University of Pennsylvania Finding Aids

Navigation Aids

University of Pennsylvania Finding Aids
Search Finding Aids
 

Sidebar

hide/display content
Information and Contacts
hide/display content
Contents for this Finding Aid
Expand all
Collapse all
Expand all
Collapse all
Expand all
Collapse all
Expand all
Collapse all
Expand all
Collapse all
Expand all
Collapse all
Expand all
Collapse all
Expand all
Collapse all

Main Content

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the University of Pennsylvania. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Archer, Henry Wilson, 1813-1887
Creator:
Archer, John, 1777-1830
Title:
Archer family account books and notebooks
Date [inclusive]:
1797-1851
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1120
Extent:
0.2 linear feet (1 box)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This collection (1797-1851) contains notebooks kept by three members of the Archer family, a prominent and politically active family of medical doctors based in Harford County, Maryland. The first file contains John Archer Jr.’s notes on materia medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Barton and given at the University of Pennsylvania in 1797 and 1798. A commonplace book (1830-1832) maintained by Henry Wilson Archer, which contains excerpts mostly from history books and poems is the second file. Also included in the collection is an account book (1841-1851) wherein the wheat purchases of Robert Harris Archer were recorded.
Cite as:
Archer family account books and notebooks, 1797-1841, Ms. Coll. 1120, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Bartram, Moses, -1791
Creator:
Curtin, Constans, 1783-1842
Creator:
Hare, Robert, 1781-1858
Creator:
Heydrick, Christopher, 1770-1856
Creator:
Kuhn, Adam, 1741-1817
Creator:
Overton, James, Jr., 1785-1865
Creator:
Rush, Benjamin, 1746-1813
Creator:
Simonton, William, 1788-1846
Title:
Benjamin Rush lecture notes
Date:
1783-1810, undated
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 225
Extent:
4.2 linear feet (5 boxes)
Language:
English
Abstract:
The Benjamin Rush lecture notes consist of 34 notebooks kept by medical students at the University of Pennsylvania, which record the content of academic lectures delivered by Dr. Benjamin Rush (1745-1813). Rush, a socially and politically prominent physician who lived and practiced in Philadelphia, served as a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine from 1769 to 1813. The handwritten lecture notes in this collection (recorded between 1783 and 1810) present the era's conventional medical wisdom on the causes, symptoms and cures of a range of diseases and disorders.
Cite as:
Benjamin Rush lecture notes, 1783-1810, undated, Ms. Coll. 225, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Greenman, David
Title:
David Greenman notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1785
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1866
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This book of notes was kept by David Greenman during a course of Materia Medica lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1785. The lecture notes themselves are not limited to Materia Medica in the strictest sense, in that they also include some information about physiology, pathology and therapeutics. The notebook is briefly inscribed by Dr. Edward Cutbush (1772-1843) an officer and surgeon in the United States Navy.
Cite as:
David Greenman notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1785, Ms. Codex 1866, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Gillasspy, George, d. 1832
Title:
George Gillasspy notes on lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date [inclusive]:
1797-1798
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1861
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This notebook, kept by George Gillasspy (also "Gillaspy"), records the content of lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1797 and 1798. These lectures touch upon a wide range of topics within materia medica, physiology, pathology and therapeutics, and represent the foundations of late eighteenth century medical education.
Cite as:
George Gillasspy notes on lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1797-1798, Ms. Codex 1861, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Mason, Wellington Smith
Creator:
Muhlenberg, H. H. (Hiester Henry), 1812-1886
Title:
Hiester H. Muhlenberg and Wellington Smith Mason notes on lectures delivered by Drs. Nathaniel Chapman, Judson Daland, and J.K. Mitchell at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1832, 1894-1895
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1873
Extent:
1 volume
Language:
English
Abstract:
This notebook contains lecture material transcribed by two different students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. One portion of the volume contains notes taken by Hiester H. Muhlenberg in 1832; the later material was written by Wellington Smith Mason during two separate courses of lectures between 1894 and 1895. The notes taken by Muhlenberg record a series of lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman on hemorrhages, fevers, cardiac disease and nervous disorders. The notes taken by Mason, decades later, document Dr. Judson Daland’s lectures on physical diagnosis and Dr. J.K. Mitchell's lectures on symptomatology.
Cite as:
Hiester H. Muhlenberg and Wellington Smith Mason notes on lectures delivered by Drs. Nathaniel Chapman, Judson Daland, and J.K. Mitchell at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1832, 1894-1895, Ms. Codex 1873, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Murduck, Jonathan
Title:
Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1802
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1865
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This volume of handwritten lecture notes, titled “A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor […] at the University of Pennsylvania,” was kept by medical student Jonathan Murduck in 1802, and provides a fairly comprehensive survey of the medicinal substances commonly in use in the early nineteenth century United States.
Cite as:
Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1802, Ms. Codex 1865, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Trevor, Joseph
Title:
Joseph Trevor notes on medical lectures delivered by Dr. Samuel Jackson at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date [inclusive]:
1824-1826
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 498
Extent:
0.2 linear foot (1 box)
Physical Facet note:
Written in one hand, attribution from front cover and 1 item laid in. Two leaves laid in. Foliation: [ii], ff. 1-113, pp. 114-119, 15 leaves cut out, 5 ff.
Language:
English
Abstract:
Joseph Trevor was a medical student at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. This volume of lecture notes documents a series of lectures taught by Dr. Samuel Jackson (1787-1872) between 1824 and 1826.
Cite as:
Joseph Trevor notes on medical lectures delivered by Dr. Samuel Jackson at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1824-1826, Ms. Coll. 498, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Huber, William S., 1865-1909
Title:
William S. Huber student lecture notes
Date [inclusive]:
1885-1888
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1306
Extent:
0.5 linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Dr. William S. Huber (1865-1909) was a dentist in Lebanon, Pennsylvania who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical and Dental Schools. This collection contains Huber's student lecture notes recorded between February 1885 and March 1888.
Cite as:
William S. Huber student lecture notes, 1885-1888, Ms. Coll. 1306, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Biography/History

The Archer family was a prominent and politically active family of medical doctors based in Harford County, Maryland. John Archer was born in Maryland in 1741 and (due to the alphabetical antecedence of his last name) was the first person to receive a medical diploma in North America, which he earned from the College of Philadelphia (later the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania) in 1768. His son, John Archer Jr. (1777-1850) also attended medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1798. J. Archer Jr. returned to Maryland after earning his degree and served as a surgeon of the Maryland militia in the War of 1812.

Henry Wilson Archer (1813-1887) was the son of John Archer Jr. Another graduate of the medical school of the University of Pennsylvania, H. Archer lived in Harford County and married Mary Elizabeth Walker in 1849.

The final volume in the collection is an account book created by Robert Harris Archer. Three individuals named Robert Harris Archer (brother of (1775-1857 or 1858), nephew of (1813-1883), or son of (1820-1878) John Archer, Jr.) may have been the account book's author.

Biography/History

Dr. Benjamin Rush (1745-1813) was a socially and politically prominent physician who lived and practiced in Philadelphia. Born in Byberry Township, Pennsylvania, Rush was educated at the University of Edinburgh, and travelled in England and France before returning to Philadelphia in 1769. Rush played an active role in the American Revolution, signing the Declaration of Independence and serving briefly as Surgeon General of the Middle Department of the Continental Army and as a physician with the Philadelphia militia.

Although most prominent Philadelphians left the city for healthier environments during the catastrophic Yellow Fever epidemics that hit Philadelphia in the 1790s, Rush remained in the city to treat the sick; though he may be equally or better remembered today for his strong advocacy of bloodletting as a therapeutic method for the disease.

Rush served as a professor of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (previously the College of Philadelphia) from 1769 to 1789 and as a professor of the "Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice" from 1791 to 1813. Rush also taught courses in the "Theory and Practice of Medicine" from 1789 to 1791, and again from 1796 to 1813.

Biography/History

Little information about David Greenman is readily available; he attended lectures at the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1785 but did not graduate. Dr. Edward Cutbush, who inscribed this volume, graduated from the University in 1794 and pursued a successful career as an officer and surgeon in the U.S. Navy. An eminent scientist of eighteenth century Philadelphia, Dr. Adam Kuhn (1741-1817) was a professor first of Botany and Materia Medica, and then the Theory and Practice of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania between 1768 and 1797.

Biography/History

George Gillasspy (elsewhere spelled “Gillaspy”) was a medical student, military doctor, and apothecary. Gillasspy served as a surgeon with the Second U.S. Infantry Regiment and on the Frigate U.S.S. United States during the Revolutionary War, at or around the same time that he kept his book of notes on medical lectures. (Indeed, Gillasspy signs his name along with “Surgeon 2d U.S. Regt [illeg] & act.g Surgn Frigate” at the beginning of the second section of the lecture notes, referring to his role as surgeon of the Second Regiment and on the frigate  United States.) Gillasspy also served as a surgeon with the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry from 1806 to 1808, and operated an apothecary shop in Philadelphia with his partner Dr. Joseph Strong. In 1803, Gillasspy and Strong outfitted Meriwether Lewis with $90.69 in medicines for his expedition west. Gillaspy died in 1832 and is buried in Christ Church Burial Ground in Philadelphia. Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815) was a leading botanist and naturalist of his day, and Benjamin Rush (1746-1813) was one of Philadelphia’s foremost physicians in late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Both taught at the University of Pennsylvania for much of their careers.

Sources:

History of the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry: From Its Organization, November 17th, 1774 to Its Centennial Anniversary, November 17th, 1874. (Princeton: 1875). URL: https://books.google.com/books?id=va8-AAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s

Kris Fresonke and Mark David Spence. Lewis & Clark: Legacies, Memories, and New Perspectives. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004).

Biography/History

Hiester H. Muhlenberg (1812-1886) graduated from the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1832, and practiced medicine in Reading, Pennsylvania, before switching his career to finance in 1837. Nathaniel Chapman (1780-1853) was a prominent physician and educator in Philadelphia, who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1801 and began his teaching career at the same institution in 1810. He taught Materia Medica and the theory and practice of medicine. Throughout his career, he remained an influential member of the medical community in Philadelphia until his death in 1853. In addition to his teaching, he founded the Medical Institute of Philadelphia in 1817; founded the Philadelphia Journal of the Medical and Physical Sciences (today the  American Journal of Medical Sciences) in 1820; and served as president of the Philadelphia Medical Society, as president of the American Philosophical Society, as fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia (elected in 1807), and as the first president of the American Medical Association (elected in 1848).

Wellington Smith Mason (1865- 1900) graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1898. He appears to have practiced medicine in Williamstown, Pennsylvania, but his career was cut short by his death on September 30, 1900, at age 35, from complications from a surgery for appendicitis. Dr. Judson Daland (1860-circa 1937) graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1882. Following his graduation, he practiced medicine in Philadelphia. He was a demonstrator and an instructor of clinical medicine at the University of Pennsylvania from 1882 until at least 1897. He was also a professor of diseases of the chest at the Philadelphia Polyclinic and College for Graduates in Medicine from 1896 to 1897 and a professor of clinical medicine at the same institution from 1897. J.K. (John Kearsley) Mitchell (1859-1917), the son of S. Weir Mitchell, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1883. He began teaching at the University of Pennsylvania in 1886, serving as assistant demonstrator in clinical medicine until 1894, and as lecturer on general symptomatology from 1894 to 1899.

Biography/History

Jonathan Murduck (born circa 1782) was a student at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1802, but did not receive his degree until 1811. Between 1803 and 1805, Murduck practiced medicine in Port-au-Prince. Murduck’s financial records, patient records, and memoranda from these voyages are held in the Manuscripts Division of the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan.

Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815) was a leading botanist and naturalist of his day, and a professor at the University of Pennsylvania from 1789 to 1813.

Sources: Jonathan Murduck Account Book and Memoranda, William L. Clements Library, The University of Michigan. https://quod.lib.umich.edu/c/clementsmss/umich-wcl-M-1890mur?byte=14434455;focusrgn=frontmatter;subview=standard;view=reslist

Biography/History

Joseph Trevor received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1826. He wrote an essay on foreign bodies in the esophagus and test-phagotomy.

Samuel Jackson was born in Philadelphia, March 22, 1787, son of pharmacist David Jackson and Susan Kemper. Although Jackson attended the College of the University of Pennsylvania, he did not complete the courses required to receive a degree but instead began his study of medicine under Dr. James Hutchinson. After Hutchinson’s death, he continued at the offices of Dr. Casper Wistar. Jackson received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1808. After graduation, he briefly took up the drug business left by his father and older brother.

When the War of 1812 broke out, Jackson joined the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry and served with them in operations in the Chesapeake Bay through the war. Jackson sold his pharmaceutical business upon his return in 1815 and began a private medical practice. In 1820, he became president of the Philadelphia Board of Health, and directed its management of the yellow fever epidemic. In 1821, Jackson helped found the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and was appointed its first Professor of Materia Medica. He also served as attending physician at the Philadelphia Almshouse and as instructor of medical chemistry and materia medica at the Medical Institute of Philadelphia, founded by Nathaniel Chapman.

In 1827, Jackson was made assistant to Professor Nathaniel Chapman at the University of Pennsylvania, a post in which Jackson was responsible for teaching physiology. When Chapman's health declined in 1835, Jackson took over as Professor of the Institutes of Medicine and remained in that chair until his retirement in 1863. He would also teach on the wards of Philadelphia Hospital from 1842 to 1845. His medical publications included The Principles of Medicine Founded on the Structure and Functions of the Animal Organism.

Jackson's professional and scholarly memberships included the College of Physicians of Philadelphia and the American Philosophical Society. While in Montreal, Canada, in 1832 investigating an outbreak of Asian cholera on behalf of the Sanitary Board of Councils for Philadelphia, he married the daughter of a British officer. Jackson died in Philadelphia, April 4, 1872.

Information regarding Dr. Samuel Jackson taken in its entirety from Penn Biographies.

Biography/History

Dr. William S. Huber was born in July, 1865, to Dr. William A. (a prominent Lebanon, Pennsylvania, dentist) and Juliana Huber. He was educated at public schools in Lebanon, Pennsylvania and graduated from Lebanon High School. From there, he began his education at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, completing first the course of medicine, and then continuing on to take a full course in dentistry. According to the University of Pennsylvania Catalogue and Announcements from the 1886 to 1887 academic year, Huber was a successful student and was among several students "selected for their proficiency in Anatomy to act as Assistant Demonstrators of Anatomy," (page 66).

Following the completion of his studies, he succeeded his father in his dental practice and "built up a large and lucrative practice," (Kirk, page 1019). In 1895, he married A. May Kaler (1866-1901) and they were the parents of William K. (1896-1951) and Charles G. (born in 1898).

In addition to his career as a dentist, Huber served as a member of the board of public schools, as presiding officer of the city council and the select council, and as member of the board of elders of the Salem Evangelical Lutheran Church. He also participated in the Mt. Lebanon Lodge, Weidle Chapter, and Hermit Commandery of the Masons; the Lu Lu Temple in Reading, Pennsylvania; and the Harrisburg Consistory. Huber died of apoplexy on May 25, 1909.

Works cited:

Kirk, Edward C., editor. The Dental Cosmos, Volume 51, 1909 (page 1019).

University of Pennsylvania Catalogue and Announcements, 1886-1887, page 66.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of notebooks kept by three members of the Archer family between 1797 and 1851. Two booklets of notes on materia medica lectures held at the University of Pennsylvania make up the first file in the collection. John Archer Jr. attended the lectures (delivered by Benjamin S. Barton, M.D., a Professor of Materia Medica, Botany and Natural History) in 1797 and 1798. Addressing what is now considered pharmacology, the booklets detail medical treatments for a number of diseases. The first volume of the set is concerned largely with the nutritional benefits of various foods and the categorization of medicines, whether as botanical or mineral astringents, tonics, emetics, stimulants, and the like. The second volume discusses the merits of different medicines (mostly plant-based) and lists viable treatments for a range of diseases. A note on the last page of the second volume suggests that there was a third booklet in this set of lecture notes.

The second file in this collection is the commonplace book of Henry Archer, written between 1830 and 1832 in Harford County, Maryland. This book is roughly organized into four sections. The first section consists of notes on the history of Asia (based on a text by Charles Rollin), Rome (based on Edward Gibbon’s The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire), Roman jurisprudence, and the feudal system in Scotland. The second section features shorter quotations taken from several sources including  Don Juan, the poetry of Byron and Thomas Campbell, and  The Young Duke, a novel by Benjamin Disraeli. Also in this section is a transcription of ‘The Union College Dunciad’, a (probably unpublished) volume of satirical verse written in Schenectady in 1830. The notebook’s third section is a list of the books that Archer read, sorted by category and year. Each book has a number next to it, perhaps denoting how many times it was read. This list is extended on the front inside cover of the notebook. The final section of the notebook is titled ‘Questions for Debate’, and includes eleven questions about both historical and contemporary political issues.

An account book kept by Robert Harris Archer from 1841 to 1851 is the third file in this series, and lists Archer’s purchases of wheat. This book is, for the most part, well organized with the name of the wheat seller, price and amount of wheat, and date of purchase laid out consistently. A few pages, however, are filled with tally marks, calculations and miscellaneous notes and sketches, including two small drawings of houses labeled ‘Baltimore’ and ‘Philadelphia’.

Scope and Contents

The Benjamin Rush lecture notes consist of 34 notebooks kept by a number of medical students at the University of Pennsylvania, which record the content of academic lectures delivered by Dr. Benjamin Rush. Many of the notebooks are undated, but those which have been inscribed with dates range from 1783 to 1810 (Rush was a professor at the University from 1769 until his death in 1813). All of the notes are handwritten, and some are unsigned or of uncertain authorship. All but two sets of notes are bound; however, those that were rebound at some point since they were created are quite fragile. The notes seem to be verbatim transcriptions of Rush's lectures, and are written in full sentences. Many of the volumes of notes have indices at the front or back, which list diseases alphabetically along with the page on which the condition is described.

Rush taught courses in Chemistry, the "Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice" and the "Theory and Practice of Medicine." The content and format of his lectures seem to have remained fairly consistent across the nearly three decades represented in this collection. Chemistry lectures (recorded by students Moses Bartram (item 3), D. Gilder (item 12), Jacob Graham (item 13), and an unidentified student (item 16)) describe particular elements and compounds, as well as broad classes of substances such as "vinegars," salts, earths, metals, and airs, some of which groups are divided into subcategories. Interspersed with this content is information about the medical applications of particular chemical substances, and their effects upon the human body.

Researchers will find lectures on the "Institutes." In the first lecture recorded by an unidentified student in item 7, Rush explains that "the Institutes are divided into four parts, Physiology, Hygiene, Pathology & Therapeutics." The notebooks that correspond to Rush’s lectures on the Institutes generally treat the topics of anatomy, sensation, perception, cognition, the psyche, mental and physical differences between men and women, epidemiology, prognosis, diagnosis, convalescence, the effects of the environment upon the body, and some of the social and cultural factors that can influence health. Rush dedicates a number of lectures to the topics of psychology and psychological disorders, including discussions of the symptoms and cures of "passions" (which he usually defines as fear, love, anger and grief) and of mania. Notes on the Institutes tend also to include fairly long discourses on diet, the preparation and qualities of different foods and beverages, especially bread, beer, wine and alcoholic spirits, and the influences of each upon the body.

The lectures on the Theory and Practice of Medicine focus heavily on fevers, their theoretical categorizations and various symptomatic presentations. A wide range of non-febrile diseases (acute, chronic, infectious, non-communicable, venereal, psychological, etc.) are also profiled, with detailed descriptions of their symptoms and of viable therapeutic approaches to each. Other lectures specifically outline the diseases and health problems especially common among women, "negroes," children, and the elderly. The notes on the practice of medicine contain some short case studies, and all of Rush’s lectures are very referential to other doctors, scientists and medical experts.

The medical students whose names appear on the volumes of notes in this collection are Moses Bartram (1767-1791), Russel Clark, Constans Curtin (1783-1842), D. Gilder, Jacob Graham (possibly), Thomas Hamilton, Robert Hare (1781-1858) (possibly), Christopher Heydrick (1770-1856), William Jackson, Robert G. Maxwell, James Overton (1785-1865), William Simonton (1788-1846), and John Spangler. The four volumes attributed to David Hayes Agnew (1818-1892) (item 8) were probably created by his father, Dr. Robert Agnew (1785-1858). One other dating anomaly: the Thomas Hamilton notebook (Item 2) which is dated January 7, 1814 (a year after Rush's death) possibly signifies the conclusion of Hamilton’s studies.

While the vast majority of the materials within this collection contain lecture notes, the first volume created by Moses Bartram (Item 3, volume 1) appears to be less a record of lecture material than a collection of excerpts from scientific and medical treatises, and is thus described in the finding aid as a commonplace book. Researchers will find a few lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn (1741-1817) in notebooks by both John Spangler (Item 4, volume 1) and D. Gilder’s notebook (Item 12). D. Gilder's notebook also includes some notes from lectures by Dr. William Shippen (1736-1808).

In addition to the lecture notes, researchers will find a "List of Domestic Medicine which ought to be Kept in the Shops of American Physicians" and a transcription of his class's valedictory address in Russel Clark's notebook (item 11, volume 3); a "Table of Fever," which seemingly correlates body temperature to a type of febrile disease, within the notebooks of Robert G. Maxwell (item 14) and an unidentified student (item 18); and several pages of "Questions in Natural Philosophy" and a short section on the government of Pennsylvania in an unbound set of notes by an unidentified student (item 15).

Prior to processing in 2017, item numbers were assigned to notebooks. These item numbers have been retained.

Scope and Contents

This book of notes was kept by David Greenman during a course of Materia Medica lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1785. The first pages of the volume include some curious annotations by Dr. Edward Cutbush in 1814. Cutbush claims, "These notes have been taken incorrectly from my friends' lectures- I purchased the volume at a public auction. Washington" and a few pages later, "orthography very incorrect." David Greenman’s signature on the title page of the notebook has been scribbled over in ink but is still legible. The lecture notes themselves are not limited to Materia Medica in the strictest sense, in that they also include some information about physiology, pathology and therapeutics. The organization of the material in the book is somewhat disjointed, and begins with a brief history of medicine, overview of physiology, discussion of digestion and the qualities of various foods (salt, sugar, milk, etc.), and the means of treating diseases, especially scurvy, by regulation or alteration of the diet. Subsequent sections focus more specifically on medicines and their classifications, especially into the categories of astringents (including “metallic astringents” like iron, lead and zinc), stimulants (including “bitters” like cinchona bark) and sedatives (among which opium is discussed at greatest length). A fairly detailed description of types of tumors, particularly those characteristic of breast cancer, begins on page 128, and a discussion of hysteria follows from page 139 to 148. The medical properties and applications of alkaline substances, soap, errhines (drugs that produce a runny nose) and mercury are subsequently explained, followed by the therapeutic uses of purgatives and blisters. The penultimate section of the book touches upon the topics of plethora (a systemic excess of blood in the body) and complications relating to menstruation, and the final chapter relates to anthelmintics (anti-parasitic medications). At the very end of this book is an alphabetized index of the contents of the notebook, which lists a combination of the names of drugs and medicinal plants, and the medical conditions discussed.

Scope and Contents

This volume of notes is organized into three sections, corresponding to three courses of lectures. The first is titled by Gillasspy, “A Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Barton, professor in the University of Pennsylvania with Remarks thereon &c,” and dated 1797. These lectures first address classes of medicines, namely astringents, vegetable tonics, metallic tonics, stimulants (seven consecutive lectures discuss the therapeutic properties of opium), emetics, cathartics, “salivating medicines,” and diuretics. Later lectures describe particular medicines, almost all of which are plant based. These profiles typically provide a medicinal plant’s Latin name, common name, native region, effects upon the human body and pharmacological applications.

The next section of the notebook (1797) contains both handwritten notes and printed material. The first page of this portion of the document is a printed cover of a booklet titled “A Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on the Institutes of Medicine by Benjamin Rush, M.D.. Professor of the Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice in the University of Pennsylvania.” The subsequent handwritten notes on these lectures are interspersed with excerpts of the printed syllabus to which they correspond. These lectures address physiology, pathology and therapeutics, in this order. Within the first topic, Rush briefly presents some basic features and functions of the human body (such as respiration, circulation, sensation, and cognition), before discussing nutrition, digestion and “the secretions and excretions,” and finally outlining the physical differences between men and women, some information about obstetric and gynecological medicine, and what he terms “the stages of life.” The portion of the lecture series on pathology outlines what Rush regards as the four causes of disease -remote, predisposing, occasional and proximate- along with some of the signs of disease. The third and final section of this syllabus, “Therapeutics, OR, of the method of curing diseases,” describes the actions of various types of medicines.

The final section of the book contains notes on “the practice of physic” from lectures delivered by Benjamin Rush in 1798. The first of these lectures relate to the topics of prognosis and diagnosis, “transient symptoms,” and depleting, stimulating and sedative medicines. The rest of the lectures in the volume relate to fevers and their extensive classifications. Along with descriptions of the various febrile “states,” Rush presents the most effective treatments for each. (There is also a short discourse, at the end of this section, on “diseases of the mind”).

The presence of press-printed material in section two, and the closeness of the handwritten text to the spine of the book, suggests that the volume was bound after the notes were taken.

Scope and Contents

This book of notes contains lecture material transcribed by two different students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. One portion of the volume contains notes taken by Hiester H. Muhlenberg in 1832; the later material was written by Wellington Smith Mason during two separate courses of lectures between 1894 and 1895. An inscription provided by William Pepper explains that "this old notebook was found in the basement of Medical Hall, Jan. 1903. It had probably been given to Mr. Wm. H. Salvador [clerk of the Medical Department] in 97 or 98." The notes taken by Muhlenberg record a series of lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman. This material reviews diseases that fall into four classes--diseases of the heart, diseases of the nervous system, exanthemata or "eruptive fevers," and hemorrhages--providing a description, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and list of causes for each condition. There is a brief, final section on asthma, and there are a few loose sheets of letter paper enclosed in the book, which describe some other diseases, like dropsy. The section on exanthemata includes some information on inoculation and vaccination.

The notes taken by Mason from 1894 to 1895 correspond to two courses. The first, Dr. Judson Daland’s lectures on Physical Diagnosis, primarily discusses cardiopulmonary diseases, reviewed through a number of case studies. Lectures seven through fourteen describe the signs and symptoms of various conditions, particularly tuberculosis. The remainder of the lectures, which feature some ink illustrations, address the anatomy of the blood and heart "with reference to diagnosis." The notes on blood mainly address the preparation and examination of microscope slides.

The second set of notes on Symptomatology lectures, given by Dr. J. K. Mitchell, focuses on how to collect and analyze information about a patient's experience of disease. In particular, these lectures address the physiological (sometimes physiognomic) indications of illness and the interpretation of these signs, the sorts of people most susceptible to pulmonary disease, different types of pain and their relationships to particular diseases, and the most effective methods of collecting relevant medical information from patients. By and large, Mason’s lectures lean heavily on illustrative case studies and patient examinations (both clinical and post-mortem), which are typically presented in a fairly detailed, standardized format.

Scope and Contents

This volume of handwritten lecture notes, titled "A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor […] in the University of Pennsylvania," was kept by Jonathan Murduck in 1802, and provides a fairly comprehensive survey of the medicinal substances commonly in use in the early nineteenth century United States. The detailed table of contents at the beginning of the notebook lists a number of broad categories into which various medicines are sorted. The primary classes of drugs and medicinal substances noted are astringents, tonics, "Alimentary Matter," stimulants, evacuants (including errhines and sialogogues, drugs that produce a runny nose and salivation, respectively), diuretics, emetics, cathartics, and antithelmintics (anti-parasitic medicines). There is also an opening chapter on milk, which mainly discusses lactation in humans and the properties of milk, and a short final section titled "Materia Nutrentia," which relates to diet, nutrition and the component elements of food (acid, sugar, oil, etc.). The main chapters or sections of the text consist of a passage discussing the general characteristics, properties and applications of this type of medicine, followed by a list of "particular" drugs within the category. The great majority of “particulars” are medicinal plants, though some sections are subdivided into "metallic," "mineral" or "animal" substances (and in some instances, medicinal plants are arranged based on their indigeneity to the United States).

The medicinal substances are usually listed by their Latin names, and discussed in a few paragraphs. For botanical medicines, these descriptions provide the plant’s common and Latin names, native region, pharmaceutical preparation, effects upon the body, therapeutic applications, and sometimes one or two brief case studies indicating its efficacy or inefficacy in treating particular conditions. The three drugs described at greatest length are opium, "Cortex Peruvianus" (Peruvian bark or cinchona) and mercury; the discussion of each of these medicines is organized by the specific diseases they can be used to combat.

Scope and Contents

This collection contains lecture notes on pathology, diagnosis, and treatments, including prescriptions, taken at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School from 1824 to 1826 in courses taught by Dr. Samuel Jackson. The lecture notes include frequent references to Dr. Nathaniel Chapman, a professor to whom Jackson was made assistant in 1827.

A portion of the volume is in question and answer format. For example, under the condition "Asthma," questions such as "What is asthma?," "What are the causes?," etc. are asked and followed by the answers. By page 36, this format changes to a more standard narrative of the lectures.

Lectures addressed bilious pleurisy, peripneumonia rotha, asthma, angina pectoris, pertussis, phthisis pulmonalis, cynanche trachialis, dropsy, atonic dropsy, ascitis, hydrothorax, scrophula, marasmus, hydrocephalus, cynanche laryngea, cynanche tonsillaris, cynanche parotidea (mumps), scarlet fever, measles, variola or small pox, gout, rheumatism, hematuria, hemorrhoides or piles, diseases of the digestive system, drunkenness, exanthemata, diseases of the cutaneous system, erysipelas, diseases of the cerebral system, epilepsy, chronic laryngitis, and hepatitis. All spelling and terms are replicated exactly. Several pages were removed, it appears with a knife. A small number of remedies follow, including a recipe for "Dr. Jackson's cough mixture." A few notes, originally laid into the volume, include a recipe for "sirip de cusineaux."

Scope and Contents

This collection contains Dr. William S. Huber’s lecture notes from his time at the University of Pennsylvania Medical and Dental Schools. There are seven volumes that begin in February of 1885 and end in March of 1888. Several of the volumes overlap in time and seem to have been used for separate classes. The notes themselves include several hand-drawn diagrams. Lectures address Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics, pharmaceuticals, bone fractures, concussions, ulcers, pain and inflammation, and cells, as well as diseases of the blood, the liver, the heart, and the lungs. There seem to be a number of descriptions of plant based remedies in the first, second, and fifth volumes in the collection. Professors include anatomist and surgeon David Hayes Agnew; professor of clinical medicine William Osler; professor of dental pathology, therapeutics, and Materia Medica James Truman; and professor of clinical medicine H.C. Wood.

Most of the volumes are written from front to back; then turned over and written back to front. On one occasion, a quiz is included, but it is unclear if the notes are documenting Huber's studying or the actual quiz. The volume dated October 1887 to January 1888 appears to contain notes from actual medical cases, describing the gender and age of patient, their vocation, their medical condition, history of condition, and, sometimes, recommendations. It is possible that this class was taught by Osler.

Huber's handwriting is fairly difficult to read and it is frequently unclear if the headings of pages are different classes or simply different lectures within classes. None of the volumes have clear titles of courses with the possible exception of the first, dating February of 1885, which seems to be Truman's class on Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics. Folder titles were crafted from the most prominent information on the first few pages of each notebook. It is often unclear who taught the courses. Despite the challenges of reading Huber's handwriting and determining courses or teachers, these volumes provide a glimpse into the type of education a student in medicine and dentistry would have received at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1880s.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2015 August 24

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  July 25, 2017

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 12

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 2

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 November 16

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 9

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2018 April 10

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2016 May 11

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Kelin Baldridge

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Mrs. W. P. Durfee of Geneva, New York.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of William Pepper.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Dr. William Pepper, 1903

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Benjamin S. Paschell, 1903.

