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Helen E. Fernald papers

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Helen E. Fernald papers

0025

Helen E. Fernald papers

0025

Helen E. Fernald papers

0025

Helen E. Fernald papers

0025

Helen E. Fernald papers

0025

Helen E. Fernald papers

0025

Helen E. Fernald papers

0025

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the University of Pennsylvania. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Fernald, Helen E., 1921-1964
Title:
Helen E. Fernald papers
Date [bulk]:
1921-1935
Date [inclusive]:
1921-1937
Call Number:
0025
Extent:
0.8 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Helen E. Fernald was employed at The University Museum from 1921-1935 as the head of the Educational Department from 1921-25, was the Assistant Curator of Far Eastern Art from 1925-30, and the Curator from 1930-35. Fernald’s first trip abroad for the museum was in the summer of 1928 to study in the museums and private collections of Far Eastern art in Paris and at the British Museum in London. Her second trip was from June – December of 1929 to Japan, Korea, and China to study collections or conduct scientific researches. Her trips were a success, having brought back many artifacts from the Far East such as bronzes, sculptures, porcelains, etc. The Helen E. Fernald papers consist of eleven folders in two archival boxes of correspondence.
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967
Title:
J. Alden Mason American Section records
Date [bulk]:
1924-1964
Date [inclusive]:
1898-1968
Call Number:
0048
Extent:
1.2 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
J. Alden Mason, noted archaeological anthropologist and linguist, was born in Orland, Indiana and attended school in Philadelphia attaining his A.B. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1907. He pursued his Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley completing his dissertation on the ethnography of the Salinan Indians of California. Mason was influenced by Alfred J. Kroeber while at Berkeley and Edward Sapir of the University of Pennsylvania. The J. Alden Mason curatorial years (1922-1967) produced three archival boxes of correspondence and in-house memos, along with Section reports, research notes and articles and notes for publication. This material, in addition to personal records of Dr. Mason and evidence of his scholarship were arranged into series and placed in chronological order.
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Umlauff, J.F.G
Title:
J. F. G. Umlauff
Date [inclusive]:
1912-1933
Call Number:
1157
Extent:
1.5 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
J.F.G. Umlauff of Germany sold this collection to Gordon of the Penn Museum in the 1910s and 1920s. Gordon expressed interest in this collection as he sought African and Oceanian specimens for the Penn Museum, artifacts from a location they previously possessed very few. J.F.G. Umlauff lived from 1833-1889 and owned a German ethnographic and artifact firm that was established in 1868 and flourished for more than a century, closing not until 1974. The firm was managed by J.F.G. Umlauff until his death, at which time the firm was taken over by his son Johannes Umlauff. The firm was still operated by J.F.G. Umlauff when he sold several African and Oceanian specimens to Gordon. The collection can still be found in the Penn Museum and is now organized into 3 separate series – correspondence, catalogues, and albums. The correspondence section consists of letters between Umlauff and Gordon, the catalogues section is comprised of many lists of the specimens Umlauff sold to Gordon and, finally, the album section consists of many photos of the artifacts sold. Overall, this collection remains important since it marks the first time the Penn Museum truly expressed interest and acquired many “primitive” African and Oceanian artifacts.
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Rowe, Alan, 1892-1968
Title:
Meydum, Egypt expedition records
Date [inclusive]:
1929-1933
Call Number:
1013
Extent:
5.6 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Alan Rowe, born in Hornchurch, Essex, England in 1891, spent his life not only in his homeland but in Australia, Egypt, Palestine and Libya in pursuit of the study of Egyptology. He excavated with C.S. Fisher at Beth Shan and George Reisner at Giza before serving as Field Director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum Expedition to Meydum, Egypt. The Meydum, Egypt Expedition records consist of eight archival boxes of records plus photographs and plans housed separately. The object registers are placed with the oversized materials.
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Title:
Nuzi, Iraq expedition records
Date [bulk]:
1929-1940
Date [inclusive]:
1925-1942
Call Number:
1019
Extent:
0.28 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
The Harvard-Baghdad School Expedition (American Schools of Oriental Research, A.S.O.R) was sent to Excavate Nuzi near Kirkuk in Iraq. The expedition members consisted of staff from the Fogg Museum of Art, the Harvard Semitic Museum, and A.S.O.R., Baghad. Excavations commenced in 1927-1928. From 1929 to 1931, the University Museum extended financial aid and the services of a helper, C.Bache, in return for his field training. Very few records pertaining to this excavation are available in the Museum’s Archives, probably reflecting the Museum’s limited participation. Where possible, a chronological order was imposed on the Near East records.
Cite as:
[Item name]. Box [Box number]. Nuzi, Iraq expedition records. Penn Museum Archives. Accessed [Date accessed].
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Burkitt, Robert James, 1869-1945
Title:
Robert Burkitt expedition records
Date [bulk]:
1913-1930
Date [inclusive]:
1903-1939
Call Number:
1102
Extent:
1.4 Linear feet ()
Language:
English
Container:
2
Abstract:
Robert Burkitt lived and worked in Guatemala for most of his life. A graduate of Harvard University, he first traveled to Central America in 1894 with George Gordon as Gordon's assistant on the Fourth Coban Expedition. Burkitt became enamored with the culture and language of the Maya and never returned to North America. He traveled the countryside, corresponding with Gordon, and collecting items for the Museum under a loosely binding agreement with Gordon and later Horace Jayne. Burkitt's letters and catalogues are rich documents depicting the cultural, linguistic, topological, and historical features of the Guatemala Highlands. Burkitt wrote and worked from the areas of Chama, Chipal, Coban, Senahu, Chiantla, Chocola, and other areas of the Alta Verapaz region. He produced a detailed catalogue of his discoveries accompanied by photgraphs and drawings. Among Burkitt's discoveries is the Ratinixul Vase unearthed in 1923. His work was published in the Museum Journal in 1924 and 1930. Burkitt also wrote about the languages of the Maya, leaving an unfinished grammar and dictionary of the Kekchi language at his death in 1945.
Cite as:
[Item name]. Box [Box number]. Robert Burkitt excavation records. Penn Museum Archives. Accessed [Date accessed].
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927
Creator:
Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
Creator:
Legrain, Leon, 1878-1962
Title:
Ur, Iraq expedition records
Date [bulk]:
1922-1934
Date [inclusive]:
1920-1976
Call Number:
1018
Extent:
3.85 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Sir Leonard Woolley directed the excavations at Ur in southern Iraq from 1922 to 1934 for the Joint Expedition of the British Museum and the University of Pennsylvania Museum. As part of this involvement, the University of Pennsylvania Museum sent Leon Legrain, Curator of the Babylonian Section, during the 1924–1925 and 1925–1926 seasons. Most of the records of the Ur expedition are located at the British Museum. The Museum Archives hold only a few records. The records consist of general correspondence, indexes and catalogs, publications, and Legrain research. Where possible, a chronological order was imposed on the Near East records.
Cite as:
[Item name]. Box [Box number]. Ur, Iraq expedition records. Penn Museum Archives. Accessed [Date accessed].
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Fewkes, Vladimir
Title:
Vladimir Fewkes papers
Date [inclusive]:
1921-1962
Call Number:
1058
Extent:
1.5 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Vladimir Jaroslav Fewkes was born in Czechoslovakia on March 23, 1901. He arrived in Philadelphia in 1921. In 1926 the Wharton School awarded Fewkes a B.S. degree; he then went on to achieve a M.A. in 1928 and a Ph.D. in 1930. During most of his graduate study, he was an Instructor in the Anthropology department, and a research associate in the University Museum. He has conducted field work in Prague, the Danube Valley and Yugoslavia. The textual records from the personal papers of Vladimir J. Fewkes consist of 1.5 linear feet of correspondence, fieldwork and research notes and catalogues, published and unpublished writings, and school notes.
Cite as:
[Item name]. Box [Box number]. Vladmir Fewkes papers. Penn Museum Archives. Accessed [Date accessed].
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Biography/History

Helen Elizabeth Fernald was born in 1891 in Baltimore, Maryland and died in 1964. Fernald attended high school in Amherst, Massachusetts where she graduated in 1910. Going on to receive her A.B. from Mount Holyoke in South Hadley, MA in 1914, Fernald was both an O.B.K. and Mary Lyon Scholar in Art and Archeology in Zoology. After graduation, Fernald attended art school at the Art Students League in New York City, from 1914-1915. While attending art school, Fernald worked as an artist and technician in the Department of Zoology at Columbia University. This position was held for three years, from 1915-1918. During this time, Fernald did her graduate work at Columbia Teachers’ College from 1916-1918. Then, from 1918-1921, Fernald became both an Instructor and Demonstrator in History of Art at Bryn Mawr College. During her three years at Bryn Mawr from 1918-1921, Fernald also did graduate work at the institution.

From 1921-1935 Fernald was an employee of The University Museum in Philadelphia, PA. From 1921-1925, she was the head of the Educational Department. From 1925-1930, Fernald was the Assistant Curator of Far Eastern Art and from 1930-1935, she was the Curator.

In the summer of 1921, Fernald traveled abroad to Italy, Switzerland, France, and England. Because of this, she was unable to start her new position at The University Museum until September as head docent. Much of her time was spent looking for Far Eastern art pieces for the museum’s collection. Once Fernald became the Assistant Curator of Far Eastern Art, she was sent to study in Museums and Private Collections in Paris, at the British Museum in London and attended the International Congress of Oriental Societies at Oxford in 1928. Fernald’s time was spent looking at collections, lecturing and writing. At this time, Fernald was a member of both the American Oriental Society and the Philadelphia Art Alliance. During this time in Paris, Fernald was searching for frescoes and visited many private collections, especially the collection of Mr. C.T. Loo. In April of 1929, Fernald was approved to go to China, and so, from June-December of 1929, she was sent by the museum to Japan, Korea, and China to study collections or conduct scientific research. Despite the summer heat, Fernald managed to have a successful trip for the museum.

From 1932-1935, Fernald taught two courses at the museum: Series of seven Round Table Talks and Chinese Painting Seminar as well as teaching 23 lectures illustrated with lantern slides, called “Talks on Art Appreciation and History.” Upon leaving the museum in 1935, Fernald set out for Orlando, Florida where she corresponded with the museum sparingly for the next two years.

Fernald was most known for being a writer, art educator, painter, and lecturer and is remembered by numerous publications in The Museum Journal, various newspaper articles and reviews, lectures, and several books.

Biography/History

J. Alden Mason, noted archaeological anthropologist and linguist, was born in Orland, Indiana and attended school in Philadelphia attaining his A.B. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1907. He pursued his Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley completing his dissertation on the ethnography of the Salinan Indians of California. Mason was influenced by Alfred J. Kroeber while at Berkeley and Edward Sapir of the University of Pennsylvania. Following the completion of his Ph.D., Mason was chosen to represent the state of Pennsylvania for two seasons in Mexico at the International School of Archaeology and Ethnology, a joint enterprise between Mexico and the United States. He then spent more than a year in Puerto Rico recording folktales in original dialects. His association with the International School of Archaeology and Ethnology brought him into close contact with Franz Boas of Columbia University.

In 1914, Mason traveled to Puerto Rico to learn about the folktales of the native people. He visited Utuado, Coamo, San German, and Loiza and transcribed in the local dialect various tales, poetry, and some music. His field notebooks contain the names of the storytellers along with brief comments from Mason about their appearance, dialect, or diction. Some of these stories, songs, and poems have been transcribed and published. Wax recordings of the material exist at the Research Center in Anthropology, Folklore and Linguistics at the University of Indiana. Several stories were translated and sent to Mason's daughter, Kathy.

Mason's curatorial career began in 1917 as an Assistant Curator of Mexican and South American Archaeology at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. He married Florence Roberts in 1921. Mason remained at the Field Museum until 1924 when he assumed an Assistant Curator position at the American Museum of Natural History. Mason held this position briefly as he moved to The University Museum at the University of Pennsylvania as Curator in 1925. He gave 25 years of service to the Museum, becoming Emeritus Curator of the American Indian Section in 1955.

Collections added during the Mason curatorial years include the remarkable gold objects from Cocle, Panama; the Piedras Negras expeditions; Shotridge's Northwest Coast collections; the vast Academy of Natural Sciences collections including the pre-1879 Haldeman and the large Gottschall Collections, originally loaned but then acquired in exchange; Frank Speck collections from eastern Canada; the large and meticulously documented Osborne (Guatemalan textiles) and Stephens (North American ethnographic) collections; various Colombian and Panamanian gold collections and the Mayer Brazilian, Broad Costa Rican, and Monday Mexican archaeological collections; and jade Northwest Coast objects from Emmons.

