also have a small number of documents filed by their name.

Box Folder

Acciaiuoli, 1609.

1 1

Accolani, 1615.

1 2

Altoviti, 1531-1692.

1 3-7

Amadori Family, 1549-1643.

1 8

Amadori, Francesco, 1645-1655.

1 9-16

Antinori, undated.

1 17

Arnolfini, 1768.

1 18

Bagnoli, 1648.

1 19

Baldovinetti, 1607.

1 20

Bartali, undated.

1 21

Bartileti, 1624.

1 22

Batta, 1647-1664.

1 23

Beccaria, 1777.

1 24

Benedetti, 1600-1646.

1 25

Bernardi, 1589.

1 26

Bettini, 1570.

1 27

Borellini, 1768.

1 28

Bosi, undated.

1 29

Botti, 1601-1615.

1 30

Brunaccini, 1517.

1 31

Buonaccorsi, 1586.

1 32

Caffarelli, 1620-1636.

1 33

Capponi Family, undated.

1 34

Capponi, Agnolo, 1590.

1 35

Capponi, Francesco, 1582-1610.

1 36

Capponi, Girolamo, 1578.

1 37

Capponi, Luigi, 1587.

1 38

Capponi, Maddalena, 1561-1638.

1 39

Capponi, Umberto, 1626.

1 40

Capponi, Vincenzo, 1609.

1 41

Cappelli, 1610.

2 42

Cassi, 1570-1622.

2 43-46

Castellamonte, 1647.

2 47

Cellini, 1564.

2 48

Cenni, 1620.

2 49

Christina of Sweden, 1642-1655.

2 50

Ciapetti, 1605.

2 51

Consoli, 1609.

2 52

Coppini, 1558.

2 53

Corsi, 1605.

2 54

Corsini, 1584-1588.

2 55

Cortona, 1572.

2 56

Cozzi, undated.

2 57

De Bartholi, 1534.

2 58

Della Casa, 1568.

2 59

Della Rovere, 1608.

2 60

Della Scala, 1534-1579.

2 61

De Romena, undated.

2 62

Di Mariano, 1603.

2 63

Fondi, 1624.

2 64

Ghaliga, 1550.

2 65

Ghalli, undated.

2 66

Gherardesca, 1582.

2 67

Gherardi, undated.

2 68

Gherardini, 1584.

2 69

Ghilera, 1607.

2 70

Gianfigliazzi, 1606-1662.

2 71

Giannelli, 1615.

2 72

Giovani, 1590.

2 73

Giraldi, 1563-1583.

2 74

Giuliani, 1601-1602.

2 75

Giunti, 1602.

2 76

Gonzaga, 1766-1767.

2 77

Grifoni, 1608.

2 78

Grimacci, 1768.

2 79

Guadagni, 1590-1647.

2 80

Guasconi, 1599.

2 81

Guicciardini, 1615-1616.

2 82

Guidi, 1608.

2 83

Guidoni, 1582.

3 84

Il Cacciatore (ship), 1607.

3 85

Il Levante (ship), 1555.

3 86

Lapini, 1579-1637.

3 87-89

Libri, 1620.

3 90

Lippi, 1624.

3 91

Livigatti, 1611.

3 92

Logri, 1663.

3 93

Lotti, 1510.

3 94

Maffi, 1746.

3 95

Malachori, 1606.

3 96

Malaspina, 1768.

3 97

Manes, 1605.

3 98

Mangani, 1660.

3 99

Manelli, 1600-1664.

3 100

Mansi, 1765-1768.

3 101-102

Martelli, 1584-1768.

3 103

Martellini, 1598-1611.

3 104

Martini, 1620.

3 105

Mascherini, 1607.

3 106

Masi, undated.

3 107

Mazzarosa, 1768.

3 108

Mazzocchi, 1591.

3 109

Montecatini, 1487-1624.

3 110

Monte di Pietà, 1630-1663.

3 111

Mugnini, 1623.

3 112

Orlandini, undated.

3 113

Orsini, 1600.

3 114

Palamatti, 1581.

3 115

Palmieri, 1577-1579.

3 116

Pandolfi, undated.

3 117

Pandolfini, 1535.

3 118

Parenti, 1624-1625.

3 119

Pasquini, 1629.

3 120

Passerini, 1606.

3 121

Picchina, 1608.

3 122

Pieri, 1590.

3 123

Pinadori, 1647.

3 124

Porcellini, 1610-1614.

3 125

Prospero (ship), 1606.

3 126

Pucci, 1609.

3 127

Quartesi, 1593-1647.

3 128-129

Rasi, undated.

3 130

Ribera, 1600.

3 131

Ricasoli, 1605-1606.

3 132

Ricci, 1565-1619.

3 133

Ricciardi Family, 1604-1620.

4 134

Ricciardi, Francesco, 1607.

4 135

Ricciardi, Jacopo, 1604-1637.

4 136

Ricciardi, Riccardo, 1600-1612.

4 137

Ricciardi Payments, 1601-1610.

4 138-141

Ricciardini, 1729.

4 142

Ridolfi, 1563-1578.

4 143

Risaliti, 1575-1579.

4 144

Roberti, 1766.

4 145

Rucellai, 1543-1598.

4 146

Salviati, 1575-1611.

4 147

Salvini, 1620-1622.

4 148

Sampieri, 1647.

4 149

Sandrini, 1585.

4 150

Santernecchi Documents, 1796-1804.

4 151

Santernecchi Receipts, 1796-1802.

4 152

Santini, 1766.

4 153

Scrigni, undated.

4 154

Selmi, 1624.

4 155

Sforza, 1620.

4 156

Simoni, 1609.

4 157

Sirigatti, 1606.

4 158

Squarcialupi, 1543.

4 159

Spedale Santa Maria Novella, 1437-1468.

4 160

Strata, 1610.

4 161

Strozzi, 1572-1640.

4 162

Stufi, 1620.

4 163

Suarez, 1630.

4 164

Torrigiani, 1606.

4 165

Turini, 1607.

4 166

Ubaldini, 1609.

4 167

Venturini, 1609.

4 168-169

Verino, undated.

4 170

Verrezzano, 1596-1599.

4 171

Vezzoli, 1584.

4 172

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II.  Subjects.

Series Description

Arranged alphabetically by subject, and chronologically within each subject. They include a variety of financial documents such as accounts; excerpts from ledgers of debtors and creditors; financial statements; notes containing computations of different kinds; financial records; receipts; and more; there are additional examples of financial documents concerning three ships, and these are filed under the ship’s name in the Families and Organizations series. A significant number of documents that deal with various aspects of rural life, including cattle and grain trade, are also present. Financial documents and documents concerning rural life constitute undoubtedly the two most extensive subjects within the series. They offer a very broad array of information on two significant spheres of Florentine life thanks to a diverse selection of documents. Other subjects include commercial relations between Florence and England, and Holland and Florence; the guilds of the wool merchants and the silk weavers; and statutes, legal, and notarial matters.

Box Folder

England and Florence, 1606.

5 173

Exemplum ... sermone, 1574-1575.

5 174

Financial documents: Bilanci (balance sheets), 1569-1645.

5 175

Financial documents: Cambi (exchanges), 1600.

5 185

Financial documents: Conti (computations), 1580-1699.

5 186-191

Financial documents: Debtors and creditors, 1567-1650.

5 192

Financial documents: Note (notes), 1596-1611.

5 193

Financial documents: Ordini (orders), 1575-1660.

5 194

Financial documents: Pagamenti (payments), 1561-1618.

5 195

Financial documents: Partite (lists), 1500-1670.

5 196-199

Financial documents: Ricevute (receipts), 1500-1659.

5 200-204

Financial documents: Rimesse (remittances), 1551-1552.

5 205

Financial documents: Saldi (settlements), 1559-1605.

5 206

Financial documents: Spese (expenses), 1601-1624.

5 207

Financial documents: Stime (estimates), 1630.

5 208

Financial documents: Tax documents, 1550-1609.

5 209

Guilds, 1550-1622.

5 210

Holland and Florence, 1602-1606.

5 211

Iron trade, 1559.

5 212

Merchants, 1530-1608.

5 213

Notarial documents: Notarial records, 1574.

5 214

Notarial documents: Ristretti (contracts), 1622.

5 215

Rural life: Bestiame (cattle), 1537-1670.

5 216

Rural life: Grano (grains), 1603-1613.

5 217

Miscellaneous documents related to rural life, 1537-1637.

5 218

Statutes, 1455-1560.

5 219

Miscellaneous, 1570-1664.

5 220

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Collection Inventory

Autographed manuscripts, 1479-1882.

Box Folder

Acciajoli, Jacopo, manuscript document, undated.

1 1

Acciajuoli, Archelao, fragmentary page of manuscript on vellum, 1550.

1 2

Albani, Giovanni Girolamo, letter signed to the Prior of Montenovo (1 p.), 1570 March 2.

1 3

Alfonso II d'Este, Duca di Ferrara, autographed note signed (1 p.), 1575.

1 4

Allegri, Antonio, autographed note signed (1 p.), 1479.

1 5

Ariosto, Lodovico, letter signed to Giudice dei Savii (1 p.), 1614 July 5.

1 6

Ariosto, Lodovico, Jr., letter signed (1 p.), [1598].

1 7

Bache, A[lexander] D[allas], signature on note of admittance to lecture (1 p.), 1841 January.

1 8

Badger, George E[dmund], letter signed to Mrs. Mary Culison (1 p.), 1841 August 31.

1 9

Balestrieri, Domenico, printed form signed (1 p.), 1769 October 20.

1 10

Bancroft, George, letter signed to Captain Charles Stewart McCauley, clipped autographs (2), 1846 July 27.

1 11

Bartenstein, Johann Christoph, freiherr von, letter signed (1 p.), 1755 March 24.

1 12

Beni, Paolo, autographed letter signed to Count Ranuccio Santinelli (1 p.), [1611 July 2].

1 13

Benjamin, Park, autographed letter signed asking that advertisement be placed in the next issue of a paper (1 p.), 1855 October 1.

1 14

[Karl XIV Johan, king of Sweden and Norway], letter signed, Bernadotte to the Minister of War (1 p.), [1800].

1 15

Betti, Salvatore, autographed letter signed (3 p.), 1852.

1 16

Bettinelli, Saverio, autographed letter signed to [Teresa Berrettoni] (2 p.), 1781 July 3.

1 17

Bevilacqua, Gherardo, autographed note signed to Vincenzo Rugieri (1/2 p.), 1584 [January 10].