Source of Acquisition

Sold by Carmen D. Valentino, 2003.

Source of Acquisition

Transferred from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, 2015.

Processing Information note

Formerly: Dewey MS 615.04 K954.

Processing Information note

Formerly Dewey MS 610.4 R89.5

Processing Information note

Formerly Dewey 610.7 C367.

Processing Information note

Formerly: Dewey MS 615.1 B283.

Return to Top »

Related Materials

Related Archival Materials note

At Dolph Briscoe Center for American History,The University of Texas at Austin: Robert Harris Archer family papers, 1846-1871

At the Maryland Historical Society: several family members' papers listed under "Archer."

Related Archival Materials note

At the American Philosophical Society:

Robert Hare papers, 1764-1859 and Hare-Willing Family Papers,1724-1965

At Duke University Libraries:

Robert Hare papers, Philadelphia. 1825-1858

At the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania:

Robert Hare correspondence, 1793-1858, Ms. Coll. 74

At the Library Company of Philadelphia:

Rush family papers, 1748-1876

Related Archival Materials note

At the American Philoslphical Society:

Violetta Delafield-Benjamin Smith Barton collection, 1783-1817, Mss.B.B284d

At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania:

Benjamin Smith Barton papers, Collection 0034

At the Library Company of Philadelphia:

Rush family papers, 1748-1876

At the University of Pennsylvania, Archives and Records Center

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810, UPW1a-13

At the University of Pennsylvania, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts:

Benjamin Rush lecture notes, 1783-1810, undated, Ms. Coll. 225

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810-1823, Ms. Coll. 669

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810, UPW1a-13

Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1802, Ms. Codex 1865

Related Archival Materials note

At the Historical Medical Library of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia:

John Kearsley Mitchell correspondence, 1892-1914, MSS 2/263

Nathaniel Chapman papers, circa 1810-1853, collection 10a

At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania:

Charles Sellers notes on Nathaniel Chapman lectures at the University of Pennsylvania, Am.13596

John Josiah White notes from Nathaniel Chapman lectures, Am.1880

At the National Library of Medicine:

Notes taken from the lectures of Nathaniel Chapman in the University of Pennsylvania / by Robert M. Tute, 1828, MS B 199

At the University of Pennsylvania, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts:

Student notes on lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1813-1833, Ms. Coll. 226

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Account books
  • Commonplace books
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
Subject(s)
  • Families
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medicine

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
Subject(s)
  • Chemistry--history
  • Chemistry--Study and teaching
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--History
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
  • Notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Cutbush, Edward, 1772-1843
  • Kuhn, Adam, 1741-1817
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Materia medica--Early works to 1800
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
  • Rush, Benjamin, 1746-1813
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
  • Notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Chapman, Nathaniel, 1780-1853
  • Daland, Judson
  • Mitchell, John Kearsley, 1793-1858
Subject(s)
  • Education
  • Medical education--United States--19th century
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Chapman, Nathaniel, 1780-1853
  • Jackson, Samuel, 1787-1872
Subject(s)
  • Medical education--United States--19th century
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Formulas, recipes, etc.
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Dental Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Subject(s)
  • Dental students
  • Dentistry
  • Dentistry--Study and teaching
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

J. Archer Jr.'s notes on Materia Medica lectures held at the University of Pennsylvania, 1797-1798.

1 1

Note and commonplace book of H. Archer, 1830-1832.

1 2

Parker and Archer account book for purchases of wheat, 1841-1851.

1 3

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Agnew, Robert (possibly), notebook [Item 8, volumes 1-4], undated.

2 4-7

Bartram, Moses, commonplace book and notebook [Item 3, volumes 1-2], before 1791.

1 3

Clark, Russel, notebook [Item 11, volumes 1-3], undated.

3 4-6

Curtin, Constans (probably), notebook [Item 6], circa 1806-1809.

2 2

Gilder, D., notebook [Item 12], 1783.

4 7

Graham, Jacob (probably), notebook [Item 13], probably 1788.

3 8

Hamilton, Thomas, notebook [Item 2], undated.

1 2

Hare, Robert (possibly), notebook [Item 9, volumes 1-2], 1796, 1798.

3 1-2

Heydrick, Christopher, notebook [Item 20, volumes 1-2], undated.

4 6-7

Jackson, William, notebook [Item 21, volume 1], 1804-1805.

4 8

Jackson, William, notebook [Item 21, volume 2], 1804-1805.

5 1

Maxwell, Robert G., notebook [Item 14], 1807-1808.

3 9

Overton, James, notebook [Item 1], 1807-1809.

1 1

Simonton, William, notebook [Item 5, volumes 1-3], undated.

1 6-8

Simonton, William, notebook [Item 5, volume 4], undated.

2 1

Spangler, John, notebook [Item 4, volumes 1-2], 1790-1791.

1 4-5

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 7], 1809-1810.

2 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 10], 1798.

3 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 16], undated.

4 2

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 17], undated.

4 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 18], undated.

4 4

Unidentified student, unbound notes [Item 15], undated.

4 1

Unidentified student, unbound notes [Item 19], undated.

4 5

Letters written by Benjamin Rush to Dr. John Dorsey (negatives), location of originals unknown, 1804, 1812.

5 2

Collection Inventory

Volume

"Notes taken from Doctor Adam Kuhn's Lectures on Materia Medica, by David Greenman", 1785.

1

Collection Inventory

Volume

Notebook, 1797-1798.

1

Collection Inventory

Notebook, 1832, 1894-1895.

Collection Inventory

Volume

"A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor Materia Medica, Natural History, and Botany in the University of Pennsylvania", 1801.

1

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Lecture notes (bound volume).

1 1

Items laid in (recipe for "Sirup de Cusineaux' and other notes), 1825, undated.

1 2

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Lectures of James Truman, including "Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics", 1885 February.

1 1

"H.C. Wood", 1886 October-1887 January.

1 2

"Agnew", 1886 November-1887 January.

1 3

"Dr. [Illegible]'s Quiz. Cells", 1886 October-1887 February.

1 4

Plant-based remedies, 1887 February-March.

1 5

"Osler" (case studies), 1887 October-1888 January.

1 6

"Cardiac Stimulants", 1887 November-1888 March.

1 7

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the University of Pennsylvania. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Archer, Henry Wilson, 1813-1887
Creator:
Archer, John, 1777-1830
Title:
Archer family account books and notebooks
Date [inclusive]:
1797-1851
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1120
Extent:
0.2 linear feet (1 box)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This collection (1797-1851) contains notebooks kept by three members of the Archer family, a prominent and politically active family of medical doctors based in Harford County, Maryland. The first file contains John Archer Jr.’s notes on materia medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Barton and given at the University of Pennsylvania in 1797 and 1798. A commonplace book (1830-1832) maintained by Henry Wilson Archer, which contains excerpts mostly from history books and poems is the second file. Also included in the collection is an account book (1841-1851) wherein the wheat purchases of Robert Harris Archer were recorded.
Cite as:
Archer family account books and notebooks, 1797-1841, Ms. Coll. 1120, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Bartram, Moses, -1791
Creator:
Curtin, Constans, 1783-1842
Creator:
Hare, Robert, 1781-1858
Creator:
Heydrick, Christopher, 1770-1856
Creator:
Kuhn, Adam, 1741-1817
Creator:
Overton, James, Jr., 1785-1865
Creator:
Rush, Benjamin, 1746-1813
Creator:
Simonton, William, 1788-1846
Title:
Benjamin Rush lecture notes
Date:
1783-1810, undated
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 225
Extent:
4.2 linear feet (5 boxes)
Language:
English
Abstract:
The Benjamin Rush lecture notes consist of 34 notebooks kept by medical students at the University of Pennsylvania, which record the content of academic lectures delivered by Dr. Benjamin Rush (1745-1813). Rush, a socially and politically prominent physician who lived and practiced in Philadelphia, served as a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine from 1769 to 1813. The handwritten lecture notes in this collection (recorded between 1783 and 1810) present the era's conventional medical wisdom on the causes, symptoms and cures of a range of diseases and disorders.
Cite as:
Benjamin Rush lecture notes, 1783-1810, undated, Ms. Coll. 225, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Greenman, David
Title:
David Greenman notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1785
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1866
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This book of notes was kept by David Greenman during a course of Materia Medica lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1785. The lecture notes themselves are not limited to Materia Medica in the strictest sense, in that they also include some information about physiology, pathology and therapeutics. The notebook is briefly inscribed by Dr. Edward Cutbush (1772-1843) an officer and surgeon in the United States Navy.
Cite as:
David Greenman notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1785, Ms. Codex 1866, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Gillasspy, George, d. 1832
Title:
George Gillasspy notes on lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date [inclusive]:
1797-1798
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1861
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This notebook, kept by George Gillasspy (also "Gillaspy"), records the content of lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1797 and 1798. These lectures touch upon a wide range of topics within materia medica, physiology, pathology and therapeutics, and represent the foundations of late eighteenth century medical education.
Cite as:
George Gillasspy notes on lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1797-1798, Ms. Codex 1861, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Mason, Wellington Smith
Creator:
Muhlenberg, H. H. (Hiester Henry), 1812-1886
Title:
Hiester H. Muhlenberg and Wellington Smith Mason notes on lectures delivered by Drs. Nathaniel Chapman, Judson Daland, and J.K. Mitchell at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1832, 1894-1895
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1873
Extent:
1 volume
Language:
English
Abstract:
This notebook contains lecture material transcribed by two different students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. One portion of the volume contains notes taken by Hiester H. Muhlenberg in 1832; the later material was written by Wellington Smith Mason during two separate courses of lectures between 1894 and 1895. The notes taken by Muhlenberg record a series of lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman on hemorrhages, fevers, cardiac disease and nervous disorders. The notes taken by Mason, decades later, document Dr. Judson Daland’s lectures on physical diagnosis and Dr. J.K. Mitchell's lectures on symptomatology.
Cite as:
Hiester H. Muhlenberg and Wellington Smith Mason notes on lectures delivered by Drs. Nathaniel Chapman, Judson Daland, and J.K. Mitchell at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1832, 1894-1895, Ms. Codex 1873, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Murduck, Jonathan
Title:
Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1802
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1865
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This volume of handwritten lecture notes, titled “A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor […] at the University of Pennsylvania,” was kept by medical student Jonathan Murduck in 1802, and provides a fairly comprehensive survey of the medicinal substances commonly in use in the early nineteenth century United States.
Cite as:
Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1802, Ms. Codex 1865, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Trevor, Joseph
Title:
Joseph Trevor notes on medical lectures delivered by Dr. Samuel Jackson at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date [inclusive]:
1824-1826
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 498
Extent:
0.2 linear foot (1 box)
Physical Facet note:
Written in one hand, attribution from front cover and 1 item laid in. Two leaves laid in. Foliation: [ii], ff. 1-113, pp. 114-119, 15 leaves cut out, 5 ff.
Language:
English
Abstract:
Joseph Trevor was a medical student at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. This volume of lecture notes documents a series of lectures taught by Dr. Samuel Jackson (1787-1872) between 1824 and 1826.
Cite as:
Joseph Trevor notes on medical lectures delivered by Dr. Samuel Jackson at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1824-1826, Ms. Coll. 498, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Huber, William S., 1865-1909
Title:
William S. Huber student lecture notes
Date [inclusive]:
1885-1888
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1306
Extent:
0.5 linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Dr. William S. Huber (1865-1909) was a dentist in Lebanon, Pennsylvania who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical and Dental Schools. This collection contains Huber's student lecture notes recorded between February 1885 and March 1888.
Cite as:
William S. Huber student lecture notes, 1885-1888, Ms. Coll. 1306, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Biography/History

The Archer family was a prominent and politically active family of medical doctors based in Harford County, Maryland. John Archer was born in Maryland in 1741 and (due to the alphabetical antecedence of his last name) was the first person to receive a medical diploma in North America, which he earned from the College of Philadelphia (later the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania) in 1768. His son, John Archer Jr. (1777-1850) also attended medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1798. J. Archer Jr. returned to Maryland after earning his degree and served as a surgeon of the Maryland militia in the War of 1812.

Henry Wilson Archer (1813-1887) was the son of John Archer Jr. Another graduate of the medical school of the University of Pennsylvania, H. Archer lived in Harford County and married Mary Elizabeth Walker in 1849.

The final volume in the collection is an account book created by Robert Harris Archer. Three individuals named Robert Harris Archer (brother of (1775-1857 or 1858), nephew of (1813-1883), or son of (1820-1878) John Archer, Jr.) may have been the account book's author.

Biography/History

Dr. Benjamin Rush (1745-1813) was a socially and politically prominent physician who lived and practiced in Philadelphia. Born in Byberry Township, Pennsylvania, Rush was educated at the University of Edinburgh, and travelled in England and France before returning to Philadelphia in 1769. Rush played an active role in the American Revolution, signing the Declaration of Independence and serving briefly as Surgeon General of the Middle Department of the Continental Army and as a physician with the Philadelphia militia.

Although most prominent Philadelphians left the city for healthier environments during the catastrophic Yellow Fever epidemics that hit Philadelphia in the 1790s, Rush remained in the city to treat the sick; though he may be equally or better remembered today for his strong advocacy of bloodletting as a therapeutic method for the disease.

Rush served as a professor of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (previously the College of Philadelphia) from 1769 to 1789 and as a professor of the "Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice" from 1791 to 1813. Rush also taught courses in the "Theory and Practice of Medicine" from 1789 to 1791, and again from 1796 to 1813.

Biography/History

Little information about David Greenman is readily available; he attended lectures at the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1785 but did not graduate. Dr. Edward Cutbush, who inscribed this volume, graduated from the University in 1794 and pursued a successful career as an officer and surgeon in the U.S. Navy. An eminent scientist of eighteenth century Philadelphia, Dr. Adam Kuhn (1741-1817) was a professor first of Botany and Materia Medica, and then the Theory and Practice of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania between 1768 and 1797.

Biography/History

George Gillasspy (elsewhere spelled “Gillaspy”) was a medical student, military doctor, and apothecary. Gillasspy served as a surgeon with the Second U.S. Infantry Regiment and on the Frigate U.S.S. United States during the Revolutionary War, at or around the same time that he kept his book of notes on medical lectures. (Indeed, Gillasspy signs his name along with “Surgeon 2d U.S. Regt [illeg] & act.g Surgn Frigate” at the beginning of the second section of the lecture notes, referring to his role as surgeon of the Second Regiment and on the frigate  United States.) Gillasspy also served as a surgeon with the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry from 1806 to 1808, and operated an apothecary shop in Philadelphia with his partner Dr. Joseph Strong. In 1803, Gillasspy and Strong outfitted Meriwether Lewis with $90.69 in medicines for his expedition west. Gillaspy died in 1832 and is buried in Christ Church Burial Ground in Philadelphia. Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815) was a leading botanist and naturalist of his day, and Benjamin Rush (1746-1813) was one of Philadelphia’s foremost physicians in late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Both taught at the University of Pennsylvania for much of their careers.

Sources:

History of the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry: From Its Organization, November 17th, 1774 to Its Centennial Anniversary, November 17th, 1874. (Princeton: 1875). URL: https://books.google.com/books?id=va8-AAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s

Kris Fresonke and Mark David Spence. Lewis & Clark: Legacies, Memories, and New Perspectives. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004).

Biography/History

Hiester H. Muhlenberg (1812-1886) graduated from the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1832, and practiced medicine in Reading, Pennsylvania, before switching his career to finance in 1837. Nathaniel Chapman (1780-1853) was a prominent physician and educator in Philadelphia, who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1801 and began his teaching career at the same institution in 1810. He taught Materia Medica and the theory and practice of medicine. Throughout his career, he remained an influential member of the medical community in Philadelphia until his death in 1853. In addition to his teaching, he founded the Medical Institute of Philadelphia in 1817; founded the Philadelphia Journal of the Medical and Physical Sciences (today the  American Journal of Medical Sciences) in 1820; and served as president of the Philadelphia Medical Society, as president of the American Philosophical Society, as fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia (elected in 1807), and as the first president of the American Medical Association (elected in 1848).

Wellington Smith Mason (1865- 1900) graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1898. He appears to have practiced medicine in Williamstown, Pennsylvania, but his career was cut short by his death on September 30, 1900, at age 35, from complications from a surgery for appendicitis. Dr. Judson Daland (1860-circa 1937) graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1882. Following his graduation, he practiced medicine in Philadelphia. He was a demonstrator and an instructor of clinical medicine at the University of Pennsylvania from 1882 until at least 1897. He was also a professor of diseases of the chest at the Philadelphia Polyclinic and College for Graduates in Medicine from 1896 to 1897 and a professor of clinical medicine at the same institution from 1897. J.K. (John Kearsley) Mitchell (1859-1917), the son of S. Weir Mitchell, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1883. He began teaching at the University of Pennsylvania in 1886, serving as assistant demonstrator in clinical medicine until 1894, and as lecturer on general symptomatology from 1894 to 1899.

Biography/History

Jonathan Murduck (born circa 1782) was a student at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1802, but did not receive his degree until 1811. Between 1803 and 1805, Murduck practiced medicine in Port-au-Prince. Murduck’s financial records, patient records, and memoranda from these voyages are held in the Manuscripts Division of the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan.

Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815) was a leading botanist and naturalist of his day, and a professor at the University of Pennsylvania from 1789 to 1813.

Sources: Jonathan Murduck Account Book and Memoranda, William L. Clements Library, The University of Michigan. https://quod.lib.umich.edu/c/clementsmss/umich-wcl-M-1890mur?byte=14434455;focusrgn=frontmatter;subview=standard;view=reslist

Biography/History

Joseph Trevor received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1826. He wrote an essay on foreign bodies in the esophagus and test-phagotomy.

Samuel Jackson was born in Philadelphia, March 22, 1787, son of pharmacist David Jackson and Susan Kemper. Although Jackson attended the College of the University of Pennsylvania, he did not complete the courses required to receive a degree but instead began his study of medicine under Dr. James Hutchinson. After Hutchinson’s death, he continued at the offices of Dr. Casper Wistar. Jackson received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1808. After graduation, he briefly took up the drug business left by his father and older brother.

When the War of 1812 broke out, Jackson joined the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry and served with them in operations in the Chesapeake Bay through the war. Jackson sold his pharmaceutical business upon his return in 1815 and began a private medical practice. In 1820, he became president of the Philadelphia Board of Health, and directed its management of the yellow fever epidemic. In 1821, Jackson helped found the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and was appointed its first Professor of Materia Medica. He also served as attending physician at the Philadelphia Almshouse and as instructor of medical chemistry and materia medica at the Medical Institute of Philadelphia, founded by Nathaniel Chapman.

In 1827, Jackson was made assistant to Professor Nathaniel Chapman at the University of Pennsylvania, a post in which Jackson was responsible for teaching physiology. When Chapman's health declined in 1835, Jackson took over as Professor of the Institutes of Medicine and remained in that chair until his retirement in 1863. He would also teach on the wards of Philadelphia Hospital from 1842 to 1845. His medical publications included The Principles of Medicine Founded on the Structure and Functions of the Animal Organism.

Jackson's professional and scholarly memberships included the College of Physicians of Philadelphia and the American Philosophical Society. While in Montreal, Canada, in 1832 investigating an outbreak of Asian cholera on behalf of the Sanitary Board of Councils for Philadelphia, he married the daughter of a British officer. Jackson died in Philadelphia, April 4, 1872.

Information regarding Dr. Samuel Jackson taken in its entirety from Penn Biographies.

Biography/History

Dr. William S. Huber was born in July, 1865, to Dr. William A. (a prominent Lebanon, Pennsylvania, dentist) and Juliana Huber. He was educated at public schools in Lebanon, Pennsylvania and graduated from Lebanon High School. From there, he began his education at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, completing first the course of medicine, and then continuing on to take a full course in dentistry. According to the University of Pennsylvania Catalogue and Announcements from the 1886 to 1887 academic year, Huber was a successful student and was among several students "selected for their proficiency in Anatomy to act as Assistant Demonstrators of Anatomy," (page 66).

Following the completion of his studies, he succeeded his father in his dental practice and "built up a large and lucrative practice," (Kirk, page 1019). In 1895, he married A. May Kaler (1866-1901) and they were the parents of William K. (1896-1951) and Charles G. (born in 1898).

In addition to his career as a dentist, Huber served as a member of the board of public schools, as presiding officer of the city council and the select council, and as member of the board of elders of the Salem Evangelical Lutheran Church. He also participated in the Mt. Lebanon Lodge, Weidle Chapter, and Hermit Commandery of the Masons; the Lu Lu Temple in Reading, Pennsylvania; and the Harrisburg Consistory. Huber died of apoplexy on May 25, 1909.

Works cited:

Kirk, Edward C., editor. The Dental Cosmos, Volume 51, 1909 (page 1019).

University of Pennsylvania Catalogue and Announcements, 1886-1887, page 66.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of notebooks kept by three members of the Archer family between 1797 and 1851. Two booklets of notes on materia medica lectures held at the University of Pennsylvania make up the first file in the collection. John Archer Jr. attended the lectures (delivered by Benjamin S. Barton, M.D., a Professor of Materia Medica, Botany and Natural History) in 1797 and 1798. Addressing what is now considered pharmacology, the booklets detail medical treatments for a number of diseases. The first volume of the set is concerned largely with the nutritional benefits of various foods and the categorization of medicines, whether as botanical or mineral astringents, tonics, emetics, stimulants, and the like. The second volume discusses the merits of different medicines (mostly plant-based) and lists viable treatments for a range of diseases. A note on the last page of the second volume suggests that there was a third booklet in this set of lecture notes.

The second file in this collection is the commonplace book of Henry Archer, written between 1830 and 1832 in Harford County, Maryland. This book is roughly organized into four sections. The first section consists of notes on the history of Asia (based on a text by Charles Rollin), Rome (based on Edward Gibbon’s The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire), Roman jurisprudence, and the feudal system in Scotland. The second section features shorter quotations taken from several sources including  Don Juan, the poetry of Byron and Thomas Campbell, and  The Young Duke, a novel by Benjamin Disraeli. Also in this section is a transcription of ‘The Union College Dunciad’, a (probably unpublished) volume of satirical verse written in Schenectady in 1830. The notebook’s third section is a list of the books that Archer read, sorted by category and year. Each book has a number next to it, perhaps denoting how many times it was read. This list is extended on the front inside cover of the notebook. The final section of the notebook is titled ‘Questions for Debate’, and includes eleven questions about both historical and contemporary political issues.

An account book kept by Robert Harris Archer from 1841 to 1851 is the third file in this series, and lists Archer’s purchases of wheat. This book is, for the most part, well organized with the name of the wheat seller, price and amount of wheat, and date of purchase laid out consistently. A few pages, however, are filled with tally marks, calculations and miscellaneous notes and sketches, including two small drawings of houses labeled ‘Baltimore’ and ‘Philadelphia’.

Scope and Contents

The Benjamin Rush lecture notes consist of 34 notebooks kept by a number of medical students at the University of Pennsylvania, which record the content of academic lectures delivered by Dr. Benjamin Rush. Many of the notebooks are undated, but those which have been inscribed with dates range from 1783 to 1810 (Rush was a professor at the University from 1769 until his death in 1813). All of the notes are handwritten, and some are unsigned or of uncertain authorship. All but two sets of notes are bound; however, those that were rebound at some point since they were created are quite fragile. The notes seem to be verbatim transcriptions of Rush's lectures, and are written in full sentences. Many of the volumes of notes have indices at the front or back, which list diseases alphabetically along with the page on which the condition is described.

Rush taught courses in Chemistry, the "Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice" and the "Theory and Practice of Medicine." The content and format of his lectures seem to have remained fairly consistent across the nearly three decades represented in this collection. Chemistry lectures (recorded by students Moses Bartram (item 3), D. Gilder (item 12), Jacob Graham (item 13), and an unidentified student (item 16)) describe particular elements and compounds, as well as broad classes of substances such as "vinegars," salts, earths, metals, and airs, some of which groups are divided into subcategories. Interspersed with this content is information about the medical applications of particular chemical substances, and their effects upon the human body.

Researchers will find lectures on the "Institutes." In the first lecture recorded by an unidentified student in item 7, Rush explains that "the Institutes are divided into four parts, Physiology, Hygiene, Pathology & Therapeutics." The notebooks that correspond to Rush’s lectures on the Institutes generally treat the topics of anatomy, sensation, perception, cognition, the psyche, mental and physical differences between men and women, epidemiology, prognosis, diagnosis, convalescence, the effects of the environment upon the body, and some of the social and cultural factors that can influence health. Rush dedicates a number of lectures to the topics of psychology and psychological disorders, including discussions of the symptoms and cures of "passions" (which he usually defines as fear, love, anger and grief) and of mania. Notes on the Institutes tend also to include fairly long discourses on diet, the preparation and qualities of different foods and beverages, especially bread, beer, wine and alcoholic spirits, and the influences of each upon the body.

The lectures on the Theory and Practice of Medicine focus heavily on fevers, their theoretical categorizations and various symptomatic presentations. A wide range of non-febrile diseases (acute, chronic, infectious, non-communicable, venereal, psychological, etc.) are also profiled, with detailed descriptions of their symptoms and of viable therapeutic approaches to each. Other lectures specifically outline the diseases and health problems especially common among women, "negroes," children, and the elderly. The notes on the practice of medicine contain some short case studies, and all of Rush’s lectures are very referential to other doctors, scientists and medical experts.

The medical students whose names appear on the volumes of notes in this collection are Moses Bartram (1767-1791), Russel Clark, Constans Curtin (1783-1842), D. Gilder, Jacob Graham (possibly), Thomas Hamilton, Robert Hare (1781-1858) (possibly), Christopher Heydrick (1770-1856), William Jackson, Robert G. Maxwell, James Overton (1785-1865), William Simonton (1788-1846), and John Spangler. The four volumes attributed to David Hayes Agnew (1818-1892) (item 8) were probably created by his father, Dr. Robert Agnew (1785-1858). One other dating anomaly: the Thomas Hamilton notebook (Item 2) which is dated January 7, 1814 (a year after Rush's death) possibly signifies the conclusion of Hamilton’s studies.

While the vast majority of the materials within this collection contain lecture notes, the first volume created by Moses Bartram (Item 3, volume 1) appears to be less a record of lecture material than a collection of excerpts from scientific and medical treatises, and is thus described in the finding aid as a commonplace book. Researchers will find a few lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn (1741-1817) in notebooks by both John Spangler (Item 4, volume 1) and D. Gilder’s notebook (Item 12). D. Gilder's notebook also includes some notes from lectures by Dr. William Shippen (1736-1808).

In addition to the lecture notes, researchers will find a "List of Domestic Medicine which ought to be Kept in the Shops of American Physicians" and a transcription of his class's valedictory address in Russel Clark's notebook (item 11, volume 3); a "Table of Fever," which seemingly correlates body temperature to a type of febrile disease, within the notebooks of Robert G. Maxwell (item 14) and an unidentified student (item 18); and several pages of "Questions in Natural Philosophy" and a short section on the government of Pennsylvania in an unbound set of notes by an unidentified student (item 15).

Prior to processing in 2017, item numbers were assigned to notebooks. These item numbers have been retained.

Scope and Contents

This book of notes was kept by David Greenman during a course of Materia Medica lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1785. The first pages of the volume include some curious annotations by Dr. Edward Cutbush in 1814. Cutbush claims, "These notes have been taken incorrectly from my friends' lectures- I purchased the volume at a public auction. Washington" and a few pages later, "orthography very incorrect." David Greenman’s signature on the title page of the notebook has been scribbled over in ink but is still legible. The lecture notes themselves are not limited to Materia Medica in the strictest sense, in that they also include some information about physiology, pathology and therapeutics. The organization of the material in the book is somewhat disjointed, and begins with a brief history of medicine, overview of physiology, discussion of digestion and the qualities of various foods (salt, sugar, milk, etc.), and the means of treating diseases, especially scurvy, by regulation or alteration of the diet. Subsequent sections focus more specifically on medicines and their classifications, especially into the categories of astringents (including “metallic astringents” like iron, lead and zinc), stimulants (including “bitters” like cinchona bark) and sedatives (among which opium is discussed at greatest length). A fairly detailed description of types of tumors, particularly those characteristic of breast cancer, begins on page 128, and a discussion of hysteria follows from page 139 to 148. The medical properties and applications of alkaline substances, soap, errhines (drugs that produce a runny nose) and mercury are subsequently explained, followed by the therapeutic uses of purgatives and blisters. The penultimate section of the book touches upon the topics of plethora (a systemic excess of blood in the body) and complications relating to menstruation, and the final chapter relates to anthelmintics (anti-parasitic medications). At the very end of this book is an alphabetized index of the contents of the notebook, which lists a combination of the names of drugs and medicinal plants, and the medical conditions discussed.

Scope and Contents

This volume of notes is organized into three sections, corresponding to three courses of lectures. The first is titled by Gillasspy, “A Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Barton, professor in the University of Pennsylvania with Remarks thereon &c,” and dated 1797. These lectures first address classes of medicines, namely astringents, vegetable tonics, metallic tonics, stimulants (seven consecutive lectures discuss the therapeutic properties of opium), emetics, cathartics, “salivating medicines,” and diuretics. Later lectures describe particular medicines, almost all of which are plant based. These profiles typically provide a medicinal plant’s Latin name, common name, native region, effects upon the human body and pharmacological applications.

The next section of the notebook (1797) contains both handwritten notes and printed material. The first page of this portion of the document is a printed cover of a booklet titled “A Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on the Institutes of Medicine by Benjamin Rush, M.D.. Professor of the Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice in the University of Pennsylvania.” The subsequent handwritten notes on these lectures are interspersed with excerpts of the printed syllabus to which they correspond. These lectures address physiology, pathology and therapeutics, in this order. Within the first topic, Rush briefly presents some basic features and functions of the human body (such as respiration, circulation, sensation, and cognition), before discussing nutrition, digestion and “the secretions and excretions,” and finally outlining the physical differences between men and women, some information about obstetric and gynecological medicine, and what he terms “the stages of life.” The portion of the lecture series on pathology outlines what Rush regards as the four causes of disease -remote, predisposing, occasional and proximate- along with some of the signs of disease. The third and final section of this syllabus, “Therapeutics, OR, of the method of curing diseases,” describes the actions of various types of medicines.

The final section of the book contains notes on “the practice of physic” from lectures delivered by Benjamin Rush in 1798. The first of these lectures relate to the topics of prognosis and diagnosis, “transient symptoms,” and depleting, stimulating and sedative medicines. The rest of the lectures in the volume relate to fevers and their extensive classifications. Along with descriptions of the various febrile “states,” Rush presents the most effective treatments for each. (There is also a short discourse, at the end of this section, on “diseases of the mind”).

The presence of press-printed material in section two, and the closeness of the handwritten text to the spine of the book, suggests that the volume was bound after the notes were taken.

Scope and Contents

This book of notes contains lecture material transcribed by two different students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. One portion of the volume contains notes taken by Hiester H. Muhlenberg in 1832; the later material was written by Wellington Smith Mason during two separate courses of lectures between 1894 and 1895. An inscription provided by William Pepper explains that "this old notebook was found in the basement of Medical Hall, Jan. 1903. It had probably been given to Mr. Wm. H. Salvador [clerk of the Medical Department] in 97 or 98." The notes taken by Muhlenberg record a series of lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman. This material reviews diseases that fall into four classes--diseases of the heart, diseases of the nervous system, exanthemata or "eruptive fevers," and hemorrhages--providing a description, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and list of causes for each condition. There is a brief, final section on asthma, and there are a few loose sheets of letter paper enclosed in the book, which describe some other diseases, like dropsy. The section on exanthemata includes some information on inoculation and vaccination.

The notes taken by Mason from 1894 to 1895 correspond to two courses. The first, Dr. Judson Daland’s lectures on Physical Diagnosis, primarily discusses cardiopulmonary diseases, reviewed through a number of case studies. Lectures seven through fourteen describe the signs and symptoms of various conditions, particularly tuberculosis. The remainder of the lectures, which feature some ink illustrations, address the anatomy of the blood and heart "with reference to diagnosis." The notes on blood mainly address the preparation and examination of microscope slides.