Mason published regularly in The Museum Journal, Journal of American Folklore, International Journal of American Linguistics, and American Anthropologist, serving as editor of American Anthropologist from 1945 to 1948. His published works included "The Language of the Papago Indians" and "The Languages of the South American Indians" among others.

In addition to linguistics, Mason developed wide interests in his fieldwork including archaeology, ethnology, and folklore, particularly from Latin America. After 1916, he focused on the Uto-Aztecan languages of northern Mexico and the southwestern part of the United States. He also worked in four eastern states in the United States, and Puerto Rico, Colombia, Panama, and Guatemala. He was Field Director of the first Eldridge R. Johnson Piedras Negras Expedition returning with "Lintel 3" a Maya carved stone wall-panel on loan to the Penn Museum from 1931 to 1946 and stone stelae dating to A.D. 514.

When Mason retired from the museum in 1955, he continued his contributions including a dig at Chiapas, Mexico in 1958 while serving as Editor and Archaeological Advisor to the New World Archaeology Foundation. Mason held this post until his death in 1967.

Biography/History

Objects from Africa and Oceania were at first overlooked by the Penn Museum. Africa, for example, was not in the minds of prominent Philadelphians who met in 1887 and contributed funds to establish the institution that would one day become The University Museum of the University of Pennsylvania. This changed, however, with the arrival of new museum director George Byron Gordon in 1910. Gordon quickly displayed interest in so-called “primitive” artifacts from Oldman, who shipped many Oceanian specimens, and J.F.G. Umlauff, a German with his own firm in Hamburg, Umlauff’s firm promoted its stock by sending museums its catalogues and photographs, which often showed its rooms absolutely crammed with African and Oceanian art. The firm was established by the patriarch of the Umlauff family, Johann Friedrich Gustav Umlauff (1833-89), and it was managed by his sons after his death (Thode-Arora 1992). The firm was officially founded in 1868 and it flourished for more than a century, closing shop only in 1974. The founder, Johann Gustav Umlauff, was originally a ship’s carpenter but in 1859 he purchased a bathhouse in Hamburg near the harbor, selling curios from overseas on the side. Later, Umlauff married a sister of the wild-animal dealer Carl Hagenbeck. Umlauff purchased a number of collections from Hagenbeck and from other prominent German collectors and dealers. Umlauff essentially profited from the substantial ethonographical “leftovers” as Hagenbeck branched out in the mid-1870s to what he named anthropological-zoological exhibitions, shows of exotic performers with their animals from overseas. J.F.G. Umlauff of Hamburg ultimately became Germany’s foremost dealer in natural history specimens and cultural objects. The Umlauffs not only bought various ethnographic objects and naturalia but also sold their possessions to many museums. The Penn Museum today still has some of these early African and Oceanian artifacts from the Umlauff firm in Hamburg.

Biography/History

Alan Rowe, born in Hornchurch, Essex, England in 1891 spent his life not only in his homeland but in Australia, Egypt, Palestine and Libya in pursuit of the study of Egyptology. Rowe was introduced to Egypt as a child when he was captivated by the collection of antiquities at the Whitechapel Museum. He was employed initially as a journalist and emigrated to Australia where he volunteered in Museums and gave lectures in history at the University of Adelaide.

Rowe's first field work came as an assistant to C.S.Fisher on the 1922 expedition to Palestine (Beth Shan). Following this experience, Rowe served as the chief archaeological assistant to George Reisner on the joint Harvard-Boston Museum of Fine Art expedition to Giza. While Reisner was away in America, Rowe discovered the tomb of Hetep-heres, a discovery of great import. Rowe continued to work on other sites in Egypt including Meydum for the University of Pennsylvania Museum and the minor site of Gezer. He was appointed curator of the Graeco-Roman Museum in Alexandria where he served from 1940 to 1949. During WWII, Rowe twice reported on the state of the monuments in Cyrenaica to the British War Office in Cairo.

Rowe turned to academia in 1950, working as a special lecturer in Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Manchester until 1952. His last four expeditions were to the tombs and cemeteries in Cyrene.

Rowe published several books and many articles based on his work. Unfortunately, he was unable to find a publisher for his Meydum manuscript, a goal he pursued until 1955.

Biography/History

The Harvard-Baghdad School Expedition (American Schools of Oriental Research, A.S.O.R) was sent to Excavate Nuzi near Kirkuk in Iraq. The expedition members consisted of staff from the Fogg Museum of Art, the Harvard Semitic Museum, and A.S.O.R., Baghad. Excavations commenced in 1927-1928, and were directed that season by E. Chiera (Professor of Assriology at the University of Pennsylvania and Field Director at A.S.O.R., Baghdad) who, in 1925, had excavated portions of the small mounds there (c.f. the Photograph Album Nuzi, 1925: Fieldnotes). Pfeiffer (Harvard University) resumed the work for the next season, 1928-1929. For the following two seasons, 1929 to 1931, R.F.S. Starr (Fogg Museum of Art) continued excavation as director. During this period, the University Museum extented financial aid and the services of a helper, C. Bache, in return for his field training.

Biography/History

Robert James Burkitt, born on January 18, 1869 in Athenry, County Galway, Ireland, was the son of Reverend Thomas Henry Burkitt and Emma Eliza Parsons. At age 14, due to economic conditions, he was sent to live with an aunt in Nova Scotia where he attended Dalhousie College. Burkitt took honors in mathematics there and enrolled at Harvard University to study mining. While he was known as a recluse among the Harvard students, Burkitt developed a friendship with George Byron Gordon based on their shared interests in engineering and their talents in drafting and art. Burkitt received his A.B. from Harvard in 1891.

Burkitt first traveled to Guatemala in 1894 as George Gordon's assistant on the Fourth Copan Expedition. In the five months of the expedition, Gordon instructed Burkitt in the basics of excavation. Gordon returned to Cambridge when the excavation was completed, but it is believed that Burkitt never returned to North America, becoming enamored of the culture and language of the Maya. In his early years in Guatemala, Burkitt visited the Kekchi-speaking Maya who lived in the Alta Verapaz. He wandered the countryside, visiting the Indian villages, learning the different languages and customs of the native people, and following native guides to sacred ruins. Burkitt never established a permanent residence in Guatemala, living with one group of friends or another. He rented an apartment in Guatemala City when business took him there, under his pseudonym, Mr. Brown.

Burkitt maintained a sporadic correspondence with his friend George Gordon who by 1910 was Director of the Free Museum of Science and Art (later renamed The University Museum). Burkitt had attained some recognition for articles on linguistics, "Notes on the Kekchi Language" having been published in American Anthropologist. Burkitt and Gordon entered into an agreement whereby Burkitt would devote a portion of each year to exploring and acquiring artifacts for the Museum for a monthly fee plus expenses. This agreement stood for many years despite attempts to get Burkitt to sign contracts and make changes to his highly eccentric style of work. Burkitt could be critical and prickly in his correspondence especially opinionated about the work of others on the Indian language and changes to his material when published.

Burkitt's letters and his Catalogue never fail to contain information on the folklore, ritual, crafts, and language of the Maya. The collection contains regular correspondence with George Gordon until Gordon's death in 1927. Burkitt then kept the Museum apprised of his exploits through letters to Miss McHugh, the Treasurer. When Horace H.F. Jayne took over as Director, Burkitt communicated with him. In addition to letters and records relating to shipments to the Museum, Burkitt kept extensive catalogue entries for each item accompanied by references to geography and the excavation process connected to their discovery. Photographs depict the sites, stages of excavation, and objects discovered. Many of the pictures are mounted by Burkitt. His own discoveries are accompanied by photographs of items purchased from collectors.

Burkitt discovered The Ratinlixul Vase, recovered in 1923. His works, published in the Museum Journal, included "A Journey in Northern Guatemala" in 1924 and "Excavations at Chocola and Explorations in the Highlands of Western Guatemala" in 1930.

Burkitt's interest in linguistics was ever present. He worked for many years on a grammar and dictionary of the Kekchi language; "investigating grammar in my own way". This work was not completed when he suffered a fatal stroke in 1945. Burkitt's papers were thought to be lost until Elin Danien, then Coordinator of Museum Events, visited Guatemala in 1985. Danien contacted relatives of Kensett Champney, a friend with whom Burkitt lived, and discovered that some early notebooks were indeed still in the family's possession.

Burkitt is buried in the British Cemetery in Guatemala City.

Biography/History

Sir Leonard Woolley directed the excavations at Ur in southern Iraq from 1922 to 1934 for the Joint Expedition of the British Museum and the University of Pennsylvania Museum. As part of this involvement, the University of Pennsylvania Museum sent Leon Legrain, Curator of the Babylonian Section, as a cuneiformist during the 1924–1925 and 1925–1926 seasons. Most of the records of the Ur expedition are located at the British Museum. The Museum Archives hold only a few records.

Biography/History

Vladimir Jaroslav Fewkes was born to a prominent family in Nymburk, Czechoslovakia on March 23, 1901. He arrived in Philadelphia in 1921. He spent ten months with two families, doing domestic work and learning English. Within a few years, he mastered English without a trace of accent, and was said to have had a scientific knowledge of fifteen European languages and a conversational knowledge of twelve. He paid his way through the University of Pennsylvania by working in hotels, clubs, and cafés. The Wharton School awarded Fewkes a Bachelor of Science degree in 1926; he then went on to achieve a Master of Arts degree in Anthropology in 1928 and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in 1930. During most of his five years of graduate study, he was an Assistant or Instructor in the Anthropology department, and thereafter a research associate in the University Museum. Between 1927-1937, he studied extensively the archaeology of Central Europe, using the earlier results as a basis for his dissertation. In 1927 he was named fellow at the American School for Prehistoric Research, and in 1928-1929 he did special work at Charles University in Prague. During the summer seasons of 1929-1931 he conducted a joint expedition in the Danube Valley for the University Museum and Harvard’s Peabody Museum, mostly at a late Neolithic village (dated circa 2000 B.C.) called Homolka. In 1931, he did archaeological reconnaissance of Yugoslavia, and in 1932 he headed the joint expedition of the Peabody Museum, the American School of Prehistoric Research, and the Fogg Museum of Art to Serbia. There he helped unearth painted pottery at Starčevo, a site belonging to the earliest farming and pottery-making phase of the Eastern European Neolithic dating back to the fourth millenium B.C. Until 1937 he was associate with the Peabody Museum, working on material obtained on expeditions to Central Europe. He was also associated with the American School of Prehistoric Research: as Associate Director from 1932-1937 and as Acting Director in 1938. During these years he directed its summer school at his excavations in Central Europe.

From the very beginning of Fewkes’s career in anthropological study he became interested in the problems of American archaeology. In 1929 he began cataloguing and revising archaeological collections in the New Jersey State Museum in preparation to open a new museum building. Despite his short stay of only a few months, Fewkes was undoubtedly the inspiration for the New Jersey Works Progress Administration (WPA) Indian Site Survey Project as well as the formation of the Archaeological Society of New Jersey. From 1937-1938, he superintended excavations at Irene Mound near Savannah, Georgia, a WPA project sponsored by the Savannah Chamber of Commerce. In 1938, he returned to Philadelphia to supervise a WPA project at the University Museum, where at first he was responsible for bibliographical research in ceramics, but later took over the ceramic technology laboratory, where he could focus on the technological problems that had always been his main interest (see separate finding aid for the records of the WPA-sponsored ceramics technology laboratory). In his later years he specialized in ceramic technology in which he performed long series of experiments and researches into the technical and chemical problems of pottery making, particularly in Catawba (which he wrote about in “Catawba Pottery Making”). Fewkes also held the distinguished position of chairman of the Committee on Ceramic Terminology and Classification (in the Society of American Archaeology).

Despite Fewkes’s successes in America, he received more honors by far in Central Europe. He was an honorary member of three Yugoslav, one Hungarian, and three American scientific societies; and a fellow, correspondent, or research associate of ten Czechoslovakian and three Yugoslav museums and institutes. He was awarded the White Lion of Czechoslovakia and was the only archaeologist to hold the Royal Crown of Yugoslavia. Prague’s Charles University and the University of Belgrade each awarded him an honorary degree. He was a member of most local and national American anthropological and archaeological organizations, a member of Sigma Xi, and was a contributing editor to the American Journal of Archaeology and to several scientific journals in Central Europe.

Fewkes was said to be an amiable man who made friends easily and enjoyed collecting coins, art work, and rare books. Sadly, his days of revelry took quite a toll on his liver and other vital organs which lead to his untimely death in 1941 at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital.

Much of this information was obtained from an obituary written by J. Alden Mason. Please see Fewkes’ biography file for the original.