1 18

Boiarda, Silvia Savitale, note signed to Vincenzo Ruggiero (1/2 p.), 1570 July 7.

1 19

Bonaparte, Joseph, autographed letter signed to [Count Jurvilliers] (1 p.), 1823 April 30.

1 20

Bowman, S., clipped autograph (1), undated.

1 21

Boyle, John, autographed letter signed to Charles Stewart McCauley giving him permission to be absent from the rendezvous at Boston until the 1st of October (1 p.), 1831 August 26.

1 22

Branch, John, dispatch signed order to Lieutenant Charles Stewart McCauley (1 p.), 1830 May 28.

1 23

Brunel, [Sir Marc Isambard], autographed acceptance of invitation signed to Mr. Martin (1 p.), undated.

1 24

Buchanan, James, U.S. president, clipped autographs (2), undated.

1 25

Bulgarini, Belisario, autographed letter signed to Cardinal Paleotto (1 p.) and manuscript transcript letter to Cardinal Paleotto (1 p.), circa 1600.

1 26

Burr, Aaron, clipped autograph (1), undated.

1 27

Bury, Lady Charlotte [(Campbell)], autographed note (1 p.), 1833 December 29.

1 28

Campagna, Giuseppe, autographed letter signed (2 p.) and autographed letter signed to Michele Caetani, Duca di Sermoneta (1 p.), 1856.

1 29

Cantu, C[esare], autographed letter signed to Felice DeMonnier (1 p.), 1851 February 20.

1 30

Capponi, G[ino Alessandro Giuseppe Gaspero], marchese, letter signed [concerning the centenary of Dante] (2 p.), 1864 [January] 2.

1 31

Cass, Lewis, autographed note signed (1 p.), 1858 December 27.

1 32

Cesari, Antonio, autographed letter signed to Luigi Salina (1 p.), 1815.

1 33

Chateaubriand, [Francois Auguste Rene], vicomte de, letter signed (2 p.), 1823 May 2.

1 34

Clark, Thomas M[arch], clipped autograph (1), undated.

1 35

Colombo, Michele, manuscript poem signed (1 p.), undated.

1 36

[Craik, Dinah Maria] (Mulock), autographed acceptance of invitation to Mrs. Mackenzie (1 p.), before 1864.

1 37

Crowninshield, B[enjamin] W[illiams], letter signed to Lieutenant Charles Stewart McCauley accompanying his commission as Lieutenant in the U.S. Navy (1 p.), 1815 April 21 .

1 38

Dante Society, by-laws, printed form (1), undated.

1 39

Dibdin, [Thomas Fragnall], autographed letter to Mr. Rich (3 p.), 1828 February 8 .

1 40

Dickerson, M[ahlon], printed leave form signed to Master Commandant Charles Stewart McCauley (1), 1835 August 4 .

1 41

Dionisi, Gian Giacomo, autographed letter signed to Gi[uolamo] Tartarotti (1 p.), 1756 February 15 .

1 42

Dobbin, J[ames] C[ochrane], clipped autograph, and letter signed to Commandant Charles Stewart McCauley from the Secretary of the Navy relating to Lieutenant Guest's patent sounding rod (2 p.), 1856 August 15 .

1 43

Dumas, Alexandre, autographed letter signed to Monsieur Rochefort (1 p.), undated.

1 44

Edgeworth, Maria, autographed letter signed (letter fragment), and petition to the Marchioness of Wellesley (3 p.), 1826 April 30 .

1 45

Etty, William, autographed letter signed (1 p.), undated.

1 46

Ferrante, II Gonzaga, letter signed (1 p.), 1616 September 20 .

1 47

Ferrucci, Luigi, autograph letter signed to Matteo Leonardo Matteu (?) (1 p.), 1855 January 1.

1 48

Fillmore, Millard, U.S. president, autographed letter signed to Charles C. Stratton (1 p.) and autographed letter of recommendation to Stratton signed (1 p.), 1857 April 8.

1 49

Fraser, John F[ries], autographed note signed to Franklin Institute asking that bearer be admitted to lectures on geology (1 p.), 1840 January 2.

1 50

Furness, Horace Howard, autographed letter signed to Francis Campbell Macauley relating to the Dante Society (1 p.), undated.

1 51

Galanti, Carimne, autographed letter signed to David Nutt (1 p.), 1882 January 10.

1 52

Galvani, Giovanni, autographed letter signed to Enola Raggianini (1 p.), 1829.

1 53

[Genlis, Stephanie Felicitie Ducrest de St. Aubin], comtesse de, afterwards marquise de Sillery, autographed note to Monseiur Maradan Libraire, with portrait on obverse (1 p.), undated.

1 54

Giannini, Crescentino, autographed letter signed to Michelangelo Caetani, Duca di Sermoneta (3 p.), [18]56 July 27.

1 55

Giuliani, Giambattista, autographed letter signed (3 p.) and autographed letter signed (1 p.), undated.

1 56

Gladstone, W[illiam] E[wart], autographed invitation to Mr. Stratton (1 p.), [18]57 May 25.

1 57

Graham, William A[lexander], letter signed to Charles S. McCauley concerning Mr. Follansbee (1 p.), 1851 December 8.

1 58

Guizot, [Francois Pierre Guillaume], autographed note signed (1 p.), 1849 February 27.

1 59

Henshaw, David, printed form signed to Captain Charles Stewart McCauley (1 p.), 1843 October 25.

1 60

Humboldt, Alexander, freiherr von, transcript of Humboldt's travels (2 p.), autographed note signed (1 p.), and autographed notes (2), [1802?].

1 61

Jefferson, Thomas, U.S. president, clipped autograph (1), envelope addressed to Mr. F. McCauley (1), circa 1801-1809.

1 62

John, Bishop of New York, autographed letter signed to Quackenbos (1 p.), 1850 September 2 .

1 63

Kennedy, John P[endleton], clipped autograph (1), and printed leave of absence form signed to Charles Stewart McCauley (1 p.), undated.

1 64

Kotzebue, [August Friedrich Ferdinand von], autographed note signed (1 p.), 1802 February 26.

1 65

Lafayette, [Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, marquis de], letter signed, copy of letter sent to M. Bailly (2 p.), 1789 July 23.

1 66

[LaMotte]-Fouque, [Friedrich Heinrich Karl], freiherr de, manuscript signed (1 p.), undated.

1 67

Lavater, Johann Caspar, manuscript poem signed (4 p.), undated.

1 68

Lawrence, Sir Thomas, autographed note (1 p.), [after 1810].

1 69

Leslie, C[harles] R[obert], autographed letter signed to T. Hayward (1 p.), 1825 April 29.

1 70

Masii, Francesco, autographed letter signed to Michelangelo Caetani, Duca di Sermoneta (2 p.), 1852 November 7.

1 71

Mason, J[ohn] Y[oung], autographed letter signed to Captain Charles Stewart McCauley appointing him member of a Naval Court (1 p.), 1846 November 27.

1 72

Meade, W[illiam], autographed letter signed to Mrs. Rosalie Lisle asking her to send a daguerreotype of Old Christ Church, Lancaster City, VA to J.B. Lippincott & Co. (1 p.), [18]57 January 14.

1 73

Medici, Guido, autographed letter signed to Roberto del Beccuto (1 p.), 1522 June 16.

1 74

Mordani, F[ilippo], autographed letter signed to Luca Vivarelli (1 p.), 1857 October 27.

1 75

Morris, Robert, autographed letter signed to J. Nicholson (1 p.), 1797 November 13.

1 76

Onslow, Arthur, autographed receipt, 1721 November 7.

1 77

Patterson, R[obert] M[askell], autographed letter signed to Mr. Franklin Peale asking his aid in preparing a lecture (1 p.), 1826 February 13 .

1 78

Paulding, J.K., letter signed to Captain Charles Stewart McCauley ordering him to proceed to Norfolk and report to William B. Shutrick for command of U.S. Ship of the Line Delaware (1 p.), 1841 February 19.

1 79

Pederzini, Fortunato Cavazzeni, autographed letter signed to Michelangelo Caetani, Duca di Sermoneta (1 p.), autographed letter signed to Michelangelo Caetani, Duca di Sermoneta (2 p.), autographed letter signed to Michelangelo Caetani (1 p. folder), autographed letter signed to Michelangelo Caetani, Duca di Sermoneta (1 p.), autographed letter signed to [Michelangelo Caetani, Duca di Sermoneta] (1 p.), 1853-1857.

1 80

Perry, M[atthew] C[albraith], clipped autograph (1), undated.

1 81

Potter, A[lonso], autographed letter signed to [Harrison Hall] (1 p.) and autographed letter signed to Reverend A.S. Clark (1 p.), undated.

1 82

Potter, H., clipped autograph (1), undated.

1 83

Preston, W[illiam] Ballard, clipped autograph (1), and printed form signed to Captain Charles Stewart McCauley (1 p.), undated.

1 84

[Rangoni, Fulvio], manuscript poem to Claudio Rangoni (1 p.), [15]89 April 4.

1 85

Read, T[homas] Buchanan, clipped autograph (1) and autographed letter signed to Mr. Lee (?) (1 p.), undated.

1 86

Roscoe, W[illiam], autographed note signed to Mr. Monro (1 p.), 1827 September 25.

1 87

Rosini, Gio[vanni], manuscript signed (1 p.), [17]99.

1 88

Rossi, Gio. Galeazzo, autographed letter signed to Cornelio Volta (3 p.), 1578[?] February 2.

1 89

Sacrata, Elenora Trotta, receipt signed for services of Antonio Ferrallo (1/2 p.), 1595 January 30.

1 90

Schelling, [Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von], document signed (1 p.), 1835 May 27.

1 91

Scott, Thomas F[ielding], clipped autograph (1), undated.

1 92

[Shee, Sir Martin Archer], clipped note (1), undated.

1 93

S[igourney], L[ydia] H[oward (Huntley)], manuscript of "The Muse" for the "Gift" (4 p.), [after 1830].

1 94

[Simonde] de Sismondi, J[ean] C[harles] L[eonard], autographed letter signed to M.F. Longhena (3 p.), 1825 February 6.

1 95

Smith, R[obert], printed form signed to Charles Stewart McCauley appointing him midshipman (1 p.), 1809 February 13.

1 96

Smith, Sydney, autographed letter signed (1 p.), undated.

1 97

Sorio, Bartolomeo, autographed letter signed to Il Duca Caetani (2 p.) and autographed letter signed to Il Duca Michelangelo Caetani (1 p.), 1863.