The second set of notes on Symptomatology lectures, given by Dr. J. K. Mitchell, focuses on how to collect and analyze information about a patient's experience of disease. In particular, these lectures address the physiological (sometimes physiognomic) indications of illness and the interpretation of these signs, the sorts of people most susceptible to pulmonary disease, different types of pain and their relationships to particular diseases, and the most effective methods of collecting relevant medical information from patients. By and large, Mason’s lectures lean heavily on illustrative case studies and patient examinations (both clinical and post-mortem), which are typically presented in a fairly detailed, standardized format.

Scope and Contents

This volume of handwritten lecture notes, titled "A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor […] in the University of Pennsylvania," was kept by Jonathan Murduck in 1802, and provides a fairly comprehensive survey of the medicinal substances commonly in use in the early nineteenth century United States. The detailed table of contents at the beginning of the notebook lists a number of broad categories into which various medicines are sorted. The primary classes of drugs and medicinal substances noted are astringents, tonics, "Alimentary Matter," stimulants, evacuants (including errhines and sialogogues, drugs that produce a runny nose and salivation, respectively), diuretics, emetics, cathartics, and antithelmintics (anti-parasitic medicines). There is also an opening chapter on milk, which mainly discusses lactation in humans and the properties of milk, and a short final section titled "Materia Nutrentia," which relates to diet, nutrition and the component elements of food (acid, sugar, oil, etc.). The main chapters or sections of the text consist of a passage discussing the general characteristics, properties and applications of this type of medicine, followed by a list of "particular" drugs within the category. The great majority of “particulars” are medicinal plants, though some sections are subdivided into "metallic," "mineral" or "animal" substances (and in some instances, medicinal plants are arranged based on their indigeneity to the United States).

The medicinal substances are usually listed by their Latin names, and discussed in a few paragraphs. For botanical medicines, these descriptions provide the plant’s common and Latin names, native region, pharmaceutical preparation, effects upon the body, therapeutic applications, and sometimes one or two brief case studies indicating its efficacy or inefficacy in treating particular conditions. The three drugs described at greatest length are opium, "Cortex Peruvianus" (Peruvian bark or cinchona) and mercury; the discussion of each of these medicines is organized by the specific diseases they can be used to combat.

Scope and Contents

This collection contains lecture notes on pathology, diagnosis, and treatments, including prescriptions, taken at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School from 1824 to 1826 in courses taught by Dr. Samuel Jackson. The lecture notes include frequent references to Dr. Nathaniel Chapman, a professor to whom Jackson was made assistant in 1827.

A portion of the volume is in question and answer format. For example, under the condition "Asthma," questions such as "What is asthma?," "What are the causes?," etc. are asked and followed by the answers. By page 36, this format changes to a more standard narrative of the lectures.

Lectures addressed bilious pleurisy, peripneumonia rotha, asthma, angina pectoris, pertussis, phthisis pulmonalis, cynanche trachialis, dropsy, atonic dropsy, ascitis, hydrothorax, scrophula, marasmus, hydrocephalus, cynanche laryngea, cynanche tonsillaris, cynanche parotidea (mumps), scarlet fever, measles, variola or small pox, gout, rheumatism, hematuria, hemorrhoides or piles, diseases of the digestive system, drunkenness, exanthemata, diseases of the cutaneous system, erysipelas, diseases of the cerebral system, epilepsy, chronic laryngitis, and hepatitis. All spelling and terms are replicated exactly. Several pages were removed, it appears with a knife. A small number of remedies follow, including a recipe for "Dr. Jackson's cough mixture." A few notes, originally laid into the volume, include a recipe for "sirip de cusineaux."

Scope and Contents

This collection contains Dr. William S. Huber’s lecture notes from his time at the University of Pennsylvania Medical and Dental Schools. There are seven volumes that begin in February of 1885 and end in March of 1888. Several of the volumes overlap in time and seem to have been used for separate classes. The notes themselves include several hand-drawn diagrams. Lectures address Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics, pharmaceuticals, bone fractures, concussions, ulcers, pain and inflammation, and cells, as well as diseases of the blood, the liver, the heart, and the lungs. There seem to be a number of descriptions of plant based remedies in the first, second, and fifth volumes in the collection. Professors include anatomist and surgeon David Hayes Agnew; professor of clinical medicine William Osler; professor of dental pathology, therapeutics, and Materia Medica James Truman; and professor of clinical medicine H.C. Wood.

Most of the volumes are written from front to back; then turned over and written back to front. On one occasion, a quiz is included, but it is unclear if the notes are documenting Huber's studying or the actual quiz. The volume dated October 1887 to January 1888 appears to contain notes from actual medical cases, describing the gender and age of patient, their vocation, their medical condition, history of condition, and, sometimes, recommendations. It is possible that this class was taught by Osler.

Huber's handwriting is fairly difficult to read and it is frequently unclear if the headings of pages are different classes or simply different lectures within classes. None of the volumes have clear titles of courses with the possible exception of the first, dating February of 1885, which seems to be Truman's class on Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics. Folder titles were crafted from the most prominent information on the first few pages of each notebook. It is often unclear who taught the courses. Despite the challenges of reading Huber's handwriting and determining courses or teachers, these volumes provide a glimpse into the type of education a student in medicine and dentistry would have received at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1880s.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2015 August 24

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  July 25, 2017

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 12

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 2

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 November 16

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 9

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2018 April 10

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2016 May 11

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Kelin Baldridge

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Mrs. W. P. Durfee of Geneva, New York.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of William Pepper.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Dr. William Pepper, 1903

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Benjamin S. Paschell, 1903.

Source of Acquisition

Sold by Carmen D. Valentino, 2003.

Source of Acquisition

Transferred from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, 2015.

Processing Information note

Formerly: Dewey MS 615.04 K954.

Processing Information note

Formerly Dewey MS 610.4 R89.5

Processing Information note

Formerly Dewey 610.7 C367.

Processing Information note

Formerly: Dewey MS 615.1 B283.

Return to Top »

Related Materials

Related Archival Materials note

At Dolph Briscoe Center for American History,The University of Texas at Austin: Robert Harris Archer family papers, 1846-1871

At the Maryland Historical Society: several family members' papers listed under "Archer."

Related Archival Materials note

At the American Philosophical Society:

Robert Hare papers, 1764-1859 and Hare-Willing Family Papers,1724-1965

At Duke University Libraries:

Robert Hare papers, Philadelphia. 1825-1858

At the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania:

Robert Hare correspondence, 1793-1858, Ms. Coll. 74

At the Library Company of Philadelphia:

Rush family papers, 1748-1876

Related Archival Materials note

At the American Philoslphical Society:

Violetta Delafield-Benjamin Smith Barton collection, 1783-1817, Mss.B.B284d

At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania:

Benjamin Smith Barton papers, Collection 0034

At the Library Company of Philadelphia:

Rush family papers, 1748-1876

At the University of Pennsylvania, Archives and Records Center

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810, UPW1a-13

At the University of Pennsylvania, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts:

Benjamin Rush lecture notes, 1783-1810, undated, Ms. Coll. 225

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810-1823, Ms. Coll. 669

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810, UPW1a-13

Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1802, Ms. Codex 1865

Related Archival Materials note

At the Historical Medical Library of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia:

John Kearsley Mitchell correspondence, 1892-1914, MSS 2/263

Nathaniel Chapman papers, circa 1810-1853, collection 10a

At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania:

Charles Sellers notes on Nathaniel Chapman lectures at the University of Pennsylvania, Am.13596

John Josiah White notes from Nathaniel Chapman lectures, Am.1880

At the National Library of Medicine:

Notes taken from the lectures of Nathaniel Chapman in the University of Pennsylvania / by Robert M. Tute, 1828, MS B 199

At the University of Pennsylvania, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts:

Student notes on lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1813-1833, Ms. Coll. 226

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Account books
  • Commonplace books
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
Subject(s)
  • Families
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medicine

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
Subject(s)
  • Chemistry--history
  • Chemistry--Study and teaching
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--History
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
  • Notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Cutbush, Edward, 1772-1843
  • Kuhn, Adam, 1741-1817
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Materia medica--Early works to 1800
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
  • Rush, Benjamin, 1746-1813
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
  • Notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Chapman, Nathaniel, 1780-1853
  • Daland, Judson
  • Mitchell, John Kearsley, 1793-1858
Subject(s)
  • Education
  • Medical education--United States--19th century
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Chapman, Nathaniel, 1780-1853
  • Jackson, Samuel, 1787-1872
Subject(s)
  • Medical education--United States--19th century
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Formulas, recipes, etc.
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Dental Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Subject(s)
  • Dental students
  • Dentistry
  • Dentistry--Study and teaching
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

J. Archer Jr.'s notes on Materia Medica lectures held at the University of Pennsylvania, 1797-1798.

1 1

Note and commonplace book of H. Archer, 1830-1832.

1 2

Parker and Archer account book for purchases of wheat, 1841-1851.

1 3

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Agnew, Robert (possibly), notebook [Item 8, volumes 1-4], undated.

2 4-7

Bartram, Moses, commonplace book and notebook [Item 3, volumes 1-2], before 1791.

1 3

Clark, Russel, notebook [Item 11, volumes 1-3], undated.

3 4-6

Curtin, Constans (probably), notebook [Item 6], circa 1806-1809.

2 2

Gilder, D., notebook [Item 12], 1783.

4 7

Graham, Jacob (probably), notebook [Item 13], probably 1788.

3 8

Hamilton, Thomas, notebook [Item 2], undated.

1 2

Hare, Robert (possibly), notebook [Item 9, volumes 1-2], 1796, 1798.

3 1-2

Heydrick, Christopher, notebook [Item 20, volumes 1-2], undated.

4 6-7

Jackson, William, notebook [Item 21, volume 1], 1804-1805.

4 8

Jackson, William, notebook [Item 21, volume 2], 1804-1805.

5 1

Maxwell, Robert G., notebook [Item 14], 1807-1808.

3 9

Overton, James, notebook [Item 1], 1807-1809.

1 1

Simonton, William, notebook [Item 5, volumes 1-3], undated.

1 6-8

Simonton, William, notebook [Item 5, volume 4], undated.

2 1

Spangler, John, notebook [Item 4, volumes 1-2], 1790-1791.

1 4-5

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 7], 1809-1810.

2 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 10], 1798.

3 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 16], undated.

4 2

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 17], undated.

4 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 18], undated.

4 4

Unidentified student, unbound notes [Item 15], undated.

4 1

Unidentified student, unbound notes [Item 19], undated.

4 5

Letters written by Benjamin Rush to Dr. John Dorsey (negatives), location of originals unknown, 1804, 1812.

5 2

Collection Inventory

Volume

"Notes taken from Doctor Adam Kuhn's Lectures on Materia Medica, by David Greenman", 1785.

1

Collection Inventory

Volume

Notebook, 1797-1798.

1

Collection Inventory

Notebook, 1832, 1894-1895.

Collection Inventory

Volume

"A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor Materia Medica, Natural History, and Botany in the University of Pennsylvania", 1801.

1

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Lecture notes (bound volume).

1 1

Items laid in (recipe for "Sirup de Cusineaux' and other notes), 1825, undated.

1 2

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Lectures of James Truman, including "Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics", 1885 February.

1 1

"H.C. Wood", 1886 October-1887 January.

1 2

"Agnew", 1886 November-1887 January.

1 3

"Dr. [Illegible]'s Quiz. Cells", 1886 October-1887 February.

1 4

Plant-based remedies, 1887 February-March.

1 5

"Osler" (case studies), 1887 October-1888 January.

1 6

"Cardiac Stimulants", 1887 November-1888 March.

1 7

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the University of Pennsylvania. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Archer, Henry Wilson, 1813-1887
Creator:
Archer, John, 1777-1830
Title:
Archer family account books and notebooks
Date [inclusive]:
1797-1851
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1120
Extent:
0.2 linear feet (1 box)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This collection (1797-1851) contains notebooks kept by three members of the Archer family, a prominent and politically active family of medical doctors based in Harford County, Maryland. The first file contains John Archer Jr.’s notes on materia medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Barton and given at the University of Pennsylvania in 1797 and 1798. A commonplace book (1830-1832) maintained by Henry Wilson Archer, which contains excerpts mostly from history books and poems is the second file. Also included in the collection is an account book (1841-1851) wherein the wheat purchases of Robert Harris Archer were recorded.
Cite as:
Archer family account books and notebooks, 1797-1841, Ms. Coll. 1120, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Bartram, Moses, -1791
Creator:
Curtin, Constans, 1783-1842
Creator:
Hare, Robert, 1781-1858
Creator:
Heydrick, Christopher, 1770-1856
Creator:
Kuhn, Adam, 1741-1817
Creator:
Overton, James, Jr., 1785-1865
Creator:
Rush, Benjamin, 1746-1813
Creator:
Simonton, William, 1788-1846
Title:
Benjamin Rush lecture notes
Date:
1783-1810, undated
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 225
Extent:
4.2 linear feet (5 boxes)
Language:
English
Abstract:
The Benjamin Rush lecture notes consist of 34 notebooks kept by medical students at the University of Pennsylvania, which record the content of academic lectures delivered by Dr. Benjamin Rush (1745-1813). Rush, a socially and politically prominent physician who lived and practiced in Philadelphia, served as a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine from 1769 to 1813. The handwritten lecture notes in this collection (recorded between 1783 and 1810) present the era's conventional medical wisdom on the causes, symptoms and cures of a range of diseases and disorders.
Cite as:
Benjamin Rush lecture notes, 1783-1810, undated, Ms. Coll. 225, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Greenman, David
Title:
David Greenman notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1785
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1866
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This book of notes was kept by David Greenman during a course of Materia Medica lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1785. The lecture notes themselves are not limited to Materia Medica in the strictest sense, in that they also include some information about physiology, pathology and therapeutics. The notebook is briefly inscribed by Dr. Edward Cutbush (1772-1843) an officer and surgeon in the United States Navy.
Cite as:
David Greenman notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1785, Ms. Codex 1866, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Gillasspy, George, d. 1832
Title:
George Gillasspy notes on lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date [inclusive]:
1797-1798
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1861
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This notebook, kept by George Gillasspy (also "Gillaspy"), records the content of lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1797 and 1798. These lectures touch upon a wide range of topics within materia medica, physiology, pathology and therapeutics, and represent the foundations of late eighteenth century medical education.
Cite as:
George Gillasspy notes on lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1797-1798, Ms. Codex 1861, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Mason, Wellington Smith
Creator:
Muhlenberg, H. H. (Hiester Henry), 1812-1886
Title:
Hiester H. Muhlenberg and Wellington Smith Mason notes on lectures delivered by Drs. Nathaniel Chapman, Judson Daland, and J.K. Mitchell at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1832, 1894-1895
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1873
Extent:
1 volume
Language:
English
Abstract:
This notebook contains lecture material transcribed by two different students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. One portion of the volume contains notes taken by Hiester H. Muhlenberg in 1832; the later material was written by Wellington Smith Mason during two separate courses of lectures between 1894 and 1895. The notes taken by Muhlenberg record a series of lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman on hemorrhages, fevers, cardiac disease and nervous disorders. The notes taken by Mason, decades later, document Dr. Judson Daland’s lectures on physical diagnosis and Dr. J.K. Mitchell's lectures on symptomatology.
Cite as:
Hiester H. Muhlenberg and Wellington Smith Mason notes on lectures delivered by Drs. Nathaniel Chapman, Judson Daland, and J.K. Mitchell at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1832, 1894-1895, Ms. Codex 1873, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Murduck, Jonathan
Title:
Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1802
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1865
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This volume of handwritten lecture notes, titled “A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor […] at the University of Pennsylvania,” was kept by medical student Jonathan Murduck in 1802, and provides a fairly comprehensive survey of the medicinal substances commonly in use in the early nineteenth century United States.
Cite as:
Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1802, Ms. Codex 1865, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Trevor, Joseph
Title:
Joseph Trevor notes on medical lectures delivered by Dr. Samuel Jackson at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date [inclusive]:
1824-1826
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 498
Extent:
0.2 linear foot (1 box)
Physical Facet note:
Written in one hand, attribution from front cover and 1 item laid in. Two leaves laid in. Foliation: [ii], ff. 1-113, pp. 114-119, 15 leaves cut out, 5 ff.
Language:
English
Abstract:
Joseph Trevor was a medical student at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. This volume of lecture notes documents a series of lectures taught by Dr. Samuel Jackson (1787-1872) between 1824 and 1826.
Cite as:
Joseph Trevor notes on medical lectures delivered by Dr. Samuel Jackson at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1824-1826, Ms. Coll. 498, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Huber, William S., 1865-1909
Title:
William S. Huber student lecture notes
Date [inclusive]:
1885-1888
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1306
Extent:
0.5 linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Dr. William S. Huber (1865-1909) was a dentist in Lebanon, Pennsylvania who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical and Dental Schools. This collection contains Huber's student lecture notes recorded between February 1885 and March 1888.
Cite as:
William S. Huber student lecture notes, 1885-1888, Ms. Coll. 1306, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Biography/History

The Archer family was a prominent and politically active family of medical doctors based in Harford County, Maryland. John Archer was born in Maryland in 1741 and (due to the alphabetical antecedence of his last name) was the first person to receive a medical diploma in North America, which he earned from the College of Philadelphia (later the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania) in 1768. His son, John Archer Jr. (1777-1850) also attended medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1798. J. Archer Jr. returned to Maryland after earning his degree and served as a surgeon of the Maryland militia in the War of 1812.

Henry Wilson Archer (1813-1887) was the son of John Archer Jr. Another graduate of the medical school of the University of Pennsylvania, H. Archer lived in Harford County and married Mary Elizabeth Walker in 1849.

The final volume in the collection is an account book created by Robert Harris Archer. Three individuals named Robert Harris Archer (brother of (1775-1857 or 1858), nephew of (1813-1883), or son of (1820-1878) John Archer, Jr.) may have been the account book's author.

Biography/History

Dr. Benjamin Rush (1745-1813) was a socially and politically prominent physician who lived and practiced in Philadelphia. Born in Byberry Township, Pennsylvania, Rush was educated at the University of Edinburgh, and travelled in England and France before returning to Philadelphia in 1769. Rush played an active role in the American Revolution, signing the Declaration of Independence and serving briefly as Surgeon General of the Middle Department of the Continental Army and as a physician with the Philadelphia militia.

Although most prominent Philadelphians left the city for healthier environments during the catastrophic Yellow Fever epidemics that hit Philadelphia in the 1790s, Rush remained in the city to treat the sick; though he may be equally or better remembered today for his strong advocacy of bloodletting as a therapeutic method for the disease.

Rush served as a professor of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (previously the College of Philadelphia) from 1769 to 1789 and as a professor of the "Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice" from 1791 to 1813. Rush also taught courses in the "Theory and Practice of Medicine" from 1789 to 1791, and again from 1796 to 1813.

Biography/History

Little information about David Greenman is readily available; he attended lectures at the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1785 but did not graduate. Dr. Edward Cutbush, who inscribed this volume, graduated from the University in 1794 and pursued a successful career as an officer and surgeon in the U.S. Navy. An eminent scientist of eighteenth century Philadelphia, Dr. Adam Kuhn (1741-1817) was a professor first of Botany and Materia Medica, and then the Theory and Practice of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania between 1768 and 1797.

Biography/History

George Gillasspy (elsewhere spelled “Gillaspy”) was a medical student, military doctor, and apothecary. Gillasspy served as a surgeon with the Second U.S. Infantry Regiment and on the Frigate U.S.S. United States during the Revolutionary War, at or around the same time that he kept his book of notes on medical lectures. (Indeed, Gillasspy signs his name along with “Surgeon 2d U.S. Regt [illeg] & act.g Surgn Frigate” at the beginning of the second section of the lecture notes, referring to his role as surgeon of the Second Regiment and on the frigate  United States.) Gillasspy also served as a surgeon with the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry from 1806 to 1808, and operated an apothecary shop in Philadelphia with his partner Dr. Joseph Strong. In 1803, Gillasspy and Strong outfitted Meriwether Lewis with $90.69 in medicines for his expedition west. Gillaspy died in 1832 and is buried in Christ Church Burial Ground in Philadelphia. Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815) was a leading botanist and naturalist of his day, and Benjamin Rush (1746-1813) was one of Philadelphia’s foremost physicians in late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Both taught at the University of Pennsylvania for much of their careers.

Sources:

History of the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry: From Its Organization, November 17th, 1774 to Its Centennial Anniversary, November 17th, 1874. (Princeton: 1875). URL: https://books.google.com/books?id=va8-AAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s

Kris Fresonke and Mark David Spence. Lewis & Clark: Legacies, Memories, and New Perspectives. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004).

Biography/History

Hiester H. Muhlenberg (1812-1886) graduated from the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1832, and practiced medicine in Reading, Pennsylvania, before switching his career to finance in 1837. Nathaniel Chapman (1780-1853) was a prominent physician and educator in Philadelphia, who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1801 and began his teaching career at the same institution in 1810. He taught Materia Medica and the theory and practice of medicine. Throughout his career, he remained an influential member of the medical community in Philadelphia until his death in 1853. In addition to his teaching, he founded the Medical Institute of Philadelphia in 1817; founded the Philadelphia Journal of the Medical and Physical Sciences (today the  American Journal of Medical Sciences) in 1820; and served as president of the Philadelphia Medical Society, as president of the American Philosophical Society, as fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia (elected in 1807), and as the first president of the American Medical Association (elected in 1848).

Wellington Smith Mason (1865- 1900) graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1898. He appears to have practiced medicine in Williamstown, Pennsylvania, but his career was cut short by his death on September 30, 1900, at age 35, from complications from a surgery for appendicitis. Dr. Judson Daland (1860-circa 1937) graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1882. Following his graduation, he practiced medicine in Philadelphia. He was a demonstrator and an instructor of clinical medicine at the University of Pennsylvania from 1882 until at least 1897. He was also a professor of diseases of the chest at the Philadelphia Polyclinic and College for Graduates in Medicine from 1896 to 1897 and a professor of clinical medicine at the same institution from 1897. J.K. (John Kearsley) Mitchell (1859-1917), the son of S. Weir Mitchell, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1883. He began teaching at the University of Pennsylvania in 1886, serving as assistant demonstrator in clinical medicine until 1894, and as lecturer on general symptomatology from 1894 to 1899.

Biography/History

Jonathan Murduck (born circa 1782) was a student at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1802, but did not receive his degree until 1811. Between 1803 and 1805, Murduck practiced medicine in Port-au-Prince. Murduck’s financial records, patient records, and memoranda from these voyages are held in the Manuscripts Division of the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan.

Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815) was a leading botanist and naturalist of his day, and a professor at the University of Pennsylvania from 1789 to 1813.

Sources: Jonathan Murduck Account Book and Memoranda, William L. Clements Library, The University of Michigan. https://quod.lib.umich.edu/c/clementsmss/umich-wcl-M-1890mur?byte=14434455;focusrgn=frontmatter;subview=standard;view=reslist

Biography/History

Joseph Trevor received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1826. He wrote an essay on foreign bodies in the esophagus and test-phagotomy.

Samuel Jackson was born in Philadelphia, March 22, 1787, son of pharmacist David Jackson and Susan Kemper. Although Jackson attended the College of the University of Pennsylvania, he did not complete the courses required to receive a degree but instead began his study of medicine under Dr. James Hutchinson. After Hutchinson’s death, he continued at the offices of Dr. Casper Wistar. Jackson received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1808. After graduation, he briefly took up the drug business left by his father and older brother.

When the War of 1812 broke out, Jackson joined the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry and served with them in operations in the Chesapeake Bay through the war. Jackson sold his pharmaceutical business upon his return in 1815 and began a private medical practice. In 1820, he became president of the Philadelphia Board of Health, and directed its management of the yellow fever epidemic. In 1821, Jackson helped found the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and was appointed its first Professor of Materia Medica. He also served as attending physician at the Philadelphia Almshouse and as instructor of medical chemistry and materia medica at the Medical Institute of Philadelphia, founded by Nathaniel Chapman.

In 1827, Jackson was made assistant to Professor Nathaniel Chapman at the University of Pennsylvania, a post in which Jackson was responsible for teaching physiology. When Chapman's health declined in 1835, Jackson took over as Professor of the Institutes of Medicine and remained in that chair until his retirement in 1863. He would also teach on the wards of Philadelphia Hospital from 1842 to 1845. His medical publications included The Principles of Medicine Founded on the Structure and Functions of the Animal Organism.

Jackson's professional and scholarly memberships included the College of Physicians of Philadelphia and the American Philosophical Society. While in Montreal, Canada, in 1832 investigating an outbreak of Asian cholera on behalf of the Sanitary Board of Councils for Philadelphia, he married the daughter of a British officer. Jackson died in Philadelphia, April 4, 1872.

Information regarding Dr. Samuel Jackson taken in its entirety from Penn Biographies.

Biography/History

Dr. William S. Huber was born in July, 1865, to Dr. William A. (a prominent Lebanon, Pennsylvania, dentist) and Juliana Huber. He was educated at public schools in Lebanon, Pennsylvania and graduated from Lebanon High School. From there, he began his education at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, completing first the course of medicine, and then continuing on to take a full course in dentistry. According to the University of Pennsylvania Catalogue and Announcements from the 1886 to 1887 academic year, Huber was a successful student and was among several students "selected for their proficiency in Anatomy to act as Assistant Demonstrators of Anatomy," (page 66).

Following the completion of his studies, he succeeded his father in his dental practice and "built up a large and lucrative practice," (Kirk, page 1019). In 1895, he married A. May Kaler (1866-1901) and they were the parents of William K. (1896-1951) and Charles G. (born in 1898).

In addition to his career as a dentist, Huber served as a member of the board of public schools, as presiding officer of the city council and the select council, and as member of the board of elders of the Salem Evangelical Lutheran Church. He also participated in the Mt. Lebanon Lodge, Weidle Chapter, and Hermit Commandery of the Masons; the Lu Lu Temple in Reading, Pennsylvania; and the Harrisburg Consistory. Huber died of apoplexy on May 25, 1909.

Works cited:

Kirk, Edward C., editor. The Dental Cosmos, Volume 51, 1909 (page 1019).

University of Pennsylvania Catalogue and Announcements, 1886-1887, page 66.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of notebooks kept by three members of the Archer family between 1797 and 1851. Two booklets of notes on materia medica lectures held at the University of Pennsylvania make up the first file in the collection. John Archer Jr. attended the lectures (delivered by Benjamin S. Barton, M.D., a Professor of Materia Medica, Botany and Natural History) in 1797 and 1798. Addressing what is now considered pharmacology, the booklets detail medical treatments for a number of diseases. The first volume of the set is concerned largely with the nutritional benefits of various foods and the categorization of medicines, whether as botanical or mineral astringents, tonics, emetics, stimulants, and the like. The second volume discusses the merits of different medicines (mostly plant-based) and lists viable treatments for a range of diseases. A note on the last page of the second volume suggests that there was a third booklet in this set of lecture notes.

The second file in this collection is the commonplace book of Henry Archer, written between 1830 and 1832 in Harford County, Maryland. This book is roughly organized into four sections. The first section consists of notes on the history of Asia (based on a text by Charles Rollin), Rome (based on Edward Gibbon’s The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire), Roman jurisprudence, and the feudal system in Scotland. The second section features shorter quotations taken from several sources including  Don Juan, the poetry of Byron and Thomas Campbell, and  The Young Duke, a novel by Benjamin Disraeli. Also in this section is a transcription of ‘The Union College Dunciad’, a (probably unpublished) volume of satirical verse written in Schenectady in 1830. The notebook’s third section is a list of the books that Archer read, sorted by category and year. Each book has a number next to it, perhaps denoting how many times it was read. This list is extended on the front inside cover of the notebook. The final section of the notebook is titled ‘Questions for Debate’, and includes eleven questions about both historical and contemporary political issues.

An account book kept by Robert Harris Archer from 1841 to 1851 is the third file in this series, and lists Archer’s purchases of wheat. This book is, for the most part, well organized with the name of the wheat seller, price and amount of wheat, and date of purchase laid out consistently. A few pages, however, are filled with tally marks, calculations and miscellaneous notes and sketches, including two small drawings of houses labeled ‘Baltimore’ and ‘Philadelphia’.

Scope and Contents

The Benjamin Rush lecture notes consist of 34 notebooks kept by a number of medical students at the University of Pennsylvania, which record the content of academic lectures delivered by Dr. Benjamin Rush. Many of the notebooks are undated, but those which have been inscribed with dates range from 1783 to 1810 (Rush was a professor at the University from 1769 until his death in 1813). All of the notes are handwritten, and some are unsigned or of uncertain authorship. All but two sets of notes are bound; however, those that were rebound at some point since they were created are quite fragile. The notes seem to be verbatim transcriptions of Rush's lectures, and are written in full sentences. Many of the volumes of notes have indices at the front or back, which list diseases alphabetically along with the page on which the condition is described.

Rush taught courses in Chemistry, the "Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice" and the "Theory and Practice of Medicine." The content and format of his lectures seem to have remained fairly consistent across the nearly three decades represented in this collection. Chemistry lectures (recorded by students Moses Bartram (item 3), D. Gilder (item 12), Jacob Graham (item 13), and an unidentified student (item 16)) describe particular elements and compounds, as well as broad classes of substances such as "vinegars," salts, earths, metals, and airs, some of which groups are divided into subcategories. Interspersed with this content is information about the medical applications of particular chemical substances, and their effects upon the human body.

Researchers will find lectures on the "Institutes." In the first lecture recorded by an unidentified student in item 7, Rush explains that "the Institutes are divided into four parts, Physiology, Hygiene, Pathology & Therapeutics." The notebooks that correspond to Rush’s lectures on the Institutes generally treat the topics of anatomy, sensation, perception, cognition, the psyche, mental and physical differences between men and women, epidemiology, prognosis, diagnosis, convalescence, the effects of the environment upon the body, and some of the social and cultural factors that can influence health. Rush dedicates a number of lectures to the topics of psychology and psychological disorders, including discussions of the symptoms and cures of "passions" (which he usually defines as fear, love, anger and grief) and of mania. Notes on the Institutes tend also to include fairly long discourses on diet, the preparation and qualities of different foods and beverages, especially bread, beer, wine and alcoholic spirits, and the influences of each upon the body.

The lectures on the Theory and Practice of Medicine focus heavily on fevers, their theoretical categorizations and various symptomatic presentations. A wide range of non-febrile diseases (acute, chronic, infectious, non-communicable, venereal, psychological, etc.) are also profiled, with detailed descriptions of their symptoms and of viable therapeutic approaches to each. Other lectures specifically outline the diseases and health problems especially common among women, "negroes," children, and the elderly. The notes on the practice of medicine contain some short case studies, and all of Rush’s lectures are very referential to other doctors, scientists and medical experts.

The medical students whose names appear on the volumes of notes in this collection are Moses Bartram (1767-1791), Russel Clark, Constans Curtin (1783-1842), D. Gilder, Jacob Graham (possibly), Thomas Hamilton, Robert Hare (1781-1858) (possibly), Christopher Heydrick (1770-1856), William Jackson, Robert G. Maxwell, James Overton (1785-1865), William Simonton (1788-1846), and John Spangler. The four volumes attributed to David Hayes Agnew (1818-1892) (item 8) were probably created by his father, Dr. Robert Agnew (1785-1858). One other dating anomaly: the Thomas Hamilton notebook (Item 2) which is dated January 7, 1814 (a year after Rush's death) possibly signifies the conclusion of Hamilton’s studies.

While the vast majority of the materials within this collection contain lecture notes, the first volume created by Moses Bartram (Item 3, volume 1) appears to be less a record of lecture material than a collection of excerpts from scientific and medical treatises, and is thus described in the finding aid as a commonplace book. Researchers will find a few lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn (1741-1817) in notebooks by both John Spangler (Item 4, volume 1) and D. Gilder’s notebook (Item 12). D. Gilder's notebook also includes some notes from lectures by Dr. William Shippen (1736-1808).