Scope and Contents

The Helen E. Fernald papers consist of two archival boxes of textual material of 0.8 linear feet. These boxes make of one series: correspondence, which are contained in eleven folders. The records have been compiled to and from Helen E. Fernald in chronological order.

The correspondence, dated from 1921-1937, consist primarily of letters to and from Helen E. Fernald regarding collections, lectures Fernald taught, articles she published, and her day-to-day activity while abroad as well as statements of expense accounts and receipts from abroad.

Scope and Contents

John Alden Mason was hired from the Field Museum of Natural History, and his tenure (1926-1955) is well-documented, including a large professional correspondence with geographical subdivisions, offerings of collections (also geographically organized), in-house memos, a set of notebooks (1922-1952), lecture notes and bibliographies, and a long-term file on his lifelong interest in American rock art. Mason made 22 expeditions of varying scope during his active curatorship and his scholarly and field activities completely encompassed the Americas. Materials on his pre-1926 activities include the 1909 expedition for the Museum, 1913 Great Slave notes later published by Yale, 1914 Puerto Rican work for Columbia, Tepecano linguistics in west Mexico, and Santa Marta excavations for the Field Museum in Colombia. The bulk of Mason's correspondence and his linguistic fieldnotes were transferred to the American Philosophical Society on his death, and his library was sold to Southern Illinois University during his lifetime. He remained active as Emeritus Curator up to his death in 1967.

American Section files were unarranged when transferred to the Archives. Curatorial files have been subdivided into "curatorial" proper as a sub-series (arranged,in general, "chronologically" by holders of assistant curatorships); an "exchanges, loans, deaccessions and thefts" sub-series, grouping documents on the movements of American objects (to be used in connection with the records of the Registrar's Office, established in 1929); an "inventories" sub-series containing various topical and other lists of objects in the American collections; a "collectors and collections" sub-series arranged alphabetically (includes Heye and a separate alphabetical list for Alaska) by the name of the donor or seller or title of collection; and a "general administration" sub-series encompassing index cards, exhibit labels, various American Section reports starting with Mercer, documents on American topics with no discernible connection, miscellaneous financial transactions, etc.

The J. Alden Mason curatorial years (1922-1967) produced three archival boxes of correspondence and in-house memos, along with Section reports, research notes and articles and notes for publication. This material, in addition to personal records of Dr. Mason and evidence of his scholarship were arranged into series and placed in chronological order.

The Correspondence series is divided into location specific writings and notes and in-house materials with specific sections devoted to J. Alden Mason's trips to Central America and Guatemala. Correspondence with specific scholars/excavators are contained in their own folders and include Robert Zingg, Anna O. shepard, George S. Fisher. Letters relating to collections offered to the Museum, proposals for reseach and professional contacts of Dr. Mason complete the series.

The highlights of the Research series are notes related to specific excavations or museum objects, for example, the Walum Olum and petroglyphs.

The Personal series provides a window into Mason's years as a graduate student and his trip to Europe in 1924.

Added to this collection are a group of small collections sent to the museum or to Mason personally. This series is filed in Box 14.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of three series – correspondence, catalogues, and albums – which involve the exchange of African and Oceanian artifacts from J.F.G. Umluff in Germany to George B. Gordon of the Penn Museum. This transfer occurred during the years 1912-1943, with most of the activity happening between 1912 and 1932. This deal between Gordon and Umlauff was significant because it marked one of the first times the Penn Museum showed interest and acquired “primitive” artifacts from Africa and Oceania. Overall, this collection is compiled to reflect this historic meeting between Gordon and Umlauff. The first aspect of the collection is the correspondence section, which is comprised of many letters and notes that track the exchange between Gordon and Umlauff. The next section of the collection is the catalogues, which consists of many lists containing item inventory that is being interchanged. Lastly, the final section is albums, which consists of the very photos and albums which were sold from the Umlauff firm in Germany to Gordon’s Penn Museum. These three sections – the correspondence, catalogues, and albums – comprise this collection and reveal the history of Umlauff and Gordon’s exchange. The first section in the collection is correspondence, which consists of a series of letters written between Gordon and Umlauff discussing their future sale. The dates of the letters are between 1912 and 1943, with the majority being between 1912 and 1933 and many concentrated in 1912 alone. The letters in the collection are all from J.F.G. Umlauff writing to Gordon; the letters written from Gordon to Umlauff are in another collection. Most of the letters express Umlauff’s desire for Gordon to pay for the items he has bought; he requests invoices and various other methods to get Gordon to begin to purchase the items he has bought. There are also many telegrams and some withdrawal sheets with similar purposes. Overall, this section is mainly concerned with letters written from Umlauff to Gordon with the interest of facilitating their transactions. The second series in this collection is catalogues, which consists of numerous lists of the artifact inventory that Umlauff sold to Gordon. There are essentially two separate lists which comprise the catalogue section: numbered lists and non-numbered lists which are instead labeled by various island groups. The numbered group list runs from 1-40; however, not all lists are present. These lists also have titles, which are locations from various places in Africa and Oceania. Likewise, the non-numbered lists are labeled by location names. Lastly, the final series in the collection is albums. This section is comprised of various albums of the actual artifacts – primarily photos – that Umlauff sold to Gordon. These photos are separated by region in separate albums. As in the lists, the albums are separated primarily into regions and islands in Africa and Oceania, respectively.

Scope and Contents

Alan Rowe, born in Hornchurch, Essex, England in 1891 spent his life not only in his homeland but in Australia, Egypt, Palestine and Libya in pursuit of the study of Egyptology. He excavated with C.S. Fisher at Beth Shan and George Reisner at Giza before serving as Field Director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum Expedition to Meydum, Egypt.

In addition to his expeditions, Rowe lectured in history at the University of Adelaide, Australia and in Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Manchester.

The Meydum, Egypt Expedition records consist of twelve archival boxes plus oversize materials. The majority consist of correspondence, reports, and preparation for publication. The collection is divided into twelve series. In addition to the correspondence, field reports, notebooks and publication materials are financial reoords, various lists and photographs. The group is completed by other graphic materials such as plans, maps and squeezes.

The records had been reviewed and box lists made prior to processing. The order of the records was largely maintained with re-organization of some of the correspondence and publication records needed for clarity. For example, many of the communications with Museum Director Horace Jayne were interspersed with materials from other series.

Rowe detailed his work in lengthy letters to Horace Jayne and former director Battiscombe Gunn, in field notebooks and diaries. He wrote often to his researchers to obtain information about translations, grafitti and coins. The materials are rich in information. He maintained typed copies of much of the research findings for publication purposes. Additional communications with Battiscombe Gunn are found in the publications series.

Rowe displayed his photographs in three hardback albums with a corresponding register and indexes by year. The large groups of plans and maps reflect Rowe's prganization by publication volume, topography, location, structure and/or type of find.

Scope and Contents

Where possible, a chronological order was imposed on the Near East records. Photographs were retained with the documents when they directly referred to content. Otherwise, the photographic collections hold material relating to excavations, objects, and travel photographs (see inventory). Large maps and drawings, when available are kept in the Oversize collections, and watercolors, small prints and drawings are in the Print Cabinet (see inventories).

Scope and Contents

The Robert Burkitt Excavation Records consist of 1.4 linear feet of correspondence, catalogues and reports, photographs, and notes and studies on the collection. The records have been compiled from the material sent to the Museum by Robert Burkitt from his exploration and excavations in Guatemala during the years 1913 through 1939 and the work on the collection by J. Alden Mason. Notes on the collection by William R. Coe comment on Burkitt and the work of Mary Butler, an expert on the pottery of the region. Studies of the collection by students of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania are also included.

The correspondence from Burkitt to the Museum is arranged chronologically. His catalogue and reports contain catalogue numbers that are not chronological but are referenced to his letters. The photographs, numbered from 101 to 326 then 804 to 807 were divided into folders using the numbers. Mason's notes are undated but those from William R.Coe date from 1953. The studies on the collection are from 1977 and 1978. Mason's notes were divided into three folders, a notebook, a chart and chart notes, and notes on Chama. Coe's material was also divided into folders of notes, photographs, and drawings.

The correspondence series reflects Burkitt's tendency to write infrequently, mostly to his friend George Gordon, and with a great attention to detail. Some letters are very long and contain information on his travels in the area. Burkitt included drawings and comments on the existing maps of the areas. Political commentary is sometimes included and Burkitt shows worries about the security of the mail to and from the museum. At times, the letters are lists of objects being sent to the museum, lists of expenses, and shipping information. Communications are written from Coban, Senahu, San Cristobal, Chiantla, Verapaz and the ruins near Chipal. Later letters come from Ciudad Guatemala and Belize.

The letters from the period 1924 to 1926 are sometimes accompanied by responses from George Gordon which have been photocopied from Gordon's collection of letters. (see Letters G.B. Gordon-Burkitt, Special Collections, Bound Volumes, Letterbooks, G.B. Gordon).

A separate folder was created for one correspondence from Robert Burkitt's father, J.H. Burkitt, to the Museum dated 1915. Reverend Burkitt sought information about the whereabouts of his son. The Catalogues and Reports of the Robert Burkitt excavation records contain descriptions of all of the items sent to the Museum from the Guatemala sites. All entries in this folder are hand-written in phonetic English. The notes are in good condition and accompanied by small, exquisite drawings of the items. Divided into three columns on each page, the first column contains the number assigned by the museum, the second, the number of the item assigned by Burkitt in numerical order, and the third a description of the item. The first portion of the catalogue consists mostly of pottery. Burkitt often writes several pages of information about an object or region.

Burkitt's later entries are type-written in the same phonetic style. For these entries, Burkitt makes use of hand-drawn maps of the area showing the arrangement of the mounds and graves in it. He includes rubbings of fragments, carvings, and pots found. Burkitt refers to the number of the photograph in the collection which corresponds to the item of the dig.

The original photographs of Robert Burkitt are contained in envelopes or mounted by Burkitt on heavy paper with notes and encased in mylar. Pictures of the objects are usually mounted. Burkitt meticulously referenced the photos to the text of the catalogue. In addition, the negative numbers are provided on the back of many photographs. The photographs depict the regions of Chocola, Kixpek, Ratinixul, Belize, Quatsoltenango, San Vicente, El Castillo, Alta Verapaz, Aintun, the Sayte River region, Coban, Xolchun, and Kuchumata, among others. In addition to objects found by Burkitt, there are also photographs of items from the Kanter Collection, part of another "private collection in Polo Gordo", and the collection of Henry Kummerfeldt.

Four folders contain photographs related to Burkitt's correspondence with George Gordon in July, October, and November 1913. One folder of these photographs is undated. Material published in the Museum Journal in 1918 and 1930 are contained in a separate folder, with negatives for only a few. The negatives, in envelopes, may reflect a need for conservation assessment.

Notes and Studies on the Collection are contained in eight folders. The material reflects comments and charts by J. Alden Mason and notes from William Coe. Coe's notes notes relate not only to Burkitt but also to Mary Butler, a research associate at the University of Pennsylvania who was an expert on the pottery of the Maya Indians of Guatemala. The mounted drawings of pottery included with this series are believed to be part of Mary Butler's work. Many of the drawings are numbered and are from Chipal and Chama. A separate "analysis" of a "small tubular object"(# 11258) by A.E.Parkinson is also contained with the series on notes and studies.

The series also contains hand-written course notes and papers written by students for the class, "W. Coe Anthropology Class: Studies of Burkitt and Butler". The papers deal with the sites at Tambor, Kixpek, Chama, Chicun, San Pedro Carcha, and an analysis of Mary Butler's excavations and work in Guatemala. Site diagrams are present for the San Pedro Carcha area.

Scope and Contents

The records consist of general correspondence, indexes and catalogs, publications, and Legrain research. Most of the correspondence appears to be letters and reports exchanged between the Director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum (1922–1927, G. B. Gordon; 1928, J. McHugh, Secretary; and 1929–1933 H. H. F. Jayne) and F. Kenyon, the Director of the British Museum, and Woolley. Indexes include a field photograph catalog covering the twelve seasons of work as well as typewritten copy of the field object catalog (with Museum object numbers annotated in red ink). The publications series holds correspondence, notes, drafts, photographs, and manuscripts pertaining to the volumes of the publications of the Ur Excavations (Volumes III, IV, VI, VII, and X). The Archives holds other records relating to Ur which may be unpublished, these have been placed in a separate series: Legrain Research. The Near East Section curatorial records and the Directors' correspondence (Jayne to British Museum, 1925–1940) contain related material.