1 98

Southard, Sam[uel] L[ewis], order signed to Lieutenant Charles Stewart McCauley (1 p.), 1825 August 5.

1 99

Southey, Robert, autographed letter signed to the Reverend Leighton Wigton (1 p.), 1832 June 13.

1 100

Stewart, Ch[arle]s, 4 envelopes addressed to Mrs. Maria McCauley, 1 envelope addressed to Francis McCauley, autographed letters signed to Nathan Baker (3 p. total), 2 letters signed to LeRoy, Bayard & Co. (2 p. total), 3 autographed letters signed to Mrs. Maria McCauley (9 p. total), autographed letter signed to Lossing (1 p.) and letter signed (4 p.), undated.

1 101

Taney, R[oger] B[rooke], autographed note signed (1 p.), 1860 March 31.

1 102

Tassoni, Estense Ferrante, receipt signed, 1595.

1 103

Tassoni, Julio A., letter signed to Vicentio Rugieri (1 p.), 1575 January 5.

1 104

Thompson, Smith, printed furlough form signed to Lieutenant Charles Stewart McCauley (1 p.), 1822 December 23.

1 105

Tiraboschi, Gero[lamo], autographed note signed (1 p.), 1782 April 12.

1 106

Tommaseo, [Niccolo], letter signed (1 p.), [18]48 August 12.

1 107

Torri, Alessandro, letter signed (1 p.), autographed letter signed (2 p.), autographed letter signed (1 p.), autographed letter signed to Michelangelo Caetani, Duca di Sermoneta (2 p.), autographed letter signed to Michelangelo Caetani, Duca di Sermoneta (1 p.), autographed letter signed (2 p.), autographed letter signed to Prince Michelangelo Caetani, Duca di Sermoneta (2 p.), 1857-1858.

1 108

Toucey, Isaac, clipped autograph (1), after 1857.

1 109

Troya, Carlo, 6 autographed letters signed to Michelangelo Caetani, Duca di Sermoneta (15 p. total), undated.

1 110

Upsher, A[bel] P[arker], manuscript regulations signed (1 p.), 1842 August 3.

1 111

Van Buren, Martin, U.S. president, autographed envelope addressed from him to Mr. William L. Dungleson (1), undated.

1 112

Watson, John F[anning], autographed letter signed to Mrs. McCauley (1 p.), 1849 December 13.

1 113

White, W[illia]m, autographed letter signed to Reverend Bird Wilson (1 p.), 1832 January 5.

1 114

Wilkie, D., autographed note to Mr. Auguste (1 p.), 1890 July 1.

1 115

Wiseman, [Nicholas Patrick Stephen] Cardinal, letter to Mr. Beard (2 p.), [18]49 August 5.

1 116

Woodbury, John, receipt from the Dante Society sent to Francis C. Macaulay, autographed invitation signed (1 p.), printed form signed (1 p.), 1881.

1 117

Woodbury, Levi, letter signed to Commander Charles Stewart McCauley (1 p.), 1831 September 27.

1 118

Anonymous, annotations on the first canto and first two thirds of the second canto of the "Divine Comedy", circa 1600s.

1 119

Miscellaneous 18th and 19th century letters written by various Italian authors whose signatures cannot be identified, and one letter in German written on January 30, [17]65, 1700-1899.

1 120

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Notes for a vocabulary of the dialect of Nice, before 1896.

Box
2
Folder
1-5

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Collection Inventory

Series I: Reverend William Henry Furness material.

Scope and Contents note

This series, arranged in three subseries, includes letters to and from Reverend William Henry Furness as well as writings by and about him. Subseries A includes letters sent to William Henry Furness, arranged alphabetically by sender. Subseries B. incudes letters written by Reverend Furness and is arranged alphabetically by recipient. Notable correspondents include George William Curtis, Rebecca Harding Davis, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Edward Everett Hale, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., Fanny Kemble, Emanuel Leutze, Harriet Martineau, Andrew Preston Peabody, John Sartain, Jared Sparks, William Buell Sprague, Charles Sumner, Bayard Taylor, and several other religious leaders, writers, and artists attesting the wide network of intellectual connections and interests cultivated by Furness during his lifetime. Researchers should be aware that Furness family correspondence is throughout the collection--it has been arranged, as much as possible, by recipient (as the holder of the original).

Subseries C includes a limited number of writings by William Henry Furness, such as a copy of the minutes of a temperance meeting held in Lancaster Co., Pa. (1851); some suggested mottoes for the U. S. Sanitation Commission; a poem; and an undated fragment of an article or sermon discussing Jesus and Tacitus. Enclosed in subseries C are also additional materials relating to William Henry Furness, including a poem to Furness; an account of anonymous visitor in Furness's home; and a collection of autographs assembled by Furness.

Sub A: Letter addressed to Reverend William Henry Furness.

Box Folder

Alcott, Amos Bronson, letter, 1857 February 19.

1 1

Barton, Susan R., letter, includes 4-page photocopy of each letter, 1849 June 29.

1 2

Binney, Horace, letters (Horace Binney was a prominent Philadelphia lawyer, elected to Congress in 1833), 1862-1875.

1 3

Child, Lydia Maria Francis, letter, undated.

1 4

Clarence and Mary, thank you letter from the senders regarding the service that Furness delivered at their wedding, 1884 November 14.

1 5

Combe, George, letter and several caricatures in pencil by an unidentified hand, 1839 February 28.

1 6

Curtis, George William, letter (George William Curtis was an author and orator who championed, among other causes, civil-service reform and the vote for women; was associated with Brook Farm and the Transcendentalists; and served as an editor on Harper's Magazine), 1859-1873.

1 7

Davis, Rebecca Harding, letter thanking Furness for his gift of a copy of the Variorum Tempest. (Rebecca Harding Davis was a novelist whose husband, Lucius Clarke Davis, worked for  The Philadelphia Inquirer and was later an editor of the  Philadelphia Public Ledger), undated.

1 8

Emerson, Ralph Waldo, letters and an autograph copy of Emerson's poem "The World-Soul", 1837-1857.

1 9

Emerson, Ralph Waldo, letters; a copy of the poem "Warning" by William Ellery Channing, written out by Emerson; and a manuscript in Emerson's hand of the poems "Loss and Gain" ("Virtue runs before the muse ...") and "A Fable" ("The mountain and the squirrel had a quarrel ..."), 1858-1875, undated.

1 10

Frothingham, Nathaniel Langdon, letter, 1865 April 12.

1 11

Furness, James, letter at the time of the death of William Henry Furness's wife, Annis Pulling Jenks Furness, 1885 June 11.

1 12

Furness, May, letter addressed to "My dearest Grandpa," on the death of her grandmother, Annis Pulling Jenks Furness, 1885 June 12.

1 13

Furness, N. H., letter probably to Rev. William Henry Furness, addressed to "My dear Cousin," offering "our deepest sympathy in your bereavement," likely on the occasion of the death of his wife, Annis Pulling Jenks Furness, circa 1885.

1 14

Furness, William Eliot, letter addressed to "Uncle William", 1885 June 14.

1 15

Garrison, William Lloyd, letters, 1859.

1 16

Gaskell, William, letter, 1871 August 12.

1 17

Giles, Henry, letters, 1851 July 6.

1 18

Gowen, Franklin Benjamin, letter, 1880 September 23.

1 19

Hale, Edward Everett, letters, 1850-1851.

1 20

Hale, John P., letter, 1850 May 23.

1 21

Haven, Clara and Fanny, letter addressed to "Dear Uncle William", 1885 June 17.

1 22

Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, letter, 1879 February 16.

1 23

Hill, Thomas, letter (with a note in Rev. Furness' hand noting that Hill was president of Harvard College), circa 1862-1868.

1 24

Holmes, Oliver Wendell, letters and a typewritten description, possibly from a sale, 1844-1893.

1 25

Hutton, Richard Holt, letter, 1872 October 20.

1 26

Jastrow, Marcus, letters, 1894, undated.

1 27

Kemble, Fanny, letters, undated.

1 28

Leutze, Emanuel, letter, 1847 March 28.

1 29

Martineau, Harriet, letters and 2 typewritten transcriptions, 1836-1856.

1 30

Martineau, James, letter, 1859 May 18.

1 31

M'Kim, J. Miller, letter, undated.

1 32

Mölling, Amalie, letter, undated.

1 33

Morison, John Hopkins, letter, 1885 April 24.

1 34

Palfrey, John Gorham, letter, 1858 May 4.

1 35

Parker, Theodore, letter, 1845 February 20.

1 36

Peabody, Andrew P., letters, 1870-1884.

1 37

Phillips, Stephen C., letter, 1845 June 23.

1 38

Phillips, Wendell, letters, 1860, undated.

1 39

Powell, Baden, letters, 1860 March 3.

1 40

Putnam, Alfred Porter, letter, 1876 October 28.

1 41

Putnam, George, letters, 1850-1864.

1 42

Quincy, Edmund, letter, 1851 August 21.

1 43

Quincy, Josiah, letters, 1856.

1 44

Sanborn, J. B., letters, 1857-1863.

1 45

Sartain, John, letters, 1848-1849.

1 46

Schubert, Goffhilf Heinrich von, letter (in German), 1853 March 23.

1 47

Schurz, Carl, letter, 1864 November 24.

1 48

Sedgwick, Catharine Maria, letters, 1850-1853, undated.

1 49

Sophocles, E. A., letter, 1856 July 28.

1 50

Sparks, Jared, letters, 1838-1849.

1 51

Sprague, William Buell, letter; 3 trimmed autographs attached to the letter: one of John Quincy Adams, one scrap of Philipp Melanchthon's handwriting (made in the margin of his copy of Plutarch's Lives), and one that looks like "C. R. Leslie;" and a manuscript poem in an unidentified hand, beginning "Cleopatra in a crisis/Thus relieved her mind to Isis", 1847 August 6.

1 52

Stetson, C., letter, 1847 March 18.

1 53

Sullivan, William, letter, 1838 May 11.

1 54

Sully, Thomas, letter, 1856 June 2.

1 55

Sumner, Charles, letters, 1848-1863.

1 56

Sumner, George, letter discussing his recent lecture tour of Indiana, Illinois and other "Western" states; the hostility he faced from Democrats and other supporters of Stephen Douglas; and Seward and the upcoming 1860 election (Sumner was probably the Boston economist (1817-1863)), 1860 April 24.

1 57

Walker, James, letter, 1868 October 19.

