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Kenneth N. Klee Papers

NBA.005

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the University of Pennsylvania. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Biddle Law Library: National Bankruptcy Archives
Creator:
Klee, Kenneth N.
Title:
Kenneth N. Klee Papers
Date [bulk]:
1975-1998
Date [inclusive]:
1969-1999
Call Number:
NBA.005
Extent:
28.5 linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Kenneth N. Klee spent his career analyzing bankruptcy law and advocating for pro-debtor reforms to the Bankruptcy Code. He graduated from Harvard Law School in 1974 and joined to the California bar in 1975. He began his career as Associate Counsel for the Subcommittee on Civil and Constitutional Rights, a subunit of the House of Representatives' Committee on the Judiciary, where he advised Congress and helped draft legislation related to bankruptcy reform in the 1970s. He was also a consultant to the House Judiciary Committee from 1977 to 1982 and the Department of Justice from 1983 to 1985. Klee was a member of the National Bankruptcy Conference, an association of scholars and practitioners committed to the study of bankruptcy legislation and reform, where he was chair of the Committee on Legislation from 1992 to 1999. He worked at Stutman, Treister and Glatt and was a founding partner of Klee, Tuchin, Bogdanoff, and Stern, LLP. The collection, 1969-1999, includes papers relating to Klee's work from 1969 to 1995 as a legal assistant to the Committee on the Judiciary, including drafts of bills, handwritten notes, markup copies of legislation, reports, and correspondence; materials related to Klee's legislative activities from 1997 to 1999 as a member of the National Bankruptcy Conference; lectures, presentations, and related material created by Klee for continuing education courses, seminars, and other programs; course materials related to Klee's professorships at UCLA and USC from 1979 to 1984; photocopies and other reference material; and related material.
Cite as:
[Identification of item], in the Kenneth N. Klee Papers, NBA.005, National Bankruptcy Archives, Biddle Law Library, University of Pennsylvania Law School, Philadelphia, PA.
PDF Version:

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Biography/History

Kenneth N. Klee spent his career analyzing bankruptcy law and advocating for pro-debtor reforms to the Bankruptcy Code. He helped improve the status of bankruptcy law and practitioners in his career as a bankruptcy lawyer, civil servant, teacher, and scholar.

Ken Klee was born in 1949 in Los Angeles, California. He graduated cum laude from Harvard Law School in 1974 and joined to the California bar in 1975. He began his career as Associate Counsel for the Subcommittee on Civil and Constitutional Rights, a subunit of the House of Representatives' Committee on the Judiciary. As Associate Counsel, Klee assisted members of Congress in drafting legislation that would comprise a sweeping reform of the Bankruptcy Code in 1978. Klee left his position as Associate Counsel in 1977 and was rehired as a consultant to the Committee on the Judiciary that same year. He remained in that role until 1982. In 1983, Klee became Consultant to the United States Department of Justice, where he was involved in debate over the federal status of bankruptcy judgeships. Klee left the Department of Justice in 1985. He resumed his advisory role to the courts as a member of the Advisory Committee on Bankruptcy Rules in 1992, a position that he held until 2000.

In addition to his governmental role in bankruptcy law, Klee was a lawyer for the law firm Shutan and Trost and Stutman, Treister, and Glatt. He co-founded his own bankruptcy and corporate reorganization firm, Klee, Tuchin, Bogdanoff, and Stern, LLP.

Klee also used his knowledge of bankruptcy law as a teacher and scholar. Since 1979, he has taught courses in bankruptcy and Chapter 11 reorganization law at the UCLA School of Law. That same year, he served as an editor of Collier on Bankruptcy, the preeminent treatise on bankruptcy in the field. Klee has served in various editorial capacities on Collier's since then. In addition to his editorial work, Klee has written a number of articles and books on bankruptcy law. His status as a leading expert on bankruptcy law led him to continuing education seminars and other meetings across the United States, where he lectured on various issues pertaining to bankruptcy.