Where possible, a chronological order was imposed on the Near East records. Photographs were retained with the documents when they directly referred to content. Otherwise, the photographic collections hold material related to the excavations, artifacts, and travel photographs (see Standard Size Print collection). Oversize material is housed in the Map Cases and the Print Cabinet depending on size.

Scope and Contents

The textual records from the personal papers of Vladimir J. Fewkes consist of 1.5 linear feet of correspondence, fieldwork and research notes and catalogues, published and unpublished writings, and school notes. The arrangement of the records reflects the major groupings apparent, and has been divided into the following series: alphabetical correspondence, fieldwork and research, other research, writings, education-related papers, and personal papers.

The correspondence is arranged alphabetically by recipient/correspondent. Most of the correspondence is located in this first series; however, expedition-related correspondence can be found at the beginning of each set of excavation records.

The fieldwork and research series is arranged chronologically by site and includes correspondence, field notes and drawings, photographs, financial records, catalogues, and reports. He did extensive research in Central Europe, as well as Works Progress Administration work on the east coast of the United States.

Records pertaining to research that could not be incorporated into the fieldwork and research series were arranged separately in an “other research” series. This includes notes for an apparently unwritten book tentatively entitled Nature, Man, Culture, a collaboration with five other anthropologists (1939); pottery drawings by Sidney Auerbach (1939); and notes on pottery making.

The writings series includes three essays by Vladimir J. Fewkes: “A War Scattered Family” (this one lists an anonymous author but was most likely written by Fewkes), “Delayed But Undismayed,” and a radio talk dated 1930 entitled “The Scope and Task of Archaeology.” This series also includes book reviews that Fewkes wrote for various periodicals, including the American Journal of Archaeology and the Science Service.

The education-related series includes notes from anthropology classes he took while a graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania. Many of the classes he took were taught by Frank G. Speck and Irving A. Hallowell, two founders of the anthropology department at Penn. This series also includes the abstract from his PhD dissertation when he presented it in 1931. A copy of Fewkes' course transcript is available in his biography file, the original of which can be found in the University of Pennsylvania Archives.

Finally, there is a folder which includes some personal effects such as an eyeglass prescription, his wife’s Red Cross card, and photographs of a wooden Madonna and Child. There is also a miscellaneous folder for a few things that did not fit into any of the afore-mentioned categories.

For additional and sometimes overlapping records relating to Fewkes, see also Administrative Records—Works Progress Administration.

The V.J. Fewkes Collection was discovered in the Harrison Auditorium basement and transferred to the archives in 1979. In 1981 it was processed by Trudy Van Houten. The original order of documents within the folders and the original order of the folders themselves were preserved. However, this order in 1979 was most likely not the order in which Fewkes himself had left the records. Therefore, a new, more organized and accessible order has been imposed to facilitate the use of the collection.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  6/27/2012

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  6/19/2015

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  6/20/2013

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  7/25/2016

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  July 2009

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  August 2009

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  August 2009

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  8/2009

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Gina Gariffo

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Bryce Little Jody Rodgers

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Ian Lachow

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Jody Rodgers

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by K. Moreau

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Jody Rodgers

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by K. Moreau

Revision Description

 5/9/13

Revision Description

 2/23/12

Use Restrictions

Although many items from the archives are in the public domain, copyright may be retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law. The user is fully responsible for compliance with relevant copyright law.

Use Restrictions

Although many items from the archives are in the public domain, copyright may be retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law. The user is fully responsible for compliance with relevant copyright law.

Use Restrictions

Although many items from the archives are in the public domain, copyright may be retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law. The user is fully responsible for compliance with relevant copyright law.

Use Restrictions

Although many items from the archives are in the public domain, copyright may be retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law. The user is fully responsible for compliance with relevant copyright law.

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Yamanaka and Co..
Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
Personal Name(s)
  • Bishop, Carl Whiting, b. 1881-d.1942
  • Fernald, Helen E., 1921-1964
  • Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927
  • Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
  • Loo, C.T., b.1880-d.1957
Subject(s)
  • Antiquities
  • Art history

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Controlled Access Headings

Personal Name(s)
  • Butler, Mary, 1903-1970
  • Fisher, George S.
  • Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927
  • Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
  • Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967
  • McHugh, Jane
  • Mercer, Henry C., 1856-1930
  • Shepard, Anna Osler, 1903-1973
  • Uhle, Max, 1856-1944
  • Vaillant, George C., b.1901-d.1945
Subject(s)
  • Anthropological museums and collections
  • Anthropology
  • Archaeological expeditions

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
Geographic Name(s)
  • Solomon Islands
Personal Name(s)
  • Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927
  • Hall, Henry Usher, b. 1876-d. 1944
  • Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
  • Umlauff, J.F.G
  • Umlauff, Johannes , 1874-1951
Subject(s)
  • Anthropology
  • Antiquities
  • Ethnology
  • Maasai (African people)

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Card catalogs
  • Diaries
  • Manuscripts for publication
  • Maps
  • Photographs
Geographic Name(s)
  • Egypt
Personal Name(s)
  • Cerny, Jaroslav, 1898-1970
  • Crum, W.E. (Walter Ewing), 1865-1944
  • FitzGerald, Gerald Milnes, 1882-1978
  • Gunn, Battiscombe G., 1883-1950
  • Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
  • Moss, Rosalind L.B., 1890-1990
  • Reisner, George Andrew, 1867-1942
  • Rowe, Alan, 1892-1968
Subject(s)
  • Archaeology--Burials
  • Plans and drawings

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • American School of Oriental Research in Baghdad.
  • University of Pennsylvania. Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Field notes
  • Photographic prints
Geographic Name(s)
  • Kirkūk (Iraq)
Personal Name(s)
  • Bache, Charles, 1902-1942
  • Chiera, Edward, 1885-1933
  • Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
Subject(s)
  • Antiquities
  • Excavations (Archaeology)

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Card catalogs
  • Correspondence
  • Photographic prints
  • Photographs
Personal Name(s)
  • Burkitt, Robert James, 1869-1945
  • Butler, Mary, 1903-1970
  • Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927
  • Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
Subject(s)
  • Archaeological expeditions
  • Archaeology--History
  • Excavations (Archaeology)
  • Maya language

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Card catalogs
  • Correspondence
Geographic Name(s)
  • Tall al-Muqayyar (deserted settlement)
Personal Name(s)
  • Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927
  • Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
  • Legrain, Leon, 1878-1962
Subject(s)
  • Archaeological expeditions
  • Excavations (Archaeology)

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Faculty papers
Geographic Name(s)
  • Sierra Mound
Personal Name(s)
  • Fewkes, Vladimir
  • Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
Subject(s)
  • American of Prehistoric Research
  • Catawba Indian Nation
  • Ethnology
  • Works Progress Administration

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Collection Inventory

Fernald, Helen Elizabeth, b. 1921-d. 1937. Correspondence, 1921-1937 (Bulk, 1921-1935) .

Biographical/Historical note

Helen Elizabeth Fernald was born in 1891 in Baltimore, Maryland and died in 1964. Fernald attended high school in Amherst, Massachusetts where she graduated in 1910. Going on to receive her A.B. from Mount Holyoke in South Hadley, MA in 1914, Fernald was both an O.B.K. and Mary Lyon Scholar in Art and Archeology in Zoology. After graduation, Fernald attended art school at the Art Students League in New York City, from 1914-1915. While attending art school, Fernald worked as an artist and technician in the Department of Zoology at Columbia University. This position was held for three years, from 1915-1918. During this time, Fernald did her graduate work at Columbia Teachers’ College from 1916-1918. Then, from 1918-1921, Fernald became both an Instructor and Demonstrator in History of Art at Bryn Mawr College. During her three years at Bryn Mawr from 1918-1921, Fernald also did graduate work at the institution.

From 1921-1935 Fernald was an employee of The University Museum in Philadelphia, PA. From 1921-1925, she was the head of the Educational Department. From 1925-1930, Fernald was the Assistant Curator of Far Eastern Art and from 1930-1935, she was the Curator.

In the summer of 1921, Fernald traveled abroad to Italy, Switzerland, France, and England. Because of this, she was unable to start her new position at The University Museum until September as head docent. Much of her time was spent looking for Far Eastern art pieces for the museum’s collection. Once Fernald became the Assistant Curator of Far Eastern Art, she was sent to study in Museums and Private Collections in Paris, at the British Museum in London and attended the International Congress of Oriental Societies at Oxford in 1928. Fernald’s time was spent looking at collections, lecturing and writing. At this time, Fernald was a member of both the American Oriental Society and the Philadelphia Art Alliance. During this time in Paris, Fernald was searching for frescoes and visited many private collections, especially the collection of Mr. C.J. Loo.

In April of 1929, Fernald was approved to go to China, and so, from June-December of 1929, she was sent by the museum to Japan, Korea, and China to study collections or conduct scientific researches. Despite the summer heat, Fernald managed to have a successful trip for the museum.

From 1932-1935, Fernald taught two courses at the museum: Series of seven Round Table Talks and Chinese Painting Seminar as well as teaching 23 lectures illustrated with lantern slides, called “Talks on Art Appreciation and History.” Upon leaving the museum in 1935, Fernald set out for Orlando, Florida where she corresponded with the museum sparingly for the next two years.

Fernald was most known for being a writer, art educator, painter, and lecturer and is remembered by numerous publications in The Museum Journal, various newspaper articles and reviews, lectures, and several books.

Controlled Access Headings
Personal Name(s)
  • Fernald, Helen E., 1921-1964
Box

1921-1926.

1

1927.

1

1928.

1

1929.

1

1930.

1

1931.

1

1932.

1

1933.

2

1934.

2

1935.

2

1929-1937.

2

Collection Inventory

Correspondence, 1926-1958.

Box

North American Curatorial 1926-1955.

12

Middle America Curatorial 1926-1967.

12

South America Curatorial 1926-1955.

12

Collections Offered-Middle America 1928-1958.

12

Collections Offered-South America 1898-1948 (1 of 2).

12

Collections Offered-South America 1898-1948 (2 of 2).

12

Collections Offered-North America 1927-1953.

12

Proposal for founding Institute of Latin American Culture Researches (early 1930s).

Box

In-House Correspondence 1926-1929.

12

In-House Correspondence 1930 (Central America trip).

12

In-House Correspondence 1934-1939.

12

In-House Correspondence 1938 (Guatemala trip).

12

In-House Correspondence 1940-1951.

12

Professional 1926-1958.

12

A.E. Anderson 1934 (Huastecan vessels).

12

Oetteking, Bruno.

12

Anna O. Shepard 1942-1943 (Mexican object in plumbate report).

12

Robert Zingg 1953 (Maya lectures, Mexican codices).

13

Margaret Plass 1955.

13

Shell Heap-Damariscotta, ME 1955.

13

American Section, 1930-1948.

Box

Educational Slide Lectures 1930-1931 (correspondence).

13

Educational Slide Lectures 1930-1931 (drafts and lists).

13

"Value of Some of My Indian Material"-Catalogue of section purchases 1933-1934.

13

Section memos and financial records 1929, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1952.

13

Section Reports 1931,1941-1943 (1 of 2).

13

Section Reports 1931,1941-1943 (2 of 2).

13

Records Placed in Vault 1942.

13

List of Pueblo Bonito sherd lots available-AMNH 1943.

13

Section Reports 1944-1948 (1 of 2).

13

Section Reports 1944-1948 (2 of 2).

13

Research, 1937-1956.

Box

Notes on the Walum Olum.

13

Washington County excavation notes-George S. Fisher 1937.

13

James W. Dickey report on excavation at Tunja and Puerta Servies,Colombia 1937.

13

Proposals for research by members of American section 1939.

13

Notes on Shotridge and Shotridge Collection c.1942.

13

Notes on Eight Chiriqui Whistles 1944.

13

Maya Pottery-list of original drawings 1950.

13

Research on Henry C. Mercer for article-Pennsylvania Archaeologist 1956.

13

S.W. Fernberger Peyote study.

13

Petroglyph Correspondence 1933-1957.

13

Petroglyph Manuscript and notes 1939, 1950.

13

Petroglyph photos and drawings 1914,1936,1942 (1 of 2).

13

Petroglyph photos and drawings 1914,1936,1942 (2 of 2).

Publications, 1927-1955.

Proposed Publications by American Section 1928.

Box

Drafts of Published Articles (n.d.-1927) (1 of 2).

14

Drafts of Published Articles (n.d.-1927) (2 of 2).

14

Personal, 1913-1968.

Box

Mason's class notes and bibliographies as a student 1913-?.

14

Diary of European trip 1924.

14

Notes on American artifacts in European Museums 1924.

14

Lectures and academic record 1925-1964.

14

Bibliography of Mason's writings; list of negatives 1959-1968.