1 58

Unidentified correspondents, including a letter from "A sincere friend," a postal card, and 13 envelopes addressed to William H. Furness, undated.

1 59

Sub B: Letters from William Henry Furness.

Box Folder

Dole, Nathan Haskell, letter, possibly 1887 February 6.

1 60

Emerson, Ralph Waldo, letters, 1835-1860.

1 61

Emerson, Ralph Waldo, letters, 1862-1880.

2 1

"Mr. Ellis," letter, 1868 October 4.

2 3

Gilpin, Henry Dilworth, manuscript copy of a letter, possibly in the hand of Horace Howard Furness, undated.

2 4

Martineau, James, letters, 1888-1894, undated.

2 5

Miles, Mr., letter, 1895 March 11.

2 6

Rice, Allen Thorndike, letter concerning a North American Review article, circa 1877.

2 7

Sampson, George A., letter regarding John Sartain, 1832 July 13.

2 8

Taylor, Bayard, letter including a copy, in Rev. Furness's hand, of Taylor's poem "Cedarcroft to Lindenshade" and Furness's reply "Lindenshade to Cedarcroft", 1869 July 25.

2 9

Tyndall, Dr. , letter, 1875 November 29.

2 10

Wetherhill, Edward and Rebecca, letters, 1859-1890.

2 11

Unidentified recipients, including a letter to "Dear Madam" on the subject, "should clergymen smoke?," letter to "My dear Sir" dated December 12, 1854, and letter to "My dear Sir" concerning the "Rebelliad" by Augustus Peirce, a college classmate of Rev. Furness (Furness indicates that some of the illustrations that originally accompanied the work might have been drawn by him), 1854, 1894-1895.

2 12

Sub C: Writings by and about Reverend William Henry Furness,.

Box Folder

Anonymous account of a visitor in Rev. Furness's home, undated.

2 18

Anonymous poem to William Henry Furness, undated.

2 17

Autograph collection (contains an assortment of trimmed autographs, most arranged alphabetically in a small envelope, some glued to a separate sheet), undated.

2 15

Emerson, Ralph Waldo, ticket to a lecture by Emerson at Phillips Exeter Academy, and small watercolor painting which possibly belonged to Rev. Furness, undated.

2 16

Emerson-Furness correspondence, copy of title page and introduction to the 1910 publication, 1910.

2 19

Furness, William H., writings, including copy of the minutes of a temperance meeting held in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, in December 1851; suggested mottoes for the U. S. Sanitation Commission; a poem entitled "The Invocation;" and an undated fragment of an article or sermon discussing Jesus and Tacitus, 1851, 1864, undated.

2 13

Golding's translation of book VII of Ovid's Metamorphoses together with selected passages from Shakespeare, manuscript excerpts (the excerpts are written on the stationery of the Rittenhouse Club, Philadelphia, in an unidentified hand that might be that of Rev. William Henry Furness), undated.

2 14

Hoffmann, R. Joseph, "William Henry Furness: the Transcendentalist defense of the Gospels" (includes two 12-page photocopies of the author's article, which appeared in The New England Quarterly, vol. LVI, no. 2 (June 1983), pp. 238-260), 1983.

2 20

Series II. Horace Howard Furness material.

Scope and Contents note

The bulk of the collection is contained within Series II, arranged in five subseries, and includes letters to and from Horace Howard Furness, Sr., research and writing by him and about him, and other materials relating to him. Subseries A. contains letters addressed to Horace Howard Furness, arranged alphabetically by sender. Subseries B. contains letters sent by Furness and is arranged alphabetically by recipient. The long list of correspondents include notable such figures as Edwin Booth, Tita Brand, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry Clay Folger, Edmund Gosse, Fanny Kemble, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Charles Eliot Norton, Tommaso Salvini, Richard Tangye, Henry Clay Trumbull, Richard Grant White, Woodrow Wilson, and many others. Subseries B also includes a set of letters relating to the history and authenticity of a block of mulberry wood that supposedly came from a tree planted by Shakespeare (this block is now in the Horace Howard Furness Memorial Library at the University of Pennsylvania). As a whole, the correspondence gathered in this series offers a perspective on the work of Furness as a Shakespearian scholar and collector of Shakespeariana, and allows for an assessment of the influence of Shakespeare among prominent members of the contemporary artistic, intellectual, and financial world.

Researchers should be aware that Furness family correspondence is throughout the collection--it has been arranged, as much as possible, by recipient (as the holder of the original).

Subseries C gathers several writings by Horace Howard Furness, including a set of working notebooks for Variorum volumes of Shakespeare; speeches given at institutions such as the University of Pennsylvania, Bryn Mawr College, the Academy of Music, the New Theatre (Chestnut Street Theatre, Philadelphia), and the Pennsylvania Society; a diary from Furness’s trip to Europe (1856); a set of daily journals from 1867-1870; notes; and clippings.

Subseries D encloses an announcement of Furness’s honorary degree by Cambridge University, and writings about Horace Howard Furness written by multiple authors. Finally, subseries E includes additional clippings, notes, and other materials concerning Horace Howard Furness.

Sub: A. Letters addressed to Horace Howard Furness.

Box Folder

Abbott, Edwin Abbott, letter, 1888 June 21.

2 21

Abercromby, J. G., letter, 1907 September 19.

2 22

Adams, Charles Francis, letters, 1877, 1900.

2 23

Adee, Alvey A., letters, 1887-1907.

2 24

Adler, Cyrus, letters (in the letter of July 28, 1896, Adler thanks Furness for sending him some biographical sketches of Furness's father, the late Rev. Dr. William H. Furness), 1896.

2 25

Agnew, D. Hayes, letter, 1886 April 14.

2 26

Aitken, Mary Carlyle, letter, 1879 March 6.

2 27

Albani, Emma Lajeunesse, letter, 1892 March 27.

2 28

Aldrich, Thomas Bailey, letter, 1885 October 13.

2 29

[Alenauchs, George], letter, 1888 December 16.

2 30

Alexander, George, letters, 1888-1890.

2 31

Allen, George, 35 letters, 1872, undated.

2 32

Allen, George, Jr., letter, 1888 May 25.

2 33

Allibone, Samuel Austin, letters and postal card, 1879-1881.

2 34

Anonymous, letter (the author of this letter withheld his name "to make sure that you do not feel called on for the trouble of a reply"), undated.

2 35

Arber, Edward, letters, 1875-1894.

2 36

Arrowsmith, M., letter, 1889 September 3.

2 37

Ashbaugh, S. S., letters regarding the author's attempt to defend John Payne Collier against accusations of having forged Shakespeare's second Folio, and includes a copy of the preface to the author's proposed article defending Collier, 1912.

2 38

Ashbee, Edmund W., letters and receipt, 1875-1876.

2 39

Austin Baldwin & Co., letter and receipt, 1871.

2 40

Baggitt, J. W. E., letter describing the nature and history of a copy of Shakespeare's Memorial in Westminster Abbey and includes 2 photographs of the copy, 1893 June 17.

2 41

Baker, William Mumford, letter, 1882.

2 42

Bancroft, George, letters, 1880-1885.

2 43

Bancroft, John Chandler, letter, 1888 June 16.

2 44

Barnard, Francis Pierrepont, letter, 1902 January 4.

2 45

Barrell, letters (first name is indecipherable), 1884-1888.

2 46

Barrett, Lawrence, letters, 1888-1889.

2 47

Bartlett, Henrietta C., letters, 1912.

2 48

Bartlett, John, letter and a manuscript list of the author's corrections to Helen Kate Furness's A Concordance to Shakespeare's Poems (1874)), 1894-1895.

2 49

Bassett, J. M., letter, 1886 April 19.

2 50

Bates, J. H., letter, 1893 January 27.

2 51

Baxter, Ida F., letters, 1899.

2 52

Beck, James M., letters (James Montgomery Beck was U.S. District Attorney of Philadelphia and Solicitor General of the United States, as well as an amateur Shakespearian), 1911 November.

2 53

Becks, George, letters, 1891-1892.

2 54

Benet, Frances Rose, letter, circa 1895.

2 55

Bennett, Anna M., letter, 1904 March 6.

2 56

Bernard Quaritch, postal card (Bernard Quaritch was a bookshop in London), 1871-1876, 1901.

8 18

Besant, Walter, letter, 1880 August.

2 57

Biddle, Cadwalader, letters informing Furness that he was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws and that he was elected to the Board of Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania (Cadwalader Biddle was secretary of the University of Pennsylvania Board of Trustees), 1879-1880.

2 58

Biddle, Craig, letter, 1892 March 18.

2 59

Biddle, S., letter, 1895 April 22.

2 60

Bierstadt, Albert, letter, 1861 November 19.

2 61

Binney, W. G., letters, 1886-1892.

2 62

Bispham, David Scull, letter, 1901 August 3.

2 63

Bittenger, Joseph Baugher, letter, 1877.

2 64

Boardman, George Dana, letters, 1880-1884.

2 65

Bok, William John, letter, 1887 July 26.

2 66

Boodle, R. W., letter, 1882.

2 67

Booth, Edwin, letters, 1884-1889, undated.

2 68

Boston Public Library, letters, 1880-1902.

2 69

Bourget, Paul, letter (in French), 1893.

2 70

Bradley, A. C., letter thanking Furness for a gift copy of Antony and Cleopatra, 1907 October 21.

3 1

Brae, Andrew Edmund, 3 letters and 1 undated note with suggested emendations to Cymbeline, 1879-1880, undated.

3 2

Brand, Tita, letters (Tita Brand was an actress who performed mostly in England in the 1890s and early 1900s and was daughter of the Wagnerian singer Marie Brema), 1900-1910, undated.

3 3

Brandl, A., letter asking Furness to read his forthcoming review of the revised edition of the Variorum Macbeth (Brandl was a German Shakespearean scholar), 1904 March 13.

3 4

Brema, Marie, letters (Marie Brema was a Wagnerian singer and mother of the actress Tita Brand), 1901, undated.

3 5

Brenon, Algernon, letter, 1898 October 13.

3 6

Brentano Brothers, letter offering a copy of the Boydell edition of Shakespeare (Bulmer & Co, 1809) for sale to Furness for $5,500, 1885 February 5.

3 7

Brewster, Katharine Grant, letters regarding the use of the word "talents" in Shakespeare's "Lover's Complaint" and remark on early English texts (Katharine Brewster was a member of the Dictionary Department of the Century Publishing Company in New York), 1891 March.