Klee's membership in leading legal organizations underscores his influence and activity in the bankruptcy field. He was a member of the American Bar Association, the American Bankruptcy Institute, and other local and national organizations. He was a member of the National Bankruptcy Conference, an association of scholars and practitioners committed to the study of bankruptcy legislation and reform, where he was chair of the Committee on Legislation from 1992 to 1999.

Scope and Contents

The Kenneth N. Klee Papers cover Klee's research, professional activity, and advocacy in the period of 1969-1999. The collection includes papers relating to Klee's work from 1969 to 1995 as a legal assistant to the Committee on the Judiciary, including drafts of bills, handwritten notes, markup copies of legislation, reports, and correspondence; materials related to Klee's legislative activities on the National Bankruptcy Conference, where Klee was Chair of the Committee on Legislation from 1992 to 1999; lectures, presentations, and related material created by Klee for continuing education courses, seminars, and other programs; course materials related to Klee's professorships at UCLA and USC from 1979 to 1984; papers related to Klee's roles as Associate Counsel and Consultant of the House Committee on the Judiciary, lawyer in Stutman, Treister, and Glatt, and Klee's personal life; photocopies and other reference material; and related material.

Arrangement note

Arrangement
  1. Legislative Activity
  2. National Bankruptcy Conference
  3. Organizational Participation
  4. Writings and Editorial Work
  5. Teaching
  6. Projects
  7. Associate Counsel and Consultant Papers
  8. Professional Files
  9. Personal Files
  10. Reference Materials
  11. Photocopy Collection of Supreme Court Justice Papers

Administrative Information

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Biddle Law Library: National Bankruptcy Archives,  2006

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Jordon Steele

Access Restrictions

The archives reserves the right to restrict access to materials of sensitive nature. Please contact the department for further information.

Use Restrictions

Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

Accruals note

Photocopy collection for Supreme Court Justice Papers received in December 2008.

Immediate Source of Acquisition note

Received from Kenneth N. Klee in 2000 and 2004.

Processing Information note

Processed by Jordon Steele, July 2006.

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • National Bankruptcy Conference (U.S.)
  • United States. Supreme Court
Form/Genre(s)
  • Faculty papers
  • Legislation (legal concepts)
Subject(s)
  • Bankruptcy

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Collection Inventory

Legislative Activity, 1969-1995.

Related Archival Materials note

For more of Klee's legislative activity as it relates to his work under the National Bankruptcy Conference, see the National Bankruptcy Conference Series.

Scope and Contents note

Materials relating to Klee's activities working for and advising the Committee on the Judiciary.

Biographical/Historical note

From 1974 to 1977, Klee served as Associate Counsel to the Subcommittee on Civil and Constitutional Rights, a subunit of the House of Representatives' Committee on the Judiciary. From 1977 to 1982, Klee worked as a consultant for the same subcommittee. He consulted the Department of Justice from 1983 to 1985. In addition to his official employment, Klee advised the Committee on the Judiciary on issues relating to bankruptcy legislation well into the 1990s. His duties included drafting and revision of bankruptcy legislation, and advising members of Congress on bankruptcy legislation. The Committee on the Judiciary was organized in the House of Representatives in 1813, making it one of the founding committees in that legislative body. The House Committee on the Judiciary is tasked with reviewing pending legislation, particularly as it relates to judicial aspects of law, and presenting its advice to Congress. Early subcommittee jurisdiction included a section devoted to bankruptcy matters. However, when the subcommittees were reorganized in 1973, the Subcommittee on Civil and Constitutional Rights was formed and assigned to preside over issues pertaining to constitutional amendments, civil rights, and bankruptcy. The subcommittee is now known as the Subcommittee on the Constitution.

Municipal Bankruptcy, 1975-1976.

Biographical/Historical note

In 1976, Congress enacted into law H.R. 10624 and S. 2597. The law amended the Bankruptcy Act to allow municipalities, including cities and towns, to file for bankruptcy without creditor approval. The primary impetus for the revision was to enable New York City, which at the time was in debt, to default on its payments to its creditors. The legislation was Klee's first major task as Associate Counsel of the Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Civil and Constitutional Rights, which advised the Committee on the Judiciary and Congress on legislative matters relating to bankruptcy.