In addition to the lecture notes, researchers will find a "List of Domestic Medicine which ought to be Kept in the Shops of American Physicians" and a transcription of his class's valedictory address in Russel Clark's notebook (item 11, volume 3); a "Table of Fever," which seemingly correlates body temperature to a type of febrile disease, within the notebooks of Robert G. Maxwell (item 14) and an unidentified student (item 18); and several pages of "Questions in Natural Philosophy" and a short section on the government of Pennsylvania in an unbound set of notes by an unidentified student (item 15).

Prior to processing in 2017, item numbers were assigned to notebooks. These item numbers have been retained.

Scope and Contents

This book of notes was kept by David Greenman during a course of Materia Medica lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1785. The first pages of the volume include some curious annotations by Dr. Edward Cutbush in 1814. Cutbush claims, "These notes have been taken incorrectly from my friends' lectures- I purchased the volume at a public auction. Washington" and a few pages later, "orthography very incorrect." David Greenman’s signature on the title page of the notebook has been scribbled over in ink but is still legible. The lecture notes themselves are not limited to Materia Medica in the strictest sense, in that they also include some information about physiology, pathology and therapeutics. The organization of the material in the book is somewhat disjointed, and begins with a brief history of medicine, overview of physiology, discussion of digestion and the qualities of various foods (salt, sugar, milk, etc.), and the means of treating diseases, especially scurvy, by regulation or alteration of the diet. Subsequent sections focus more specifically on medicines and their classifications, especially into the categories of astringents (including “metallic astringents” like iron, lead and zinc), stimulants (including “bitters” like cinchona bark) and sedatives (among which opium is discussed at greatest length). A fairly detailed description of types of tumors, particularly those characteristic of breast cancer, begins on page 128, and a discussion of hysteria follows from page 139 to 148. The medical properties and applications of alkaline substances, soap, errhines (drugs that produce a runny nose) and mercury are subsequently explained, followed by the therapeutic uses of purgatives and blisters. The penultimate section of the book touches upon the topics of plethora (a systemic excess of blood in the body) and complications relating to menstruation, and the final chapter relates to anthelmintics (anti-parasitic medications). At the very end of this book is an alphabetized index of the contents of the notebook, which lists a combination of the names of drugs and medicinal plants, and the medical conditions discussed.

Scope and Contents

This volume of notes is organized into three sections, corresponding to three courses of lectures. The first is titled by Gillasspy, “A Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Barton, professor in the University of Pennsylvania with Remarks thereon &c,” and dated 1797. These lectures first address classes of medicines, namely astringents, vegetable tonics, metallic tonics, stimulants (seven consecutive lectures discuss the therapeutic properties of opium), emetics, cathartics, “salivating medicines,” and diuretics. Later lectures describe particular medicines, almost all of which are plant based. These profiles typically provide a medicinal plant’s Latin name, common name, native region, effects upon the human body and pharmacological applications.

The next section of the notebook (1797) contains both handwritten notes and printed material. The first page of this portion of the document is a printed cover of a booklet titled “A Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on the Institutes of Medicine by Benjamin Rush, M.D.. Professor of the Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice in the University of Pennsylvania.” The subsequent handwritten notes on these lectures are interspersed with excerpts of the printed syllabus to which they correspond. These lectures address physiology, pathology and therapeutics, in this order. Within the first topic, Rush briefly presents some basic features and functions of the human body (such as respiration, circulation, sensation, and cognition), before discussing nutrition, digestion and “the secretions and excretions,” and finally outlining the physical differences between men and women, some information about obstetric and gynecological medicine, and what he terms “the stages of life.” The portion of the lecture series on pathology outlines what Rush regards as the four causes of disease -remote, predisposing, occasional and proximate- along with some of the signs of disease. The third and final section of this syllabus, “Therapeutics, OR, of the method of curing diseases,” describes the actions of various types of medicines.

The final section of the book contains notes on “the practice of physic” from lectures delivered by Benjamin Rush in 1798. The first of these lectures relate to the topics of prognosis and diagnosis, “transient symptoms,” and depleting, stimulating and sedative medicines. The rest of the lectures in the volume relate to fevers and their extensive classifications. Along with descriptions of the various febrile “states,” Rush presents the most effective treatments for each. (There is also a short discourse, at the end of this section, on “diseases of the mind”).

The presence of press-printed material in section two, and the closeness of the handwritten text to the spine of the book, suggests that the volume was bound after the notes were taken.

Scope and Contents

This book of notes contains lecture material transcribed by two different students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. One portion of the volume contains notes taken by Hiester H. Muhlenberg in 1832; the later material was written by Wellington Smith Mason during two separate courses of lectures between 1894 and 1895. An inscription provided by William Pepper explains that "this old notebook was found in the basement of Medical Hall, Jan. 1903. It had probably been given to Mr. Wm. H. Salvador [clerk of the Medical Department] in 97 or 98." The notes taken by Muhlenberg record a series of lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman. This material reviews diseases that fall into four classes--diseases of the heart, diseases of the nervous system, exanthemata or "eruptive fevers," and hemorrhages--providing a description, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and list of causes for each condition. There is a brief, final section on asthma, and there are a few loose sheets of letter paper enclosed in the book, which describe some other diseases, like dropsy. The section on exanthemata includes some information on inoculation and vaccination.

The notes taken by Mason from 1894 to 1895 correspond to two courses. The first, Dr. Judson Daland’s lectures on Physical Diagnosis, primarily discusses cardiopulmonary diseases, reviewed through a number of case studies. Lectures seven through fourteen describe the signs and symptoms of various conditions, particularly tuberculosis. The remainder of the lectures, which feature some ink illustrations, address the anatomy of the blood and heart "with reference to diagnosis." The notes on blood mainly address the preparation and examination of microscope slides.

The second set of notes on Symptomatology lectures, given by Dr. J. K. Mitchell, focuses on how to collect and analyze information about a patient's experience of disease. In particular, these lectures address the physiological (sometimes physiognomic) indications of illness and the interpretation of these signs, the sorts of people most susceptible to pulmonary disease, different types of pain and their relationships to particular diseases, and the most effective methods of collecting relevant medical information from patients. By and large, Mason’s lectures lean heavily on illustrative case studies and patient examinations (both clinical and post-mortem), which are typically presented in a fairly detailed, standardized format.

Scope and Contents

This volume of handwritten lecture notes, titled "A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor […] in the University of Pennsylvania," was kept by Jonathan Murduck in 1802, and provides a fairly comprehensive survey of the medicinal substances commonly in use in the early nineteenth century United States. The detailed table of contents at the beginning of the notebook lists a number of broad categories into which various medicines are sorted. The primary classes of drugs and medicinal substances noted are astringents, tonics, "Alimentary Matter," stimulants, evacuants (including errhines and sialogogues, drugs that produce a runny nose and salivation, respectively), diuretics, emetics, cathartics, and antithelmintics (anti-parasitic medicines). There is also an opening chapter on milk, which mainly discusses lactation in humans and the properties of milk, and a short final section titled "Materia Nutrentia," which relates to diet, nutrition and the component elements of food (acid, sugar, oil, etc.). The main chapters or sections of the text consist of a passage discussing the general characteristics, properties and applications of this type of medicine, followed by a list of "particular" drugs within the category. The great majority of “particulars” are medicinal plants, though some sections are subdivided into "metallic," "mineral" or "animal" substances (and in some instances, medicinal plants are arranged based on their indigeneity to the United States).

The medicinal substances are usually listed by their Latin names, and discussed in a few paragraphs. For botanical medicines, these descriptions provide the plant’s common and Latin names, native region, pharmaceutical preparation, effects upon the body, therapeutic applications, and sometimes one or two brief case studies indicating its efficacy or inefficacy in treating particular conditions. The three drugs described at greatest length are opium, "Cortex Peruvianus" (Peruvian bark or cinchona) and mercury; the discussion of each of these medicines is organized by the specific diseases they can be used to combat.

Scope and Contents

This collection contains lecture notes on pathology, diagnosis, and treatments, including prescriptions, taken at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School from 1824 to 1826 in courses taught by Dr. Samuel Jackson. The lecture notes include frequent references to Dr. Nathaniel Chapman, a professor to whom Jackson was made assistant in 1827.

A portion of the volume is in question and answer format. For example, under the condition "Asthma," questions such as "What is asthma?," "What are the causes?," etc. are asked and followed by the answers. By page 36, this format changes to a more standard narrative of the lectures.

Lectures addressed bilious pleurisy, peripneumonia rotha, asthma, angina pectoris, pertussis, phthisis pulmonalis, cynanche trachialis, dropsy, atonic dropsy, ascitis, hydrothorax, scrophula, marasmus, hydrocephalus, cynanche laryngea, cynanche tonsillaris, cynanche parotidea (mumps), scarlet fever, measles, variola or small pox, gout, rheumatism, hematuria, hemorrhoides or piles, diseases of the digestive system, drunkenness, exanthemata, diseases of the cutaneous system, erysipelas, diseases of the cerebral system, epilepsy, chronic laryngitis, and hepatitis. All spelling and terms are replicated exactly. Several pages were removed, it appears with a knife. A small number of remedies follow, including a recipe for "Dr. Jackson's cough mixture." A few notes, originally laid into the volume, include a recipe for "sirip de cusineaux."

Scope and Contents

This collection contains Dr. William S. Huber’s lecture notes from his time at the University of Pennsylvania Medical and Dental Schools. There are seven volumes that begin in February of 1885 and end in March of 1888. Several of the volumes overlap in time and seem to have been used for separate classes. The notes themselves include several hand-drawn diagrams. Lectures address Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics, pharmaceuticals, bone fractures, concussions, ulcers, pain and inflammation, and cells, as well as diseases of the blood, the liver, the heart, and the lungs. There seem to be a number of descriptions of plant based remedies in the first, second, and fifth volumes in the collection. Professors include anatomist and surgeon David Hayes Agnew; professor of clinical medicine William Osler; professor of dental pathology, therapeutics, and Materia Medica James Truman; and professor of clinical medicine H.C. Wood.

Most of the volumes are written from front to back; then turned over and written back to front. On one occasion, a quiz is included, but it is unclear if the notes are documenting Huber's studying or the actual quiz. The volume dated October 1887 to January 1888 appears to contain notes from actual medical cases, describing the gender and age of patient, their vocation, their medical condition, history of condition, and, sometimes, recommendations. It is possible that this class was taught by Osler.

Huber's handwriting is fairly difficult to read and it is frequently unclear if the headings of pages are different classes or simply different lectures within classes. None of the volumes have clear titles of courses with the possible exception of the first, dating February of 1885, which seems to be Truman's class on Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics. Folder titles were crafted from the most prominent information on the first few pages of each notebook. It is often unclear who taught the courses. Despite the challenges of reading Huber's handwriting and determining courses or teachers, these volumes provide a glimpse into the type of education a student in medicine and dentistry would have received at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1880s.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2015 August 24

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  July 25, 2017

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 12

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 2

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 November 16

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 9

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2018 April 10

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2016 May 11

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Kelin Baldridge

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Mrs. W. P. Durfee of Geneva, New York.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of William Pepper.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Dr. William Pepper, 1903

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Benjamin S. Paschell, 1903.

Source of Acquisition

Sold by Carmen D. Valentino, 2003.

Source of Acquisition

Transferred from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, 2015.

Processing Information note

Formerly: Dewey MS 615.04 K954.

Processing Information note

Formerly Dewey MS 610.4 R89.5

Processing Information note

Formerly Dewey 610.7 C367.

Processing Information note

Formerly: Dewey MS 615.1 B283.

Return to Top »

Related Materials

Related Archival Materials note

At Dolph Briscoe Center for American History,The University of Texas at Austin: Robert Harris Archer family papers, 1846-1871

At the Maryland Historical Society: several family members' papers listed under "Archer."

Related Archival Materials note

At the American Philosophical Society:

Robert Hare papers, 1764-1859 and Hare-Willing Family Papers,1724-1965

At Duke University Libraries:

Robert Hare papers, Philadelphia. 1825-1858

At the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania:

Robert Hare correspondence, 1793-1858, Ms. Coll. 74

At the Library Company of Philadelphia:

Rush family papers, 1748-1876

Related Archival Materials note

At the American Philoslphical Society:

Violetta Delafield-Benjamin Smith Barton collection, 1783-1817, Mss.B.B284d

At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania:

Benjamin Smith Barton papers, Collection 0034

At the Library Company of Philadelphia:

Rush family papers, 1748-1876

At the University of Pennsylvania, Archives and Records Center

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810, UPW1a-13

At the University of Pennsylvania, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts:

Benjamin Rush lecture notes, 1783-1810, undated, Ms. Coll. 225

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810-1823, Ms. Coll. 669

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810, UPW1a-13

Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1802, Ms. Codex 1865

Related Archival Materials note

At the Historical Medical Library of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia:

John Kearsley Mitchell correspondence, 1892-1914, MSS 2/263

Nathaniel Chapman papers, circa 1810-1853, collection 10a

At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania:

Charles Sellers notes on Nathaniel Chapman lectures at the University of Pennsylvania, Am.13596

John Josiah White notes from Nathaniel Chapman lectures, Am.1880

At the National Library of Medicine:

Notes taken from the lectures of Nathaniel Chapman in the University of Pennsylvania / by Robert M. Tute, 1828, MS B 199

At the University of Pennsylvania, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts:

Student notes on lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1813-1833, Ms. Coll. 226

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Account books
  • Commonplace books
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
Subject(s)
  • Families
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medicine

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
Subject(s)
  • Chemistry--history
  • Chemistry--Study and teaching
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--History
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
  • Notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Cutbush, Edward, 1772-1843
  • Kuhn, Adam, 1741-1817
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Materia medica--Early works to 1800
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
  • Rush, Benjamin, 1746-1813
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
  • Notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Chapman, Nathaniel, 1780-1853
  • Daland, Judson
  • Mitchell, John Kearsley, 1793-1858
Subject(s)
  • Education
  • Medical education--United States--19th century
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Chapman, Nathaniel, 1780-1853
  • Jackson, Samuel, 1787-1872
Subject(s)
  • Medical education--United States--19th century
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Formulas, recipes, etc.
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Dental Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Subject(s)
  • Dental students
  • Dentistry
  • Dentistry--Study and teaching
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

J. Archer Jr.'s notes on Materia Medica lectures held at the University of Pennsylvania, 1797-1798.

1 1

Note and commonplace book of H. Archer, 1830-1832.

1 2

Parker and Archer account book for purchases of wheat, 1841-1851.

1 3

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Agnew, Robert (possibly), notebook [Item 8, volumes 1-4], undated.

2 4-7

Bartram, Moses, commonplace book and notebook [Item 3, volumes 1-2], before 1791.

1 3

Clark, Russel, notebook [Item 11, volumes 1-3], undated.

3 4-6

Curtin, Constans (probably), notebook [Item 6], circa 1806-1809.

2 2

Gilder, D., notebook [Item 12], 1783.

4 7

Graham, Jacob (probably), notebook [Item 13], probably 1788.

3 8

Hamilton, Thomas, notebook [Item 2], undated.

1 2

Hare, Robert (possibly), notebook [Item 9, volumes 1-2], 1796, 1798.

3 1-2

Heydrick, Christopher, notebook [Item 20, volumes 1-2], undated.

4 6-7

Jackson, William, notebook [Item 21, volume 1], 1804-1805.

4 8

Jackson, William, notebook [Item 21, volume 2], 1804-1805.

5 1

Maxwell, Robert G., notebook [Item 14], 1807-1808.

3 9

Overton, James, notebook [Item 1], 1807-1809.

1 1

Simonton, William, notebook [Item 5, volumes 1-3], undated.

1 6-8

Simonton, William, notebook [Item 5, volume 4], undated.

2 1

Spangler, John, notebook [Item 4, volumes 1-2], 1790-1791.

1 4-5

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 7], 1809-1810.

2 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 10], 1798.

3 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 16], undated.

4 2

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 17], undated.

4 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 18], undated.

4 4

Unidentified student, unbound notes [Item 15], undated.

4 1

Unidentified student, unbound notes [Item 19], undated.

4 5

Letters written by Benjamin Rush to Dr. John Dorsey (negatives), location of originals unknown, 1804, 1812.

5 2

Collection Inventory

Volume

"Notes taken from Doctor Adam Kuhn's Lectures on Materia Medica, by David Greenman", 1785.

1

Collection Inventory

Volume

Notebook, 1797-1798.

1

Collection Inventory

Notebook, 1832, 1894-1895.

Collection Inventory

Volume

"A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor Materia Medica, Natural History, and Botany in the University of Pennsylvania", 1801.

1

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Lecture notes (bound volume).

1 1

Items laid in (recipe for "Sirup de Cusineaux' and other notes), 1825, undated.

1 2

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Lectures of James Truman, including "Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics", 1885 February.

1 1

"H.C. Wood", 1886 October-1887 January.

1 2

"Agnew", 1886 November-1887 January.

1 3

"Dr. [Illegible]'s Quiz. Cells", 1886 October-1887 February.

1 4

Plant-based remedies, 1887 February-March.

1 5

"Osler" (case studies), 1887 October-1888 January.

1 6

"Cardiac Stimulants", 1887 November-1888 March.

1 7

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the University of Pennsylvania. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Archer, Henry Wilson, 1813-1887
Creator:
Archer, John, 1777-1830
Title:
Archer family account books and notebooks
Date [inclusive]:
1797-1851
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1120
Extent:
0.2 linear feet (1 box)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This collection (1797-1851) contains notebooks kept by three members of the Archer family, a prominent and politically active family of medical doctors based in Harford County, Maryland. The first file contains John Archer Jr.’s notes on materia medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Barton and given at the University of Pennsylvania in 1797 and 1798. A commonplace book (1830-1832) maintained by Henry Wilson Archer, which contains excerpts mostly from history books and poems is the second file. Also included in the collection is an account book (1841-1851) wherein the wheat purchases of Robert Harris Archer were recorded.
Cite as:
Archer family account books and notebooks, 1797-1841, Ms. Coll. 1120, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Bartram, Moses, -1791
Creator:
Curtin, Constans, 1783-1842
Creator:
Hare, Robert, 1781-1858
Creator:
Heydrick, Christopher, 1770-1856
Creator:
Kuhn, Adam, 1741-1817
Creator:
Overton, James, Jr., 1785-1865
Creator:
Rush, Benjamin, 1746-1813
Creator:
Simonton, William, 1788-1846
Title:
Benjamin Rush lecture notes
Date:
1783-1810, undated
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 225
Extent:
4.2 linear feet (5 boxes)
Language:
English
Abstract:
The Benjamin Rush lecture notes consist of 34 notebooks kept by medical students at the University of Pennsylvania, which record the content of academic lectures delivered by Dr. Benjamin Rush (1745-1813). Rush, a socially and politically prominent physician who lived and practiced in Philadelphia, served as a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine from 1769 to 1813. The handwritten lecture notes in this collection (recorded between 1783 and 1810) present the era's conventional medical wisdom on the causes, symptoms and cures of a range of diseases and disorders.
Cite as:
Benjamin Rush lecture notes, 1783-1810, undated, Ms. Coll. 225, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Greenman, David
Title:
David Greenman notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1785
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1866
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This book of notes was kept by David Greenman during a course of Materia Medica lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1785. The lecture notes themselves are not limited to Materia Medica in the strictest sense, in that they also include some information about physiology, pathology and therapeutics. The notebook is briefly inscribed by Dr. Edward Cutbush (1772-1843) an officer and surgeon in the United States Navy.
Cite as:
David Greenman notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1785, Ms. Codex 1866, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Gillasspy, George, d. 1832
Title:
George Gillasspy notes on lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date [inclusive]:
1797-1798
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1861
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This notebook, kept by George Gillasspy (also "Gillaspy"), records the content of lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1797 and 1798. These lectures touch upon a wide range of topics within materia medica, physiology, pathology and therapeutics, and represent the foundations of late eighteenth century medical education.
Cite as:
George Gillasspy notes on lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1797-1798, Ms. Codex 1861, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Mason, Wellington Smith
Creator:
Muhlenberg, H. H. (Hiester Henry), 1812-1886
Title:
Hiester H. Muhlenberg and Wellington Smith Mason notes on lectures delivered by Drs. Nathaniel Chapman, Judson Daland, and J.K. Mitchell at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1832, 1894-1895
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1873
Extent:
1 volume
Language:
English
Abstract:
This notebook contains lecture material transcribed by two different students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. One portion of the volume contains notes taken by Hiester H. Muhlenberg in 1832; the later material was written by Wellington Smith Mason during two separate courses of lectures between 1894 and 1895. The notes taken by Muhlenberg record a series of lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman on hemorrhages, fevers, cardiac disease and nervous disorders. The notes taken by Mason, decades later, document Dr. Judson Daland’s lectures on physical diagnosis and Dr. J.K. Mitchell's lectures on symptomatology.
Cite as:
Hiester H. Muhlenberg and Wellington Smith Mason notes on lectures delivered by Drs. Nathaniel Chapman, Judson Daland, and J.K. Mitchell at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1832, 1894-1895, Ms. Codex 1873, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Murduck, Jonathan
Title:
Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1802
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1865
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This volume of handwritten lecture notes, titled “A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor […] at the University of Pennsylvania,” was kept by medical student Jonathan Murduck in 1802, and provides a fairly comprehensive survey of the medicinal substances commonly in use in the early nineteenth century United States.
Cite as:
Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1802, Ms. Codex 1865, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Trevor, Joseph
Title:
Joseph Trevor notes on medical lectures delivered by Dr. Samuel Jackson at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date [inclusive]:
1824-1826
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 498
Extent:
0.2 linear foot (1 box)
Physical Facet note:
Written in one hand, attribution from front cover and 1 item laid in. Two leaves laid in. Foliation: [ii], ff. 1-113, pp. 114-119, 15 leaves cut out, 5 ff.
Language:
English
Abstract:
Joseph Trevor was a medical student at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. This volume of lecture notes documents a series of lectures taught by Dr. Samuel Jackson (1787-1872) between 1824 and 1826.
Cite as:
Joseph Trevor notes on medical lectures delivered by Dr. Samuel Jackson at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1824-1826, Ms. Coll. 498, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Huber, William S., 1865-1909
Title:
William S. Huber student lecture notes
Date [inclusive]:
1885-1888
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1306
Extent:
0.5 linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Dr. William S. Huber (1865-1909) was a dentist in Lebanon, Pennsylvania who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical and Dental Schools. This collection contains Huber's student lecture notes recorded between February 1885 and March 1888.
Cite as:
William S. Huber student lecture notes, 1885-1888, Ms. Coll. 1306, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Biography/History

The Archer family was a prominent and politically active family of medical doctors based in Harford County, Maryland. John Archer was born in Maryland in 1741 and (due to the alphabetical antecedence of his last name) was the first person to receive a medical diploma in North America, which he earned from the College of Philadelphia (later the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania) in 1768. His son, John Archer Jr. (1777-1850) also attended medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1798. J. Archer Jr. returned to Maryland after earning his degree and served as a surgeon of the Maryland militia in the War of 1812.

Henry Wilson Archer (1813-1887) was the son of John Archer Jr. Another graduate of the medical school of the University of Pennsylvania, H. Archer lived in Harford County and married Mary Elizabeth Walker in 1849.

The final volume in the collection is an account book created by Robert Harris Archer. Three individuals named Robert Harris Archer (brother of (1775-1857 or 1858), nephew of (1813-1883), or son of (1820-1878) John Archer, Jr.) may have been the account book's author.

Biography/History

Dr. Benjamin Rush (1745-1813) was a socially and politically prominent physician who lived and practiced in Philadelphia. Born in Byberry Township, Pennsylvania, Rush was educated at the University of Edinburgh, and travelled in England and France before returning to Philadelphia in 1769. Rush played an active role in the American Revolution, signing the Declaration of Independence and serving briefly as Surgeon General of the Middle Department of the Continental Army and as a physician with the Philadelphia militia.

Although most prominent Philadelphians left the city for healthier environments during the catastrophic Yellow Fever epidemics that hit Philadelphia in the 1790s, Rush remained in the city to treat the sick; though he may be equally or better remembered today for his strong advocacy of bloodletting as a therapeutic method for the disease.

Rush served as a professor of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (previously the College of Philadelphia) from 1769 to 1789 and as a professor of the "Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice" from 1791 to 1813. Rush also taught courses in the "Theory and Practice of Medicine" from 1789 to 1791, and again from 1796 to 1813.

Biography/History

Little information about David Greenman is readily available; he attended lectures at the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1785 but did not graduate. Dr. Edward Cutbush, who inscribed this volume, graduated from the University in 1794 and pursued a successful career as an officer and surgeon in the U.S. Navy. An eminent scientist of eighteenth century Philadelphia, Dr. Adam Kuhn (1741-1817) was a professor first of Botany and Materia Medica, and then the Theory and Practice of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania between 1768 and 1797.

Biography/History

George Gillasspy (elsewhere spelled “Gillaspy”) was a medical student, military doctor, and apothecary. Gillasspy served as a surgeon with the Second U.S. Infantry Regiment and on the Frigate U.S.S. United States during the Revolutionary War, at or around the same time that he kept his book of notes on medical lectures. (Indeed, Gillasspy signs his name along with “Surgeon 2d U.S. Regt [illeg] & act.g Surgn Frigate” at the beginning of the second section of the lecture notes, referring to his role as surgeon of the Second Regiment and on the frigate  United States.) Gillasspy also served as a surgeon with the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry from 1806 to 1808, and operated an apothecary shop in Philadelphia with his partner Dr. Joseph Strong. In 1803, Gillasspy and Strong outfitted Meriwether Lewis with $90.69 in medicines for his expedition west. Gillaspy died in 1832 and is buried in Christ Church Burial Ground in Philadelphia. Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815) was a leading botanist and naturalist of his day, and Benjamin Rush (1746-1813) was one of Philadelphia’s foremost physicians in late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Both taught at the University of Pennsylvania for much of their careers.

Sources:

History of the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry: From Its Organization, November 17th, 1774 to Its Centennial Anniversary, November 17th, 1874. (Princeton: 1875). URL: https://books.google.com/books?id=va8-AAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s

Kris Fresonke and Mark David Spence. Lewis & Clark: Legacies, Memories, and New Perspectives. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004).

Biography/History

Hiester H. Muhlenberg (1812-1886) graduated from the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1832, and practiced medicine in Reading, Pennsylvania, before switching his career to finance in 1837. Nathaniel Chapman (1780-1853) was a prominent physician and educator in Philadelphia, who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1801 and began his teaching career at the same institution in 1810. He taught Materia Medica and the theory and practice of medicine. Throughout his career, he remained an influential member of the medical community in Philadelphia until his death in 1853. In addition to his teaching, he founded the Medical Institute of Philadelphia in 1817; founded the Philadelphia Journal of the Medical and Physical Sciences (today the  American Journal of Medical Sciences) in 1820; and served as president of the Philadelphia Medical Society, as president of the American Philosophical Society, as fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia (elected in 1807), and as the first president of the American Medical Association (elected in 1848).

Wellington Smith Mason (1865- 1900) graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1898. He appears to have practiced medicine in Williamstown, Pennsylvania, but his career was cut short by his death on September 30, 1900, at age 35, from complications from a surgery for appendicitis. Dr. Judson Daland (1860-circa 1937) graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1882. Following his graduation, he practiced medicine in Philadelphia. He was a demonstrator and an instructor of clinical medicine at the University of Pennsylvania from 1882 until at least 1897. He was also a professor of diseases of the chest at the Philadelphia Polyclinic and College for Graduates in Medicine from 1896 to 1897 and a professor of clinical medicine at the same institution from 1897. J.K. (John Kearsley) Mitchell (1859-1917), the son of S. Weir Mitchell, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1883. He began teaching at the University of Pennsylvania in 1886, serving as assistant demonstrator in clinical medicine until 1894, and as lecturer on general symptomatology from 1894 to 1899.

Biography/History

Jonathan Murduck (born circa 1782) was a student at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1802, but did not receive his degree until 1811. Between 1803 and 1805, Murduck practiced medicine in Port-au-Prince. Murduck’s financial records, patient records, and memoranda from these voyages are held in the Manuscripts Division of the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan.

Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815) was a leading botanist and naturalist of his day, and a professor at the University of Pennsylvania from 1789 to 1813.

Sources: Jonathan Murduck Account Book and Memoranda, William L. Clements Library, The University of Michigan. https://quod.lib.umich.edu/c/clementsmss/umich-wcl-M-1890mur?byte=14434455;focusrgn=frontmatter;subview=standard;view=reslist

Biography/History

Joseph Trevor received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1826. He wrote an essay on foreign bodies in the esophagus and test-phagotomy.

Samuel Jackson was born in Philadelphia, March 22, 1787, son of pharmacist David Jackson and Susan Kemper. Although Jackson attended the College of the University of Pennsylvania, he did not complete the courses required to receive a degree but instead began his study of medicine under Dr. James Hutchinson. After Hutchinson’s death, he continued at the offices of Dr. Casper Wistar. Jackson received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1808. After graduation, he briefly took up the drug business left by his father and older brother.

When the War of 1812 broke out, Jackson joined the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry and served with them in operations in the Chesapeake Bay through the war. Jackson sold his pharmaceutical business upon his return in 1815 and began a private medical practice. In 1820, he became president of the Philadelphia Board of Health, and directed its management of the yellow fever epidemic. In 1821, Jackson helped found the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and was appointed its first Professor of Materia Medica. He also served as attending physician at the Philadelphia Almshouse and as instructor of medical chemistry and materia medica at the Medical Institute of Philadelphia, founded by Nathaniel Chapman.

In 1827, Jackson was made assistant to Professor Nathaniel Chapman at the University of Pennsylvania, a post in which Jackson was responsible for teaching physiology. When Chapman's health declined in 1835, Jackson took over as Professor of the Institutes of Medicine and remained in that chair until his retirement in 1863. He would also teach on the wards of Philadelphia Hospital from 1842 to 1845. His medical publications included The Principles of Medicine Founded on the Structure and Functions of the Animal Organism.

Jackson's professional and scholarly memberships included the College of Physicians of Philadelphia and the American Philosophical Society. While in Montreal, Canada, in 1832 investigating an outbreak of Asian cholera on behalf of the Sanitary Board of Councils for Philadelphia, he married the daughter of a British officer. Jackson died in Philadelphia, April 4, 1872.

Information regarding Dr. Samuel Jackson taken in its entirety from Penn Biographies.

Biography/History

Dr. William S. Huber was born in July, 1865, to Dr. William A. (a prominent Lebanon, Pennsylvania, dentist) and Juliana Huber. He was educated at public schools in Lebanon, Pennsylvania and graduated from Lebanon High School. From there, he began his education at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, completing first the course of medicine, and then continuing on to take a full course in dentistry. According to the University of Pennsylvania Catalogue and Announcements from the 1886 to 1887 academic year, Huber was a successful student and was among several students "selected for their proficiency in Anatomy to act as Assistant Demonstrators of Anatomy," (page 66).

Following the completion of his studies, he succeeded his father in his dental practice and "built up a large and lucrative practice," (Kirk, page 1019). In 1895, he married A. May Kaler (1866-1901) and they were the parents of William K. (1896-1951) and Charles G. (born in 1898).

In addition to his career as a dentist, Huber served as a member of the board of public schools, as presiding officer of the city council and the select council, and as member of the board of elders of the Salem Evangelical Lutheran Church. He also participated in the Mt. Lebanon Lodge, Weidle Chapter, and Hermit Commandery of the Masons; the Lu Lu Temple in Reading, Pennsylvania; and the Harrisburg Consistory. Huber died of apoplexy on May 25, 1909.

Works cited:

Kirk, Edward C., editor. The Dental Cosmos, Volume 51, 1909 (page 1019).