3 8

Bright, James Wilson, letter (James Wilson Bright was secretary of the Modern Language Association of America), 1895 April 18.

3 9

Brinton, Daniel Garrison, letter, 1886 September 4.

3 10

Bristol, Frank Milton, letter, 1884 March 25.

3 11

British Empire Shakespeare Society, letter regarding Furness's suggestion of a cooperative venture between the Society and a number of American universities, signed by Acton Bond, Joint Hon. Gen. Director of the Society, listed on the letterhead as Hon. Treasurer, 1911 February 20.

3 12

Broadbent, S. W., letter (Broadbent was a Philadelphia photographer), 1885 July 21.

3 13

Brown, Edward Miles, letter, 1897 October 27.

3 14

Brown, Ernest C., letter, 1909 January 13.

3 15

Brown, Henry Armitt, letters, 1873.

3 16

Browne, Irving, letters including two printed poems by and a brief printed biography of Lewis C. Browne; a printed poem by and a photomechanical portrait of Irving Browne; and a holograph poem by Irving Browne, entitled "The Telegram" (Irving Browne was editor of the Albany (N.Y.)  Law Journal and son of Lewis C. Browne, a Unitarian minister and a poet), 1888-1895.

3 17

Browne, William Hand, letters, 1891 October.

3 18

Browning, Charles Henry, letter including a newspaper clipping, 1894 November 9.

3 19

Brubaker, Albert Philson, letter, 1905 November 5.

3 20

Bryce, E. Marion, letter, 1912 April 4.

3 21

Bryce, James Bryce, letters, 1900-1911.

3 22

Bueler, W. H., letter, 1858 November 19.

3 23

Bullen, A. H., letters including two book advertisements, two checks, one postal card, and an order form, dated 1885, for privately-printed copies of Bullen's books (Bullen was the editor of Old English Plays (London, 1882-1890), the  Works of Shakespeare (Stratford, 1904-1907), and the variorum edition of Beaumont and Fletcher (London, 1904-1912)), 1882-1895.

3 24

Bullitt, John Christian, letter thanking Furness for a gift copy of Variorum edition of The Tempest (1892), circa 1892.

3 25

Bunn, Romanzo, letter regarding a reading in King Lear (according to the letterhead, Bunn was a U.S. judge), 1901 May 14.

3 26

Burgin, Caroline A., letter, 1879 February 15.

3 27

Burnet, Gilbert, letter including annotations in hand of Horace Howard Furness on second page, 1877.

3 28

Burnwell, James G., postal card (James G. Burnwell was a librarian at the Library Company of Philadelphia), 1907 June 7.

3 29

Byrne, James N., letter, undated.

3 30

C.W. Smartt & Son, letter regarding a life size oil portrait of Shakespeare at Shakespeare's Birthplace in Stratford which Smartt & Son produced copies of in a variety of sizes, which they offer for sale (includes one undated sepia-toned photograph labeled "Arley Brook, S.T. & 'Sancho,'" of a bearded man with a dog at the edge of a stream), possibly 1887 July 2.

3 31

Cable, Ben T., letter forwarding two photographic reproductions ("autotypes") of the title and final leaves to the Rastell edition of Chaucer (1526), inscribed to Furness from Charles Edmunds on May 8, 1883, 1884 January 18.

3 32

Cabot, Samuel, letter, 1903 August 13.

3 33

Camac, W., letter, undated.

3 34

Cameron, A., letters, 1891.

3 35

Carlyle, Alexander, writing for his uncle Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881), letter thanking Furness for gift copy of King Lear and stating that his uncle considers Furness' edition "decidedly the best edition of Shakespeare yet published", 1880 April 10.

3 36

Carlyle, J., letter, 1853 April 28.

3 37

Carpenter, Harriet O., letters thanking Furness for gift copies of his editions of Shakespeare and for The Merchant of Venice (1888), circa 1886-1888.

3 38

Challiss, J. M., letter, 1892 March 23.

3 39

Chapman, Elizabeth, letter, 1912 August 9.

3 40

Charles Scribner's Sons, letter including proofs of Furness's introduction to the "Home & Haunts of Shakespeare" for corrections, 1890 December 18.

3 41

Chase, Thomas, letters, 1887-1892.

3 42

Chasles, Maria Philarète, widow of Philarète Chasles, letters including manuscript samples of her late husband's unpublished commentary to Shakespeare's Sonnets and asking Furness's opinion about the feasibility of translating the entire work into English and publishing it, circa 1875.

3 43

Chiarini, Giuseppe, letter, 1889 January 20.

3 44

Child, Francis James, letters, 1873-1894, undated.

3 45

Childress, Rufus J., letter addressing Furness as "Mr. President or Secretary of the Shakespeare Club, Philadelphia", 1908 June 12.

3 46

Childs, George William, letters, 1878 January.

3 47

Childs Hospital (Albany, NY), letter, in verse, apparently thanking Furness for a donation, 1901 July 29.

3 48

Clark, Imogen, letter, 1897 October 6.

3 49

Clark, O. B., letter, 1886 May 20.

3 50

Clarke, Creston, letters (Creston Clarke was a nephew of the actor Edwin Booth), 1889.

3 51

Clarke, G., letter, 1882 January 31.

3 52

Clarke, James Freeman, letter, 1872 December 18.

3 53

Clarke, Mary Cowden, letters to Horace Howard Furness and Helen Kate Rogers Furness (includes a letter by Clarke on "Music in Dresden" printed in the Musical Times, September 1, 1879), 1875-1896.

3 54

Clifford, John Henry, letters, 1883-1884.

3 55

Coates, Edward H., letter including a statement of W. H. Wells identifying David Garrick's cane on October 24, 1876, 1886.

3 56

Coates, Joseph Hornor, letter, 1910 March 5.

3 57

Cobb, James V., letter, 1882 February 7.

3 58

Cohn, Albert, letters, one relating to the rare edition of the "Englishe Comedien" in the Furness Library; a bill of sale; and a receipt (Albert Cohn was a German Shakespeare scholar, antiquarian from whom Furness made some purchases for his own collection, and author of Shakespeare in Germany in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries), 1873-1900.

3 59

Colburn, Jeremiah, letter, 1885 August 4.

3 60

Colby, George A., letter, 1902 December 15.

3 61

Coleman, William Macon, letter (Coleman was assistant editor of the Southern Mercury (Dallas, Texas)), 1902 March 2.

3 62

Coleridge, John Duke Coleridge, letter, 1890 January 28.

3 63

Collier, John Payne, letters, 1871-1880.

3 64

Collins, John Churton, letters, 1898-1907.

3 65

Columbia University Library, card acknowledging Furness's gift of a copy of his edition of The Merchant of Venice to the library, 1888 May 14.

3 66

Conway, Moncure Daniel, letters, 1888-1892.

3 67

Cook, Richard G., letter, including one newspaper clipping, 1912 July.

3 68

Cooke, James Francis, letter, 1911 April 29.

3 69

Cooke, Martin Warren, letter, 1887 July 21.

3 70

Corson, Hiram, letters (Hiram Corson, originally a Philadelphian, was librarian at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C., and also as a teacher and writer about literature and spiritualism. From 1870 to 1903 he taught at Cornell University. He was the author of An Introduction to the Study of Shakespeare (1889)), 1872-1909.

3 71

Coulton, Harland, letter, undated.

3 72

Cowen, Esek, letter referring to his article in the Variorum Merchant of Venice, ed. H. H. Furness, (Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1888), 405-409, which was abridged from "Shylock v. Antonio" (  Albany Law Journal, 5 (1872), 193-196), 1888 July 13.

3 73

Craig, W. J., letter, 1901 November 25.

4 1

Crilly, F. J., letter requesting Furness to come to the customs office to pick up a refund check for excess of duty collected on an imported book (F. J. Crilly was Special D'y Collector in the Office of the Collector of Customs, Port of Philadelphia), 1893 May 5.

4 2

Crosby, Joseph (a student and collector of Shakespeariana from Zanesville, Ohio, and whose library was auctioned in New York in 1886 (the catalog for his library is in the Furness Collection)), letters, 1879-1880.

4 3

Cuningham, Henry, letter, 1894 July.

4 4

Curtis, Benjamin F., letter, 1886 June 8.

4 5

Da Costa, J. M., letter, 1886 April 11.

4 6

Daily Evening Bulletin, Philadelphia, letter, signed by Francis Wells, asking about Furness's interpretation of Portia's "quality of mercy" speech from  The Merchant of Venice, which he wishes to use in connection with the S.P.C.A., 1879.

4 7

Daly, Augustin, letters (including a typewritten transcription of a portion of the letter dated March 22, 1892), 1886-1895.

4 8

Damirales, Michael N., letter regarding Shakespearian subjects (Damirales was Secretary of the National Bank of Greece), 1893 March 23.

4 9

Dana, Charles Edmund, letter comparing the daily casualty averages of the Union in the American Civil War with those of the Germans in the Franco-Prussian War (includes a 3-page article on 14th- and 15th-century artillery), undated.

4 10

Daniel, P. A., letter, 1885 August 19.

4 11

Darmesteter, James, letters (in French), 1881.

4 12

Daves, Edward Graham, notes, 1880-1886.

4 13

Davis, Cushman Kellogg, letter, possibly 1882 January 24.

4 14

Davis, Horace, letter offering Davis's opinions on the Sonnets and pointing out "a few trifling errors" in Helen Kate Furness's A Concordance to Shakespeare's Poems (1874), 1886 August 7.

4 15

Davis, L. Clarke, letters and newspaper clipping of a review of Furness's edition of The Merchant of Venice which appeared in the  Public Ledger on June 9, 1888 (Lucius Clarke Davis worked for  The Philadelphia Inquirer before becoming an editor of the  Philadelphia Public Ledger and his wife was the novelist Rebecca Harding Davis), 1880-1899.

4 16

Davis, Rebecca Harding, letters thanking Furness for his gift of a copy of the Variorum Tempest (Rebecca Harding Davis was a novelist and her husband, Lucius Clarke Davis, worked for  The Philadelphia Inquirer and was later an editor of the  Philadelphia Public Ledger), circa 1892.

4 17

Dawson, Eric Allen, letter (includes a 2-page mimeograph entitled "Deed given by William and John Combe to Shakespeare in May, 1602, for 107 acres of land in Old Stratford" and a 1-page mimeograph excerpt of Hamlet's speech in Act V, scene 1), 1901 December 4.

4 18

Dawson, George, letter, 1875 March 24.