14

Mary Butler's file on Mason, papers, library 1968.

14

Non-Museum Collections, 1926-1941.

Box

Nicaragua Clay Cylinder Cells (B. Marin) n.d.

14

Caribbean-Antigua, B.W.I. 1931.

14

Hernandez de Alba, Hacienda Segovia 1936.

14

Gold Objects-Veraguas, Panama 1940.

14

A.T. Anderson Excavation-Melbourne, FL. 1941.

14

Collection Inventory

Correspondence, 1912-1943.

Box

1912, 1912.

1

1913-1943, 1913-1943 (Bulk, 1913-1931) .

1

Catalogues.

Box

Herero Sammlung.

1

New Guinea.

1

New Britain, New Ireland, Matty Islands, New Zealand.

1

Solomon Islands, New Caledonien.

1

List 1: Afrika Allgemein.

1

List 2: OST-Afrika.

1

List 4: Admiralitaets Inseln.

1

List 7: Karolinen Inseln.

1

List 15: Massai.

1

List 19: Marquesas.

1

List 23: Viti Inseln.

1

List 32: Togo Fetische.

1

List 38: Nubien Sudan.

1

List 39: Franz Inseln.

1

List 40: Schilluk.

1

Albums.

Box

Tahiti and Hervey Islands. Katalog No. 300.

1

Pacific Islands. Katalog No. 301.

1

Kamerun Sammlung 1914 Katalog No. 222.

2

Kamerun-Sammlung 1914 Katalog No. 223.

2

Carolinen Sammlung.

3

New Zealand Sammlung.

3

Baininng & Sulka Sammlung.

3

New Guinea.

3

Kamerun Sammlung.

3

Massai.

3

Herero Sammlung. Katalog No. 163.

3

Collection Inventory

Correspondence.

Box

Cairo Museum.

1

Cairo Museum-Memphis-Meydum transition.

1

Horace Jayne (1 of 3).

1

Horace Jayne (2 of 3).

1

Horace Jayne (3 of 3).

1

Battiscombe Gunn.

1

George A. Reisner.

1

Re: Research.

1

Re: Coins.

1

Re: Meydum manuscript 1951-1955.

1

General 1928-1932.

1

Financial 1928-1932.

Box

Correspondence 1936-1937.

1

Kodak receipts, correspondence 1929-1930.

1

Reports-January 1928-December 1929.

1

Reports-January 1930-December 1930.

1

Records-January-March 1931; September-December 1931; January-June 1932.

1

Field Reports 1928-1931.

Box

Monthly reports (1 of 2).

1

Monthly reports (2 of 2).

1

Field notes.

Box

Rowe 1928.

1

Rowe 1931.

1

Diary (1 of 3).

1

Diary (2 of 3).

1

Diary (3 of 3).

2

Tomb cards 1930-1932.

Box

A.N.N.I. 1932.

3

A.N. cemetery, mastaba plans.

3

A.N. sites 1931.

3

A.N.S. 1931-1932.

3

Mastaba (1-395) 1931-1932.

3

Tombs (T328-T399) 1930-1931.

3

Tombs (T200-T546) 1931.

3

Tombs (T547-T607) 1931.

3

Object cards.

Box

By tomb number.

4, 5

By location.

5

By type, composition.

5, 6

Field negatives.

6

Object registers.

Oversize

1929 (29-11-12).

1

1930 (30-1-12).

1

1931 (30-1-4).

1

1931 (30-11-12).

1

1932 (32-1).

1

Lists 1929-1932.

Box

Packing lists 1930-1932.

2

Division lists by photo number.

2

Division lists by object register number.

2

Publication 1928-1933.

Box

Grafitti correspondence.

2

Grafitti notes.

2

Research notes (1 of 2).

2

Research notes (2 of 2).

2

List of personnel.

2

Museum Journal.

2

Museum Journal 1931 (annotated).

2

Illustrated London News.

2

Miscellaneous articles.

2

J.Y. Brinton article 1932.

2

Notes on translations; axe head.

2

Lists-tombs, photos, objects.

7

Unpublished Manuscript Vol. I (1 of 2).

7

Unpublished Manuscript Vol. I (2 of 2).

7

Unpublished Manuscript Vol. II.

7

Unpublished Manuscript Vol. III.

7

Unpublished Manuscript Vol. IV.

7

Unpublished Manuscript Vol. V.

7

Misc. articles and bibliographies Vol. I (1 of 2).

7

Misc. articles and bibliographies Vol. I (2 of 2).

8

Misc. articles and bibliographies Vol. II (1 of 2).

8

Misc. articles and bibliographies Vol. II (2 of 2).

8

Notes, bibliography.

8

Bibliography cards (1 of 2).

8

Bibliography cards (2 of 2).

8

Photographs.

Box

Photo Register.

9

Photo Index 1929-1930.

9

Photo Index 1930-1931.

9

Photo Index 1931-1932.

9

Photo album 1 (1-370).

10

Photo album II (371-869).

11

Photo album III (870-1121).

9

Additional photo albums in flat storage boxes.

flat box

Maps, Plans 32842-38933.

EG13

Excavations 1-72.

EG13

Excavations 73-254.

EG13

Excavations 255-370.

EG13

Excavations 370-481.

EG13

Excavations 482-555.

EG13

Excavations 556-680.

EG13

Excavations 681-770.

EG13

Excavations 771-868.

EG13

Excavations 869-921.

EG13

Excavations 922-1022.

EG13

Excavations 1023-1242.

EG14

Meydum-General Views.

EG14

Aerial Views.

EG14

Archaeol. Objects 36058-36303.

EG14

Stone Sculpture 33987-36723.

EG14

Stone Vessels.

EG14

Stone Tools.

EG14

Mummies 34708-34782.

EG14

Mummies 36228-36422.

EG14

Mummies 36434-36640.

EG14

Mummies 39811-36302.

EG14

Mummies-Skeletal Remains 34509-34670.

EG14

Mummies Field Nos. 83-93.

EG14

Wall Painting.

EG14

Linen Basketry 34346-36625.

EG14

Pottery Vessels 34738-34794.

EG15

Pottery Vessels 36173-36525.

EG15

Pottery Vessels 36527-36600.

EG15

Pottery Vessels 36604-80630.

EG15

Jar Stoppers.

EG15

Pottery Lamps 34664-36612.

EG15

Ostraca 34731-36594.

EG15

Terracottas 34635-36645.

EG15

Bricks.

EG15

Wood.

EG15

Glass.

EG15

Faience.

EG15

Ivory.

EG15

Bronze, Iron.

EG15

Jewelry 31655-36652.

EG15

Scarabs, Scarabands, Seals.

EG15

Graffiti 34478-38277.

EG15

Papyri.

EG15

Coins.

EG15

Meydum-Unnumbered.

EG15

Abu Nur (near Meydum) by Neg. Nos. 36438-36558 (106).

EG15

Abu Nur (near Meydum) by Neg. Nos. 34692-34918 (77).

EG15

Plate Photos for Rowe's unpublished Ms.- Vol.II XVII-XXVIII.

EG16

Plate Photos Rowe's unpubl. Ms.-XI-XXXII.

EG16

Plate Photos Rowe's unpubl. Ms.-XVIII-XXXVIII.

EG16

Plate Photos Rowe's unpubl. Ms.-XL-65.

EG16

Maps and Plans.

Drawer
Meydum publication plates Volume I.
M-11-2
Drawer

Plate I-Reconstruction of Meydum Pyramid Site Looking Northwest.

M-11-2

Plate II-Sketch Showing Stepped Appearance of the King's Pyramid and Mastabah 17.

M-11-2

Plate III-Meydum Pyramid Site-Restored from Details Published by Petrie.

M-11-2

Plate IV-Stages in the Construction of the Meydum Pyramid.

M-11-2

Plate V-Details of Staged Funerary Buildings.

M-11-2

Plate VI-Quarrymen's Gang.

M-11-2

Plate VII- Map of Northern and Middle Egypt.

M-11-2

Plate VIII-Composite Map of Meydum Prior to the Excavations.

M-11-2

Plate IX-The Meydum Pyramid in Relation to other Royal Tombs of Egypt.

M-11-2

Plate X-Meydum Pyramid-Entrance, Passage and Chambers.

M-11-2

Plate XI-Meydum Pyramid Temple.

M-11-2

Plate XII-Meydum Pyramid Causeway.

M-11-2

Plate XIII-Brick Furnace above the Causeway.

M-11-2

Plate XIV-Pyramid, North Face.

M-11-2

Plate XV-Pyramid-East Face; Pyramid Passage; Pyramid Causeway; East Peribolus Wall.

M-11-2
Meydum plates Volume II.
M-11-3
Drawer

Plate I-Plan of Pit and Chamber Section (Looking South).

M-11-3

Plate II-Section Through Pit and Chamber, Nefert's Burial, Mastaba No. 6 Looking West.

M-11-3

Plate III-Reconstruction of the Wooden Coffin of Nefert.

M-11-3

Plate IV-Details of Crenellations.

M-11-3

Plate V-Plan of Mastaba No. 7.

M-11-3

Plate VI- Section Looking West, Drawings of Objects, Mastaba No 7.

M-11-3

Plate VII-Plan of Mastaba No 8.

M-11-3

Plate VIII-Plan of Pit and Chamber, Drawings of Objects.

M-11-3

Plate IX-Section Through Pit and Chamber of NY-HEP.

M-11-3

Plate X-Plan of Northern Pit and Chamber, Drawing of Objects.

M-11-3

Plate XI-Section Through Northern Pit and Chamber.

M-11-3

Plate XII-Plan and Section of Intrusive Pit, Drawings of Objects.

M-11-3

Plate XIII-Plans and Sections of Classified Tombs in Northern Cemetery.

M-11-3

Plate XIV-Plans and Sections of Unclassified Tombs in Northern Cemetery.

M-11-3

Plate XV-Objects from Northern Cemetery.

M-11-3

Plate XVI-Plans and Sections of Late Dynastic Tombs in Northern Cemetery.

M-11-3

Plate I-Printed Reproduction on Paper (see A).

M-11-3
Meydum plates-volume III and extra.
M-11-4
Drawer

Plate I-General Plan of Mastaba 17.

M-11-4

Plate II-Plan and Section of North End of Mastaba.

M-11-4

Plate III-Plans and Sections of East Side of Mastaba.

M-11-4

Plate IV-Details of Builders Level Marks and Guide-Lines on Mastaba.

M-11-4

Plate V-Detailed Plan and Sections of Stone Chapel.

M-11-4

Plate VI-Detailed Plan and Section of Original Sarcophagus Chamber.

M-11-4

Plate VII-Sketch Plan and Sections of the Tomb of Gemesh.

M-11-4

Plate VIII-Drawings of Wooden and Pottery Coffins.

M-11-4

Plate IX-Drawing of the Coffin of Iah-tef-nekht.

M-11-4

Plate X-Drawings of Coffins from Intrusive Tombs.

M-11-4

Plate XI-Drawings of Coffins from Intrusive Tombs.

M-11-4

Plate XII-Drawings of Coffins from Intrusive Tombs.

M-11-4

Plate XIII-Drawings of Coffins from Intrusive Tombs.

M-11-4

Plate XIV-Drawings of Large Objects from Intrusive Tombs.

M-11-4

Plate XV-Drawings of Large Objects from Intrusive Tombs.

M-11-4

Plate XVI- Drawings of Small Objects from Intrusive Tombs.

M-11-4

Plate XVII- Drawings of Miscellaneous Objects from Mastaba Debris.

M-11-4
Extra drawings.
M-11-4

Mastaba 17 West side, extreme North part.

Mastabe 17 Plan of the north side showing intrusive burials.

Mastabe 17 Section S-T from East to West looking South.

Mastaba 17 Sections U-V from South to North, looking West.

Drawer

Mastaba 17 West side, extreme North part.

M-11-4

Mastaba 17 East side, South part.

M-11-4

Mastaba 17 East side, North part.

M-11-4

Mastaba 17 Offering niche; section O-P West, looking North.

M-11-4

Mastaba 17 Offering niche; elevation looking West.

M-11-4

Mastaba 17 Section Q-R From West to East looking North.

M-11-4

Mastaba 17 General Plan.

M-11-4

Stone Chapel- Plan.

Stone Chapel- Section K-L from South to North looking West.

Stone Chapel- Section M-N, from East to West looking South.

Drawer

Sketch Plans of the Tomb of Gemesh.

M-11-4

Sketch of Objects Found Outside the Coffin of Gemesh.

M-11-4

Sketch of Objects Found in the Coffin of Gemesh.

M-11-4
Meydum Plates Volume IV.
Drawer

PLATE I Plan of Tomb 277.