University of Pennsylvania Catalogue and Announcements, 1886-1887, page 66.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of notebooks kept by three members of the Archer family between 1797 and 1851. Two booklets of notes on materia medica lectures held at the University of Pennsylvania make up the first file in the collection. John Archer Jr. attended the lectures (delivered by Benjamin S. Barton, M.D., a Professor of Materia Medica, Botany and Natural History) in 1797 and 1798. Addressing what is now considered pharmacology, the booklets detail medical treatments for a number of diseases. The first volume of the set is concerned largely with the nutritional benefits of various foods and the categorization of medicines, whether as botanical or mineral astringents, tonics, emetics, stimulants, and the like. The second volume discusses the merits of different medicines (mostly plant-based) and lists viable treatments for a range of diseases. A note on the last page of the second volume suggests that there was a third booklet in this set of lecture notes.

The second file in this collection is the commonplace book of Henry Archer, written between 1830 and 1832 in Harford County, Maryland. This book is roughly organized into four sections. The first section consists of notes on the history of Asia (based on a text by Charles Rollin), Rome (based on Edward Gibbon’s The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire), Roman jurisprudence, and the feudal system in Scotland. The second section features shorter quotations taken from several sources including  Don Juan, the poetry of Byron and Thomas Campbell, and  The Young Duke, a novel by Benjamin Disraeli. Also in this section is a transcription of ‘The Union College Dunciad’, a (probably unpublished) volume of satirical verse written in Schenectady in 1830. The notebook’s third section is a list of the books that Archer read, sorted by category and year. Each book has a number next to it, perhaps denoting how many times it was read. This list is extended on the front inside cover of the notebook. The final section of the notebook is titled ‘Questions for Debate’, and includes eleven questions about both historical and contemporary political issues.

An account book kept by Robert Harris Archer from 1841 to 1851 is the third file in this series, and lists Archer’s purchases of wheat. This book is, for the most part, well organized with the name of the wheat seller, price and amount of wheat, and date of purchase laid out consistently. A few pages, however, are filled with tally marks, calculations and miscellaneous notes and sketches, including two small drawings of houses labeled ‘Baltimore’ and ‘Philadelphia’.

Scope and Contents

The Benjamin Rush lecture notes consist of 34 notebooks kept by a number of medical students at the University of Pennsylvania, which record the content of academic lectures delivered by Dr. Benjamin Rush. Many of the notebooks are undated, but those which have been inscribed with dates range from 1783 to 1810 (Rush was a professor at the University from 1769 until his death in 1813). All of the notes are handwritten, and some are unsigned or of uncertain authorship. All but two sets of notes are bound; however, those that were rebound at some point since they were created are quite fragile. The notes seem to be verbatim transcriptions of Rush's lectures, and are written in full sentences. Many of the volumes of notes have indices at the front or back, which list diseases alphabetically along with the page on which the condition is described.

Rush taught courses in Chemistry, the "Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice" and the "Theory and Practice of Medicine." The content and format of his lectures seem to have remained fairly consistent across the nearly three decades represented in this collection. Chemistry lectures (recorded by students Moses Bartram (item 3), D. Gilder (item 12), Jacob Graham (item 13), and an unidentified student (item 16)) describe particular elements and compounds, as well as broad classes of substances such as "vinegars," salts, earths, metals, and airs, some of which groups are divided into subcategories. Interspersed with this content is information about the medical applications of particular chemical substances, and their effects upon the human body.

Researchers will find lectures on the "Institutes." In the first lecture recorded by an unidentified student in item 7, Rush explains that "the Institutes are divided into four parts, Physiology, Hygiene, Pathology & Therapeutics." The notebooks that correspond to Rush’s lectures on the Institutes generally treat the topics of anatomy, sensation, perception, cognition, the psyche, mental and physical differences between men and women, epidemiology, prognosis, diagnosis, convalescence, the effects of the environment upon the body, and some of the social and cultural factors that can influence health. Rush dedicates a number of lectures to the topics of psychology and psychological disorders, including discussions of the symptoms and cures of "passions" (which he usually defines as fear, love, anger and grief) and of mania. Notes on the Institutes tend also to include fairly long discourses on diet, the preparation and qualities of different foods and beverages, especially bread, beer, wine and alcoholic spirits, and the influences of each upon the body.

The lectures on the Theory and Practice of Medicine focus heavily on fevers, their theoretical categorizations and various symptomatic presentations. A wide range of non-febrile diseases (acute, chronic, infectious, non-communicable, venereal, psychological, etc.) are also profiled, with detailed descriptions of their symptoms and of viable therapeutic approaches to each. Other lectures specifically outline the diseases and health problems especially common among women, "negroes," children, and the elderly. The notes on the practice of medicine contain some short case studies, and all of Rush’s lectures are very referential to other doctors, scientists and medical experts.

The medical students whose names appear on the volumes of notes in this collection are Moses Bartram (1767-1791), Russel Clark, Constans Curtin (1783-1842), D. Gilder, Jacob Graham (possibly), Thomas Hamilton, Robert Hare (1781-1858) (possibly), Christopher Heydrick (1770-1856), William Jackson, Robert G. Maxwell, James Overton (1785-1865), William Simonton (1788-1846), and John Spangler. The four volumes attributed to David Hayes Agnew (1818-1892) (item 8) were probably created by his father, Dr. Robert Agnew (1785-1858). One other dating anomaly: the Thomas Hamilton notebook (Item 2) which is dated January 7, 1814 (a year after Rush's death) possibly signifies the conclusion of Hamilton’s studies.

While the vast majority of the materials within this collection contain lecture notes, the first volume created by Moses Bartram (Item 3, volume 1) appears to be less a record of lecture material than a collection of excerpts from scientific and medical treatises, and is thus described in the finding aid as a commonplace book. Researchers will find a few lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn (1741-1817) in notebooks by both John Spangler (Item 4, volume 1) and D. Gilder’s notebook (Item 12). D. Gilder's notebook also includes some notes from lectures by Dr. William Shippen (1736-1808).

In addition to the lecture notes, researchers will find a "List of Domestic Medicine which ought to be Kept in the Shops of American Physicians" and a transcription of his class's valedictory address in Russel Clark's notebook (item 11, volume 3); a "Table of Fever," which seemingly correlates body temperature to a type of febrile disease, within the notebooks of Robert G. Maxwell (item 14) and an unidentified student (item 18); and several pages of "Questions in Natural Philosophy" and a short section on the government of Pennsylvania in an unbound set of notes by an unidentified student (item 15).

Prior to processing in 2017, item numbers were assigned to notebooks. These item numbers have been retained.

Scope and Contents

This book of notes was kept by David Greenman during a course of Materia Medica lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1785. The first pages of the volume include some curious annotations by Dr. Edward Cutbush in 1814. Cutbush claims, "These notes have been taken incorrectly from my friends' lectures- I purchased the volume at a public auction. Washington" and a few pages later, "orthography very incorrect." David Greenman’s signature on the title page of the notebook has been scribbled over in ink but is still legible. The lecture notes themselves are not limited to Materia Medica in the strictest sense, in that they also include some information about physiology, pathology and therapeutics. The organization of the material in the book is somewhat disjointed, and begins with a brief history of medicine, overview of physiology, discussion of digestion and the qualities of various foods (salt, sugar, milk, etc.), and the means of treating diseases, especially scurvy, by regulation or alteration of the diet. Subsequent sections focus more specifically on medicines and their classifications, especially into the categories of astringents (including “metallic astringents” like iron, lead and zinc), stimulants (including “bitters” like cinchona bark) and sedatives (among which opium is discussed at greatest length). A fairly detailed description of types of tumors, particularly those characteristic of breast cancer, begins on page 128, and a discussion of hysteria follows from page 139 to 148. The medical properties and applications of alkaline substances, soap, errhines (drugs that produce a runny nose) and mercury are subsequently explained, followed by the therapeutic uses of purgatives and blisters. The penultimate section of the book touches upon the topics of plethora (a systemic excess of blood in the body) and complications relating to menstruation, and the final chapter relates to anthelmintics (anti-parasitic medications). At the very end of this book is an alphabetized index of the contents of the notebook, which lists a combination of the names of drugs and medicinal plants, and the medical conditions discussed.

Scope and Contents

This volume of notes is organized into three sections, corresponding to three courses of lectures. The first is titled by Gillasspy, “A Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Barton, professor in the University of Pennsylvania with Remarks thereon &c,” and dated 1797. These lectures first address classes of medicines, namely astringents, vegetable tonics, metallic tonics, stimulants (seven consecutive lectures discuss the therapeutic properties of opium), emetics, cathartics, “salivating medicines,” and diuretics. Later lectures describe particular medicines, almost all of which are plant based. These profiles typically provide a medicinal plant’s Latin name, common name, native region, effects upon the human body and pharmacological applications.

The next section of the notebook (1797) contains both handwritten notes and printed material. The first page of this portion of the document is a printed cover of a booklet titled “A Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on the Institutes of Medicine by Benjamin Rush, M.D.. Professor of the Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice in the University of Pennsylvania.” The subsequent handwritten notes on these lectures are interspersed with excerpts of the printed syllabus to which they correspond. These lectures address physiology, pathology and therapeutics, in this order. Within the first topic, Rush briefly presents some basic features and functions of the human body (such as respiration, circulation, sensation, and cognition), before discussing nutrition, digestion and “the secretions and excretions,” and finally outlining the physical differences between men and women, some information about obstetric and gynecological medicine, and what he terms “the stages of life.” The portion of the lecture series on pathology outlines what Rush regards as the four causes of disease -remote, predisposing, occasional and proximate- along with some of the signs of disease. The third and final section of this syllabus, “Therapeutics, OR, of the method of curing diseases,” describes the actions of various types of medicines.

The final section of the book contains notes on “the practice of physic” from lectures delivered by Benjamin Rush in 1798. The first of these lectures relate to the topics of prognosis and diagnosis, “transient symptoms,” and depleting, stimulating and sedative medicines. The rest of the lectures in the volume relate to fevers and their extensive classifications. Along with descriptions of the various febrile “states,” Rush presents the most effective treatments for each. (There is also a short discourse, at the end of this section, on “diseases of the mind”).

The presence of press-printed material in section two, and the closeness of the handwritten text to the spine of the book, suggests that the volume was bound after the notes were taken.

Scope and Contents

This book of notes contains lecture material transcribed by two different students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. One portion of the volume contains notes taken by Hiester H. Muhlenberg in 1832; the later material was written by Wellington Smith Mason during two separate courses of lectures between 1894 and 1895. An inscription provided by William Pepper explains that "this old notebook was found in the basement of Medical Hall, Jan. 1903. It had probably been given to Mr. Wm. H. Salvador [clerk of the Medical Department] in 97 or 98." The notes taken by Muhlenberg record a series of lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman. This material reviews diseases that fall into four classes--diseases of the heart, diseases of the nervous system, exanthemata or "eruptive fevers," and hemorrhages--providing a description, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and list of causes for each condition. There is a brief, final section on asthma, and there are a few loose sheets of letter paper enclosed in the book, which describe some other diseases, like dropsy. The section on exanthemata includes some information on inoculation and vaccination.

The notes taken by Mason from 1894 to 1895 correspond to two courses. The first, Dr. Judson Daland’s lectures on Physical Diagnosis, primarily discusses cardiopulmonary diseases, reviewed through a number of case studies. Lectures seven through fourteen describe the signs and symptoms of various conditions, particularly tuberculosis. The remainder of the lectures, which feature some ink illustrations, address the anatomy of the blood and heart "with reference to diagnosis." The notes on blood mainly address the preparation and examination of microscope slides.

The second set of notes on Symptomatology lectures, given by Dr. J. K. Mitchell, focuses on how to collect and analyze information about a patient's experience of disease. In particular, these lectures address the physiological (sometimes physiognomic) indications of illness and the interpretation of these signs, the sorts of people most susceptible to pulmonary disease, different types of pain and their relationships to particular diseases, and the most effective methods of collecting relevant medical information from patients. By and large, Mason’s lectures lean heavily on illustrative case studies and patient examinations (both clinical and post-mortem), which are typically presented in a fairly detailed, standardized format.

Scope and Contents

This volume of handwritten lecture notes, titled "A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor […] in the University of Pennsylvania," was kept by Jonathan Murduck in 1802, and provides a fairly comprehensive survey of the medicinal substances commonly in use in the early nineteenth century United States. The detailed table of contents at the beginning of the notebook lists a number of broad categories into which various medicines are sorted. The primary classes of drugs and medicinal substances noted are astringents, tonics, "Alimentary Matter," stimulants, evacuants (including errhines and sialogogues, drugs that produce a runny nose and salivation, respectively), diuretics, emetics, cathartics, and antithelmintics (anti-parasitic medicines). There is also an opening chapter on milk, which mainly discusses lactation in humans and the properties of milk, and a short final section titled "Materia Nutrentia," which relates to diet, nutrition and the component elements of food (acid, sugar, oil, etc.). The main chapters or sections of the text consist of a passage discussing the general characteristics, properties and applications of this type of medicine, followed by a list of "particular" drugs within the category. The great majority of “particulars” are medicinal plants, though some sections are subdivided into "metallic," "mineral" or "animal" substances (and in some instances, medicinal plants are arranged based on their indigeneity to the United States).

The medicinal substances are usually listed by their Latin names, and discussed in a few paragraphs. For botanical medicines, these descriptions provide the plant’s common and Latin names, native region, pharmaceutical preparation, effects upon the body, therapeutic applications, and sometimes one or two brief case studies indicating its efficacy or inefficacy in treating particular conditions. The three drugs described at greatest length are opium, "Cortex Peruvianus" (Peruvian bark or cinchona) and mercury; the discussion of each of these medicines is organized by the specific diseases they can be used to combat.

Scope and Contents

This collection contains lecture notes on pathology, diagnosis, and treatments, including prescriptions, taken at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School from 1824 to 1826 in courses taught by Dr. Samuel Jackson. The lecture notes include frequent references to Dr. Nathaniel Chapman, a professor to whom Jackson was made assistant in 1827.

A portion of the volume is in question and answer format. For example, under the condition "Asthma," questions such as "What is asthma?," "What are the causes?," etc. are asked and followed by the answers. By page 36, this format changes to a more standard narrative of the lectures.

Lectures addressed bilious pleurisy, peripneumonia rotha, asthma, angina pectoris, pertussis, phthisis pulmonalis, cynanche trachialis, dropsy, atonic dropsy, ascitis, hydrothorax, scrophula, marasmus, hydrocephalus, cynanche laryngea, cynanche tonsillaris, cynanche parotidea (mumps), scarlet fever, measles, variola or small pox, gout, rheumatism, hematuria, hemorrhoides or piles, diseases of the digestive system, drunkenness, exanthemata, diseases of the cutaneous system, erysipelas, diseases of the cerebral system, epilepsy, chronic laryngitis, and hepatitis. All spelling and terms are replicated exactly. Several pages were removed, it appears with a knife. A small number of remedies follow, including a recipe for "Dr. Jackson's cough mixture." A few notes, originally laid into the volume, include a recipe for "sirip de cusineaux."

Scope and Contents

This collection contains Dr. William S. Huber’s lecture notes from his time at the University of Pennsylvania Medical and Dental Schools. There are seven volumes that begin in February of 1885 and end in March of 1888. Several of the volumes overlap in time and seem to have been used for separate classes. The notes themselves include several hand-drawn diagrams. Lectures address Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics, pharmaceuticals, bone fractures, concussions, ulcers, pain and inflammation, and cells, as well as diseases of the blood, the liver, the heart, and the lungs. There seem to be a number of descriptions of plant based remedies in the first, second, and fifth volumes in the collection. Professors include anatomist and surgeon David Hayes Agnew; professor of clinical medicine William Osler; professor of dental pathology, therapeutics, and Materia Medica James Truman; and professor of clinical medicine H.C. Wood.

Most of the volumes are written from front to back; then turned over and written back to front. On one occasion, a quiz is included, but it is unclear if the notes are documenting Huber's studying or the actual quiz. The volume dated October 1887 to January 1888 appears to contain notes from actual medical cases, describing the gender and age of patient, their vocation, their medical condition, history of condition, and, sometimes, recommendations. It is possible that this class was taught by Osler.

Huber's handwriting is fairly difficult to read and it is frequently unclear if the headings of pages are different classes or simply different lectures within classes. None of the volumes have clear titles of courses with the possible exception of the first, dating February of 1885, which seems to be Truman's class on Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics. Folder titles were crafted from the most prominent information on the first few pages of each notebook. It is often unclear who taught the courses. Despite the challenges of reading Huber's handwriting and determining courses or teachers, these volumes provide a glimpse into the type of education a student in medicine and dentistry would have received at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1880s.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2015 August 24

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  July 25, 2017

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 12

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 2

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 November 16

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 9

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2018 April 10

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2016 May 11

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Kelin Baldridge

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Mrs. W. P. Durfee of Geneva, New York.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of William Pepper.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Dr. William Pepper, 1903

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Benjamin S. Paschell, 1903.

Source of Acquisition

Sold by Carmen D. Valentino, 2003.

Source of Acquisition

Transferred from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, 2015.

Processing Information note

Formerly: Dewey MS 615.04 K954.

Processing Information note

Formerly Dewey MS 610.4 R89.5

Processing Information note

Formerly Dewey 610.7 C367.

Processing Information note

Formerly: Dewey MS 615.1 B283.

Return to Top »

Related Materials

Related Archival Materials note

At Dolph Briscoe Center for American History,The University of Texas at Austin: Robert Harris Archer family papers, 1846-1871

At the Maryland Historical Society: several family members' papers listed under "Archer."

Related Archival Materials note

At the American Philosophical Society:

Robert Hare papers, 1764-1859 and Hare-Willing Family Papers,1724-1965

At Duke University Libraries:

Robert Hare papers, Philadelphia. 1825-1858

At the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania:

Robert Hare correspondence, 1793-1858, Ms. Coll. 74

At the Library Company of Philadelphia:

Rush family papers, 1748-1876

Related Archival Materials note

At the American Philoslphical Society:

Violetta Delafield-Benjamin Smith Barton collection, 1783-1817, Mss.B.B284d

At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania:

Benjamin Smith Barton papers, Collection 0034

At the Library Company of Philadelphia:

Rush family papers, 1748-1876

At the University of Pennsylvania, Archives and Records Center

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810, UPW1a-13

At the University of Pennsylvania, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts:

Benjamin Rush lecture notes, 1783-1810, undated, Ms. Coll. 225

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810-1823, Ms. Coll. 669

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810, UPW1a-13

Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1802, Ms. Codex 1865

Related Archival Materials note

At the Historical Medical Library of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia:

John Kearsley Mitchell correspondence, 1892-1914, MSS 2/263

Nathaniel Chapman papers, circa 1810-1853, collection 10a

At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania:

Charles Sellers notes on Nathaniel Chapman lectures at the University of Pennsylvania, Am.13596

John Josiah White notes from Nathaniel Chapman lectures, Am.1880

At the National Library of Medicine:

Notes taken from the lectures of Nathaniel Chapman in the University of Pennsylvania / by Robert M. Tute, 1828, MS B 199

At the University of Pennsylvania, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts:

Student notes on lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1813-1833, Ms. Coll. 226

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Account books
  • Commonplace books
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
Subject(s)
  • Families
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medicine

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
Subject(s)
  • Chemistry--history
  • Chemistry--Study and teaching
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--History
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
  • Notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Cutbush, Edward, 1772-1843
  • Kuhn, Adam, 1741-1817
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Materia medica--Early works to 1800
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
  • Rush, Benjamin, 1746-1813
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
  • Notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Chapman, Nathaniel, 1780-1853
  • Daland, Judson
  • Mitchell, John Kearsley, 1793-1858
Subject(s)
  • Education
  • Medical education--United States--19th century
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Chapman, Nathaniel, 1780-1853
  • Jackson, Samuel, 1787-1872
Subject(s)
  • Medical education--United States--19th century
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Formulas, recipes, etc.
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Dental Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Subject(s)
  • Dental students
  • Dentistry
  • Dentistry--Study and teaching
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

J. Archer Jr.'s notes on Materia Medica lectures held at the University of Pennsylvania, 1797-1798.

1 1

Note and commonplace book of H. Archer, 1830-1832.

1 2

Parker and Archer account book for purchases of wheat, 1841-1851.

1 3

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Agnew, Robert (possibly), notebook [Item 8, volumes 1-4], undated.

2 4-7

Bartram, Moses, commonplace book and notebook [Item 3, volumes 1-2], before 1791.

1 3

Clark, Russel, notebook [Item 11, volumes 1-3], undated.

3 4-6

Curtin, Constans (probably), notebook [Item 6], circa 1806-1809.

2 2

Gilder, D., notebook [Item 12], 1783.

4 7

Graham, Jacob (probably), notebook [Item 13], probably 1788.

3 8

Hamilton, Thomas, notebook [Item 2], undated.

1 2

Hare, Robert (possibly), notebook [Item 9, volumes 1-2], 1796, 1798.

3 1-2

Heydrick, Christopher, notebook [Item 20, volumes 1-2], undated.

4 6-7

Jackson, William, notebook [Item 21, volume 1], 1804-1805.

4 8

Jackson, William, notebook [Item 21, volume 2], 1804-1805.

5 1

Maxwell, Robert G., notebook [Item 14], 1807-1808.

3 9

Overton, James, notebook [Item 1], 1807-1809.

1 1

Simonton, William, notebook [Item 5, volumes 1-3], undated.

1 6-8

Simonton, William, notebook [Item 5, volume 4], undated.

2 1

Spangler, John, notebook [Item 4, volumes 1-2], 1790-1791.

1 4-5

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 7], 1809-1810.

2 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 10], 1798.

3 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 16], undated.

4 2

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 17], undated.

4 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 18], undated.

4 4

Unidentified student, unbound notes [Item 15], undated.

4 1

Unidentified student, unbound notes [Item 19], undated.

4 5

Letters written by Benjamin Rush to Dr. John Dorsey (negatives), location of originals unknown, 1804, 1812.

5 2

Collection Inventory

Volume

"Notes taken from Doctor Adam Kuhn's Lectures on Materia Medica, by David Greenman", 1785.

1

Collection Inventory

Volume

Notebook, 1797-1798.

1

Collection Inventory

Notebook, 1832, 1894-1895.

Collection Inventory

Volume

"A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor Materia Medica, Natural History, and Botany in the University of Pennsylvania", 1801.

1

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Lecture notes (bound volume).

1 1

Items laid in (recipe for "Sirup de Cusineaux' and other notes), 1825, undated.

1 2

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Lectures of James Truman, including "Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics", 1885 February.

1 1

"H.C. Wood", 1886 October-1887 January.

1 2

"Agnew", 1886 November-1887 January.

1 3

"Dr. [Illegible]'s Quiz. Cells", 1886 October-1887 February.

1 4

Plant-based remedies, 1887 February-March.

1 5

"Osler" (case studies), 1887 October-1888 January.

1 6

"Cardiac Stimulants", 1887 November-1888 March.

1 7

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the University of Pennsylvania. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Archer, Henry Wilson, 1813-1887
Creator:
Archer, John, 1777-1830
Title:
Archer family account books and notebooks
Date [inclusive]:
1797-1851
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1120
Extent:
0.2 linear feet (1 box)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This collection (1797-1851) contains notebooks kept by three members of the Archer family, a prominent and politically active family of medical doctors based in Harford County, Maryland. The first file contains John Archer Jr.’s notes on materia medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Barton and given at the University of Pennsylvania in 1797 and 1798. A commonplace book (1830-1832) maintained by Henry Wilson Archer, which contains excerpts mostly from history books and poems is the second file. Also included in the collection is an account book (1841-1851) wherein the wheat purchases of Robert Harris Archer were recorded.
Cite as:
Archer family account books and notebooks, 1797-1841, Ms. Coll. 1120, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Bartram, Moses, -1791
Creator:
Curtin, Constans, 1783-1842
Creator:
Hare, Robert, 1781-1858
Creator:
Heydrick, Christopher, 1770-1856
Creator:
Kuhn, Adam, 1741-1817
Creator:
Overton, James, Jr., 1785-1865
Creator:
Rush, Benjamin, 1746-1813
Creator:
Simonton, William, 1788-1846
Title:
Benjamin Rush lecture notes
Date:
1783-1810, undated
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 225
Extent:
4.2 linear feet (5 boxes)
Language:
English
Abstract:
The Benjamin Rush lecture notes consist of 34 notebooks kept by medical students at the University of Pennsylvania, which record the content of academic lectures delivered by Dr. Benjamin Rush (1745-1813). Rush, a socially and politically prominent physician who lived and practiced in Philadelphia, served as a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine from 1769 to 1813. The handwritten lecture notes in this collection (recorded between 1783 and 1810) present the era's conventional medical wisdom on the causes, symptoms and cures of a range of diseases and disorders.
Cite as:
Benjamin Rush lecture notes, 1783-1810, undated, Ms. Coll. 225, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Greenman, David
Title:
David Greenman notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1785
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1866
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This book of notes was kept by David Greenman during a course of Materia Medica lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1785. The lecture notes themselves are not limited to Materia Medica in the strictest sense, in that they also include some information about physiology, pathology and therapeutics. The notebook is briefly inscribed by Dr. Edward Cutbush (1772-1843) an officer and surgeon in the United States Navy.
Cite as:
David Greenman notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1785, Ms. Codex 1866, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Gillasspy, George, d. 1832
Title:
George Gillasspy notes on lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date [inclusive]:
1797-1798
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1861
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This notebook, kept by George Gillasspy (also "Gillaspy"), records the content of lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1797 and 1798. These lectures touch upon a wide range of topics within materia medica, physiology, pathology and therapeutics, and represent the foundations of late eighteenth century medical education.
Cite as:
George Gillasspy notes on lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1797-1798, Ms. Codex 1861, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Mason, Wellington Smith
Creator:
Muhlenberg, H. H. (Hiester Henry), 1812-1886
Title:
Hiester H. Muhlenberg and Wellington Smith Mason notes on lectures delivered by Drs. Nathaniel Chapman, Judson Daland, and J.K. Mitchell at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1832, 1894-1895
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1873
Extent:
1 volume
Language:
English
Abstract:
This notebook contains lecture material transcribed by two different students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. One portion of the volume contains notes taken by Hiester H. Muhlenberg in 1832; the later material was written by Wellington Smith Mason during two separate courses of lectures between 1894 and 1895. The notes taken by Muhlenberg record a series of lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman on hemorrhages, fevers, cardiac disease and nervous disorders. The notes taken by Mason, decades later, document Dr. Judson Daland’s lectures on physical diagnosis and Dr. J.K. Mitchell's lectures on symptomatology.
Cite as:
Hiester H. Muhlenberg and Wellington Smith Mason notes on lectures delivered by Drs. Nathaniel Chapman, Judson Daland, and J.K. Mitchell at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1832, 1894-1895, Ms. Codex 1873, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Murduck, Jonathan
Title:
Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1802
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1865
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This volume of handwritten lecture notes, titled “A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor […] at the University of Pennsylvania,” was kept by medical student Jonathan Murduck in 1802, and provides a fairly comprehensive survey of the medicinal substances commonly in use in the early nineteenth century United States.
Cite as:
Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1802, Ms. Codex 1865, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Trevor, Joseph
Title:
Joseph Trevor notes on medical lectures delivered by Dr. Samuel Jackson at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date [inclusive]:
1824-1826
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 498
Extent:
0.2 linear foot (1 box)
Physical Facet note:
Written in one hand, attribution from front cover and 1 item laid in. Two leaves laid in. Foliation: [ii], ff. 1-113, pp. 114-119, 15 leaves cut out, 5 ff.
Language:
English
Abstract:
Joseph Trevor was a medical student at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. This volume of lecture notes documents a series of lectures taught by Dr. Samuel Jackson (1787-1872) between 1824 and 1826.
Cite as:
Joseph Trevor notes on medical lectures delivered by Dr. Samuel Jackson at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1824-1826, Ms. Coll. 498, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Huber, William S., 1865-1909
Title:
William S. Huber student lecture notes
Date [inclusive]:
1885-1888
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1306
Extent:
0.5 linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Dr. William S. Huber (1865-1909) was a dentist in Lebanon, Pennsylvania who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical and Dental Schools. This collection contains Huber's student lecture notes recorded between February 1885 and March 1888.
Cite as:
William S. Huber student lecture notes, 1885-1888, Ms. Coll. 1306, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Biography/History

The Archer family was a prominent and politically active family of medical doctors based in Harford County, Maryland. John Archer was born in Maryland in 1741 and (due to the alphabetical antecedence of his last name) was the first person to receive a medical diploma in North America, which he earned from the College of Philadelphia (later the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania) in 1768. His son, John Archer Jr. (1777-1850) also attended medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1798. J. Archer Jr. returned to Maryland after earning his degree and served as a surgeon of the Maryland militia in the War of 1812.

Henry Wilson Archer (1813-1887) was the son of John Archer Jr. Another graduate of the medical school of the University of Pennsylvania, H. Archer lived in Harford County and married Mary Elizabeth Walker in 1849.

The final volume in the collection is an account book created by Robert Harris Archer. Three individuals named Robert Harris Archer (brother of (1775-1857 or 1858), nephew of (1813-1883), or son of (1820-1878) John Archer, Jr.) may have been the account book's author.

Biography/History

Dr. Benjamin Rush (1745-1813) was a socially and politically prominent physician who lived and practiced in Philadelphia. Born in Byberry Township, Pennsylvania, Rush was educated at the University of Edinburgh, and travelled in England and France before returning to Philadelphia in 1769. Rush played an active role in the American Revolution, signing the Declaration of Independence and serving briefly as Surgeon General of the Middle Department of the Continental Army and as a physician with the Philadelphia militia.

Although most prominent Philadelphians left the city for healthier environments during the catastrophic Yellow Fever epidemics that hit Philadelphia in the 1790s, Rush remained in the city to treat the sick; though he may be equally or better remembered today for his strong advocacy of bloodletting as a therapeutic method for the disease.

Rush served as a professor of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (previously the College of Philadelphia) from 1769 to 1789 and as a professor of the "Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice" from 1791 to 1813. Rush also taught courses in the "Theory and Practice of Medicine" from 1789 to 1791, and again from 1796 to 1813.

Biography/History

Little information about David Greenman is readily available; he attended lectures at the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1785 but did not graduate. Dr. Edward Cutbush, who inscribed this volume, graduated from the University in 1794 and pursued a successful career as an officer and surgeon in the U.S. Navy. An eminent scientist of eighteenth century Philadelphia, Dr. Adam Kuhn (1741-1817) was a professor first of Botany and Materia Medica, and then the Theory and Practice of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania between 1768 and 1797.

Biography/History

George Gillasspy (elsewhere spelled “Gillaspy”) was a medical student, military doctor, and apothecary. Gillasspy served as a surgeon with the Second U.S. Infantry Regiment and on the Frigate U.S.S. United States during the Revolutionary War, at or around the same time that he kept his book of notes on medical lectures. (Indeed, Gillasspy signs his name along with “Surgeon 2d U.S. Regt [illeg] & act.g Surgn Frigate” at the beginning of the second section of the lecture notes, referring to his role as surgeon of the Second Regiment and on the frigate  United States.) Gillasspy also served as a surgeon with the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry from 1806 to 1808, and operated an apothecary shop in Philadelphia with his partner Dr. Joseph Strong. In 1803, Gillasspy and Strong outfitted Meriwether Lewis with $90.69 in medicines for his expedition west. Gillaspy died in 1832 and is buried in Christ Church Burial Ground in Philadelphia. Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815) was a leading botanist and naturalist of his day, and Benjamin Rush (1746-1813) was one of Philadelphia’s foremost physicians in late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Both taught at the University of Pennsylvania for much of their careers.

Sources:

History of the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry: From Its Organization, November 17th, 1774 to Its Centennial Anniversary, November 17th, 1874. (Princeton: 1875). URL: https://books.google.com/books?id=va8-AAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s

Kris Fresonke and Mark David Spence. Lewis & Clark: Legacies, Memories, and New Perspectives. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004).