4 19

Deighton, Kenneth, letters, a recommendation written by Furness for Deighton, and a copy of the M.A. exam given at Calcutta University (Deighton taught in India where he eventually became Inspector of Schools), 1881-1894.

4 20

Delius, Nicolaus, letter, in appreciation for the dedication of the Variorum Hamlet to the Deutsche Shakespeare-Gesellschaft, 1877 November 22.

4 21

Demmon, Isaac Newton, letters (Demmon was a member of the Department of English and Rhetoric at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor), 1893-1899.

4 22

Denison, Ernest Beckett, wedding invitation to Mr. and Mrs. Furness for the wedding of Miss Katherine Tracy and Mr. William Henry Hurlbert, before 1890.

4 23

Deutsche Shakespeare-Gesellschaft, letters (in German and English) formally acknowledging the dedication of the Variorum Hamlet to the Deutsche Shakespeare-Gesellschaft, signed by August Freiherr von Loën and Wilhelm Öchelhäuser, vice-presidents of the Society and Paul von Bojanowski, a representative for the Society), 1877-1907.

4 24

Dewey, Mary, letter containing verses about Furness's ear trumpet (includes an explanatory note in Furness's hand, in which he indicates that he gave a reading in Boston in March 1895 and lost his ear trumpet there; it was returned to him the next morning by Mary Dewey, accompanied by these initialed verses), 1895.

4 25

Dey, E. M., letters, 1897.

4 26

Dithmar, Edward Augustus, letter discussing the author's review of the Variorum Tempest (1892), circa 1892.

4 27

Doane, William Croswell, letter, 1878 April 18.

4 28

Dornheim, Frank R., letters apologizing on learning that Furness does not find his work satisfactory and asking Furness to give explicit directions in the future regarding his wishes; and asking Furness for a copy of the Variorum Antony and Cleopatra, on which Dornheim worked (Dornheim was a proof-reader at Westcott and Thomson, the Philadelphia typesetting firm that produced the Variorum volumes for Furness), 1907.

4 29

Douse, Thomas Le Marchant, letter presenting Furness with a copy of the author's monograph "Examination of an old manuscript preserved in the library of the Duke of Northumberland at Alnwick and sometimes called the Northumberland Manuscript", 1904 November 9.

4 30

Dowden, Edward, letters (Edward Dowden was an Irish author and Shakespearian critic who was educated at Queen's College, Cork and graduated from Trinity College, Dublin in 1863, where he became professor of English in 1867), 1883-1907.

4 31

Doyle, John Thomas, letter, 1887 May 6.

4 32

Du Maurier, George, letters, 1895-1896.

4 33

[Dunne, John Francis], letters, 1905, undated.

4 34

Dyer, Louis, letter, 1896 August 28.

4 35

Earl, Marie Bonner, letter, undated.

4 36

Easton, Morton William, letter, 1899 December 16.

4 37

Editorial Research Company, letters signed by J.P. Lamberton, secretary, and two receipts, 1888.

4 38

Edmonds, Charles, letter and receipts, 1874.

4 39

Edwards, Henry, letters, 1888.

4 40

Eliot, Charles William, president of Harvard University, letters, 1872-1900.

4 41

Ellis, Charles, letters and a copy of Ellis's commentary on Sonnet 39 (Charles Ellis was author of The Christ in Shakspeare (3rd edition, 1902)), 1903-1906.

4 42

Elze, Karl, letters (in English and in German), 1874-1888.

4 43

Emerson, Ralph Waldo, letter discussing Herman Grimm's article on Hamlet and Karl Werder's Vorlesungen über Shakespeares Hamlet (later published in English as  The Heart of Hamlet's mystery), 1875 June 24.

4 44

Essex, Henry, letter, 1898 January 25.

4 45

Evans, F. Cridland, letter, 1910 April 27.

4 46

Everett, William, letters, 1903-1904.

4 47

F., E., letter, from Boston, offering botanical opinion about a plant mentioned in King Lear, 1880 April 6.

4 48

Faculté des lettres de Paris, letter (in French) thanking Furness for donating a book (the signature on the letter is indecipherable), 1898 December 14.

4 49

Fairchild, Arthur Henry Rolfe, letter, 1904 February 4.

4 50

Fay, Edwin Whitfield, letter, 1909 February 15.

4 51

Fell, John R., letter, 1893 February 18.

4 52

Fields, Annie, letter, 1895 April 23.

4 53

Fields, James Thomas, letters, 1873-1880.

4 54

Fish, Asa I., letters, 1875, 1878.

4 55

Fish, Asa I., notice of an Administrator's Sale of "very choice wines and liquors, the private stock of the late Asa I. Fish, Esq." M. Thomas & Sons, Auctioneers, 21 June 1879, 1879.

107

Fitzgerald, Thomas, letter, undated.

4 56

Fleay, Frederick Gard, letters, 2 postal cards, 1 newspaper clipping, one card of notes, and a 3-page photocopy of the letter, 1879-1907.

4 57

Flemming, Otto, letter (in German) written on the letterhead of the Electric Telegraph Works, Philadelphia, 1871 August 23.

4 58

Folger, Henry Clay, letters, 1892-1907.

4 59

Forbes, Edith Emerson, letter (includes a letter from Ralph Waldo Emerson to Mary Howland Russell, dated May 7, 1860, which Edith Emerson Forbes is sending on to Furness), 1860, 1898.

4 60

Forbes-Robertson, Johnston, letters, 1903-1904.

4 61

Foss, letter addressed to "My dear editor," thanking Furness for sending him a copy of the Variorum Antony and Cleopatra (1907) and informing Furness that he is working on a biography of George Washington, circa 1907.

4 62

Foulke, William Dudley, letter, 1886 May 7.

4 63

Francis, Philip W., letter inquiring about a passage in A Midsummer Night's Dream (includes Furness's reply), 1911 January.

4 64

Francis, Thomas, letter, 1871 March 26.

4 65

Frank, Henry, letter and 2 advertisements for a lecture series by Henry Frank and for his book, The tragedy of Hamlet: a psychological study, 1911.

4 66

Freeman, Edward Augustus, letter (includes a 2-page typewritten copy of the letter), 1882 March 22, undated.

4 67

Friesen, Hermann, letter (in German) expressing appreciation to Furness for dedicating the Variorum Hamlet to the Deutsche Schakespeare-Gesellschaft, 1877 November 22.

4 68

Frost, Edwin Collins, letter, 1906 April 24.

4 69

Furness, Caroline Augusta, letters written from Bar Harbor, Maine (Caroline Augusta Furness was the daughter of Horace Howard Furness and married Horace Jayne in 1894), 1896, undated.

4 70

Furness, Evans & Co., letter, indicating enclosure of a bill (not included) for alterations to Horace Howard Furness's house in Wallingford, Pennsylvania (Furness, Evans & Co. was the architectural firm of Walter Rogers Furness, son of Horace Howard Furness), 1894 May 29.

5 1

Furness, Fannie Miller Fassitt, letter, undated.

5 2

[Furness, H. K., or Furness, H. R.], letter, 1896 August 3.

5 3

Furness, Helen Bullitt, letters thanking Furness for sending her a remembrance of his late wife, Helen Kate Rogers Furness and for sending her some specimens of Walter's poetic translations (Helen Bullitt Furness was the wife of Horace Howard Furness's son Walter Rogers Furness), 1895, undated.

5 4

Furness, Louise Brooks Winsor, letters and a clipping with a Christmas lunch menu, 1894, undated.

5 5

Furness, Walter Rogers, letters (Walter Rogers Furness, son of Horace Howard Furness, was a Philadelphia architect in the firm Furness, Evans & Co.), 1884-1896, undated.

5 6

Furness, William Eliot, letters, 1896.

5 7

Furness, William Henry (father), letters, undated.

2 2

Furnivall, Frederick James, letters and cards, 1869-1907.

5 8

G.P. Putnam's Sons, letter concerning an edition of Othello (letter is misaddressed "Rev. H. H. Furness, D.D., Wallingford, Pa."), 1890 August 28.

5 9

Gallagher, Helen Mar Pierce, letter, 1907 September 18.

5 10

Gardette, Charles Demarais, letter, 1865 March 20.

5 11

Garnett, Richard, letters, 1892-1904.

5 12

Gerson, T. Perceval, letters (Gerson was a physician who attended the University of Pennsylvania), 1908.

5 13

Gilbert, Dora Anne, letter, 1896 October 18.

5 14

Gilder, Joseph Benson, letter and poem "Fear no more", 1884 October 28.

5 15

Giles, Henry, letters, 1873, undated.

5 16

Gill, Watson, letters, 1875.

5 17

Gladstone, W. E., letters thanking Furness for sending him a copy of the Variorum King Lear (1880), 1879-1880.

5 18

Godwin, Parke, letter, undated.

5 19

Goodwin, William Watson, letters, 1880-1895.

5 20

Gosse, Edmund, letters, 1885-1900.

5 21

Gover, Amos M., letter informing Furness of upcoming lecture on Hamlet by Rev. D. J. Stafford and a flier advertising the lecture and providing information on Dr. Stafford, a Catholic clergyman, who gave lectures on Shakespeare and other literary topics (Amos Gover was a partner in the Washington, D.C. talent management firm Gover & Gulick, together with Charles L. Gulick), 1897.

5 22

Graves, Eliza S., printed card soliciting funds for the rebuilding of the church in Stratford-on-Avon where Shakespeare is buried with a manuscript note on the reverse indicating that the card originally accompanied a piece of decayed wood from the stalls of the old church, which appear to have dated to the 15th century, undated.

5 23

Green, Bennett Wood, letter, 1902 March 1.

5 24

Greet, Philip Barling Ben, letters, 1910-1912.

5 25

Guitéras, Juan, letter, 1894 October 27.

5 26

Haddon, Alfred C., letters and a portrait photograph of Haddon, 1904-1910, undated.

5 27

Hale, Edward Everett, letters, 1854-1908.

5 28

Hales, John W., letters thanking Furness for gift copies of Othello (1886),  The Merchant of Venice (1888),  The Tempest (1892) and  A Midsummer Night's Dream (1895) (John Wesley Hales was Professor of English Language and Literature at King's College (London)), circa 1886-1895.

5 29

Hall, Fitzedward, letters, 1892-1895.

5 30

Halliwell-Phillipps, J. O., letters, newspaper clipping, and article concerning the performance date of Othello, 1865-1888.

5 31

Hammersly, George, letters, 1871.

5 32

Hammond, William Alexander, letter, 1886 May 2.