M-11-5

PLATE II Plan of Tomb 202 Dynasty IV (This Drawing Is Found As(7)of Composite Plate 4.

M-11-5

PLATE III Plan and section of Tomb 393 Type S.P.IIIvth Dynasty.

M-11-5

PLATE IV Plans and Sections of Tombs 552(=?)-Type SR III; 556 and 559-fourth Dynasty.

M-11-5

PLATE V Plans and Sections of Tombs Nos. 1 and 4-fourth Dynasty (No 4 Is that of Heknen).

M-11-5

PLATE VI Plans and Sections of Mastaba 293 and Tombs Nos 310, 295, 292 IVth Dyn. (with Late Dyn. intrusions).

M-11-5

PLATE VII Plans and sections of Tomb nos. 312,315, 318, 460, (?)512 Fourth Dynasty.

M-11-5

PLATE VIII Objects from the fourth Dynasty Tombs.

M-11-5

PLATE IX General Map of Meydum site; Detailed "Map A".

M-11-5

PLATE X Meydum site-Detailed map B and C.

M-11-5
Meydum Plates Volume V.
Drawer

PLATE I (Tombs 581, 587, 591 and Pottery Types).

M-11-6

PLATE II (Tombs 316, 324, 389, 478, 478A).

M-11-6

PLATE III Tomb 313 Dynasty XII Onward.

M-11-6

PLATE IV Tomb 314 Tomb groups-Small objects.

M-11-6

PLATE V Tomb 314-Concl. 315, 316, 317, 318-Tomb groups small objects.

M-11-6

PLATE VI Tomb 266, 277, 278, 287, 293, 295, 302,321, 324-Tomb groups Small objects.

M-11-6

PLATE VII Tomb 261B, 264, 265, 266, 267, 276, 277, 278, 281, 282, 287, Tomb Groups Large Objects.

M-11-6

PLATE VIII Tomb 261B, 264, 265, 266, 267, 276, 277, 278, 281, 282, 287, Tomb Groups Large Objects.

M-11-6

PLATE IX Miscellaneous and Tomb groups Small and Large objects.

M-11-6

PLATE X Unspecified.

M-11-6

PLATE XI Unspecified.

M-11-6

PLATE XII Roman tombs 462, 464, 465, 467, 468.

M-11-6

PLATE XIII Roman tombs 472, 473, 495.

M-11-6

PLATE XIV From Roman tombs.

M-11-6

PLATE XV From Christian tombs.

M-11-6

PLATE XVI Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XVII Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XVIII Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XIX Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XX Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XXI Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XXII Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XXIII Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XXIV Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XXV Coffins, pottery and stone.

M-11-6

PLATE XXVI Miscellaneous.

M-11-6
Meydum Plates with no Volume Number (Group !).
Drawer

PLATE I Plan and section of Tomb 277.

M-11-7

PLATE II Plan and section of Tomb 202.

M-11-7

PLATE III Plan and section of Tomb 393.

M-11-7

PLATE IV Plan and section of Tomb 352 (in Mastaba 14).

M-11-7

PLATE V Plan and section of Tomb 1 and 4.

M-11-7

PLATE VI Plan and section of Mastaba 293 with Tomb Pits 310. 295, 292.

M-11-7

PLATE VII Plan and section Unclassified tombs 312, 315, 318, 460, 481, 512.

M-11-7

PLATE VIII Some Objects from Fourth Dynasty Tombs.

M-11-7

PLATE IX General Map Showing 1929 - 1932 Excavation at Meydum, and Detailed Map A.

M-11-7

PLATE X Meydum Detailed Maps-Band C.

M-11-7
Drawer
Meydum Plates with no volume number (Group 2).
M-11-1
Drawer

Pl. 1 Tomb groups-small objects.

M-11-1
Map-case

Pl. 3 Tomb groups-small objects.

M-11-1

Pl. 4 Map of Meydum showing excavations of 1929-1930 with plans.

M-11-1

Pl. 5 Tomb groups-small objects.

M-11-1

Pl. 6 Tomb groups-large objects.

M-11-1

Pl. 7 Tomb groups-large objects.

M-11-1

Pl. 9 Tomb groups-large objects.

M-11-1

Pl. 10 Tomb groups-large objects.

M-11-1

Pl. 12 Plan of tomb 251.

M-11-1

Pl. 14 Plans of tombs and furnace.

M-11-1

Pl. 15 Plans of tombs 311, 312, 315, 316.

M-11-1

Pl. 16 Tomb 314.

M-11-1

Pl. 17 Coffin of Sat-her-em-hat.

M-11-1

Pl. 18 Coffin of Khenty-khety-em-hat.

M-11-1

Pl. 19 Wooden coffins.

M-11-1

Pl. 20 Wooden coffins.

M-11-1

Pl. 21 Coffins-wooden & pottery.

M-11-1

Pl. 22 Wooden coffins.

M-11-1

Pl. 23 Wooden coffins.

M-11-1

Pl. 24 Wooden coffins.

M-11-1

Pl. 25 Wooden coffins.

M-11-1

Pl. 26 Coffin of Iah-tef-nekht.

M-11-1

Pl. 27 Coffins-wooden, pottery & stone.

M-11-1

Pl. 30 From and near Mastaba.

M-11-1

Pl. 31 Miscellaneous tombs.

M-11-1
Meydum Miscellaneous.
Drawer

"Coffin Tomb 362 Meydum 1930" Watercolor 6" by 16".

M-11-8

"Reconstruction of Meydum Pyramid Site Looking Northwest" Watercolor with Caption 20" by 20".

M-11-8
Meydum The Great Pyramid.
Drawer

"Cross Section and Plan [of Great Pyramid at Meydum]." Architect's Plan. Scale 1:1000" 22.5" x 13.5".

M-11-9

Plan of Interior of Great Pyramid at Meydum-Architects Plan Scale 1:100 ft. 24" by 30".

M-11-9

"The Great Pyramid" Cross Section and 3 Interior Plans- Archtects Plan Scale 1:100 ft. 24.5" by 30".

M-11-9

As Above- Encapsulated.

M-11-9

As Above- Encapsulated.

M-11-9
Meydum Miscellaneous.
Drawer

Restoration of Wall Painting (E641) Watercolor 12" x 9".

M-11-10
Meydum Topographical Map Series.
Drawer

58 Architect's Maps of Meydum-Captions in Arabic Various sizes.

M-11-11
Meydum the Great Pyramid.
Drawer

"Successive Schemes of Saqqarah Pyramid." 1:50 m. Ink on paper. Written on bottom "A. S. A. vol. XXIX, pl. VIII".

M-11-12
Meydum-Maps, Sketches, Site Plans and Floor Plans of Tombs.
Drawer

9A Tomb plans. Scale 1/50. Pencil on paper. Tombs: 391, 394, 399, 431, 433, 436, 442, 445, 390, 409, 413,414, 432, 434, 437, 438, 440, 443.

M-11-13

11A Tomb Plans Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 Tombs 517-522, 513, 524 On Reverse: 11B-Tomb Plans. Pencil on Paper. Scale 1/50.Tombs: 505-512, 514-516, and 523.

M-11-13

Tomb Plans Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 Tombs 461, 466, 471,485, 486, 488, 491, 492 On Reverse: 13B-Tomb Plans. Pencil on Paper. Scale 1/50.Tombs: 472, 473, 482-484, 489, 495.

M-11-13

6A "Crenellated Wall to the North of the Pyramid" Ink and Pencil on Paper Scale 1/100 Dated 14/1/1931 On Reverse: 6B- "Plan of Tomb 389 (West of the Pyra.[mid]) Pencil on Paper. Dated 10/1/1931.

M-11-13

4B "Tombs on the East Side of Mas.[taba] [17]" Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 Tombs: 463, 474, 475, 478, 479, 480, 487, 490, 493, 496.

M-11-13

14A "Roman Tombs" Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 Tombs: 460, 464, 465, 476, 477. On Reverse: 14B- "Roman Tombs" Pencil on Paper. Tombs: 462, 467-470, 481.

M-11-13

1A Tomb of Mas.[taba] 16" Ink and Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 Dated 23/11/1931. Also Plan of "Top of Entrance" Pencil on Paper. Scale 1/100. Dated 6/1/1932. On Reverse: 1B- Plan of "Tomb of Hek-nen, Mast.[aba] No 4" Ink and Pencil on Paper. Scale 1/50.

M-11-13

Plans of Tomb 393 Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 On Reverse: 3A "Mastaba No. 7" Ink and Pencil on Paper. Scale 1/100. 5 Plans.

M-11-13

[A] "Sarcophagus of Cheops, Giza" and "Sarcophagus of Mastaba 17, Meydum" Printed Reproduction, 2 Plans.

M-11-13

[B] "N.W. Level-and Incline-Indicaton Wall of Mastaba 17" Pencil on Paper-Plan Scale 1/25 On Reverse: Writing and Sketching in Pencil.

M-11-13

12A "Mastaba No. 8" Pencil on Paper Scale 1/100 Plan On Reverse: 3 Plans-Subject Unidentified-Pencil on Paper Scale 1/100 and 1/50.

M-11-13

[C] "Mastaba No. 8 NY HEP" 5 Plans Ink and Pencil on Paper Various Scales On Reverse: Tomb Plans. Pencil on Paper. Scale 1:50. Tombs: 401, 402, 408, 410, 411, 412, 417- 419, 420, 421, 423, 424, 427, 439, 441, 444, 448, 449, 457, 458, 459.

M-11-13

[D] Plan of Tomb ANS 30 With Captions. The captions concern location of objects in the tomb. Pencil on Paper.

M-11-13

[E] Cross section diagrams of pottery from Meydum (?) Pencil on Paper.

M-11-13

[F] As above-Ink and Pencil on Paper.

M-11-13

5B Tomb Plan- Pencil on Paper. Scale 1:50. Dated "29/1/32.

M-11-13

G Plan- Unspecified Ink and Pencil on Paper.

M-11-13

[H] Map of Tomb at Meydum Pencil on Paper. Scale 1:100. Plan. Cross section of Pyramid at Meydum. Pencil on Paper. Scale 1:50. Both plans are dated "31/12/30".

M-11-13

[I ] "Dra-Abu-Ner, Meydum" Ink on Paper Ink on Paper Scale 1/1000.

M-11-13

"Southern Side of Mastaba 17" Ink and pencil on Paper Scale 1/100 Dated "15/1/1931" and "18/1/1931".

M-11-13

7B "Cross section A-B and Tomb 592" Plans Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50.

M-11-13

2A "Mastaba 14 Cross section E-F, C-D and [Topview} Ink and Pencil on Paper. Dated "15/1/1931".

M-11-13

10A Plan of Tomb 200 Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 Dated 28/1/1931 On Reverse: Tomb 379 Plan Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 Dated 27/1/1931.

M-11-13

7 Plans of Tombs 398, 400, 405, 406, 415, 426, 428, 435, 450, 451. Pencil on Paper Scale 1:50 On Reverse: Plans of Tombs 403, 429, 454, 422, 452, 392, 456, 453, 455. Pencil on Paper Scale 1:50.

M-11-13

8A "Mastaba No. 16 Nefer Maat" Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 On Reverse: "Mastaba No. 9 of Ra Nefer" and "6 of RaHotep". Pencil on Paper. Scale 1:50.

M-11-13

"Plans and Sections of Tombs and Section through the Cemetery on Lines A-B, C-D" Plan Printed Reproduction on Posterboard. 40.5" by 28".

M-11-16
Drawer

Map From Meydum Grid system Unidentified 13 Fragments Ink on Linen.

M-11-15

"Map of the Northern and Middle Showing the Relative Positions of Meydum and Other Pyramid Sites Dating to the Ancient and Middle Empires c. 3000-c. 1800 B. C." 5 Pieces Printed Reproduction.

M-11-15
Meydum Squeezes.
Drawer

15 Squeezes of Meydum Found with some Meydum Notes. A. R. S. 8 June '60 (Box 22). Poor Quality.

M-11-14

Collection Inventory

General Correspondence, 1927-1931.

Scope and Contents note

Guidelines for Nuzi excavations, 1927 and 1929; reports from the field, some with sketches of the ezcavation, from Starr to D.G. Lyon and other Harvard scholars, and to H .Jayne; letters, reports and financial statements from C. Bache to H. Jayne, news releases, a note (1930) on the exhibition of the Harvard Mesopotamian Expedition and an epigraphical report fromT.J. Meek to D. Lyon. Arranged chronologically.

Box

Harvard Baghdad School Expedition, general correspondence, 1929-1931.

1

Field Notes, 1929-1930.