Biography/History

Hiester H. Muhlenberg (1812-1886) graduated from the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1832, and practiced medicine in Reading, Pennsylvania, before switching his career to finance in 1837. Nathaniel Chapman (1780-1853) was a prominent physician and educator in Philadelphia, who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1801 and began his teaching career at the same institution in 1810. He taught Materia Medica and the theory and practice of medicine. Throughout his career, he remained an influential member of the medical community in Philadelphia until his death in 1853. In addition to his teaching, he founded the Medical Institute of Philadelphia in 1817; founded the Philadelphia Journal of the Medical and Physical Sciences (today the  American Journal of Medical Sciences) in 1820; and served as president of the Philadelphia Medical Society, as president of the American Philosophical Society, as fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia (elected in 1807), and as the first president of the American Medical Association (elected in 1848).

Wellington Smith Mason (1865- 1900) graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1898. He appears to have practiced medicine in Williamstown, Pennsylvania, but his career was cut short by his death on September 30, 1900, at age 35, from complications from a surgery for appendicitis. Dr. Judson Daland (1860-circa 1937) graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1882. Following his graduation, he practiced medicine in Philadelphia. He was a demonstrator and an instructor of clinical medicine at the University of Pennsylvania from 1882 until at least 1897. He was also a professor of diseases of the chest at the Philadelphia Polyclinic and College for Graduates in Medicine from 1896 to 1897 and a professor of clinical medicine at the same institution from 1897. J.K. (John Kearsley) Mitchell (1859-1917), the son of S. Weir Mitchell, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1883. He began teaching at the University of Pennsylvania in 1886, serving as assistant demonstrator in clinical medicine until 1894, and as lecturer on general symptomatology from 1894 to 1899.

Biography/History

Jonathan Murduck (born circa 1782) was a student at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1802, but did not receive his degree until 1811. Between 1803 and 1805, Murduck practiced medicine in Port-au-Prince. Murduck’s financial records, patient records, and memoranda from these voyages are held in the Manuscripts Division of the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan.

Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815) was a leading botanist and naturalist of his day, and a professor at the University of Pennsylvania from 1789 to 1813.

Sources: Jonathan Murduck Account Book and Memoranda, William L. Clements Library, The University of Michigan. https://quod.lib.umich.edu/c/clementsmss/umich-wcl-M-1890mur?byte=14434455;focusrgn=frontmatter;subview=standard;view=reslist

Biography/History

Joseph Trevor received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1826. He wrote an essay on foreign bodies in the esophagus and test-phagotomy.

Samuel Jackson was born in Philadelphia, March 22, 1787, son of pharmacist David Jackson and Susan Kemper. Although Jackson attended the College of the University of Pennsylvania, he did not complete the courses required to receive a degree but instead began his study of medicine under Dr. James Hutchinson. After Hutchinson’s death, he continued at the offices of Dr. Casper Wistar. Jackson received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1808. After graduation, he briefly took up the drug business left by his father and older brother.

When the War of 1812 broke out, Jackson joined the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry and served with them in operations in the Chesapeake Bay through the war. Jackson sold his pharmaceutical business upon his return in 1815 and began a private medical practice. In 1820, he became president of the Philadelphia Board of Health, and directed its management of the yellow fever epidemic. In 1821, Jackson helped found the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and was appointed its first Professor of Materia Medica. He also served as attending physician at the Philadelphia Almshouse and as instructor of medical chemistry and materia medica at the Medical Institute of Philadelphia, founded by Nathaniel Chapman.

In 1827, Jackson was made assistant to Professor Nathaniel Chapman at the University of Pennsylvania, a post in which Jackson was responsible for teaching physiology. When Chapman's health declined in 1835, Jackson took over as Professor of the Institutes of Medicine and remained in that chair until his retirement in 1863. He would also teach on the wards of Philadelphia Hospital from 1842 to 1845. His medical publications included The Principles of Medicine Founded on the Structure and Functions of the Animal Organism.

Jackson's professional and scholarly memberships included the College of Physicians of Philadelphia and the American Philosophical Society. While in Montreal, Canada, in 1832 investigating an outbreak of Asian cholera on behalf of the Sanitary Board of Councils for Philadelphia, he married the daughter of a British officer. Jackson died in Philadelphia, April 4, 1872.

Information regarding Dr. Samuel Jackson taken in its entirety from Penn Biographies.

Biography/History

Dr. William S. Huber was born in July, 1865, to Dr. William A. (a prominent Lebanon, Pennsylvania, dentist) and Juliana Huber. He was educated at public schools in Lebanon, Pennsylvania and graduated from Lebanon High School. From there, he began his education at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, completing first the course of medicine, and then continuing on to take a full course in dentistry. According to the University of Pennsylvania Catalogue and Announcements from the 1886 to 1887 academic year, Huber was a successful student and was among several students "selected for their proficiency in Anatomy to act as Assistant Demonstrators of Anatomy," (page 66).

Following the completion of his studies, he succeeded his father in his dental practice and "built up a large and lucrative practice," (Kirk, page 1019). In 1895, he married A. May Kaler (1866-1901) and they were the parents of William K. (1896-1951) and Charles G. (born in 1898).

In addition to his career as a dentist, Huber served as a member of the board of public schools, as presiding officer of the city council and the select council, and as member of the board of elders of the Salem Evangelical Lutheran Church. He also participated in the Mt. Lebanon Lodge, Weidle Chapter, and Hermit Commandery of the Masons; the Lu Lu Temple in Reading, Pennsylvania; and the Harrisburg Consistory. Huber died of apoplexy on May 25, 1909.

Works cited:

Kirk, Edward C., editor. The Dental Cosmos, Volume 51, 1909 (page 1019).

University of Pennsylvania Catalogue and Announcements, 1886-1887, page 66.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of notebooks kept by three members of the Archer family between 1797 and 1851. Two booklets of notes on materia medica lectures held at the University of Pennsylvania make up the first file in the collection. John Archer Jr. attended the lectures (delivered by Benjamin S. Barton, M.D., a Professor of Materia Medica, Botany and Natural History) in 1797 and 1798. Addressing what is now considered pharmacology, the booklets detail medical treatments for a number of diseases. The first volume of the set is concerned largely with the nutritional benefits of various foods and the categorization of medicines, whether as botanical or mineral astringents, tonics, emetics, stimulants, and the like. The second volume discusses the merits of different medicines (mostly plant-based) and lists viable treatments for a range of diseases. A note on the last page of the second volume suggests that there was a third booklet in this set of lecture notes.

The second file in this collection is the commonplace book of Henry Archer, written between 1830 and 1832 in Harford County, Maryland. This book is roughly organized into four sections. The first section consists of notes on the history of Asia (based on a text by Charles Rollin), Rome (based on Edward Gibbon’s The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire), Roman jurisprudence, and the feudal system in Scotland. The second section features shorter quotations taken from several sources including  Don Juan, the poetry of Byron and Thomas Campbell, and  The Young Duke, a novel by Benjamin Disraeli. Also in this section is a transcription of ‘The Union College Dunciad’, a (probably unpublished) volume of satirical verse written in Schenectady in 1830. The notebook’s third section is a list of the books that Archer read, sorted by category and year. Each book has a number next to it, perhaps denoting how many times it was read. This list is extended on the front inside cover of the notebook. The final section of the notebook is titled ‘Questions for Debate’, and includes eleven questions about both historical and contemporary political issues.

An account book kept by Robert Harris Archer from 1841 to 1851 is the third file in this series, and lists Archer’s purchases of wheat. This book is, for the most part, well organized with the name of the wheat seller, price and amount of wheat, and date of purchase laid out consistently. A few pages, however, are filled with tally marks, calculations and miscellaneous notes and sketches, including two small drawings of houses labeled ‘Baltimore’ and ‘Philadelphia’.

Scope and Contents

The Benjamin Rush lecture notes consist of 34 notebooks kept by a number of medical students at the University of Pennsylvania, which record the content of academic lectures delivered by Dr. Benjamin Rush. Many of the notebooks are undated, but those which have been inscribed with dates range from 1783 to 1810 (Rush was a professor at the University from 1769 until his death in 1813). All of the notes are handwritten, and some are unsigned or of uncertain authorship. All but two sets of notes are bound; however, those that were rebound at some point since they were created are quite fragile. The notes seem to be verbatim transcriptions of Rush's lectures, and are written in full sentences. Many of the volumes of notes have indices at the front or back, which list diseases alphabetically along with the page on which the condition is described.

Rush taught courses in Chemistry, the "Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice" and the "Theory and Practice of Medicine." The content and format of his lectures seem to have remained fairly consistent across the nearly three decades represented in this collection. Chemistry lectures (recorded by students Moses Bartram (item 3), D. Gilder (item 12), Jacob Graham (item 13), and an unidentified student (item 16)) describe particular elements and compounds, as well as broad classes of substances such as "vinegars," salts, earths, metals, and airs, some of which groups are divided into subcategories. Interspersed with this content is information about the medical applications of particular chemical substances, and their effects upon the human body.

Researchers will find lectures on the "Institutes." In the first lecture recorded by an unidentified student in item 7, Rush explains that "the Institutes are divided into four parts, Physiology, Hygiene, Pathology & Therapeutics." The notebooks that correspond to Rush’s lectures on the Institutes generally treat the topics of anatomy, sensation, perception, cognition, the psyche, mental and physical differences between men and women, epidemiology, prognosis, diagnosis, convalescence, the effects of the environment upon the body, and some of the social and cultural factors that can influence health. Rush dedicates a number of lectures to the topics of psychology and psychological disorders, including discussions of the symptoms and cures of "passions" (which he usually defines as fear, love, anger and grief) and of mania. Notes on the Institutes tend also to include fairly long discourses on diet, the preparation and qualities of different foods and beverages, especially bread, beer, wine and alcoholic spirits, and the influences of each upon the body.

The lectures on the Theory and Practice of Medicine focus heavily on fevers, their theoretical categorizations and various symptomatic presentations. A wide range of non-febrile diseases (acute, chronic, infectious, non-communicable, venereal, psychological, etc.) are also profiled, with detailed descriptions of their symptoms and of viable therapeutic approaches to each. Other lectures specifically outline the diseases and health problems especially common among women, "negroes," children, and the elderly. The notes on the practice of medicine contain some short case studies, and all of Rush’s lectures are very referential to other doctors, scientists and medical experts.

The medical students whose names appear on the volumes of notes in this collection are Moses Bartram (1767-1791), Russel Clark, Constans Curtin (1783-1842), D. Gilder, Jacob Graham (possibly), Thomas Hamilton, Robert Hare (1781-1858) (possibly), Christopher Heydrick (1770-1856), William Jackson, Robert G. Maxwell, James Overton (1785-1865), William Simonton (1788-1846), and John Spangler. The four volumes attributed to David Hayes Agnew (1818-1892) (item 8) were probably created by his father, Dr. Robert Agnew (1785-1858). One other dating anomaly: the Thomas Hamilton notebook (Item 2) which is dated January 7, 1814 (a year after Rush's death) possibly signifies the conclusion of Hamilton’s studies.

While the vast majority of the materials within this collection contain lecture notes, the first volume created by Moses Bartram (Item 3, volume 1) appears to be less a record of lecture material than a collection of excerpts from scientific and medical treatises, and is thus described in the finding aid as a commonplace book. Researchers will find a few lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn (1741-1817) in notebooks by both John Spangler (Item 4, volume 1) and D. Gilder’s notebook (Item 12). D. Gilder's notebook also includes some notes from lectures by Dr. William Shippen (1736-1808).

In addition to the lecture notes, researchers will find a "List of Domestic Medicine which ought to be Kept in the Shops of American Physicians" and a transcription of his class's valedictory address in Russel Clark's notebook (item 11, volume 3); a "Table of Fever," which seemingly correlates body temperature to a type of febrile disease, within the notebooks of Robert G. Maxwell (item 14) and an unidentified student (item 18); and several pages of "Questions in Natural Philosophy" and a short section on the government of Pennsylvania in an unbound set of notes by an unidentified student (item 15).

Prior to processing in 2017, item numbers were assigned to notebooks. These item numbers have been retained.

Scope and Contents

This book of notes was kept by David Greenman during a course of Materia Medica lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1785. The first pages of the volume include some curious annotations by Dr. Edward Cutbush in 1814. Cutbush claims, "These notes have been taken incorrectly from my friends' lectures- I purchased the volume at a public auction. Washington" and a few pages later, "orthography very incorrect." David Greenman’s signature on the title page of the notebook has been scribbled over in ink but is still legible. The lecture notes themselves are not limited to Materia Medica in the strictest sense, in that they also include some information about physiology, pathology and therapeutics. The organization of the material in the book is somewhat disjointed, and begins with a brief history of medicine, overview of physiology, discussion of digestion and the qualities of various foods (salt, sugar, milk, etc.), and the means of treating diseases, especially scurvy, by regulation or alteration of the diet. Subsequent sections focus more specifically on medicines and their classifications, especially into the categories of astringents (including “metallic astringents” like iron, lead and zinc), stimulants (including “bitters” like cinchona bark) and sedatives (among which opium is discussed at greatest length). A fairly detailed description of types of tumors, particularly those characteristic of breast cancer, begins on page 128, and a discussion of hysteria follows from page 139 to 148. The medical properties and applications of alkaline substances, soap, errhines (drugs that produce a runny nose) and mercury are subsequently explained, followed by the therapeutic uses of purgatives and blisters. The penultimate section of the book touches upon the topics of plethora (a systemic excess of blood in the body) and complications relating to menstruation, and the final chapter relates to anthelmintics (anti-parasitic medications). At the very end of this book is an alphabetized index of the contents of the notebook, which lists a combination of the names of drugs and medicinal plants, and the medical conditions discussed.

Scope and Contents

This volume of notes is organized into three sections, corresponding to three courses of lectures. The first is titled by Gillasspy, “A Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Barton, professor in the University of Pennsylvania with Remarks thereon &c,” and dated 1797. These lectures first address classes of medicines, namely astringents, vegetable tonics, metallic tonics, stimulants (seven consecutive lectures discuss the therapeutic properties of opium), emetics, cathartics, “salivating medicines,” and diuretics. Later lectures describe particular medicines, almost all of which are plant based. These profiles typically provide a medicinal plant’s Latin name, common name, native region, effects upon the human body and pharmacological applications.

The next section of the notebook (1797) contains both handwritten notes and printed material. The first page of this portion of the document is a printed cover of a booklet titled “A Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on the Institutes of Medicine by Benjamin Rush, M.D.. Professor of the Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice in the University of Pennsylvania.” The subsequent handwritten notes on these lectures are interspersed with excerpts of the printed syllabus to which they correspond. These lectures address physiology, pathology and therapeutics, in this order. Within the first topic, Rush briefly presents some basic features and functions of the human body (such as respiration, circulation, sensation, and cognition), before discussing nutrition, digestion and “the secretions and excretions,” and finally outlining the physical differences between men and women, some information about obstetric and gynecological medicine, and what he terms “the stages of life.” The portion of the lecture series on pathology outlines what Rush regards as the four causes of disease -remote, predisposing, occasional and proximate- along with some of the signs of disease. The third and final section of this syllabus, “Therapeutics, OR, of the method of curing diseases,” describes the actions of various types of medicines.

The final section of the book contains notes on “the practice of physic” from lectures delivered by Benjamin Rush in 1798. The first of these lectures relate to the topics of prognosis and diagnosis, “transient symptoms,” and depleting, stimulating and sedative medicines. The rest of the lectures in the volume relate to fevers and their extensive classifications. Along with descriptions of the various febrile “states,” Rush presents the most effective treatments for each. (There is also a short discourse, at the end of this section, on “diseases of the mind”).

The presence of press-printed material in section two, and the closeness of the handwritten text to the spine of the book, suggests that the volume was bound after the notes were taken.

Scope and Contents

This book of notes contains lecture material transcribed by two different students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. One portion of the volume contains notes taken by Hiester H. Muhlenberg in 1832; the later material was written by Wellington Smith Mason during two separate courses of lectures between 1894 and 1895. An inscription provided by William Pepper explains that "this old notebook was found in the basement of Medical Hall, Jan. 1903. It had probably been given to Mr. Wm. H. Salvador [clerk of the Medical Department] in 97 or 98." The notes taken by Muhlenberg record a series of lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman. This material reviews diseases that fall into four classes--diseases of the heart, diseases of the nervous system, exanthemata or "eruptive fevers," and hemorrhages--providing a description, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and list of causes for each condition. There is a brief, final section on asthma, and there are a few loose sheets of letter paper enclosed in the book, which describe some other diseases, like dropsy. The section on exanthemata includes some information on inoculation and vaccination.

The notes taken by Mason from 1894 to 1895 correspond to two courses. The first, Dr. Judson Daland’s lectures on Physical Diagnosis, primarily discusses cardiopulmonary diseases, reviewed through a number of case studies. Lectures seven through fourteen describe the signs and symptoms of various conditions, particularly tuberculosis. The remainder of the lectures, which feature some ink illustrations, address the anatomy of the blood and heart "with reference to diagnosis." The notes on blood mainly address the preparation and examination of microscope slides.

The second set of notes on Symptomatology lectures, given by Dr. J. K. Mitchell, focuses on how to collect and analyze information about a patient's experience of disease. In particular, these lectures address the physiological (sometimes physiognomic) indications of illness and the interpretation of these signs, the sorts of people most susceptible to pulmonary disease, different types of pain and their relationships to particular diseases, and the most effective methods of collecting relevant medical information from patients. By and large, Mason’s lectures lean heavily on illustrative case studies and patient examinations (both clinical and post-mortem), which are typically presented in a fairly detailed, standardized format.

Scope and Contents

This volume of handwritten lecture notes, titled "A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor […] in the University of Pennsylvania," was kept by Jonathan Murduck in 1802, and provides a fairly comprehensive survey of the medicinal substances commonly in use in the early nineteenth century United States. The detailed table of contents at the beginning of the notebook lists a number of broad categories into which various medicines are sorted. The primary classes of drugs and medicinal substances noted are astringents, tonics, "Alimentary Matter," stimulants, evacuants (including errhines and sialogogues, drugs that produce a runny nose and salivation, respectively), diuretics, emetics, cathartics, and antithelmintics (anti-parasitic medicines). There is also an opening chapter on milk, which mainly discusses lactation in humans and the properties of milk, and a short final section titled "Materia Nutrentia," which relates to diet, nutrition and the component elements of food (acid, sugar, oil, etc.). The main chapters or sections of the text consist of a passage discussing the general characteristics, properties and applications of this type of medicine, followed by a list of "particular" drugs within the category. The great majority of “particulars” are medicinal plants, though some sections are subdivided into "metallic," "mineral" or "animal" substances (and in some instances, medicinal plants are arranged based on their indigeneity to the United States).

The medicinal substances are usually listed by their Latin names, and discussed in a few paragraphs. For botanical medicines, these descriptions provide the plant’s common and Latin names, native region, pharmaceutical preparation, effects upon the body, therapeutic applications, and sometimes one or two brief case studies indicating its efficacy or inefficacy in treating particular conditions. The three drugs described at greatest length are opium, "Cortex Peruvianus" (Peruvian bark or cinchona) and mercury; the discussion of each of these medicines is organized by the specific diseases they can be used to combat.

Scope and Contents

This collection contains lecture notes on pathology, diagnosis, and treatments, including prescriptions, taken at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School from 1824 to 1826 in courses taught by Dr. Samuel Jackson. The lecture notes include frequent references to Dr. Nathaniel Chapman, a professor to whom Jackson was made assistant in 1827.

A portion of the volume is in question and answer format. For example, under the condition "Asthma," questions such as "What is asthma?," "What are the causes?," etc. are asked and followed by the answers. By page 36, this format changes to a more standard narrative of the lectures.

Lectures addressed bilious pleurisy, peripneumonia rotha, asthma, angina pectoris, pertussis, phthisis pulmonalis, cynanche trachialis, dropsy, atonic dropsy, ascitis, hydrothorax, scrophula, marasmus, hydrocephalus, cynanche laryngea, cynanche tonsillaris, cynanche parotidea (mumps), scarlet fever, measles, variola or small pox, gout, rheumatism, hematuria, hemorrhoides or piles, diseases of the digestive system, drunkenness, exanthemata, diseases of the cutaneous system, erysipelas, diseases of the cerebral system, epilepsy, chronic laryngitis, and hepatitis. All spelling and terms are replicated exactly. Several pages were removed, it appears with a knife. A small number of remedies follow, including a recipe for "Dr. Jackson's cough mixture." A few notes, originally laid into the volume, include a recipe for "sirip de cusineaux."

Scope and Contents

This collection contains Dr. William S. Huber’s lecture notes from his time at the University of Pennsylvania Medical and Dental Schools. There are seven volumes that begin in February of 1885 and end in March of 1888. Several of the volumes overlap in time and seem to have been used for separate classes. The notes themselves include several hand-drawn diagrams. Lectures address Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics, pharmaceuticals, bone fractures, concussions, ulcers, pain and inflammation, and cells, as well as diseases of the blood, the liver, the heart, and the lungs. There seem to be a number of descriptions of plant based remedies in the first, second, and fifth volumes in the collection. Professors include anatomist and surgeon David Hayes Agnew; professor of clinical medicine William Osler; professor of dental pathology, therapeutics, and Materia Medica James Truman; and professor of clinical medicine H.C. Wood.

Most of the volumes are written from front to back; then turned over and written back to front. On one occasion, a quiz is included, but it is unclear if the notes are documenting Huber's studying or the actual quiz. The volume dated October 1887 to January 1888 appears to contain notes from actual medical cases, describing the gender and age of patient, their vocation, their medical condition, history of condition, and, sometimes, recommendations. It is possible that this class was taught by Osler.

Huber's handwriting is fairly difficult to read and it is frequently unclear if the headings of pages are different classes or simply different lectures within classes. None of the volumes have clear titles of courses with the possible exception of the first, dating February of 1885, which seems to be Truman's class on Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics. Folder titles were crafted from the most prominent information on the first few pages of each notebook. It is often unclear who taught the courses. Despite the challenges of reading Huber's handwriting and determining courses or teachers, these volumes provide a glimpse into the type of education a student in medicine and dentistry would have received at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1880s.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2015 August 24

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  July 25, 2017

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 12

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 2

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 November 16

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 9

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2018 April 10

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2016 May 11

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Kelin Baldridge

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Mrs. W. P. Durfee of Geneva, New York.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of William Pepper.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Dr. William Pepper, 1903

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Benjamin S. Paschell, 1903.

Source of Acquisition

Sold by Carmen D. Valentino, 2003.

Source of Acquisition

Transferred from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, 2015.

Processing Information note

Formerly: Dewey MS 615.04 K954.

Processing Information note

Formerly Dewey MS 610.4 R89.5

Processing Information note

Formerly Dewey 610.7 C367.

Processing Information note

Formerly: Dewey MS 615.1 B283.

Return to Top »

Related Materials

Related Archival Materials note

At Dolph Briscoe Center for American History,The University of Texas at Austin: Robert Harris Archer family papers, 1846-1871

At the Maryland Historical Society: several family members' papers listed under "Archer."

Related Archival Materials note

At the American Philosophical Society:

Robert Hare papers, 1764-1859 and Hare-Willing Family Papers,1724-1965

At Duke University Libraries:

Robert Hare papers, Philadelphia. 1825-1858

At the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania:

Robert Hare correspondence, 1793-1858, Ms. Coll. 74

At the Library Company of Philadelphia:

Rush family papers, 1748-1876

Related Archival Materials note

At the American Philoslphical Society:

Violetta Delafield-Benjamin Smith Barton collection, 1783-1817, Mss.B.B284d

At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania:

Benjamin Smith Barton papers, Collection 0034

At the Library Company of Philadelphia:

Rush family papers, 1748-1876

At the University of Pennsylvania, Archives and Records Center

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810, UPW1a-13

At the University of Pennsylvania, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts:

Benjamin Rush lecture notes, 1783-1810, undated, Ms. Coll. 225

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810-1823, Ms. Coll. 669

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810, UPW1a-13

Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1802, Ms. Codex 1865

Related Archival Materials note

At the Historical Medical Library of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia:

John Kearsley Mitchell correspondence, 1892-1914, MSS 2/263

Nathaniel Chapman papers, circa 1810-1853, collection 10a

At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania:

Charles Sellers notes on Nathaniel Chapman lectures at the University of Pennsylvania, Am.13596

John Josiah White notes from Nathaniel Chapman lectures, Am.1880

At the National Library of Medicine:

Notes taken from the lectures of Nathaniel Chapman in the University of Pennsylvania / by Robert M. Tute, 1828, MS B 199

At the University of Pennsylvania, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts:

Student notes on lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1813-1833, Ms. Coll. 226

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Account books
  • Commonplace books
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
Subject(s)
  • Families
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medicine

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
Subject(s)
  • Chemistry--history
  • Chemistry--Study and teaching
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--History
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
  • Notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Cutbush, Edward, 1772-1843
  • Kuhn, Adam, 1741-1817
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Materia medica--Early works to 1800
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
  • Rush, Benjamin, 1746-1813
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
  • Notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Chapman, Nathaniel, 1780-1853
  • Daland, Judson
  • Mitchell, John Kearsley, 1793-1858
Subject(s)
  • Education
  • Medical education--United States--19th century
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Chapman, Nathaniel, 1780-1853
  • Jackson, Samuel, 1787-1872
Subject(s)
  • Medical education--United States--19th century
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Formulas, recipes, etc.
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Dental Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Subject(s)
  • Dental students
  • Dentistry
  • Dentistry--Study and teaching
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

J. Archer Jr.'s notes on Materia Medica lectures held at the University of Pennsylvania, 1797-1798.

1 1

Note and commonplace book of H. Archer, 1830-1832.

1 2

Parker and Archer account book for purchases of wheat, 1841-1851.

1 3

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Agnew, Robert (possibly), notebook [Item 8, volumes 1-4], undated.

2 4-7

Bartram, Moses, commonplace book and notebook [Item 3, volumes 1-2], before 1791.

1 3

Clark, Russel, notebook [Item 11, volumes 1-3], undated.

3 4-6

Curtin, Constans (probably), notebook [Item 6], circa 1806-1809.

2 2

Gilder, D., notebook [Item 12], 1783.

4 7

Graham, Jacob (probably), notebook [Item 13], probably 1788.

3 8

Hamilton, Thomas, notebook [Item 2], undated.

1 2

Hare, Robert (possibly), notebook [Item 9, volumes 1-2], 1796, 1798.

3 1-2

Heydrick, Christopher, notebook [Item 20, volumes 1-2], undated.

4 6-7

Jackson, William, notebook [Item 21, volume 1], 1804-1805.

4 8

Jackson, William, notebook [Item 21, volume 2], 1804-1805.

5 1

Maxwell, Robert G., notebook [Item 14], 1807-1808.

3 9

Overton, James, notebook [Item 1], 1807-1809.

1 1

Simonton, William, notebook [Item 5, volumes 1-3], undated.

1 6-8

Simonton, William, notebook [Item 5, volume 4], undated.

2 1

Spangler, John, notebook [Item 4, volumes 1-2], 1790-1791.

1 4-5

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 7], 1809-1810.

2 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 10], 1798.

3 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 16], undated.

4 2

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 17], undated.

4 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 18], undated.

4 4

Unidentified student, unbound notes [Item 15], undated.

4 1

Unidentified student, unbound notes [Item 19], undated.

4 5

Letters written by Benjamin Rush to Dr. John Dorsey (negatives), location of originals unknown, 1804, 1812.

5 2

Collection Inventory

Volume

"Notes taken from Doctor Adam Kuhn's Lectures on Materia Medica, by David Greenman", 1785.

1

Collection Inventory

Volume

Notebook, 1797-1798.

1

Collection Inventory

Notebook, 1832, 1894-1895.

Collection Inventory

Volume

"A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor Materia Medica, Natural History, and Botany in the University of Pennsylvania", 1801.

1

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Lecture notes (bound volume).

1 1

Items laid in (recipe for "Sirup de Cusineaux' and other notes), 1825, undated.

1 2

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Lectures of James Truman, including "Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics", 1885 February.

1 1

"H.C. Wood", 1886 October-1887 January.

1 2

"Agnew", 1886 November-1887 January.

1 3

"Dr. [Illegible]'s Quiz. Cells", 1886 October-1887 February.

1 4

Plant-based remedies, 1887 February-March.

1 5

"Osler" (case studies), 1887 October-1888 January.

1 6

"Cardiac Stimulants", 1887 November-1888 March.

1 7

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the University of Pennsylvania. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Archer, Henry Wilson, 1813-1887
Creator:
Archer, John, 1777-1830
Title:
Archer family account books and notebooks
Date [inclusive]:
1797-1851
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1120
Extent:
0.2 linear feet (1 box)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This collection (1797-1851) contains notebooks kept by three members of the Archer family, a prominent and politically active family of medical doctors based in Harford County, Maryland. The first file contains John Archer Jr.’s notes on materia medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Barton and given at the University of Pennsylvania in 1797 and 1798. A commonplace book (1830-1832) maintained by Henry Wilson Archer, which contains excerpts mostly from history books and poems is the second file. Also included in the collection is an account book (1841-1851) wherein the wheat purchases of Robert Harris Archer were recorded.
Cite as:
Archer family account books and notebooks, 1797-1841, Ms. Coll. 1120, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Bartram, Moses, -1791
Creator:
Curtin, Constans, 1783-1842
Creator:
Hare, Robert, 1781-1858
Creator:
Heydrick, Christopher, 1770-1856
Creator:
Kuhn, Adam, 1741-1817
Creator:
Overton, James, Jr., 1785-1865
Creator:
Rush, Benjamin, 1746-1813
Creator:
Simonton, William, 1788-1846
Title:
Benjamin Rush lecture notes
Date:
1783-1810, undated
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 225
Extent:
4.2 linear feet (5 boxes)
Language:
English
Abstract:
The Benjamin Rush lecture notes consist of 34 notebooks kept by medical students at the University of Pennsylvania, which record the content of academic lectures delivered by Dr. Benjamin Rush (1745-1813). Rush, a socially and politically prominent physician who lived and practiced in Philadelphia, served as a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine from 1769 to 1813. The handwritten lecture notes in this collection (recorded between 1783 and 1810) present the era's conventional medical wisdom on the causes, symptoms and cures of a range of diseases and disorders.
Cite as:
Benjamin Rush lecture notes, 1783-1810, undated, Ms. Coll. 225, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Greenman, David
Title:
David Greenman notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1785
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1866
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This book of notes was kept by David Greenman during a course of Materia Medica lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1785. The lecture notes themselves are not limited to Materia Medica in the strictest sense, in that they also include some information about physiology, pathology and therapeutics. The notebook is briefly inscribed by Dr. Edward Cutbush (1772-1843) an officer and surgeon in the United States Navy.
Cite as:
David Greenman notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1785, Ms. Codex 1866, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Gillasspy, George, d. 1832
Title:
George Gillasspy notes on lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date [inclusive]:
1797-1798
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1861
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This notebook, kept by George Gillasspy (also "Gillaspy"), records the content of lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1797 and 1798. These lectures touch upon a wide range of topics within materia medica, physiology, pathology and therapeutics, and represent the foundations of late eighteenth century medical education.
Cite as:
George Gillasspy notes on lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1797-1798, Ms. Codex 1861, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Mason, Wellington Smith
Creator:
Muhlenberg, H. H. (Hiester Henry), 1812-1886
Title:
Hiester H. Muhlenberg and Wellington Smith Mason notes on lectures delivered by Drs. Nathaniel Chapman, Judson Daland, and J.K. Mitchell at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1832, 1894-1895
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1873
Extent:
1 volume
Language:
English
Abstract:
This notebook contains lecture material transcribed by two different students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. One portion of the volume contains notes taken by Hiester H. Muhlenberg in 1832; the later material was written by Wellington Smith Mason during two separate courses of lectures between 1894 and 1895. The notes taken by Muhlenberg record a series of lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman on hemorrhages, fevers, cardiac disease and nervous disorders. The notes taken by Mason, decades later, document Dr. Judson Daland’s lectures on physical diagnosis and Dr. J.K. Mitchell's lectures on symptomatology.
Cite as:
Hiester H. Muhlenberg and Wellington Smith Mason notes on lectures delivered by Drs. Nathaniel Chapman, Judson Daland, and J.K. Mitchell at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1832, 1894-1895, Ms. Codex 1873, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Murduck, Jonathan
Title:
Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1802
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1865
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This volume of handwritten lecture notes, titled “A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor […] at the University of Pennsylvania,” was kept by medical student Jonathan Murduck in 1802, and provides a fairly comprehensive survey of the medicinal substances commonly in use in the early nineteenth century United States.
Cite as:
Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1802, Ms. Codex 1865, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Trevor, Joseph
Title:
Joseph Trevor notes on medical lectures delivered by Dr. Samuel Jackson at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date [inclusive]:
1824-1826
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 498
Extent:
0.2 linear foot (1 box)
Physical Facet note:
Written in one hand, attribution from front cover and 1 item laid in. Two leaves laid in. Foliation: [ii], ff. 1-113, pp. 114-119, 15 leaves cut out, 5 ff.
Language:
English
Abstract:
Joseph Trevor was a medical student at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. This volume of lecture notes documents a series of lectures taught by Dr. Samuel Jackson (1787-1872) between 1824 and 1826.
Cite as:
Joseph Trevor notes on medical lectures delivered by Dr. Samuel Jackson at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1824-1826, Ms. Coll. 498, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Huber, William S., 1865-1909
Title:
William S. Huber student lecture notes
Date [inclusive]:
1885-1888
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1306
Extent:
0.5 linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Dr. William S. Huber (1865-1909) was a dentist in Lebanon, Pennsylvania who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical and Dental Schools. This collection contains Huber's student lecture notes recorded between February 1885 and March 1888.
Cite as:
William S. Huber student lecture notes, 1885-1888, Ms. Coll. 1306, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Biography/History

The Archer family was a prominent and politically active family of medical doctors based in Harford County, Maryland. John Archer was born in Maryland in 1741 and (due to the alphabetical antecedence of his last name) was the first person to receive a medical diploma in North America, which he earned from the College of Philadelphia (later the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania) in 1768. His son, John Archer Jr. (1777-1850) also attended medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1798. J. Archer Jr. returned to Maryland after earning his degree and served as a surgeon of the Maryland militia in the War of 1812.