5 33

Haney, John Louis, letters (Haney was a professor of English and president of Central High School in Philadelphia and was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1929), 1898.

5 34

Hanford, Charles B., letter, 1906 August 11.

5 35

Harding, William Henry, letter probably regarding the birth of the child of Mrs. Wister, sister of Horace Howard Furness, and letters, dated 1965, pertaining to attempts to decipher the difficult signature, possibly 1866, 1965.

5 36

Harding, W. W., letter, 1883 January 19.

5 37

Hardy, J. M., letter, 1886 April 14.

5 38

Hart, Abraham, letter, 1871.

5 39

Hartshorne, Mary Rogers, letter addressing Furness as "Dear Cousin Horace", 1895 April 21.

5 40

Harvard University Library, formal acknowledgement of Furness' gift to the Library of a copy of the Variorum King Lear, 1880 March 16.

5 41

Haseltine, John W., letter, 1882 December 5.

5 42

Haupt, Paul, letters, 1899-1907.

5 43

Hay, Henry Hanby, letter and printed copy of the poem "An Ode to Shakespeare," written by Hay in honor of Robert Mantell, "in recognition of his noble revival of Shakespearean plays", 1908 March.

5 44

Heard, Franklin Fiske, letter giving personal information, the writer thanks Furness, on behalf of The Furness Club [Boston], for donating a copy of the Variorum Merchant of Venice (1888) to the Club), 1888 May 25.

5 45

Hedge, Frederic Henry, letters, 1888, undated.

5 46

Hemphill, A. J., letters, 1898.

5 47

Henderson, William George, letter, 1888 February 4.

5 48

Hersey, Heloise Edwina, letter, 1892 March 18.

5 49

Hersh, B. F., letter, 1908 December 1.

5 50

Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, letter, 1875 February 6.

5 51

Historical Society of Pennsylvania, letter, signed by F. D. Stone, Librarian of the Historical Society, 1885 August 5.

5 52

Hoag, Clarence Gilbert, letters, 1898.

5 53

Holbrook, D. M., letters, 1911-1912.

5 54

Holmes, Oliver Wendell, letters (including a typewritten description, possibly from a sale), 1887, undated.

5 55

Howard Publishing Co., letters concerning the cipher writings of Sir Francis Bacon in Shakespeare's plays indicating that a copy of Orville W. Owen's work on this subject was being sent to Furness (one letter was misaddressed to "Rev. Horace H. Furness" and was signed O. W. Owen), 1894.

5 56

Howe, Julia Ward, letter, 1864 November 25.

5 57

Hudson, Henry Norman, letters, an autograph copy of a letter sent by Hudson to Joseph Parker Norris, and newspaper clipping of Hudson's letter to the editor of The Nation, 1870-1885.

5 58

Hunt, William, letters, thanking Furness for a copy of Variorum Othello (1886), 1860-1886.

5 59

Hunter, George W., letters, 1864-1865.

5 60

Hunter, Isabel, note and copy of author's poem, "On Shakespeare's gloves, seen at the house of Mr. Horace Howard Furness", 1888 January 28.

5 61

Huntington, William Henry, letters, 1856-1857.

5 62

Husted, Hudson O., letters and 3-page manuscript extract from 1866 Central Park Report, signed by Andrew H. Green, Comptroller of the Park, regarding the Shakespeare monument in Central Park, New York City, 1870.

5 63

Hutchins, Mary H., letters, 1906, undated.

5 64

Hutt, A. Granger, letters; a receipt from the Villon Society to Furness for 3 guineas, the price of his subscription for John Payne's translation of Boccaccio's Decameron, which the Society was issuing; and 2 copies of the printed subscription announcement for this edition, one of which is inscribed by Hutt, 1886.

5 65

Hutton, Laurence, letter, 1893.

5 66

Ingleby, Clement Mansfield, letters and notes (includes a letter dated 17 June 1875 to Ingleby from S. Mullins of the Central Free Library, Birmingham (England); Ingleby wrote his comments on the same sheet and forwarded it to Furness. Also includes a note by the Rev. J. B. Dykes; a recent note suggesting possible dates for this and other letters; and a note from Ingleby, dated 10 August 1875, in which Ingleby attests to the authenticity of a piece of oak supposed to come from a tree at Shakespeare's birthplace. Many of the letters are not in Ingleby's hand, since he was afflicted with eye trouble and dictated much of his correspondence), 1872-1886.

5 67

Intlekofer, Edward, letter (Intlekofer was a disabled soldier of the Civil War living in the National Military Home in Montgomery County and was interested in Shakespeare), 1893 October 24.

5 68

Irving, Henry, letters (including an undated letter to J. L. Toole which is accompanied by a note from Furness stating that Toole gave it to him in 1879), circa 1879-1900.

5 69

Irwin, Agnes, letter thanking Furness for his gift of a copy of the Variorum Othello (1886) and a Shakespearean note from James Bradley Thayer, which Agnes Irwin was sending to Furness, 1879-1886, undated.

5 70

Isaacs, Nathan, letter (Nathan Isaacs was a lawyer at the Cincinnati law firm of Isaacs & Bevis, professor of law, and author of books about legal matters), 1911 September 18.

5 71

J.B. Lippincott & Co., letters, 1874-1911.

6 1

Jackson, A. W., letter, 1901 February 7.

6 2

Jackson, Ebenezer, letter, 1871 April 29.

6 3

Jackson, Margaret E., letter (for Furness' reply see: The Letters of Horace Howard Furness (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1922), vol. I, pp. 340-41), 1897 October 25.

6 4

Jaggard, William, letter and receipt for a copy of Jaggard's Shakespeare Bibliograpy and 2 advertisements for it, one in the form of a pamphlet (Jaggard was associated with the Shakespeare Press in Stratford-on-Avon), 1911, undated.

6 5

James, Henry, letters, including xerox copy of each letter, 1911.

6 6

James, William, letters, 1910.

6 7

Jamison, Lloyd McKim, letter, 1883 April 17.

6 8

Jastrow, Morris, letters, some of which are in the hand of Morris Jastrow's wife, Helen Bachman Jastrow, 1888-1912.

6 9

Jayne, Horace, letter (Jayne was Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania and was married to Caroline Augusta Furness, daughter of Horace Howard Furness), 1896 September 11.

6 10

Jefferson, Joseph, letter (Jefferson was an American actor), undated.

6 11

Jefferys, C. P. B., letter, 1890 September 15.

6 12

Jerrold, Blanchard, letters, 1871, 1879.

6 13

Jewish Messenger, letter concerning Furness's inquiry about the Jewish Record for February 1863 containing a Jewish version of the  Merchant of Venice (Isaac S. Isaacs), 1871 March 1.

6 14

John, king of Saxony, letter (in German) copied by amanuensis and signed by a minister of the royal household in Dresden, 1873 June 30.

6 15

Johns Hopkins University, invitation to attend a ceremony presenting a bust of Sidney Lanier to Johns Hopkins University, 1888 January 26.

6 16

Johnson, Charles Frederick, letters, 1908, undated.

6 17

Johnson, Henry, letters and reprinted leaf from Johnson's edition of A Midsummer Night's Dream (Henry Johnson was on the faculty of Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine), 1887-1888.

6 18

Johnson, Robert Underwood, letters and notice concerning a proposed banquet honoring the Shakespearean actor Tommaso Salvini, 1883-1907.

6 19

Johnson, William Woolsey, letter, 1894 January 19.

6 20

Johnson's Universal Cyclopædia, letters asking Furness to revise Richard Grant White's article on Shakespeare from the Cyclopædia, 1893.

6 21

Jones, William R., letter, 1879 November 20.

6 22

Jordan, Mary Augusta, letter, 1912 March 30.

6 23

Jordan, Wilhelm, letter (in German) (Wilhelm Jordan was the author of Shakespeares Dramatische Werke), 1872 March 23.

6 24

Journalists' Club, Philadelphia, letter signed by H.F. Keenan, president, 1883 March.

6 25

Jusserand, J. J., letters, 1904-1912.

6 26

Kellogg, Abner Otis, letter, 1879 August 12.

6 27

Kemble, Fanny, letters, one providing the provenance of "Shakespeare's gloves," which she presented to Horace Howard Furness, 1873-1892, undated.

6 28

Kennedy, Charles Rann, letters, one of which contains a postscript by Kennedy's wife, Edith Wynne Matthison Kennedy, in which she quotes G. B. Shaw's comments on C. Rann Kennedy's latest play, 1902-1912.

6 29

Kennedy, Edith Wynne Matthison, letter (Edith Wynne Matthison Kennedy was married to Charles Rann Kennedy (1871-1950)), 1904 November 4.

6 30

Kennedy, William Sloane, letter, 1900 July 8.

6 31

Kidder, Christabel W., letters, 1906, undated.

6 32

Kirk, Ellen Olney, letters, undated.

6 33

Kirk, John Foster, letters, 1880-1891, undated.

6 34

Knapp, Arthur Mason, letters, 1885.

6 35

Knerr, Calvin B., letter (in English and German) including a Shakespearean note in German from Constantine Hering, which Knerr is forwarding to Furness), 1875 February 2.

6 36

Knight, Joseph, letters and a photograph of Knight, 1881-1905.

6 37

Köhler, Reinhold, letter and postal card (Reinhold Köhler was a member of the German Shakespeare Society in Weimar), 1880, 1888.

6 38

Krauth, C. P., letter (Krauth was a member of the Shakspere Society of Philadelphia), 1875 February 3.

6 39

L., M. M., letter thanking Furness for a gift copy of A Midsummer Night's Dream (1895) and discussing members of Furness's family, possibly 1895 April 26.

6 40

Lane, George Martin, letters, 1868, 1878.

6 41

Lang, Andrew, letters, 2 pages of notes, 1 clipping, and 1 advertisement, 1900-1912, undated.

6 42

Lanier, Sidney, letter, 1878 October 17.

6 43

Lathrop, George Parsons, letters, 1882-1896.

6 44

Law, Ernest Philip Alphonse, letters and clipping from The Times of London dated December 26, 1911, 1911.

6 45

Lea, Henry Charles, letter, 1893 February 24.

6 46

Lee, Sidney, letters, 1889-1904.

6 47

Leidy, Joseph, letters, 1886-1890.

6 48

Leland, Charles Godfrey, letters (two of the letters have illuminated capital letters) and poem by Leland, "Evening Star Waltz," copied in Furness' hand, 1880-1882, undated.

6 49

Lemcke & Buechner, letter (Lemcke & Buechner was a bookselling and publishing firm.), 1907 April 18.