Scope and Contents note

Notes from field by Charles Bache. Original notebook aka. Containes material from excavations at Beech Bottom, W. VA. It is filed under Noerth America/Mid. Atlantic and other small expeditions, 1911-1969/Beech Bottom/Box 16. (L-1-5). Notebook labelled “Beech Bottom” and “Charles Bache”.

Box

Charles Bache Field Notebook, Kirkuk, Dec.-Mar.

1

Photographs, 1925-1930.

Scope and Contents note

Photographic catalogue; two sets of photographs, one from Chiera’s 1925 excavation and the other from 1929-1930 season. Arranged by season.

Box

Photograph catalogue of survey and excavation.

1

Publications, 1928-1942.

Scope and Contents note

Preliminary report (1928); notes, annotated draft and final dissertation manuscript. Arranged topically.

Box

Kirkuk, Preliminary Report, 1928.

1

Real Estate Transactions-Tablet translations, 1942.

1

Real Estate Transactions-Tablet translations, 1942.

1

Real Estate Transactions-Tablet translations.

1

Collection Inventory

Correspondence, 1903-1939.

Box

List of letters to Robert Burkitt.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (1 of 10) 1904-1913.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (2 of 10) 1913.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (3 of 10) 1914-1915.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (4 of 10) 1916-1917.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (5 of 10) 1918-1919.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (6 of 10) 1920.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (7 of 10) 1921-1923.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (8 of 10) 1924.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (9 of 10) 1925.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (10 of 10) 1926.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon and Miss McHugh 1927.

1

Robert Burkitt to Miss McHugh 1928-1929.

1

Robert Burkitt to Horace Jayne and Miss McHugh 1930-1932.

1

Robert Burkitt to Horace Jayne and Miss McHugh 1933-1939.

1

Letter of Rev. J.H. Burkitt (father of Robert Burkitt) 1915.

1

Notes and Studies on Collection, 1953-1978.

Box

J. Alden Mason notes (1 of 3) 1953-1978.

4

J. Alden Mason notes (2 of 3).

4

J. Alden Mason notes (3 of 3).

4

William R. Coe Notes on Burkitt and Butler (1 of 3).

4

William R. Coe Notes on Burkitt and Butler ( 2 of 3).

3

William R. Coe Notes on Burkitt and Butler (3 of 3).

Box 3

Kixpek, El Quiche, Guatemala.

The Burkitt Excavations at Chama; A Preliminary Report.

The Robert Burkitt Skeletal collection from Highland Guatemala.

William Coe Anthropology Class Studies of Burkitt and Butler.

Catalogues and Reports, 1913-1930.

Box

Checklist of numbers and provenience.

2

Catalogue numbers 1 to 99 (1 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 100 to 200 (2 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 201 to 331 (3 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 332 to 623 (4 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 624 to 786 (5 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 787 to 803 (6 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 804 to 811 (7 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 812 to 962 (8 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 962 to 1090 (9 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 1091 to 1109 (10 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 1110 to 1115 (11 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 1116 to 1154 (12 of 12).

2

Typed Draft of "Explorations in the Highlands of Western Guatemala".

2

Photographs, 1913-1930.

Box

Photographs 101 to 156 (1 of 8).

2

Photographs 157 to 203 (2 of 8).

2

Photographs 204 to 243 (3 of 8).

2

Photographs 244 to 261 (4 of 8).

2

Photographs 262 to 287 (5 of 8).

2

Photographs 288 to 326 (6 of 8).

2

Photographs 804-1 to 804-24 (7 of 8).

2

Photographs 804-25 to 807 (8 of 8).

2

Miscellaneous and unidentified.

2

Photos relating to letters of Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (1 of 4).

2

Photos relating to letters of Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (2 of 4).

2

Photos relating to letters of Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (3 of 4).

2

Photos relating to letters of Robert Burkitt to George Gordon, undated (4 of 4).

2

Museum Journal.

2

Negatives.

2

Maps and Plans.

Collection Inventory

General Correspondence.

Scope and Contents note

Letters, reports from the field, financial statements, cablegrams, press releases and expense notebook. Arranged by type and then chronologically.

Box

Correspondence 1919-1921.

1

Correspondence Exp. I 1922.

1

Correspondence Exp. I 1923.

1

Correspondence Exp. II 1923-1924.

1

Correspondence Exp. II 1924.

1

Correspondence Exp. III 1924.

1

Correspondence Exp. III 1925.

1

Correspondence Exp. IV 1925.

1

Correspondence Exp. IV 1926.

1

Correspondence Exp. V 1926.

1

Correspondence Exp. V 1927.

1

Correspondence Exp. VI 1927.

1

Correspondence Vice-President, University of Pennsylvania 1928.

1

Correspondence Exp. VI 1928, Jan.-June.

2

Correspondence Exp. VII 1928.

2

Correspondence Exp. VII 1929.

2

Correspondence Exp. VIII 1929.

2

Correspondence Exp. VIII 1930.

2

Correspondence Exp. IX 1930.

2

Correspondence Exp. IX 1931.

2

Correspondence Exp. X 1931.

2

Correspondence Exp. X 1932.

2

Correspondence Exp. XI 1932.

2

Correspondence Exp. XI 1933.

2

Correspondence Exp. XII 1933.

2

Correspondence-Iraq Director of Antiquities, 1933-1938 (Bulk, 1936) .

2

Correspondence, resumes and press releases, 1922-1934 (Bulk, 1922) .

2

Accounts— Legrain's Expense Notebook, Ur Expedition, 1924-1926.

2

Indexes and Catalogues, 1922-1976 (Bulk, 1922-1934) .

Scope and Contents note

Photo catalogue, field photo catalogue and index, register of inscribed materials, drawings of lyre, field object catalogue. Arranged by type and thereunder numerically.

Box

Ur Field Catalog.

3

Ur Nos. U. 1 – U. 1054, 1922-1923.

3

Ur II Nos. U. 1,101 – U. 1788, 1923-1924.

3

Ur III Nos. U. 2501 – U. 3373, 1924-1925.

3

Ur IV Nos. U. 6001 – U. 7143, 1925-1926.

3

Ur V Nos. U. 7500 – U. 9360, 1926-1927.

3

Ur VI Nos. U. 9501 – U. 11231, 1927-1928.

3

Ur VII Nos. U. 11400 – U. 13108, 1928-1929.

3

Ur VIII Nos. U. 13500 – U. 15817, 1929-1930.

3

Ur IX Nos. U. 16001 – U. 17448, 1930-1931.

3

Ur X Nos. U. 17601 – U. 18207, 1931-1932.

3

Ur XI Nos. U. 18207 – U. 18723, 1932-1933.

3

Ur XII Nos. U. 18724 – U. 20094, 1933-1934.

3

Field Photographs Catalogue, 1922-1934.

4

Field Photographs Catalogue by L. Legrain, 1922-1934.

4

Photograph Catalogues— Miscellaneous.

4

Lists of Divisions and related documents, objects presented to other institutions.

4

Ur tomb artifacts.

4

List of Ur Bronzes Out for Cleaning, 1933.

4

Ur Register of Inscribed Materials, 1976.

4

Drawings of Lyre, 1976.

4

Site Abbreviations.

4

Publications, 1922-1976 (Bulk, 1922-1956) .

Scope and Contents note

Correspondence, notes, drafts, photographs, plans and drawings, catalogues, and manuscripts. Arranged by volume number and thereunder by type.

Box

Correspondence Ur Dispute, 1923-1948 (Bulk, 1923-1935) .

4

General Correspondence, 1942-1976 (Bulk, 1945-1948) .

4

Ur Expedition I-X plans and drawings, 1922-1934.

4

Ur Text, Vol. II-Translation (1 of 2).

4

Ur Texts Vol. III-Translation (2 of 2).

5

Ur Texts Vol. III-Concordance (1 of 2).

5

Ur Texts Vol. III-Concordance (2 of 2).

5

Ur Texts Vol. III-Notes, Index, Catalogue.

5

Ur Excavations Vol. III-Archaic Seal Impressions and Photos.

5

Ur Excavations Vol. III-Archaic Seal Impressions, Proto-Elamite Signs.

5

Ur Excavations Vol. III-Seal Impressions, notes on chronology.

5

Ur Excavations Vol. X-Seal Impressions, 1931-1932.

5

Ur Excavations Vol. X-Seal Cylinders.

6

Ur Excavation, Vol. X-Seal Cylinders.

6

Correspondence -Woolley- Ur Excavations Vol. IV, 1953-1956.

6

Ur Excavations Vol. IV Plates (1 of 2).

6

Ur Excavations Vol. IV Plates (2 of 2).

6

Correspondence Ur VI-VII, 1953-1972.

6

Ur Excavations Vol. VI- Plate Drawings.

6

Ur Excavations Vol. VI- Plates.

6

Legrain Research.

Scope and Contents note

Object Cards, some with photographs and sketches, classification, catalogue, and manuscripts. Arranged by subject

Box

Legrain Research Ur Terra-Cottas, catalogue.

7

Legrain Research- Ur Terra-Cottas Classification.

7

Legrain Research-Ur Historical Inscriptions Translations (1 of 2), 1919.

7

Legrain Research-Ur Historical Inscriptions Translations (2 of 2), 1919-1926.

7

Object Cards— Terra Cottas.

8

Object Cards— Terra Cottas-tablets and notes.

9

Collection Inventory

Alphabetical Correspondence.

Scope and Contents note

This series contains correspondence between Fewkes and other colleagues and friends, both work-related and personal. Arranged alphabetically by correspondent.

Box

[Angier-Broome].

1

[American Philosophical Society Grant(s)].

1

[Conference on Ceramic Technological Research in Archaeology (1937-8)].

1

[Conklin-Greywacz].

1

[Guthe-Heffner].

1

[Hibben].

1

[Hiebel-Hiefetz].

1

[Jayne (1 of 3)].

1

[Jayne (2 of 3)].

1

[Jayne (3 of 3)].

1

[Johnson-Krause].

1

[Lewis-Markus].

1

[MacCurdy].

1

[McFarland-Palmatary].

1

[Patterson-Prihada].

1

[Ritchie].

1

[Rogers-Setzler].

1

[Science Service].

1

[Sigma Xi Grant].

1

[Smith-Wright].

1

[Unidentified Correspondence].

1

Fieldwork and Research.

Scope and Contents note

This series is arranged chronologically by site and contains correspondence, field notes and drawings, photographs, financial records, catalogues, and reports.

Box

[Central European Research for PhD (1927)].

1

[Kane, PA (Nov. 1-10, 1928)].

1

[Abbott Farm (1929)].

1

[Catawba – Correspondence (1929)].

1

[Catawba – Notes and Drawings].

1

[Catawba – Reports – “Catawba Pottery Making”].

1

[Central European Expedition – Correspondence (1929)].

1

[Central European Expedition – Correspondence (1930-31)].

1

[Central European Expedition – Correspondence (1932)].

1

[Central European Expedition – Correspondence (1939-41, 62)].

1

[Central European Expedition – Financial Records (1929)].

1

[Central European Expedition – Financial Records and Report (1932)].

1

[Central European Expedition – Catalogues – Missing Items (1929)].

1

[Central European Expedition – Catalogues – “List of Missing Items” (1929)].

1

[Central European Expedition – Catalogues – “Located Items” (1929)].

1

[Central European Expedition – Catalogues – Notes and Lists of Objects (1938)].

1

[Central European Expedition – Catalogues – “University Museum’s Share” (Field Copy, 1929)].

1

[Central European Expedition – Catalogues – “University of Pennsylvania Museum’s Share” (Copy 1, 1941)].

1

[Central European Expedition – Catalogues – “University of Pennsylvania Museum’s Share” (Copy 2, 1941)].

1

[Central European Expedition – Miscellaneous].

1

[Central European Expedition – Blank Forms].

1

[Cape Cod, MA – Correspondence (1937)].

1

[Cape Cod, MA – Notes and Maps (1937)].

1

[Danubian Expedition with the American School of Prehistoric Research – Correspondence (1938)].

1

[Danubian Expedition with the American School of Prehistoric Research – Miscellaneous].

1

[Irene Mound – Correspondence (1938, 1941)].

1

[Irene Mound – Notes (1 of 2)].

1

[Irene Mound – Notes (2 of 2)].

1

[Irene Mound – Photographs].

1

[Irene Mound – Reports – “Report on Excavations at Irene Mound” (March 1, 1938)].

1

[Irene Mound – Reports – “WPA Excavations at Irene Mound” (1938)].

1

[Irene Mound – Reports – “Professionals and Amateurs”].

1

Other Research.