Henry Wilson Archer (1813-1887) was the son of John Archer Jr. Another graduate of the medical school of the University of Pennsylvania, H. Archer lived in Harford County and married Mary Elizabeth Walker in 1849.

The final volume in the collection is an account book created by Robert Harris Archer. Three individuals named Robert Harris Archer (brother of (1775-1857 or 1858), nephew of (1813-1883), or son of (1820-1878) John Archer, Jr.) may have been the account book's author.

Biography/History

Dr. Benjamin Rush (1745-1813) was a socially and politically prominent physician who lived and practiced in Philadelphia. Born in Byberry Township, Pennsylvania, Rush was educated at the University of Edinburgh, and travelled in England and France before returning to Philadelphia in 1769. Rush played an active role in the American Revolution, signing the Declaration of Independence and serving briefly as Surgeon General of the Middle Department of the Continental Army and as a physician with the Philadelphia militia.

Although most prominent Philadelphians left the city for healthier environments during the catastrophic Yellow Fever epidemics that hit Philadelphia in the 1790s, Rush remained in the city to treat the sick; though he may be equally or better remembered today for his strong advocacy of bloodletting as a therapeutic method for the disease.

Rush served as a professor of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (previously the College of Philadelphia) from 1769 to 1789 and as a professor of the "Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice" from 1791 to 1813. Rush also taught courses in the "Theory and Practice of Medicine" from 1789 to 1791, and again from 1796 to 1813.

Biography/History

Little information about David Greenman is readily available; he attended lectures at the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1785 but did not graduate. Dr. Edward Cutbush, who inscribed this volume, graduated from the University in 1794 and pursued a successful career as an officer and surgeon in the U.S. Navy. An eminent scientist of eighteenth century Philadelphia, Dr. Adam Kuhn (1741-1817) was a professor first of Botany and Materia Medica, and then the Theory and Practice of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania between 1768 and 1797.

Biography/History

George Gillasspy (elsewhere spelled “Gillaspy”) was a medical student, military doctor, and apothecary. Gillasspy served as a surgeon with the Second U.S. Infantry Regiment and on the Frigate U.S.S. United States during the Revolutionary War, at or around the same time that he kept his book of notes on medical lectures. (Indeed, Gillasspy signs his name along with “Surgeon 2d U.S. Regt [illeg] & act.g Surgn Frigate” at the beginning of the second section of the lecture notes, referring to his role as surgeon of the Second Regiment and on the frigate  United States.) Gillasspy also served as a surgeon with the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry from 1806 to 1808, and operated an apothecary shop in Philadelphia with his partner Dr. Joseph Strong. In 1803, Gillasspy and Strong outfitted Meriwether Lewis with $90.69 in medicines for his expedition west. Gillaspy died in 1832 and is buried in Christ Church Burial Ground in Philadelphia. Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815) was a leading botanist and naturalist of his day, and Benjamin Rush (1746-1813) was one of Philadelphia’s foremost physicians in late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Both taught at the University of Pennsylvania for much of their careers.

Sources:

History of the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry: From Its Organization, November 17th, 1774 to Its Centennial Anniversary, November 17th, 1874. (Princeton: 1875). URL: https://books.google.com/books?id=va8-AAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s

Kris Fresonke and Mark David Spence. Lewis & Clark: Legacies, Memories, and New Perspectives. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004).

Biography/History

Hiester H. Muhlenberg (1812-1886) graduated from the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1832, and practiced medicine in Reading, Pennsylvania, before switching his career to finance in 1837. Nathaniel Chapman (1780-1853) was a prominent physician and educator in Philadelphia, who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1801 and began his teaching career at the same institution in 1810. He taught Materia Medica and the theory and practice of medicine. Throughout his career, he remained an influential member of the medical community in Philadelphia until his death in 1853. In addition to his teaching, he founded the Medical Institute of Philadelphia in 1817; founded the Philadelphia Journal of the Medical and Physical Sciences (today the  American Journal of Medical Sciences) in 1820; and served as president of the Philadelphia Medical Society, as president of the American Philosophical Society, as fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia (elected in 1807), and as the first president of the American Medical Association (elected in 1848).

Wellington Smith Mason (1865- 1900) graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1898. He appears to have practiced medicine in Williamstown, Pennsylvania, but his career was cut short by his death on September 30, 1900, at age 35, from complications from a surgery for appendicitis. Dr. Judson Daland (1860-circa 1937) graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1882. Following his graduation, he practiced medicine in Philadelphia. He was a demonstrator and an instructor of clinical medicine at the University of Pennsylvania from 1882 until at least 1897. He was also a professor of diseases of the chest at the Philadelphia Polyclinic and College for Graduates in Medicine from 1896 to 1897 and a professor of clinical medicine at the same institution from 1897. J.K. (John Kearsley) Mitchell (1859-1917), the son of S. Weir Mitchell, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1883. He began teaching at the University of Pennsylvania in 1886, serving as assistant demonstrator in clinical medicine until 1894, and as lecturer on general symptomatology from 1894 to 1899.

Biography/History

Jonathan Murduck (born circa 1782) was a student at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1802, but did not receive his degree until 1811. Between 1803 and 1805, Murduck practiced medicine in Port-au-Prince. Murduck’s financial records, patient records, and memoranda from these voyages are held in the Manuscripts Division of the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan.

Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815) was a leading botanist and naturalist of his day, and a professor at the University of Pennsylvania from 1789 to 1813.

Sources: Jonathan Murduck Account Book and Memoranda, William L. Clements Library, The University of Michigan. https://quod.lib.umich.edu/c/clementsmss/umich-wcl-M-1890mur?byte=14434455;focusrgn=frontmatter;subview=standard;view=reslist

Biography/History

Joseph Trevor received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1826. He wrote an essay on foreign bodies in the esophagus and test-phagotomy.

Samuel Jackson was born in Philadelphia, March 22, 1787, son of pharmacist David Jackson and Susan Kemper. Although Jackson attended the College of the University of Pennsylvania, he did not complete the courses required to receive a degree but instead began his study of medicine under Dr. James Hutchinson. After Hutchinson’s death, he continued at the offices of Dr. Casper Wistar. Jackson received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1808. After graduation, he briefly took up the drug business left by his father and older brother.

When the War of 1812 broke out, Jackson joined the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry and served with them in operations in the Chesapeake Bay through the war. Jackson sold his pharmaceutical business upon his return in 1815 and began a private medical practice. In 1820, he became president of the Philadelphia Board of Health, and directed its management of the yellow fever epidemic. In 1821, Jackson helped found the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and was appointed its first Professor of Materia Medica. He also served as attending physician at the Philadelphia Almshouse and as instructor of medical chemistry and materia medica at the Medical Institute of Philadelphia, founded by Nathaniel Chapman.

In 1827, Jackson was made assistant to Professor Nathaniel Chapman at the University of Pennsylvania, a post in which Jackson was responsible for teaching physiology. When Chapman's health declined in 1835, Jackson took over as Professor of the Institutes of Medicine and remained in that chair until his retirement in 1863. He would also teach on the wards of Philadelphia Hospital from 1842 to 1845. His medical publications included The Principles of Medicine Founded on the Structure and Functions of the Animal Organism.

Jackson's professional and scholarly memberships included the College of Physicians of Philadelphia and the American Philosophical Society. While in Montreal, Canada, in 1832 investigating an outbreak of Asian cholera on behalf of the Sanitary Board of Councils for Philadelphia, he married the daughter of a British officer. Jackson died in Philadelphia, April 4, 1872.

Information regarding Dr. Samuel Jackson taken in its entirety from Penn Biographies.

Biography/History

Dr. William S. Huber was born in July, 1865, to Dr. William A. (a prominent Lebanon, Pennsylvania, dentist) and Juliana Huber. He was educated at public schools in Lebanon, Pennsylvania and graduated from Lebanon High School. From there, he began his education at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, completing first the course of medicine, and then continuing on to take a full course in dentistry. According to the University of Pennsylvania Catalogue and Announcements from the 1886 to 1887 academic year, Huber was a successful student and was among several students "selected for their proficiency in Anatomy to act as Assistant Demonstrators of Anatomy," (page 66).

Following the completion of his studies, he succeeded his father in his dental practice and "built up a large and lucrative practice," (Kirk, page 1019). In 1895, he married A. May Kaler (1866-1901) and they were the parents of William K. (1896-1951) and Charles G. (born in 1898).

In addition to his career as a dentist, Huber served as a member of the board of public schools, as presiding officer of the city council and the select council, and as member of the board of elders of the Salem Evangelical Lutheran Church. He also participated in the Mt. Lebanon Lodge, Weidle Chapter, and Hermit Commandery of the Masons; the Lu Lu Temple in Reading, Pennsylvania; and the Harrisburg Consistory. Huber died of apoplexy on May 25, 1909.

Works cited:

Kirk, Edward C., editor. The Dental Cosmos, Volume 51, 1909 (page 1019).

University of Pennsylvania Catalogue and Announcements, 1886-1887, page 66.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of notebooks kept by three members of the Archer family between 1797 and 1851. Two booklets of notes on materia medica lectures held at the University of Pennsylvania make up the first file in the collection. John Archer Jr. attended the lectures (delivered by Benjamin S. Barton, M.D., a Professor of Materia Medica, Botany and Natural History) in 1797 and 1798. Addressing what is now considered pharmacology, the booklets detail medical treatments for a number of diseases. The first volume of the set is concerned largely with the nutritional benefits of various foods and the categorization of medicines, whether as botanical or mineral astringents, tonics, emetics, stimulants, and the like. The second volume discusses the merits of different medicines (mostly plant-based) and lists viable treatments for a range of diseases. A note on the last page of the second volume suggests that there was a third booklet in this set of lecture notes.

The second file in this collection is the commonplace book of Henry Archer, written between 1830 and 1832 in Harford County, Maryland. This book is roughly organized into four sections. The first section consists of notes on the history of Asia (based on a text by Charles Rollin), Rome (based on Edward Gibbon’s The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire), Roman jurisprudence, and the feudal system in Scotland. The second section features shorter quotations taken from several sources including  Don Juan, the poetry of Byron and Thomas Campbell, and  The Young Duke, a novel by Benjamin Disraeli. Also in this section is a transcription of ‘The Union College Dunciad’, a (probably unpublished) volume of satirical verse written in Schenectady in 1830. The notebook’s third section is a list of the books that Archer read, sorted by category and year. Each book has a number next to it, perhaps denoting how many times it was read. This list is extended on the front inside cover of the notebook. The final section of the notebook is titled ‘Questions for Debate’, and includes eleven questions about both historical and contemporary political issues.

An account book kept by Robert Harris Archer from 1841 to 1851 is the third file in this series, and lists Archer’s purchases of wheat. This book is, for the most part, well organized with the name of the wheat seller, price and amount of wheat, and date of purchase laid out consistently. A few pages, however, are filled with tally marks, calculations and miscellaneous notes and sketches, including two small drawings of houses labeled ‘Baltimore’ and ‘Philadelphia’.

Scope and Contents

The Benjamin Rush lecture notes consist of 34 notebooks kept by a number of medical students at the University of Pennsylvania, which record the content of academic lectures delivered by Dr. Benjamin Rush. Many of the notebooks are undated, but those which have been inscribed with dates range from 1783 to 1810 (Rush was a professor at the University from 1769 until his death in 1813). All of the notes are handwritten, and some are unsigned or of uncertain authorship. All but two sets of notes are bound; however, those that were rebound at some point since they were created are quite fragile. The notes seem to be verbatim transcriptions of Rush's lectures, and are written in full sentences. Many of the volumes of notes have indices at the front or back, which list diseases alphabetically along with the page on which the condition is described.

Rush taught courses in Chemistry, the "Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice" and the "Theory and Practice of Medicine." The content and format of his lectures seem to have remained fairly consistent across the nearly three decades represented in this collection. Chemistry lectures (recorded by students Moses Bartram (item 3), D. Gilder (item 12), Jacob Graham (item 13), and an unidentified student (item 16)) describe particular elements and compounds, as well as broad classes of substances such as "vinegars," salts, earths, metals, and airs, some of which groups are divided into subcategories. Interspersed with this content is information about the medical applications of particular chemical substances, and their effects upon the human body.

Researchers will find lectures on the "Institutes." In the first lecture recorded by an unidentified student in item 7, Rush explains that "the Institutes are divided into four parts, Physiology, Hygiene, Pathology & Therapeutics." The notebooks that correspond to Rush’s lectures on the Institutes generally treat the topics of anatomy, sensation, perception, cognition, the psyche, mental and physical differences between men and women, epidemiology, prognosis, diagnosis, convalescence, the effects of the environment upon the body, and some of the social and cultural factors that can influence health. Rush dedicates a number of lectures to the topics of psychology and psychological disorders, including discussions of the symptoms and cures of "passions" (which he usually defines as fear, love, anger and grief) and of mania. Notes on the Institutes tend also to include fairly long discourses on diet, the preparation and qualities of different foods and beverages, especially bread, beer, wine and alcoholic spirits, and the influences of each upon the body.

The lectures on the Theory and Practice of Medicine focus heavily on fevers, their theoretical categorizations and various symptomatic presentations. A wide range of non-febrile diseases (acute, chronic, infectious, non-communicable, venereal, psychological, etc.) are also profiled, with detailed descriptions of their symptoms and of viable therapeutic approaches to each. Other lectures specifically outline the diseases and health problems especially common among women, "negroes," children, and the elderly. The notes on the practice of medicine contain some short case studies, and all of Rush’s lectures are very referential to other doctors, scientists and medical experts.

The medical students whose names appear on the volumes of notes in this collection are Moses Bartram (1767-1791), Russel Clark, Constans Curtin (1783-1842), D. Gilder, Jacob Graham (possibly), Thomas Hamilton, Robert Hare (1781-1858) (possibly), Christopher Heydrick (1770-1856), William Jackson, Robert G. Maxwell, James Overton (1785-1865), William Simonton (1788-1846), and John Spangler. The four volumes attributed to David Hayes Agnew (1818-1892) (item 8) were probably created by his father, Dr. Robert Agnew (1785-1858). One other dating anomaly: the Thomas Hamilton notebook (Item 2) which is dated January 7, 1814 (a year after Rush's death) possibly signifies the conclusion of Hamilton’s studies.

While the vast majority of the materials within this collection contain lecture notes, the first volume created by Moses Bartram (Item 3, volume 1) appears to be less a record of lecture material than a collection of excerpts from scientific and medical treatises, and is thus described in the finding aid as a commonplace book. Researchers will find a few lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn (1741-1817) in notebooks by both John Spangler (Item 4, volume 1) and D. Gilder’s notebook (Item 12). D. Gilder's notebook also includes some notes from lectures by Dr. William Shippen (1736-1808).

In addition to the lecture notes, researchers will find a "List of Domestic Medicine which ought to be Kept in the Shops of American Physicians" and a transcription of his class's valedictory address in Russel Clark's notebook (item 11, volume 3); a "Table of Fever," which seemingly correlates body temperature to a type of febrile disease, within the notebooks of Robert G. Maxwell (item 14) and an unidentified student (item 18); and several pages of "Questions in Natural Philosophy" and a short section on the government of Pennsylvania in an unbound set of notes by an unidentified student (item 15).

Prior to processing in 2017, item numbers were assigned to notebooks. These item numbers have been retained.

Scope and Contents

This book of notes was kept by David Greenman during a course of Materia Medica lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1785. The first pages of the volume include some curious annotations by Dr. Edward Cutbush in 1814. Cutbush claims, "These notes have been taken incorrectly from my friends' lectures- I purchased the volume at a public auction. Washington" and a few pages later, "orthography very incorrect." David Greenman’s signature on the title page of the notebook has been scribbled over in ink but is still legible. The lecture notes themselves are not limited to Materia Medica in the strictest sense, in that they also include some information about physiology, pathology and therapeutics. The organization of the material in the book is somewhat disjointed, and begins with a brief history of medicine, overview of physiology, discussion of digestion and the qualities of various foods (salt, sugar, milk, etc.), and the means of treating diseases, especially scurvy, by regulation or alteration of the diet. Subsequent sections focus more specifically on medicines and their classifications, especially into the categories of astringents (including “metallic astringents” like iron, lead and zinc), stimulants (including “bitters” like cinchona bark) and sedatives (among which opium is discussed at greatest length). A fairly detailed description of types of tumors, particularly those characteristic of breast cancer, begins on page 128, and a discussion of hysteria follows from page 139 to 148. The medical properties and applications of alkaline substances, soap, errhines (drugs that produce a runny nose) and mercury are subsequently explained, followed by the therapeutic uses of purgatives and blisters. The penultimate section of the book touches upon the topics of plethora (a systemic excess of blood in the body) and complications relating to menstruation, and the final chapter relates to anthelmintics (anti-parasitic medications). At the very end of this book is an alphabetized index of the contents of the notebook, which lists a combination of the names of drugs and medicinal plants, and the medical conditions discussed.

Scope and Contents

This volume of notes is organized into three sections, corresponding to three courses of lectures. The first is titled by Gillasspy, “A Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Barton, professor in the University of Pennsylvania with Remarks thereon &c,” and dated 1797. These lectures first address classes of medicines, namely astringents, vegetable tonics, metallic tonics, stimulants (seven consecutive lectures discuss the therapeutic properties of opium), emetics, cathartics, “salivating medicines,” and diuretics. Later lectures describe particular medicines, almost all of which are plant based. These profiles typically provide a medicinal plant’s Latin name, common name, native region, effects upon the human body and pharmacological applications.

The next section of the notebook (1797) contains both handwritten notes and printed material. The first page of this portion of the document is a printed cover of a booklet titled “A Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on the Institutes of Medicine by Benjamin Rush, M.D.. Professor of the Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice in the University of Pennsylvania.” The subsequent handwritten notes on these lectures are interspersed with excerpts of the printed syllabus to which they correspond. These lectures address physiology, pathology and therapeutics, in this order. Within the first topic, Rush briefly presents some basic features and functions of the human body (such as respiration, circulation, sensation, and cognition), before discussing nutrition, digestion and “the secretions and excretions,” and finally outlining the physical differences between men and women, some information about obstetric and gynecological medicine, and what he terms “the stages of life.” The portion of the lecture series on pathology outlines what Rush regards as the four causes of disease -remote, predisposing, occasional and proximate- along with some of the signs of disease. The third and final section of this syllabus, “Therapeutics, OR, of the method of curing diseases,” describes the actions of various types of medicines.

The final section of the book contains notes on “the practice of physic” from lectures delivered by Benjamin Rush in 1798. The first of these lectures relate to the topics of prognosis and diagnosis, “transient symptoms,” and depleting, stimulating and sedative medicines. The rest of the lectures in the volume relate to fevers and their extensive classifications. Along with descriptions of the various febrile “states,” Rush presents the most effective treatments for each. (There is also a short discourse, at the end of this section, on “diseases of the mind”).

The presence of press-printed material in section two, and the closeness of the handwritten text to the spine of the book, suggests that the volume was bound after the notes were taken.

Scope and Contents

This book of notes contains lecture material transcribed by two different students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. One portion of the volume contains notes taken by Hiester H. Muhlenberg in 1832; the later material was written by Wellington Smith Mason during two separate courses of lectures between 1894 and 1895. An inscription provided by William Pepper explains that "this old notebook was found in the basement of Medical Hall, Jan. 1903. It had probably been given to Mr. Wm. H. Salvador [clerk of the Medical Department] in 97 or 98." The notes taken by Muhlenberg record a series of lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman. This material reviews diseases that fall into four classes--diseases of the heart, diseases of the nervous system, exanthemata or "eruptive fevers," and hemorrhages--providing a description, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and list of causes for each condition. There is a brief, final section on asthma, and there are a few loose sheets of letter paper enclosed in the book, which describe some other diseases, like dropsy. The section on exanthemata includes some information on inoculation and vaccination.

The notes taken by Mason from 1894 to 1895 correspond to two courses. The first, Dr. Judson Daland’s lectures on Physical Diagnosis, primarily discusses cardiopulmonary diseases, reviewed through a number of case studies. Lectures seven through fourteen describe the signs and symptoms of various conditions, particularly tuberculosis. The remainder of the lectures, which feature some ink illustrations, address the anatomy of the blood and heart "with reference to diagnosis." The notes on blood mainly address the preparation and examination of microscope slides.

The second set of notes on Symptomatology lectures, given by Dr. J. K. Mitchell, focuses on how to collect and analyze information about a patient's experience of disease. In particular, these lectures address the physiological (sometimes physiognomic) indications of illness and the interpretation of these signs, the sorts of people most susceptible to pulmonary disease, different types of pain and their relationships to particular diseases, and the most effective methods of collecting relevant medical information from patients. By and large, Mason’s lectures lean heavily on illustrative case studies and patient examinations (both clinical and post-mortem), which are typically presented in a fairly detailed, standardized format.

Scope and Contents

This volume of handwritten lecture notes, titled "A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor […] in the University of Pennsylvania," was kept by Jonathan Murduck in 1802, and provides a fairly comprehensive survey of the medicinal substances commonly in use in the early nineteenth century United States. The detailed table of contents at the beginning of the notebook lists a number of broad categories into which various medicines are sorted. The primary classes of drugs and medicinal substances noted are astringents, tonics, "Alimentary Matter," stimulants, evacuants (including errhines and sialogogues, drugs that produce a runny nose and salivation, respectively), diuretics, emetics, cathartics, and antithelmintics (anti-parasitic medicines). There is also an opening chapter on milk, which mainly discusses lactation in humans and the properties of milk, and a short final section titled "Materia Nutrentia," which relates to diet, nutrition and the component elements of food (acid, sugar, oil, etc.). The main chapters or sections of the text consist of a passage discussing the general characteristics, properties and applications of this type of medicine, followed by a list of "particular" drugs within the category. The great majority of “particulars” are medicinal plants, though some sections are subdivided into "metallic," "mineral" or "animal" substances (and in some instances, medicinal plants are arranged based on their indigeneity to the United States).

The medicinal substances are usually listed by their Latin names, and discussed in a few paragraphs. For botanical medicines, these descriptions provide the plant’s common and Latin names, native region, pharmaceutical preparation, effects upon the body, therapeutic applications, and sometimes one or two brief case studies indicating its efficacy or inefficacy in treating particular conditions. The three drugs described at greatest length are opium, "Cortex Peruvianus" (Peruvian bark or cinchona) and mercury; the discussion of each of these medicines is organized by the specific diseases they can be used to combat.

Scope and Contents

This collection contains lecture notes on pathology, diagnosis, and treatments, including prescriptions, taken at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School from 1824 to 1826 in courses taught by Dr. Samuel Jackson. The lecture notes include frequent references to Dr. Nathaniel Chapman, a professor to whom Jackson was made assistant in 1827.

A portion of the volume is in question and answer format. For example, under the condition "Asthma," questions such as "What is asthma?," "What are the causes?," etc. are asked and followed by the answers. By page 36, this format changes to a more standard narrative of the lectures.

Lectures addressed bilious pleurisy, peripneumonia rotha, asthma, angina pectoris, pertussis, phthisis pulmonalis, cynanche trachialis, dropsy, atonic dropsy, ascitis, hydrothorax, scrophula, marasmus, hydrocephalus, cynanche laryngea, cynanche tonsillaris, cynanche parotidea (mumps), scarlet fever, measles, variola or small pox, gout, rheumatism, hematuria, hemorrhoides or piles, diseases of the digestive system, drunkenness, exanthemata, diseases of the cutaneous system, erysipelas, diseases of the cerebral system, epilepsy, chronic laryngitis, and hepatitis. All spelling and terms are replicated exactly. Several pages were removed, it appears with a knife. A small number of remedies follow, including a recipe for "Dr. Jackson's cough mixture." A few notes, originally laid into the volume, include a recipe for "sirip de cusineaux."

Scope and Contents

This collection contains Dr. William S. Huber’s lecture notes from his time at the University of Pennsylvania Medical and Dental Schools. There are seven volumes that begin in February of 1885 and end in March of 1888. Several of the volumes overlap in time and seem to have been used for separate classes. The notes themselves include several hand-drawn diagrams. Lectures address Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics, pharmaceuticals, bone fractures, concussions, ulcers, pain and inflammation, and cells, as well as diseases of the blood, the liver, the heart, and the lungs. There seem to be a number of descriptions of plant based remedies in the first, second, and fifth volumes in the collection. Professors include anatomist and surgeon David Hayes Agnew; professor of clinical medicine William Osler; professor of dental pathology, therapeutics, and Materia Medica James Truman; and professor of clinical medicine H.C. Wood.

Most of the volumes are written from front to back; then turned over and written back to front. On one occasion, a quiz is included, but it is unclear if the notes are documenting Huber's studying or the actual quiz. The volume dated October 1887 to January 1888 appears to contain notes from actual medical cases, describing the gender and age of patient, their vocation, their medical condition, history of condition, and, sometimes, recommendations. It is possible that this class was taught by Osler.

Huber's handwriting is fairly difficult to read and it is frequently unclear if the headings of pages are different classes or simply different lectures within classes. None of the volumes have clear titles of courses with the possible exception of the first, dating February of 1885, which seems to be Truman's class on Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics. Folder titles were crafted from the most prominent information on the first few pages of each notebook. It is often unclear who taught the courses. Despite the challenges of reading Huber's handwriting and determining courses or teachers, these volumes provide a glimpse into the type of education a student in medicine and dentistry would have received at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1880s.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2015 August 24

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  July 25, 2017

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 12

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 2

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 November 16

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2017 October 9

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2018 April 10

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2016 May 11

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Rive Cadwallader

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Kelin Baldridge

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Mrs. W. P. Durfee of Geneva, New York.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of William Pepper.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Dr. William Pepper, 1903

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Benjamin S. Paschell, 1903.

Source of Acquisition

Sold by Carmen D. Valentino, 2003.

Source of Acquisition

Transferred from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, 2015.

Processing Information note

Formerly: Dewey MS 615.04 K954.

Processing Information note

Formerly Dewey MS 610.4 R89.5

Processing Information note

Formerly Dewey 610.7 C367.

Processing Information note

Formerly: Dewey MS 615.1 B283.

Return to Top »

Related Materials

Related Archival Materials note

At Dolph Briscoe Center for American History,The University of Texas at Austin: Robert Harris Archer family papers, 1846-1871

At the Maryland Historical Society: several family members' papers listed under "Archer."

Related Archival Materials note

At the American Philosophical Society:

Robert Hare papers, 1764-1859 and Hare-Willing Family Papers,1724-1965

At Duke University Libraries:

Robert Hare papers, Philadelphia. 1825-1858

At the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania:

Robert Hare correspondence, 1793-1858, Ms. Coll. 74

At the Library Company of Philadelphia:

Rush family papers, 1748-1876

Related Archival Materials note

At the American Philoslphical Society:

Violetta Delafield-Benjamin Smith Barton collection, 1783-1817, Mss.B.B284d

At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania:

Benjamin Smith Barton papers, Collection 0034

At the Library Company of Philadelphia:

Rush family papers, 1748-1876

At the University of Pennsylvania, Archives and Records Center

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810, UPW1a-13

At the University of Pennsylvania, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts:

Benjamin Rush lecture notes, 1783-1810, undated, Ms. Coll. 225

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810-1823, Ms. Coll. 669

Benjamin Smith Barton lecture notes, 1810, UPW1a-13

Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1802, Ms. Codex 1865

Related Archival Materials note

At the Historical Medical Library of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia:

John Kearsley Mitchell correspondence, 1892-1914, MSS 2/263

Nathaniel Chapman papers, circa 1810-1853, collection 10a

At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania:

Charles Sellers notes on Nathaniel Chapman lectures at the University of Pennsylvania, Am.13596

John Josiah White notes from Nathaniel Chapman lectures, Am.1880

At the National Library of Medicine:

Notes taken from the lectures of Nathaniel Chapman in the University of Pennsylvania / by Robert M. Tute, 1828, MS B 199

At the University of Pennsylvania, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts:

Student notes on lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 1813-1833, Ms. Coll. 226

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Account books
  • Commonplace books
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
Subject(s)
  • Families
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medicine

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
Subject(s)
  • Chemistry--history
  • Chemistry--Study and teaching
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--History
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
  • Notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Cutbush, Edward, 1772-1843
  • Kuhn, Adam, 1741-1817
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Materia medica--Early works to 1800
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
  • Rush, Benjamin, 1746-1813
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
  • Notebooks
  • Notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Chapman, Nathaniel, 1780-1853
  • Daland, Judson
  • Mitchell, John Kearsley, 1793-1858
Subject(s)
  • Education
  • Medical education--United States--19th century
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Barton, Benjamin Smith, 1766-1815
Subject(s)
  • Materia medica
  • Medical education--United States
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Personal Name(s)
  • Chapman, Nathaniel, 1780-1853
  • Jackson, Samuel, 1787-1872
Subject(s)
  • Medical education--United States--19th century
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Formulas, recipes, etc.
  • Medicine--Study and teaching

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Dental Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Medicine.
  • University of Pennsylvania.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Lecture notes
Subject(s)
  • Dental students
  • Dentistry
  • Dentistry--Study and teaching
  • Medical students
  • Medicine
  • Medicine--Study and teaching--19th century

Return to Top »

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

J. Archer Jr.'s notes on Materia Medica lectures held at the University of Pennsylvania, 1797-1798.

1 1

Note and commonplace book of H. Archer, 1830-1832.

1 2

Parker and Archer account book for purchases of wheat, 1841-1851.

1 3

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Agnew, Robert (possibly), notebook [Item 8, volumes 1-4], undated.

2 4-7

Bartram, Moses, commonplace book and notebook [Item 3, volumes 1-2], before 1791.

1 3

Clark, Russel, notebook [Item 11, volumes 1-3], undated.

3 4-6

Curtin, Constans (probably), notebook [Item 6], circa 1806-1809.