6 50

Leo, F. A., letters (For a reference to Leo's letter of 30 March 1898, see The Letters of Horace Howard Furness, vol. II, pp. 8-9) and checklist of Furness/Leo correspondence in the Folger Library (inventoried by Prof. Dr. Werner Habicht, Universität Würzburg, October 1991), 1880, 1895, 1898, 1991.

6 51

Leutze, Emanuel, letter, undated.

6 52

Lewis, C. W., letters and post card, 1887, 1901, 1907.

6 53

Library Company of Philadelphia, letters signed by Lloyd P. Smith and James G. Barnwell, 1883-1888, 1903.

6 54

Liddel, Mark Harvey, letter, undated.

6 55

Lippe, Adolph, letter and a note by William E. Miller, dated February 1980, providing information about Adolph Lippe obtained by Frances James Dallett, archivist of the University of Pennsylvania, 1886, 1980.

6 56

Lloyd, James Hendrie, letter and offprint of his article, "The so-called Oedipus-complex in Hamlet," which Lloyd read before the Philadelphia Neurological Society on February 24, 1911 and was published in The Journal of the American Medical Association, LVI (13 May 1911), pp. 1377-1379, 1911.

6 57

Loën, August, letter (Baron von Loën was a vice-president of the German Shakespeare Society), 1877 November 30.

7 1

Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, letters, one introducing John Fiske to Furness; and an undated portrait engraving of Longfellow, 1870-1880, undated.

7 2

Longfellow, Samuel, letter, 1859 November 4.

7 3

Lounsbury, Thomas Raynesford, letter, 1907 October 2.

7 4

Lowell, James Russell, letters and an undated portrait engraving of Lowell with a facsimile of his signature, 1888-1890, undated.

7 5

Lunt, A. T., letter, 1885 September 25.

7 6

M. Thomas & Sons, letter and receipts, 1871-1874.

7 7

Mackay, Charles, letter, 1885 July 13.

7 8

Mackenzie, R. Shelton, letter, 1873 April 21.

7 9

Madden, Dodgson Hamilton, letter, 1898 November 13.

7 10

Mallery, Garrick, letter and a clipping from The Daily Graphic of December 4, 1877, 1877.

7 11

Malone, John, letter and author's notes on Hamlet, 1893 March 17.

7 12

Manley, Frederick, letter presenting Furness with a copy of The Merchant of Venice, edited by him for use in schools (written on the letterhead of C. C. Birchard & Company, Boston), 1901 December 14.

7 13

Manly, John Matthews, letter, 1896 December 11.

7 14

March, Francis Andrew, letters inviting Furness to attend the 1873 and 1874 annual meetings of the American Philological Association and read papers, 1873-1874.

7 15

Marlowe, Julia, letters and wedding announcement, 1890, 1910-1911.

7 16

Marriott, Elizabeth, letter discussing the question of Baconian authorship of Shakespeare's works, 1899 May 10.

7 17

Marsh, John Fitchett, letters, 1877.

7 18

Martin, Helena Faucit, letters, 1889-1896.

7 19

Martin, Myra B., letter inviting Furness to the Society's celebration of Shakespeare's birthday, to be held on 23 April 1912 (Martin was the president of The Shakespeare Club of New York City), 1912 March 29.

7 20

Martin, Theodore, letters, 1889-1907.

7 21

Mason, Edward Tuckerman, letters, 1890, 1911.

7 22

Massey, Gerald, letter, 1873 March 17.

7 23

Matthews, Albert, letter, 1905 November 14.

7 24

Mayor, Joseph B., letter, 1908 August 1.

7 25

McCamant, Frances W., letter, 1909 December 16.

7 26

McClellan, Katherine Elizabeth, letter and note indicating that the letter was found laid into a copy of Margaret Crosby Munn's Will Shakespeare of Stratford and London (New York, 1910), 1911 June 27.

7 27

McCook, Henry C., letters, including 4 pages of Shakespeare quotations concerning spiders, 1891.

7 28

McMaster, John Bach, letter, 1892 March 21.

7 29

McMichael, Morton, letter, 1880 April 2.

7 30

Meredith, E. A., letter and clipping of an article in which Meredith suggests an emendation in All's Well That Ends Well, 1891 August 26.

7 31

Messchert, Matthew Huizinga, letter thanking Furness for gift copy of A Midsummer Night's Dream (Messchert was a member of the Shakspere Society of Philadelphia who was elected treasurer in 1858), possibly 1895 April 17.

7 32

Metcalf, Henry Aiken, letters and notes on Macbeth, 1901-1902, undated.

7 33

Middleton, P., letter, possibly 1894 November 1.

7 34

Millard, Clara, receipt, 1891 July 23.

7 35

Miller, DeWitt, letter discussing Hamlet, (this might be J. DeWitt Miller, who was also a correspondent of Horace Howard Furness, Jr.), undated.

7 36

Millward, A. Sydney, letters, 1892, undated.

7 37

Mitchell, S. Weir, letters and autograph poem, "Henry the Fifth," signed and dated June 1897, at Venice (compare a variant version in The Complete Poems (New York: The Century Co., 1914), pp. 362-363)), 1876-1910, undated.

7 38

Moberly, Charles E., letter, 1880 March 25.

7 39

Monty, Flora A., letter, 1911 November 12.

7 40

Mook, [C.]. [?], letter, 1897 March 23.

7 41

Moore, Charles Leonard, letter, 1892 November 30.

7 42

Morgan, Appleton, letters and clipping (Appleton Morgan was president of the Shakespeare Society of New York), 1888-1908.

7 43

Morris, Harrison S., letters, 1895-1903.

7 44

Moulton, Richard Green, letters, 1899, 1909, undated.

7 45

Murray, James Augustus Henry, letters, pamphlets, and clippings concerning the Philological Society's New English Dictionary, soliciting extracts from readers for inclusion in the Dictionary, 1879-1881, undated.

7 46

Murray, John, letter concerning Furness's request for information about the author of an article (Gerald Massey) that had appeared in the Quarterly Review, published in London (includes a note indicating that this letter was laid into the July 1871 issue of the  Quarterly Review (vol. 131, no. 261), which contains Massey's article (on pp. 1-46)), 1911 June 26.

7 47

Naff, H. W., letter, 1888 May 6.

7 48

Neilson, Lilian Adelaide, letters, 1873, undated.

7 49

New Shakspere Society (London, England), letters and cash receipt for 10 guineas for a special donation that Furness made to the Society, signed by A. G. Snelgrove, Hon. Sec., 1874-1880.

7 50

Nichols, G. H., letter, possibly 1873 November 27.

7 51

Nicholson, Brinsley, letters, 1881-1891.

7 52

Nolan, Edward J., letter written on the stationery of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, 1880 February 2.

7 53

Norris, Isaac, letter, 1898 February 11.

7 54

Norris, Joseph Parker, letters, copy of the poem "Antony and Cleopatra" by William Haines Lytle, and 8 pages of notes on King Lear, 1872-1895.

7 55

Norton, Charles Eliot, letters, one of which is incomplete, 1879-1907.

7 56

Norton, Grace, letters, one thanking Furness for note, 1903, undated.

7 57

Noyes, John Buttrick, letters, newspaper clippings, and essay on Shakespeare, 1902-1908.

7 58

Oakes, James, letters, one regarding an edition of Shakespeare saved from a fire in Edwin Forrest's library with Folio pages enclosed, 1873.

7 59

Öchelhäuser, Wilhelm, letter thanking Furness for copy of Variorum Hamlet (1877), dedicated to the Deutsche Shakespeare-Gesellschaft (Öchelhäuser was Vice-President of the Deutsche Shakespeare-Gesellschaft), 1877 November 29.

7 60

O'Neil, James, letters, a supposed facsimile of the title page of an edition of Shakespeare's poems published in Philadelphia in 1796 by Bioren and Maden, and a page of notes by Furness in which Furness refutes O'Neil's belief that he possesses a copy of the first American edition of Shakespeare's poems (Furness believes that the first American edition was published in Boston in 1807), 1893.

7 61

Opdyche, L. E., letter and bibliography (in English and Modern Greek), including Shakespeare bibliography in Modern Greek), 1894 July 3.

7 62

Orson, S. W., letter and postal cards, 1893-1894.

7 63

Pallis, Alexander, letters and notes on As You Like It, 1911.

8 1

Parrott, Thomas Marc, letters and six typed pages of observations on Titus Andronicus (Thomas Marc Parrott was on the faculty of Princeton University), 1902-1903, undated.

8 2

Parsons, James Challis, letter, 1873 November 5.

8 3

Peirce, James Mills, letter, 1888 May 30.

8 4

Pepper, Frances Sergeant, letter thanking Furness for his gift copy of one of his Variorum Shakespeare editions (Frances Sergeant Pepper was the wife of William Pepper (1843-1898), who was Provost of the University of Pennsylvania from 1881 to 1894), circa 1892.

8 5

Pepper, William, letter (William Pepper was Provost of the University of Pennsylvania from 1881 to 1894), 1886 April 7.

8 6

Perkins, Theodore B., letter and several transcriptions from books in the Boston Public Library, 1876 April 15.

8 7

Perry, Thomas Sergeant, letter, 1905 May 18.

8 8

Pessels, Constance, letter, 1892 May 28.

8 9

Phin, John, letters, one includes a 2-page typed note on Henry IV, Part 1, 1901, 1910.

8 10

Platt, Isaac Hull, letters, 1907-1908, undated.

8 11

Pollock, Lady Emma Jane, letter (Pollock published "The little people and other tales" in 1874), circa 1910.

8 12

Pollock, Walter Herries, letters, 1909-1911.

8 13

Porter, Charlotte Endymion, letters, one thanking Furness for his gift of the seventh volume of the Variorum Shakespeare ( The Merchant of Venice), published in 1888, circa 1888, 1905.

8 14

Pratt, Edward Ellerton, letter, 1895 April 18.

8 15

Prince, William Cowper, letters, 1856-1857.

8 16

Putnam, George, letter, 1888 May 14.

8 17

Quincy, Josiah Phillips, letter, 1874 August 26.

8 19

Radford, George Heynes, letter, 1892 February 7.

8 20

Raleigh, Walter Alexander, letter, 1911 April 3.

8 21

Randolph, A. M. F., letter informing Furness that he was sending a copy of "The Trial of Sir John Falstaff"(A. M. F. Randolph was a court reporter in the Supreme Court of the State of Kansas), 1893 October 10.

8 22