Scope and Contents note

Copies of bills, including H.R. 10624 and H.R. 10481 (the "Bail-out Bill"); drafts of bills; drafts of amendments, including those of Congressman Caldwell Butler and Congresswoman Elizabeth Holtzmann; letters and memoranda to and from members of Congress; reports to the Committee on the Judiciary; Senate versions of S. 2597 and amendments; and related material.

Box
1
2
Folder
1-7
1-13

Securities Investor Protection Act Amendments, 1970-1976.

Biographical/Historical note

In 1977, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 8331, the Securities Investor Protection Act Amendments of 1977. The bill amended the Securities Investor Protection Act of 1970, which was designed to give protection to investors whose broker or dealer had filed for bankruptcy. The amendments provided for additional protections. The Senate did not approve the legislation until 1978.

Scope and Contents note

Correspondence, drafts of bills, and related material.

Box
3
Folder
1-2

Bankruptcy Code, 1969, 1973-1981.

Related Archival Materials note

This subseries includes materials that Klee filed as general bankruptcy legislation. It includes, but is not limited to, his work as Counsel in the drafting and passage of H.R. 8200. For Klee's activities concerning specific aspects of the Bankruptcy Reform Act, and for later legislative activity, consult the corresponding subseries. However, this subseries may include relevant material.

Biographical/Historical note

Congress passed in 1978 the first sweeping revision of bankruptcy law since the Chandler Act of 1938. Among the major changes of H.R. 8200 were the creation of a new system of federal bankruptcy judges, the reduction of the role of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) as primary administrator of bankruptcy cases, the consolidation of corporate reorganization laws, and the establishment of reforms more favorable to debtors. While the Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978 was enacted into law in 1978, legislative efforts began as far back as 1975. Early versions of bankruptcy bills include H.R. 6, H.R. 31 and H.R. 32. One of the more notable examples of controversy during this period surrounds H.R. 31 and 32. In 1977, Congress created a commission of bankruptcy lawyers and experts to analyze the state of bankruptcy in the United States and to suggest revisions to the existing law. The National Bankruptcy Review Commission, as the group was known, primarily consisted of members of the National Bankruptcy Conference (NBC), the leading advocate for bankruptcy reform. Klee was a member of the NBC. The commission submitted to Congress its final report, known as the "Commission Bill," in 1977 as H.R. 31. In response to the Commission Bill, the National Conference of Bankruptcy Judges submitted H.R. 32, its own version of bankruptcy reform legislation, known at the "Judges' Bill." One of the tasks of the Subcommittee of Civil and Constitutional Rights was to report to Congress on the differences between the competing bills. As associate counsel for that committee, Klee worked on this report, submitted in Congress in 1977. These two bills, along with H.R. 6, were considered when drafting the H.R. 8200, the bill that would become the Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978. The Senate drafted its own version of bankruptcy legislation, S. 2266, in 1977. However, it was H.R. 8200 that finally passed both houses of Congress in 1978. H.R. 8200 was adopted as positive law, effectively replacing the previous version of Title 11 of the United States Code, which concerns Bankruptcy. For this reason, the Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978 is commonly referred to as the "Bankruptcy Code."

Scope and Contents note

Correspondence with lobbyists, interest groups, organizations, and other parties; copies of bills, committee markups of bills, drafts of bills, and amendments of H.R. 6, H.R. 31, H.R. 32, and H.R. 8200; analysis and reports comparing H.R. 31 and 32; letters and memoranda between Klee and members and staff of Congress, including Richard Levin (who served with Klee as Counsel to the House Judiciary Committee), Vern Countryman, and Larry King; and related material.

Box
3
4-16
Folder
3-5

Tax Aspects of Bankruptcy, 1973-1982.