2 2

Gilder, D., notebook [Item 12], 1783.

4 7

Graham, Jacob (probably), notebook [Item 13], probably 1788.

3 8

Hamilton, Thomas, notebook [Item 2], undated.

1 2

Hare, Robert (possibly), notebook [Item 9, volumes 1-2], 1796, 1798.

3 1-2

Heydrick, Christopher, notebook [Item 20, volumes 1-2], undated.

4 6-7

Jackson, William, notebook [Item 21, volume 1], 1804-1805.

4 8

Jackson, William, notebook [Item 21, volume 2], 1804-1805.

5 1

Maxwell, Robert G., notebook [Item 14], 1807-1808.

3 9

Overton, James, notebook [Item 1], 1807-1809.

1 1

Simonton, William, notebook [Item 5, volumes 1-3], undated.

1 6-8

Simonton, William, notebook [Item 5, volume 4], undated.

2 1

Spangler, John, notebook [Item 4, volumes 1-2], 1790-1791.

1 4-5

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 7], 1809-1810.

2 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 10], 1798.

3 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 16], undated.

4 2

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 17], undated.

4 3

Unidentified student, notebook [Item 18], undated.

4 4

Unidentified student, unbound notes [Item 15], undated.

4 1

Unidentified student, unbound notes [Item 19], undated.

4 5

Letters written by Benjamin Rush to Dr. John Dorsey (negatives), location of originals unknown, 1804, 1812.

5 2

Collection Inventory

Volume

"Notes taken from Doctor Adam Kuhn's Lectures on Materia Medica, by David Greenman", 1785.

1

Collection Inventory

Volume

Notebook, 1797-1798.

1

Collection Inventory

Notebook, 1832, 1894-1895.

Collection Inventory

Volume

"A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor Materia Medica, Natural History, and Botany in the University of Pennsylvania", 1801.

1

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Lecture notes (bound volume).

1 1

Items laid in (recipe for "Sirup de Cusineaux' and other notes), 1825, undated.

1 2

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Lectures of James Truman, including "Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics", 1885 February.

1 1

"H.C. Wood", 1886 October-1887 January.

1 2

"Agnew", 1886 November-1887 January.

1 3

"Dr. [Illegible]'s Quiz. Cells", 1886 October-1887 February.

1 4

Plant-based remedies, 1887 February-March.

1 5

"Osler" (case studies), 1887 October-1888 January.

1 6

"Cardiac Stimulants", 1887 November-1888 March.

1 7

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

Archer family account books and notebooks

Ms. Coll. 1120

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the University of Pennsylvania. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Archer, Henry Wilson, 1813-1887
Creator:
Archer, John, 1777-1830
Title:
Archer family account books and notebooks
Date [inclusive]:
1797-1851
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1120
Extent:
0.2 linear feet (1 box)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This collection (1797-1851) contains notebooks kept by three members of the Archer family, a prominent and politically active family of medical doctors based in Harford County, Maryland. The first file contains John Archer Jr.’s notes on materia medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Barton and given at the University of Pennsylvania in 1797 and 1798. A commonplace book (1830-1832) maintained by Henry Wilson Archer, which contains excerpts mostly from history books and poems is the second file. Also included in the collection is an account book (1841-1851) wherein the wheat purchases of Robert Harris Archer were recorded.
Cite as:
Archer family account books and notebooks, 1797-1841, Ms. Coll. 1120, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Bartram, Moses, -1791
Creator:
Curtin, Constans, 1783-1842
Creator:
Hare, Robert, 1781-1858
Creator:
Heydrick, Christopher, 1770-1856
Creator:
Kuhn, Adam, 1741-1817
Creator:
Overton, James, Jr., 1785-1865
Creator:
Rush, Benjamin, 1746-1813
Creator:
Simonton, William, 1788-1846
Title:
Benjamin Rush lecture notes
Date:
1783-1810, undated
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 225
Extent:
4.2 linear feet (5 boxes)
Language:
English
Abstract:
The Benjamin Rush lecture notes consist of 34 notebooks kept by medical students at the University of Pennsylvania, which record the content of academic lectures delivered by Dr. Benjamin Rush (1745-1813). Rush, a socially and politically prominent physician who lived and practiced in Philadelphia, served as a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine from 1769 to 1813. The handwritten lecture notes in this collection (recorded between 1783 and 1810) present the era's conventional medical wisdom on the causes, symptoms and cures of a range of diseases and disorders.
Cite as:
Benjamin Rush lecture notes, 1783-1810, undated, Ms. Coll. 225, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Greenman, David
Title:
David Greenman notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1785
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1866
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This book of notes was kept by David Greenman during a course of Materia Medica lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1785. The lecture notes themselves are not limited to Materia Medica in the strictest sense, in that they also include some information about physiology, pathology and therapeutics. The notebook is briefly inscribed by Dr. Edward Cutbush (1772-1843) an officer and surgeon in the United States Navy.
Cite as:
David Greenman notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1785, Ms. Codex 1866, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Gillasspy, George, d. 1832
Title:
George Gillasspy notes on lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date [inclusive]:
1797-1798
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1861
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This notebook, kept by George Gillasspy (also "Gillaspy"), records the content of lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1797 and 1798. These lectures touch upon a wide range of topics within materia medica, physiology, pathology and therapeutics, and represent the foundations of late eighteenth century medical education.
Cite as:
George Gillasspy notes on lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton and Benjamin Rush at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1797-1798, Ms. Codex 1861, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Mason, Wellington Smith
Creator:
Muhlenberg, H. H. (Hiester Henry), 1812-1886
Title:
Hiester H. Muhlenberg and Wellington Smith Mason notes on lectures delivered by Drs. Nathaniel Chapman, Judson Daland, and J.K. Mitchell at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1832, 1894-1895
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1873
Extent:
1 volume
Language:
English
Abstract:
This notebook contains lecture material transcribed by two different students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. One portion of the volume contains notes taken by Hiester H. Muhlenberg in 1832; the later material was written by Wellington Smith Mason during two separate courses of lectures between 1894 and 1895. The notes taken by Muhlenberg record a series of lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman on hemorrhages, fevers, cardiac disease and nervous disorders. The notes taken by Mason, decades later, document Dr. Judson Daland’s lectures on physical diagnosis and Dr. J.K. Mitchell's lectures on symptomatology.
Cite as:
Hiester H. Muhlenberg and Wellington Smith Mason notes on lectures delivered by Drs. Nathaniel Chapman, Judson Daland, and J.K. Mitchell at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1832, 1894-1895, Ms. Codex 1873, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Murduck, Jonathan
Title:
Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date:
1802
Call Number:
Ms. Codex 1865
Extent:
0.1 linear foot (1 volume)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This volume of handwritten lecture notes, titled “A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor […] at the University of Pennsylvania,” was kept by medical student Jonathan Murduck in 1802, and provides a fairly comprehensive survey of the medicinal substances commonly in use in the early nineteenth century United States.
Cite as:
Jonathan Murduck notes on Materia Medica lectures delivered by Benjamin Smith Barton at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1802, Ms. Codex 1865, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Trevor, Joseph
Title:
Joseph Trevor notes on medical lectures delivered by Dr. Samuel Jackson at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Date [inclusive]:
1824-1826
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 498
Extent:
0.2 linear foot (1 box)
Physical Facet note:
Written in one hand, attribution from front cover and 1 item laid in. Two leaves laid in. Foliation: [ii], ff. 1-113, pp. 114-119, 15 leaves cut out, 5 ff.
Language:
English
Abstract:
Joseph Trevor was a medical student at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. This volume of lecture notes documents a series of lectures taught by Dr. Samuel Jackson (1787-1872) between 1824 and 1826.
Cite as:
Joseph Trevor notes on medical lectures delivered by Dr. Samuel Jackson at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, 1824-1826, Ms. Coll. 498, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Huber, William S., 1865-1909
Title:
William S. Huber student lecture notes
Date [inclusive]:
1885-1888
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1306
Extent:
0.5 linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Dr. William S. Huber (1865-1909) was a dentist in Lebanon, Pennsylvania who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical and Dental Schools. This collection contains Huber's student lecture notes recorded between February 1885 and March 1888.
Cite as:
William S. Huber student lecture notes, 1885-1888, Ms. Coll. 1306, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Biography/History

The Archer family was a prominent and politically active family of medical doctors based in Harford County, Maryland. John Archer was born in Maryland in 1741 and (due to the alphabetical antecedence of his last name) was the first person to receive a medical diploma in North America, which he earned from the College of Philadelphia (later the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania) in 1768. His son, John Archer Jr. (1777-1850) also attended medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1798. J. Archer Jr. returned to Maryland after earning his degree and served as a surgeon of the Maryland militia in the War of 1812.

Henry Wilson Archer (1813-1887) was the son of John Archer Jr. Another graduate of the medical school of the University of Pennsylvania, H. Archer lived in Harford County and married Mary Elizabeth Walker in 1849.

The final volume in the collection is an account book created by Robert Harris Archer. Three individuals named Robert Harris Archer (brother of (1775-1857 or 1858), nephew of (1813-1883), or son of (1820-1878) John Archer, Jr.) may have been the account book's author.

Biography/History

Dr. Benjamin Rush (1745-1813) was a socially and politically prominent physician who lived and practiced in Philadelphia. Born in Byberry Township, Pennsylvania, Rush was educated at the University of Edinburgh, and travelled in England and France before returning to Philadelphia in 1769. Rush played an active role in the American Revolution, signing the Declaration of Independence and serving briefly as Surgeon General of the Middle Department of the Continental Army and as a physician with the Philadelphia militia.

Although most prominent Philadelphians left the city for healthier environments during the catastrophic Yellow Fever epidemics that hit Philadelphia in the 1790s, Rush remained in the city to treat the sick; though he may be equally or better remembered today for his strong advocacy of bloodletting as a therapeutic method for the disease.

Rush served as a professor of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (previously the College of Philadelphia) from 1769 to 1789 and as a professor of the "Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice" from 1791 to 1813. Rush also taught courses in the "Theory and Practice of Medicine" from 1789 to 1791, and again from 1796 to 1813.

Biography/History

Little information about David Greenman is readily available; he attended lectures at the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1785 but did not graduate. Dr. Edward Cutbush, who inscribed this volume, graduated from the University in 1794 and pursued a successful career as an officer and surgeon in the U.S. Navy. An eminent scientist of eighteenth century Philadelphia, Dr. Adam Kuhn (1741-1817) was a professor first of Botany and Materia Medica, and then the Theory and Practice of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania between 1768 and 1797.

Biography/History

George Gillasspy (elsewhere spelled “Gillaspy”) was a medical student, military doctor, and apothecary. Gillasspy served as a surgeon with the Second U.S. Infantry Regiment and on the Frigate U.S.S. United States during the Revolutionary War, at or around the same time that he kept his book of notes on medical lectures. (Indeed, Gillasspy signs his name along with “Surgeon 2d U.S. Regt [illeg] & act.g Surgn Frigate” at the beginning of the second section of the lecture notes, referring to his role as surgeon of the Second Regiment and on the frigate  United States.) Gillasspy also served as a surgeon with the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry from 1806 to 1808, and operated an apothecary shop in Philadelphia with his partner Dr. Joseph Strong. In 1803, Gillasspy and Strong outfitted Meriwether Lewis with $90.69 in medicines for his expedition west. Gillaspy died in 1832 and is buried in Christ Church Burial Ground in Philadelphia. Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815) was a leading botanist and naturalist of his day, and Benjamin Rush (1746-1813) was one of Philadelphia’s foremost physicians in late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Both taught at the University of Pennsylvania for much of their careers.

Sources:

History of the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry: From Its Organization, November 17th, 1774 to Its Centennial Anniversary, November 17th, 1874. (Princeton: 1875). URL: https://books.google.com/books?id=va8-AAAAYAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s

Kris Fresonke and Mark David Spence. Lewis & Clark: Legacies, Memories, and New Perspectives. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004).

Biography/History

Hiester H. Muhlenberg (1812-1886) graduated from the Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1832, and practiced medicine in Reading, Pennsylvania, before switching his career to finance in 1837. Nathaniel Chapman (1780-1853) was a prominent physician and educator in Philadelphia, who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1801 and began his teaching career at the same institution in 1810. He taught Materia Medica and the theory and practice of medicine. Throughout his career, he remained an influential member of the medical community in Philadelphia until his death in 1853. In addition to his teaching, he founded the Medical Institute of Philadelphia in 1817; founded the Philadelphia Journal of the Medical and Physical Sciences (today the  American Journal of Medical Sciences) in 1820; and served as president of the Philadelphia Medical Society, as president of the American Philosophical Society, as fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia (elected in 1807), and as the first president of the American Medical Association (elected in 1848).

Wellington Smith Mason (1865- 1900) graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1898. He appears to have practiced medicine in Williamstown, Pennsylvania, but his career was cut short by his death on September 30, 1900, at age 35, from complications from a surgery for appendicitis. Dr. Judson Daland (1860-circa 1937) graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1882. Following his graduation, he practiced medicine in Philadelphia. He was a demonstrator and an instructor of clinical medicine at the University of Pennsylvania from 1882 until at least 1897. He was also a professor of diseases of the chest at the Philadelphia Polyclinic and College for Graduates in Medicine from 1896 to 1897 and a professor of clinical medicine at the same institution from 1897. J.K. (John Kearsley) Mitchell (1859-1917), the son of S. Weir Mitchell, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1883. He began teaching at the University of Pennsylvania in 1886, serving as assistant demonstrator in clinical medicine until 1894, and as lecturer on general symptomatology from 1894 to 1899.

Biography/History

Jonathan Murduck (born circa 1782) was a student at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1802, but did not receive his degree until 1811. Between 1803 and 1805, Murduck practiced medicine in Port-au-Prince. Murduck’s financial records, patient records, and memoranda from these voyages are held in the Manuscripts Division of the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan.

Benjamin Smith Barton (1766-1815) was a leading botanist and naturalist of his day, and a professor at the University of Pennsylvania from 1789 to 1813.

Sources: Jonathan Murduck Account Book and Memoranda, William L. Clements Library, The University of Michigan. https://quod.lib.umich.edu/c/clementsmss/umich-wcl-M-1890mur?byte=14434455;focusrgn=frontmatter;subview=standard;view=reslist

Biography/History

Joseph Trevor received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1826. He wrote an essay on foreign bodies in the esophagus and test-phagotomy.

Samuel Jackson was born in Philadelphia, March 22, 1787, son of pharmacist David Jackson and Susan Kemper. Although Jackson attended the College of the University of Pennsylvania, he did not complete the courses required to receive a degree but instead began his study of medicine under Dr. James Hutchinson. After Hutchinson’s death, he continued at the offices of Dr. Casper Wistar. Jackson received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1808. After graduation, he briefly took up the drug business left by his father and older brother.

When the War of 1812 broke out, Jackson joined the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry and served with them in operations in the Chesapeake Bay through the war. Jackson sold his pharmaceutical business upon his return in 1815 and began a private medical practice. In 1820, he became president of the Philadelphia Board of Health, and directed its management of the yellow fever epidemic. In 1821, Jackson helped found the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and was appointed its first Professor of Materia Medica. He also served as attending physician at the Philadelphia Almshouse and as instructor of medical chemistry and materia medica at the Medical Institute of Philadelphia, founded by Nathaniel Chapman.

In 1827, Jackson was made assistant to Professor Nathaniel Chapman at the University of Pennsylvania, a post in which Jackson was responsible for teaching physiology. When Chapman's health declined in 1835, Jackson took over as Professor of the Institutes of Medicine and remained in that chair until his retirement in 1863. He would also teach on the wards of Philadelphia Hospital from 1842 to 1845. His medical publications included The Principles of Medicine Founded on the Structure and Functions of the Animal Organism.

Jackson's professional and scholarly memberships included the College of Physicians of Philadelphia and the American Philosophical Society. While in Montreal, Canada, in 1832 investigating an outbreak of Asian cholera on behalf of the Sanitary Board of Councils for Philadelphia, he married the daughter of a British officer. Jackson died in Philadelphia, April 4, 1872.

Information regarding Dr. Samuel Jackson taken in its entirety from Penn Biographies.

Biography/History

Dr. William S. Huber was born in July, 1865, to Dr. William A. (a prominent Lebanon, Pennsylvania, dentist) and Juliana Huber. He was educated at public schools in Lebanon, Pennsylvania and graduated from Lebanon High School. From there, he began his education at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, completing first the course of medicine, and then continuing on to take a full course in dentistry. According to the University of Pennsylvania Catalogue and Announcements from the 1886 to 1887 academic year, Huber was a successful student and was among several students "selected for their proficiency in Anatomy to act as Assistant Demonstrators of Anatomy," (page 66).

Following the completion of his studies, he succeeded his father in his dental practice and "built up a large and lucrative practice," (Kirk, page 1019). In 1895, he married A. May Kaler (1866-1901) and they were the parents of William K. (1896-1951) and Charles G. (born in 1898).

In addition to his career as a dentist, Huber served as a member of the board of public schools, as presiding officer of the city council and the select council, and as member of the board of elders of the Salem Evangelical Lutheran Church. He also participated in the Mt. Lebanon Lodge, Weidle Chapter, and Hermit Commandery of the Masons; the Lu Lu Temple in Reading, Pennsylvania; and the Harrisburg Consistory. Huber died of apoplexy on May 25, 1909.

Works cited:

Kirk, Edward C., editor. The Dental Cosmos, Volume 51, 1909 (page 1019).

University of Pennsylvania Catalogue and Announcements, 1886-1887, page 66.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of notebooks kept by three members of the Archer family between 1797 and 1851. Two booklets of notes on materia medica lectures held at the University of Pennsylvania make up the first file in the collection. John Archer Jr. attended the lectures (delivered by Benjamin S. Barton, M.D., a Professor of Materia Medica, Botany and Natural History) in 1797 and 1798. Addressing what is now considered pharmacology, the booklets detail medical treatments for a number of diseases. The first volume of the set is concerned largely with the nutritional benefits of various foods and the categorization of medicines, whether as botanical or mineral astringents, tonics, emetics, stimulants, and the like. The second volume discusses the merits of different medicines (mostly plant-based) and lists viable treatments for a range of diseases. A note on the last page of the second volume suggests that there was a third booklet in this set of lecture notes.

The second file in this collection is the commonplace book of Henry Archer, written between 1830 and 1832 in Harford County, Maryland. This book is roughly organized into four sections. The first section consists of notes on the history of Asia (based on a text by Charles Rollin), Rome (based on Edward Gibbon’s The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire), Roman jurisprudence, and the feudal system in Scotland. The second section features shorter quotations taken from several sources including  Don Juan, the poetry of Byron and Thomas Campbell, and  The Young Duke, a novel by Benjamin Disraeli. Also in this section is a transcription of ‘The Union College Dunciad’, a (probably unpublished) volume of satirical verse written in Schenectady in 1830. The notebook’s third section is a list of the books that Archer read, sorted by category and year. Each book has a number next to it, perhaps denoting how many times it was read. This list is extended on the front inside cover of the notebook. The final section of the notebook is titled ‘Questions for Debate’, and includes eleven questions about both historical and contemporary political issues.

An account book kept by Robert Harris Archer from 1841 to 1851 is the third file in this series, and lists Archer’s purchases of wheat. This book is, for the most part, well organized with the name of the wheat seller, price and amount of wheat, and date of purchase laid out consistently. A few pages, however, are filled with tally marks, calculations and miscellaneous notes and sketches, including two small drawings of houses labeled ‘Baltimore’ and ‘Philadelphia’.

Scope and Contents

The Benjamin Rush lecture notes consist of 34 notebooks kept by a number of medical students at the University of Pennsylvania, which record the content of academic lectures delivered by Dr. Benjamin Rush. Many of the notebooks are undated, but those which have been inscribed with dates range from 1783 to 1810 (Rush was a professor at the University from 1769 until his death in 1813). All of the notes are handwritten, and some are unsigned or of uncertain authorship. All but two sets of notes are bound; however, those that were rebound at some point since they were created are quite fragile. The notes seem to be verbatim transcriptions of Rush's lectures, and are written in full sentences. Many of the volumes of notes have indices at the front or back, which list diseases alphabetically along with the page on which the condition is described.

Rush taught courses in Chemistry, the "Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice" and the "Theory and Practice of Medicine." The content and format of his lectures seem to have remained fairly consistent across the nearly three decades represented in this collection. Chemistry lectures (recorded by students Moses Bartram (item 3), D. Gilder (item 12), Jacob Graham (item 13), and an unidentified student (item 16)) describe particular elements and compounds, as well as broad classes of substances such as "vinegars," salts, earths, metals, and airs, some of which groups are divided into subcategories. Interspersed with this content is information about the medical applications of particular chemical substances, and their effects upon the human body.

Researchers will find lectures on the "Institutes." In the first lecture recorded by an unidentified student in item 7, Rush explains that "the Institutes are divided into four parts, Physiology, Hygiene, Pathology & Therapeutics." The notebooks that correspond to Rush’s lectures on the Institutes generally treat the topics of anatomy, sensation, perception, cognition, the psyche, mental and physical differences between men and women, epidemiology, prognosis, diagnosis, convalescence, the effects of the environment upon the body, and some of the social and cultural factors that can influence health. Rush dedicates a number of lectures to the topics of psychology and psychological disorders, including discussions of the symptoms and cures of "passions" (which he usually defines as fear, love, anger and grief) and of mania. Notes on the Institutes tend also to include fairly long discourses on diet, the preparation and qualities of different foods and beverages, especially bread, beer, wine and alcoholic spirits, and the influences of each upon the body.

The lectures on the Theory and Practice of Medicine focus heavily on fevers, their theoretical categorizations and various symptomatic presentations. A wide range of non-febrile diseases (acute, chronic, infectious, non-communicable, venereal, psychological, etc.) are also profiled, with detailed descriptions of their symptoms and of viable therapeutic approaches to each. Other lectures specifically outline the diseases and health problems especially common among women, "negroes," children, and the elderly. The notes on the practice of medicine contain some short case studies, and all of Rush’s lectures are very referential to other doctors, scientists and medical experts.

The medical students whose names appear on the volumes of notes in this collection are Moses Bartram (1767-1791), Russel Clark, Constans Curtin (1783-1842), D. Gilder, Jacob Graham (possibly), Thomas Hamilton, Robert Hare (1781-1858) (possibly), Christopher Heydrick (1770-1856), William Jackson, Robert G. Maxwell, James Overton (1785-1865), William Simonton (1788-1846), and John Spangler. The four volumes attributed to David Hayes Agnew (1818-1892) (item 8) were probably created by his father, Dr. Robert Agnew (1785-1858). One other dating anomaly: the Thomas Hamilton notebook (Item 2) which is dated January 7, 1814 (a year after Rush's death) possibly signifies the conclusion of Hamilton’s studies.

While the vast majority of the materials within this collection contain lecture notes, the first volume created by Moses Bartram (Item 3, volume 1) appears to be less a record of lecture material than a collection of excerpts from scientific and medical treatises, and is thus described in the finding aid as a commonplace book. Researchers will find a few lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn (1741-1817) in notebooks by both John Spangler (Item 4, volume 1) and D. Gilder’s notebook (Item 12). D. Gilder's notebook also includes some notes from lectures by Dr. William Shippen (1736-1808).

In addition to the lecture notes, researchers will find a "List of Domestic Medicine which ought to be Kept in the Shops of American Physicians" and a transcription of his class's valedictory address in Russel Clark's notebook (item 11, volume 3); a "Table of Fever," which seemingly correlates body temperature to a type of febrile disease, within the notebooks of Robert G. Maxwell (item 14) and an unidentified student (item 18); and several pages of "Questions in Natural Philosophy" and a short section on the government of Pennsylvania in an unbound set of notes by an unidentified student (item 15).

Prior to processing in 2017, item numbers were assigned to notebooks. These item numbers have been retained.

Scope and Contents

This book of notes was kept by David Greenman during a course of Materia Medica lectures delivered by Dr. Adam Kuhn at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1785. The first pages of the volume include some curious annotations by Dr. Edward Cutbush in 1814. Cutbush claims, "These notes have been taken incorrectly from my friends' lectures- I purchased the volume at a public auction. Washington" and a few pages later, "orthography very incorrect." David Greenman’s signature on the title page of the notebook has been scribbled over in ink but is still legible. The lecture notes themselves are not limited to Materia Medica in the strictest sense, in that they also include some information about physiology, pathology and therapeutics. The organization of the material in the book is somewhat disjointed, and begins with a brief history of medicine, overview of physiology, discussion of digestion and the qualities of various foods (salt, sugar, milk, etc.), and the means of treating diseases, especially scurvy, by regulation or alteration of the diet. Subsequent sections focus more specifically on medicines and their classifications, especially into the categories of astringents (including “metallic astringents” like iron, lead and zinc), stimulants (including “bitters” like cinchona bark) and sedatives (among which opium is discussed at greatest length). A fairly detailed description of types of tumors, particularly those characteristic of breast cancer, begins on page 128, and a discussion of hysteria follows from page 139 to 148. The medical properties and applications of alkaline substances, soap, errhines (drugs that produce a runny nose) and mercury are subsequently explained, followed by the therapeutic uses of purgatives and blisters. The penultimate section of the book touches upon the topics of plethora (a systemic excess of blood in the body) and complications relating to menstruation, and the final chapter relates to anthelmintics (anti-parasitic medications). At the very end of this book is an alphabetized index of the contents of the notebook, which lists a combination of the names of drugs and medicinal plants, and the medical conditions discussed.

Scope and Contents

This volume of notes is organized into three sections, corresponding to three courses of lectures. The first is titled by Gillasspy, “A Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Barton, professor in the University of Pennsylvania with Remarks thereon &c,” and dated 1797. These lectures first address classes of medicines, namely astringents, vegetable tonics, metallic tonics, stimulants (seven consecutive lectures discuss the therapeutic properties of opium), emetics, cathartics, “salivating medicines,” and diuretics. Later lectures describe particular medicines, almost all of which are plant based. These profiles typically provide a medicinal plant’s Latin name, common name, native region, effects upon the human body and pharmacological applications.

The next section of the notebook (1797) contains both handwritten notes and printed material. The first page of this portion of the document is a printed cover of a booklet titled “A Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on the Institutes of Medicine by Benjamin Rush, M.D.. Professor of the Institutes of Medicine and Clinical Practice in the University of Pennsylvania.” The subsequent handwritten notes on these lectures are interspersed with excerpts of the printed syllabus to which they correspond. These lectures address physiology, pathology and therapeutics, in this order. Within the first topic, Rush briefly presents some basic features and functions of the human body (such as respiration, circulation, sensation, and cognition), before discussing nutrition, digestion and “the secretions and excretions,” and finally outlining the physical differences between men and women, some information about obstetric and gynecological medicine, and what he terms “the stages of life.” The portion of the lecture series on pathology outlines what Rush regards as the four causes of disease -remote, predisposing, occasional and proximate- along with some of the signs of disease. The third and final section of this syllabus, “Therapeutics, OR, of the method of curing diseases,” describes the actions of various types of medicines.

The final section of the book contains notes on “the practice of physic” from lectures delivered by Benjamin Rush in 1798. The first of these lectures relate to the topics of prognosis and diagnosis, “transient symptoms,” and depleting, stimulating and sedative medicines. The rest of the lectures in the volume relate to fevers and their extensive classifications. Along with descriptions of the various febrile “states,” Rush presents the most effective treatments for each. (There is also a short discourse, at the end of this section, on “diseases of the mind”).

The presence of press-printed material in section two, and the closeness of the handwritten text to the spine of the book, suggests that the volume was bound after the notes were taken.

Scope and Contents

This book of notes contains lecture material transcribed by two different students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. One portion of the volume contains notes taken by Hiester H. Muhlenberg in 1832; the later material was written by Wellington Smith Mason during two separate courses of lectures between 1894 and 1895. An inscription provided by William Pepper explains that "this old notebook was found in the basement of Medical Hall, Jan. 1903. It had probably been given to Mr. Wm. H. Salvador [clerk of the Medical Department] in 97 or 98." The notes taken by Muhlenberg record a series of lectures delivered by Dr. Nathaniel Chapman. This material reviews diseases that fall into four classes--diseases of the heart, diseases of the nervous system, exanthemata or "eruptive fevers," and hemorrhages--providing a description, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and list of causes for each condition. There is a brief, final section on asthma, and there are a few loose sheets of letter paper enclosed in the book, which describe some other diseases, like dropsy. The section on exanthemata includes some information on inoculation and vaccination.

The notes taken by Mason from 1894 to 1895 correspond to two courses. The first, Dr. Judson Daland’s lectures on Physical Diagnosis, primarily discusses cardiopulmonary diseases, reviewed through a number of case studies. Lectures seven through fourteen describe the signs and symptoms of various conditions, particularly tuberculosis. The remainder of the lectures, which feature some ink illustrations, address the anatomy of the blood and heart "with reference to diagnosis." The notes on blood mainly address the preparation and examination of microscope slides.

The second set of notes on Symptomatology lectures, given by Dr. J. K. Mitchell, focuses on how to collect and analyze information about a patient's experience of disease. In particular, these lectures address the physiological (sometimes physiognomic) indications of illness and the interpretation of these signs, the sorts of people most susceptible to pulmonary disease, different types of pain and their relationships to particular diseases, and the most effective methods of collecting relevant medical information from patients. By and large, Mason’s lectures lean heavily on illustrative case studies and patient examinations (both clinical and post-mortem), which are typically presented in a fairly detailed, standardized format.

Scope and Contents

This volume of handwritten lecture notes, titled "A Course of Lectures on the Materia Medica by Benjamin Smith Barton M.D., Professor […] in the University of Pennsylvania," was kept by Jonathan Murduck in 1802, and provides a fairly comprehensive survey of the medicinal substances commonly in use in the early nineteenth century United States. The detailed table of contents at the beginning of the notebook lists a number of broad categories into which various medicines are sorted. The primary classes of drugs and medicinal substances noted are astringents, tonics, "Alimentary Matter," stimulants, evacuants (including errhines and sialogogues, drugs that produce a runny nose and salivation, respectively), diuretics, emetics, cathartics, and antithelmintics (anti-parasitic medicines). There is also an opening chapter on milk, which mainly discusses lactation in humans and the properties of milk, and a short final section titled "Materia Nutrentia," which relates to diet, nutrition and the component elements of food (acid, sugar, oil, etc.). The main chapters or sections of the text consist of a passage discussing the general characteristics, properties and applications of this type of medicine, followed by a list of "particular" drugs within the category. The great majority of “particulars” are medicinal plants, though some sections are subdivided into "metallic," "mineral" or "animal" substances (and in some instances, medicinal plants are arranged based on their indigeneity to the United States).

The medicinal substances are usually listed by their Latin names, and discussed in a few paragraphs. For botanical medicines, these descriptions provide the plant’s common and Latin names, native region, pharmaceutical preparation, effects upon the body, therapeutic applications, and sometimes one or two brief case studies indicating its efficacy or inefficacy in treating particular conditions. The three drugs described at greatest length are opium, "Cortex Peruvianus" (Peruvian bark or cinchona) and mercury; the discussion of each of these medicines is organized by the specific diseases they can be used to combat.

Scope and Contents

This collection contains lecture notes on pathology, diagnosis, and treatments, including prescriptions, taken at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School from 1824 to 1826 in courses taught by Dr. Samuel Jackson. The lecture notes include frequent references to Dr. Nathaniel Chapman, a professor to whom Jackson was made assistant in 1827.

A portion of the volume is in question and answer format. For example, under the condition "Asthma," questions such as "What is asthma?," "What are the causes?," etc. are asked and followed by the answers. By page 36, this format changes to a more standard narrative of the lectures.

Lectures addressed bilious pleurisy, peripneumonia rotha, asthma, angina pectoris, pertussis, phthisis pulmonalis, cynanche trachialis, dropsy, atonic dropsy, ascitis, hydrothorax, scrophula, marasmus, hydrocephalus, cynanche laryngea, cynanche tonsillaris, cynanch