Biographical/Historical note

Following the passage of the Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978, Congress introduced H.R. 9973, designed to revise tax rules for discharges of debt in bankruptcy cases. Congress formed a Joint Taxation Committee, consisting of members of the Committee on Ways and Means and the Committee on the Judiciary, to analyze the background and provisions of H.R. 9973. As Associate Counsel for the House Judiciary Committee, Klee helped draft the report of the Joint Committee on Taxation's findings. That report, entitled "Tax Aspects of Bankruptcy," was submitted to Congress in 1978. Congress used this report as a foundation for its debate over, and passage of, H.R. 5043, known as the Bankruptcy Tax Act of 1980.

Scope and Contents note

Correspondence, working copies of H.R. 9973, section-by-section analysis of legislation, copies of the original Internal Revenue Code bill and other material, handwritten draft of introduction and discussion of proposed tax bill, handwritten notes, and related material.

Box
17
18-19
20
Folder
1-7
1-4

Technical Amendments to the Bankruptcy Code, 1977-1982.

Biographical/Historical note

In 1980, the Senate passed a bill (S. 658) designed to make a number of "technical changes" to the Bankruptcy Code. The most hotly debated aspect of this bill, also known as the "Cleanup bill," was create a new retirement system for bankruptcy judges. The House of Representatives failed to pass similar legislation. Congress would address the status of bankruptcy judges again in 1984.

Scope and Contents note

Correspondence with members of Congress and other individuals, drafts of legislation, working copies, letters and memoranda regarding proposed "Repo" (repurchase agreements) amendments, and related material.

Box
20
21
Folder
5-7
1-5

Bankruptcy Judge Provisions, 1977-1984.

Biographical/Historical note

In the final days before passage of what would become the Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978, Warren E. Burger, who was Chief Justice of the Supreme Court at the Time, appealed to Senator Strom Thurmond to delay passage of the bill. Thurmond agreed, and significant changes were made to the status of bankruptcy judges under the new law. Burger's concern lay in his disagreement over provisions including presidential appointments of bankruptcy judges, retirement benefits for bankruptcy judges that would match those of other federal judges, and the establishment of the bankruptcy courts as adjuncts to appeals judges. While the final version of the bill as enacted into law still required the President to appoint judges to the bankruptcy court, the latter two provisions were removed. Many bankruptcy professionals, as well as members of Congress sympathetic to bankruptcy reform, viewed Burger's intrusion as a violation of the separation-of-powers doctrine and an example of the continuous struggle of bankruptcy professionals to gain greater respect in the legal field. In its decision regarding the corporate bankruptcy case of Northern Pipeline Construction v. Marathon Pipeline, the Supreme Court in 1982 ruled that the restructuring of the bankruptcy court system as passed by Congress in 1978 was unconstitutional. According to the Supreme Court--which had, in the intervening years since Burger's eleventh hour intervention, become more friendly to bankruptcy jurisdiction--the 14-year appointment terms of bankruptcy judges were unfair when compared to the lifetime appointment of other federal judgeships, given that both types of judges did the same amount of work. The Court ordered Congress to amend the law, providing for lifetime tenure of bankruptcy judges. While Congress introduced various bills, including H.R. 6978 and S. 2297, in response to the Supreme Court's demand, legislation failed to pass. In 1984, Congress passed H.R. 5174, the Bankruptcy Amendments and Federal Judgeship Act of 1984. The law revised the tenure for bankruptcy judges, but it did not include a lifetime tenure provision. From 1977 to 1982, Klee served as a consultant for the Committee on the Judiciary. During this time, he provided advice to Congressional members on a number of bankruptcy-related issues, including the debate over tenure for bankruptcy judges. Klee supported the Supreme Court decision and advocated for lifetime tenure.

Scope and Contents note

Correspondence with members of Congress and bankruptcy professionals, including Richard Levin; copies of drafts of bills, including H.R. 6978, H.R. 6216, H.R. 3, and H.R. 5174, all versions of bills that would factor into the Bankruptcy Amendments and Federal Judgeship Act of 1984; and related material.

Box
21
22
23
Folder
6
1-8
1-10

Consumer Provisions, 1976-1978, 1981.

Biographical/Historical note

In his roles as Associate Counsel and Consultant to the House Judiciary Committee, as well as his professional role as bankruptcy lawyer, Klee analyzed and reported on aspects of bankruptcy law pertaining to consumer bankruptcy. In an ongoing effort to make bankruptcy legislation more debtor-friendly, Congress passed H.R. 4786, the Bankruptcy Improvements Act of 1981.

Scope and Contents note

Correspondence and related material regarding consumer bankruptcy aspects, including Klee's analysis of consumer provisions in both the Commission Bill and the Judges' Bill, two pieces of legislation proposed in 1977 by the National Bankruptcy Review Commission (the de-facto congressional arm of the National Bankruptcy Conference) and the National Conference of Bankruptcy Judges, respectively.

Box
23
24
Folder
11
1-3

Shopping Center Tenant Bankruptcy Provisions, 1984.

Biographical/Historical note

In 1983 and 1984, Congress considered H.R. 2377 and H.R. 5187, legislation designed to revise trustee responsibilities concerning shopping center leases during tenant insolvency proceedings to improve protection of shopping center landlords and solvent tenants. The final bill was known as the Shopping Center Tenant Bankruptcy Protections Improvements Act of 1984.

Scope and Contents note

Correspondence, notes and related material regarding Klee's activity in the above legislation.

Box
24
Folder
4

Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1994, 1995.

Biographical/Historical note

In response to the rapid increase in bankruptcy filings since the last major overhaul of the Bankruptcy Code in 1978, Congress passed the Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1994, aimed to streamline the process of bankruptcy cases and to create new provisions more favorable to both creditors and debtors.

Scope and Contents note

Memorandum from Klee and enclosure from United State Department of Justice regarding the proposed revisions to the United States Trustee Guidelines.

Box
24
Folder
5

Department of Justice Materials, 1977.

Scope and Contents note

Correspondence between Klee and the Department of Justice, which issued its response to proposed bankruptcy reform legislation in 1977, and an SEC report on the same legislation.

Box
24
Folder
6

Judicial Conference of the United States, 1974-1978.

Scope and Contents note

Correspondence between Klee, acting as Associate Counsel of the House Judiciary Committee, and members of the Judicial Conference of the United States, which opposed pending legislation. This series also includes bankruptcy courts statistics and related material.

Box
24
Folder
7

Ways and Means Committee Materials, 1975.

Scope and Contents note

Chiefly correspondence between Klee, serving as Associate Counsel to the House Judiciary Committee, and the Ways and Means Committee, regarding tax provisions of H.R. 31 (the Commission Bill) and H.R. 32 (the Judges' Bill). The House Judiciary Committee and the Ways and Means Committee co-authored a report, "Tax Aspects of Bankruptcy," in 1978 as part of the Joint Committee on Taxation.

Box
24
Folder
8

Office of the United States Trustee, 1978-1991.

Scope and Contents note

Letters, memoranda, and related material regarding the Office of the United States Trustee, established under the Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978 to oversee administrative, non-judicial aspects of bankruptcy cases. The position replaced the role of the SEC.

Box
25
Folder
1

Crime-related Aspects, 1978 and undated.

Scope and Contents note

Correspondence and related material regarding bankruptcy-related aspects of the United States Criminal Code, which Congress reformed in 1982.

Box
25
Folder
2-3

Title IV: Transition, 1976-1977.

Scope and Contents note

Discussion drafts, correspondence, and related material regarding Title IV of the Bankruptcy Code, "Transition," which declared that bankruptcy judges as of 1978 would continue their existing terms until 1984.

Box
25
Folder
4

Exemptions, 1975-1978.

Scope and Contents note

Correspondence and related material, including materials concerning the 1976 Uniform Exemptions Act of the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Law (NCCUSL), regarding exemption provisions in bankruptcy law.

Box
25
Folder
5

National Bankruptcy Conference, 1997-1998.

Biographical/Historical note

The National Bankruptcy Conference was founded in 1932 as an association of scholars and practitioners committed to the improvement of the bankruptcy system. The conference's primary mode of advocacy was through its Committee on Legislation, which Klee chaired from 1992 to 1999.

Administration, 1997-1998.

Box
25
Folder
6

Legislative Activity, 1997-1998.

Scope and Contents note

Correspondence with members of the National Bankruptcy Conference, drafts of bills, photocopies of congressional testimony by members of the National Bankruptcy Conference (including Klee) and other individuals and groups, notes handwritten by Klee, reports, and related material regarding bankruptcy legislation proposed by Congress from 1997 to 1999. See subseries below for more information about each piece of legislation.

Arrangement note

Alphabetical by subject or short title of bill.

Box
25
26-32
Folder
7-11

Organizational Participation, 1977-1999.

Box Folder
American Bankruptcy Institute, 1985-1999.
Scope and Contents note

This series includes membership materials, programs, correspondence, and related materials regarding Klee's membership and activity in the American Bankruptcy Institute, an organization committed to research and education on matters relating to insolvency.

33 1-2
Stutman, Tresiter, and Glatt Retreats, 1981-1982.
Scope and Contents note

As a partner at Stutman, Treister, and Glatt, a bankruptcy firm in Los Angeles California founded by noted bankruptcy expert George Treister, Klee participated in a number of retreats that considered both internal business matters and the firm's position on pending bankruptcy legislation. Materials in this series include letters and memoranda to and from colleagues, planning materials, agendas, and related material.

33 3-7

Bankruptcy Seminars, 1983.

33 8

California Bankers Program, 1979.

34 1

California Credit Union Attorneys Conference, 1977.

34 2

California Savings and Loan Program on New Bankruptcy Code, 1979.

34 3

Conference on the Bankruptcy Tax Act of 1980, 1980-1981.

34 4-6

Credit Union National Association League Attorneys Conference, 1977 and 1979.

35 1

Crocker Bank Program: "The New Bankruptcy Code", 1979.

35 2

Enforcement of Judgments Seminar, 1983.

35 3

Greater Los Angeles Legal Support Personnel Program, 1979-1981.

35 4

Harvard University Bankruptcy Seminar, 1977-1978.

35 5

Kansas City Bar Association Seminar, 1978.

35 6

Los Angeles Bank Credit Association Program, undated.

35 7

Los Angeles Bankruptcy Study Group, 1978.

35 8

"Negotiation", 1982 and 1985.

35 9

"Pending Bankruptcy Legislation," San Diego, undated.

35 10

University of Southern California Tax Institute on Major Tax Planning, 1983-1984.

35 11

Writings and Editorial Work, 1975-1980.

Scope and Contents note

Reference material, drafts of articles with handwritten marginalia by Klee, correspondence with editorial staff, copies of final articles, and related material.

Box Folder

"All You Ever Wanted to Know About Cram-Down Under the New Bankruptcy Code", 1977-1980.

36 1-2

"Caveat Creditor: The consumer debtor under the bankruptcy code", 1979-1980.

36 3

"Congress and the Bankruptcy Act of 1978", 1975 October.

36 4

"Impairment in Business Reorganizations", 1980.

36 5

"A Lending Officer's Primer on the New Bankruptcy Code", 1979-1980.

36 6

"Secured Creditors Under the New Bankruptcy Code", 1978-1979.

36 7
Collier on Bankruptcy Editorial Work, 1979-1980.
Scope and Contents note

Klee served as Co-editor of the 15th Edition of Collier on Bankruptcy, a leading legal reference source for bankruptcy law, from 1979 to 1980. This series includes a copy of the Matthew Bender Editorial Policy, letters to editorial staff, drafts of foreword written by Caldwell Butler, sketch of title page for the edition, and related material.

36 8-9

Teaching, 1983-1984.

Biographical/Historical note

Klee began teaching at University of California-Los Angeles as an adjunct professor in 1979. He joined UCLA full-time in 1997. He also taught courses at University of Southern California.

Scope and Contents note

Course materials, including syllabi, letters to and from colleagues and students, course evaluations, lecture notes, and related material.

UCLA Course Materials, 1979-1984.

Box
37
Folder
1-5

USC Course Materials, 1983.

Box
37
Folder
6-8

Projects, 1979-1981.

Arrangement note

Alphabetical.

Box Folder
"Collier Bankruptcy Manual Video Guide", 1980 November-September.
Scope and Contents note

In 1980, Klee collaborated with New York University Professor Lawrence P. King to issue a video of the two explaining the newly revised Bankruptcy Code. This series includes a letter from Larry King initiating the project, Klee's notes, a brochure promoting the video, a transcript of the video, and related material.

37 9-10
"What Can I Do If I Can't Pay My Debts" Pamphlet Project, 1979-1980.
Scope and Contents note

Correspondence, drafts of the pamphlet, and a copy of the final pamphlet of the project, for which Klee provided consultation.

38 1

Associate Counsel and Consultant Papers, 1974-1978.

Scope and Contents note

Correspondence and related material regarding Klee's employment with the Committee on the Judiciary. Klee served as Associate Counsel from 1974 to 1977 and as a consultant from 1977 to 1982.

Box
38
Folder
2-9

Professional Files, 1978-1984.

Scope and Contents note

Correspondence and related material regarding business matters at Klee's law firm, Stutman, Treister, and Glatt, that is not directly related to his legislative activity.

Box
38
Folder
10-14

Personal Files, 1978-1980.

Scope and Contents note

Correspondence, materials relating to the Financial News Network's 1980 profile of Klee, and related material regarding personal matters in Klee's life.

Box
38
39
Folder
15-18
1

Reference Materials, undated.

Scope and Contents note

Chiefly photocopies of articles and reports. Subject matter covered in this series includes bankruptcy statistics, the United States Code, alimony and property settlement, cost estimates of the bankruptcy system, cost of credit, stay of police powers, bibliographies of bankruptcy resources, and other subjects.

Box
39
40-41
Folder
2-9

Photocopy Collection of Supreme Court Justice Papers, 2000-2008. 13.3 linear feet.

Other Finding Aids note

Indexes for some of the judges' papers were created by research assistants for Klee are available in hard copy. Please contact the Archives for more information.

Scope and Contents note

Photocopies of opinions, internal correspondence and memoranda, and other papers regarding bankruptcy cases, originally collected and created by Judges of the Supreme Court of the United States. These photocopies were complied for Kenneth N. Klee while Klee was writing a book on the subject. The photocopies represent papers that were created and collected from 1902 to 1990.

Box
Blackmun, Harry.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1970 to 1990.

42-44
Brandeis, Louis.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1934 to 1938.

45-47

48

1-6

Brennan, William J.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1959 to 1964.

48

49

7

1-2

Burton, Harold H. 1 item.
Scope and Contents note

This file contains one item: a photocopy of a January 23, 1946 letter from William O. Douglas, addressed to the "Conference," regarding Meyer V. Fleming.

49 3
Byrnes, James F.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1941.

49 4-5
Clark, Tom.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1950-1966.

49

50

6-7

1

Clarke, John Hessin.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1916 to 1992.

50 2-4
Douglas, William O.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1939 to 1973.

51-59

50

60

1-4

5-6

Fortas, Abe.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1965.

60 5-6
Frankfurter, Felix.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1939 to 1962.

61-63

64

1

Harlan, John Marshall II.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1959 to 1971.

64

65

1-6

2-11

Holmes, Oliver Wendell.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1902 to 1928.

65 7-8
Jackson, Robert H.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1943 to 1951.

66 1
Marshall, Thurgood.
Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements note

Photocopies from 1970 to 1982.

66 2
McReynolds, James Clark.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from circa 1914 to 1945.

66 3-5
Minton, Sherman.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1950.

66 6

Murphy, Frank.

66

67

1

7-9

Powell, Lewis F.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1972-1986.

67

68

69

2-6

1

1-6

Reed, Stanley Forman.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1937-1941.

69

70

2-6

1-2

Rutledge, Wiley Blount.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1944 to 1946.

70 3-4
Stone, Harlan Fiske.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1930 to 1943.

70 5
Vinson, Frederick Moore.
Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements note

Photocopies from 1946 to 1950.

70

71

5-6

1-4

Warren, Earl.
Scope and Contents note

Photocopies from 1953 to 1968.

71

72

73

1-2

1-6

5-6