Scope and Contents note

This series contains records pertaining to research that could not be incorporated into the fieldwork and research series. It includes notes for an apparently unwritten book tentatively entitled Nature, Man, Culture, a collaboration with five other anthropologists (1939); pottery drawings by Sidney Auerbach (1939); and notes on pottery making.

Box

[Notes for “Nature, Man, Culture” (1939)].

1

[Pottery Drawings by Sidney Auerbach (1939)].

1

[Notes on Pottery Making].

1

Writings.

Scope and Contents note

This series contains three essays by Vladimir J. Fewkes: “A War Scattered Family” (this one lists an anonymous author but was most likely written by Fewkes), “Delayed But Undismayed,” and a radio talk dated 1930 entitled “The Scope and Task of Archaeology.” This series also includes book reviews that Fewkes wrote for various periodicals, including the American Journal of Archaeology and the Science Service.

Box

[“A War Scattered Family” (Anonymous author, probably V.J. Fewkes)].

1

[“Delayed But Undismayed”].

1

[Radio Talk – “The Scope and Task of Archaeology” (1930)].

1

[Book Reviews (1939-41)].

1

Education.

Scope and Contents note

This series contains class notes from Fewkes’ graduate education at Penn. Notable are the classes taught by Frank G. Speck and Irving A. Hallowell. Also included is the abstract from his PhD dissertation when he presented it in 1931.

Box

[Anthropology 1: General Anthropology (1921)].

2

[Anthropology 1: General Anthropology (1925)].

2

[Anthropology 1: General Anthropology (1926)].

2

[Anthropology 2: Prehistoric Archaeology of Europe (1926)].

2

[Anthropology 7: American Anthropology and Ethnology (1926).

2

[Anthropology 8: Peoples of the Pacific (1926)].

2

[Anthropology 3: Primitive Arts and Industries (1926-27)].

2

[Anthropology 3: Primitive Arts and Industries (1926-27) (?)].

2

[Anthropology 5: Primitive Religions (1926-27)].

2

[Anthropology 10: Primitive Society (1926-27)].

2

[Anthropology 13: Mythology of Primitive Peoples (1926-27)].

2

[Anthropology 14: Anthropology of the Negro (1926-27)].

2

[Anthropology 15: Cultural Dynamics (1926-27)].

2

[Oriental Archaeology 27: Egyptian Archaeology (1928)].

2

[Anthropology 2: Prehistoric Archaeology of Europe (1929)].

2

[Anthropology 7: The Ethnology of the American Indian (1929)].

2

[Geology 14: The Methods and Object of Geological Science (1929-30)].

2

[Unidentified Notes (1929)].

2

[Abstract of PhD Dissertation (1931)].

2

Personal.

Box

[Personal].

2

[Miscellaneous].

2

Helen E. Fernald papers

0025

Helen E. Fernald papers

0025

Helen E. Fernald papers

0025

Helen E. Fernald papers

0025

Helen E. Fernald papers

0025

Helen E. Fernald papers

0025

Helen E. Fernald papers

0025

Helen E. Fernald papers

0025

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the University of Pennsylvania. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Fernald, Helen E., 1921-1964
Title:
Helen E. Fernald papers
Date [bulk]:
1921-1935
Date [inclusive]:
1921-1937
Call Number:
0025
Extent:
0.8 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Helen E. Fernald was employed at The University Museum from 1921-1935 as the head of the Educational Department from 1921-25, was the Assistant Curator of Far Eastern Art from 1925-30, and the Curator from 1930-35. Fernald’s first trip abroad for the museum was in the summer of 1928 to study in the museums and private collections of Far Eastern art in Paris and at the British Museum in London. Her second trip was from June – December of 1929 to Japan, Korea, and China to study collections or conduct scientific researches. Her trips were a success, having brought back many artifacts from the Far East such as bronzes, sculptures, porcelains, etc. The Helen E. Fernald papers consist of eleven folders in two archival boxes of correspondence.
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967
Title:
J. Alden Mason American Section records
Date [bulk]:
1924-1964
Date [inclusive]:
1898-1968
Call Number:
0048
Extent:
1.2 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
J. Alden Mason, noted archaeological anthropologist and linguist, was born in Orland, Indiana and attended school in Philadelphia attaining his A.B. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1907. He pursued his Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley completing his dissertation on the ethnography of the Salinan Indians of California. Mason was influenced by Alfred J. Kroeber while at Berkeley and Edward Sapir of the University of Pennsylvania. The J. Alden Mason curatorial years (1922-1967) produced three archival boxes of correspondence and in-house memos, along with Section reports, research notes and articles and notes for publication. This material, in addition to personal records of Dr. Mason and evidence of his scholarship were arranged into series and placed in chronological order.
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Umlauff, J.F.G
Title:
J. F. G. Umlauff
Date [inclusive]:
1912-1933
Call Number:
1157
Extent:
1.5 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
J.F.G. Umlauff of Germany sold this collection to Gordon of the Penn Museum in the 1910s and 1920s. Gordon expressed interest in this collection as he sought African and Oceanian specimens for the Penn Museum, artifacts from a location they previously possessed very few. J.F.G. Umlauff lived from 1833-1889 and owned a German ethnographic and artifact firm that was established in 1868 and flourished for more than a century, closing not until 1974. The firm was managed by J.F.G. Umlauff until his death, at which time the firm was taken over by his son Johannes Umlauff. The firm was still operated by J.F.G. Umlauff when he sold several African and Oceanian specimens to Gordon. The collection can still be found in the Penn Museum and is now organized into 3 separate series – correspondence, catalogues, and albums. The correspondence section consists of letters between Umlauff and Gordon, the catalogues section is comprised of many lists of the specimens Umlauff sold to Gordon and, finally, the album section consists of many photos of the artifacts sold. Overall, this collection remains important since it marks the first time the Penn Museum truly expressed interest and acquired many “primitive” African and Oceanian artifacts.
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Rowe, Alan, 1892-1968
Title:
Meydum, Egypt expedition records
Date [inclusive]:
1929-1933
Call Number:
1013
Extent:
5.6 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Alan Rowe, born in Hornchurch, Essex, England in 1891, spent his life not only in his homeland but in Australia, Egypt, Palestine and Libya in pursuit of the study of Egyptology. He excavated with C.S. Fisher at Beth Shan and George Reisner at Giza before serving as Field Director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum Expedition to Meydum, Egypt. The Meydum, Egypt Expedition records consist of eight archival boxes of records plus photographs and plans housed separately. The object registers are placed with the oversized materials.
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Title:
Nuzi, Iraq expedition records
Date [bulk]:
1929-1940
Date [inclusive]:
1925-1942
Call Number:
1019
Extent:
0.28 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
The Harvard-Baghdad School Expedition (American Schools of Oriental Research, A.S.O.R) was sent to Excavate Nuzi near Kirkuk in Iraq. The expedition members consisted of staff from the Fogg Museum of Art, the Harvard Semitic Museum, and A.S.O.R., Baghad. Excavations commenced in 1927-1928. From 1929 to 1931, the University Museum extended financial aid and the services of a helper, C.Bache, in return for his field training. Very few records pertaining to this excavation are available in the Museum’s Archives, probably reflecting the Museum’s limited participation. Where possible, a chronological order was imposed on the Near East records.
Cite as:
[Item name]. Box [Box number]. Nuzi, Iraq expedition records. Penn Museum Archives. Accessed [Date accessed].
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Burkitt, Robert James, 1869-1945
Title:
Robert Burkitt expedition records
Date [bulk]:
1913-1930
Date [inclusive]:
1903-1939
Call Number:
1102
Extent:
1.4 Linear feet ()
Language:
English
Container:
2
Abstract:
Robert Burkitt lived and worked in Guatemala for most of his life. A graduate of Harvard University, he first traveled to Central America in 1894 with George Gordon as Gordon's assistant on the Fourth Coban Expedition. Burkitt became enamored with the culture and language of the Maya and never returned to North America. He traveled the countryside, corresponding with Gordon, and collecting items for the Museum under a loosely binding agreement with Gordon and later Horace Jayne. Burkitt's letters and catalogues are rich documents depicting the cultural, linguistic, topological, and historical features of the Guatemala Highlands. Burkitt wrote and worked from the areas of Chama, Chipal, Coban, Senahu, Chiantla, Chocola, and other areas of the Alta Verapaz region. He produced a detailed catalogue of his discoveries accompanied by photgraphs and drawings. Among Burkitt's discoveries is the Ratinixul Vase unearthed in 1923. His work was published in the Museum Journal in 1924 and 1930. Burkitt also wrote about the languages of the Maya, leaving an unfinished grammar and dictionary of the Kekchi language at his death in 1945.
Cite as:
[Item name]. Box [Box number]. Robert Burkitt excavation records. Penn Museum Archives. Accessed [Date accessed].
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927
Creator:
Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
Creator:
Legrain, Leon, 1878-1962
Title:
Ur, Iraq expedition records
Date [bulk]:
1922-1934
Date [inclusive]:
1920-1976
Call Number:
1018
Extent:
3.85 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Sir Leonard Woolley directed the excavations at Ur in southern Iraq from 1922 to 1934 for the Joint Expedition of the British Museum and the University of Pennsylvania Museum. As part of this involvement, the University of Pennsylvania Museum sent Leon Legrain, Curator of the Babylonian Section, during the 1924–1925 and 1925–1926 seasons. Most of the records of the Ur expedition are located at the British Museum. The Museum Archives hold only a few records. The records consist of general correspondence, indexes and catalogs, publications, and Legrain research. Where possible, a chronological order was imposed on the Near East records.
Cite as:
[Item name]. Box [Box number]. Ur, Iraq expedition records. Penn Museum Archives. Accessed [Date accessed].
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Fewkes, Vladimir
Title:
Vladimir Fewkes papers
Date [inclusive]:
1921-1962
Call Number:
1058
Extent:
1.5 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Vladimir Jaroslav Fewkes was born in Czechoslovakia on March 23, 1901. He arrived in Philadelphia in 1921. In 1926 the Wharton School awarded Fewkes a B.S. degree; he then went on to achieve a M.A. in 1928 and a Ph.D. in 1930. During most of his graduate study, he was an Instructor in the Anthropology department, and a research associate in the University Museum. He has conducted field work in Prague, the Danube Valley and Yugoslavia. The textual records from the personal papers of Vladimir J. Fewkes consist of 1.5 linear feet of correspondence, fieldwork and research notes and catalogues, published and unpublished writings, and school notes.
Cite as:
[Item name]. Box [Box number]. Vladmir Fewkes papers. Penn Museum Archives. Accessed [Date accessed].
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Biography/History

Helen Elizabeth Fernald was born in 1891 in Baltimore, Maryland and died in 1964. Fernald attended high school in Amherst, Massachusetts where she graduated in 1910. Going on to receive her A.B. from Mount Holyoke in South Hadley, MA in 1914, Fernald was both an O.B.K. and Mary Lyon Scholar in Art and Archeology in Zoology. After graduation, Fernald attended art school at the Art Students League in New York City, from 1914-1915. While attending art school, Fernald worked as an artist and technician in the Department of Zoology at Columbia University. This position was held for three years, from 1915-1918. During this time, Fernald did her graduate work at Columbia Teachers’ College from 1916-1918. Then, from 1918-1921, Fernald became both an Instructor and Demonstrator in History of Art at Bryn Mawr College. During her three years at Bryn Mawr from 1918-1921, Fernald also did graduate work at the institution.

From 1921-1935 Fernald was an employee of The University Museum in Philadelphia, PA. From 1921-1925, she was the head of the Educational Department. From 1925-1930, Fernald was the Assistant Curator of Far Eastern Art and from 1930-1935, she was the Curator.

In the summer of 1921, Fernald traveled abroad to Italy, Switzerland, France, and England. Because of this, she was unable to start her new position at The University Museum until September as head docent. Much of her time was spent looking for Far Eastern art pieces for the museum’s collection. Once Fernald became the Assistant Curator of Far Eastern Art, she was sent to study in Museums and Private Collections in Paris, at the British Museum in London and attended the International Congress of Oriental Societies at Oxford in 1928. Fernald’s time was spent looking at collections, lecturing and writing. At this time, Fernald was a member of both the American Oriental Society and the Philadelphia Art Alliance. During this time in Paris, Fernald was searching for frescoes and visited many private collections, especially the collection of Mr. C.T. Loo. In April of 1929, Fernald was approved to go to China, and so, from June-December of 1929, she was sent by the museum to Japan, Korea, and China to study collections or conduct scientific research. Despite the summer heat, Fernald managed to have a successful trip for the museum.

From 1932-1935, Fernald taught two courses at the museum: Series of seven Round Table Talks and Chinese Painting Seminar as well as teaching 23 lectures illustrated with lantern slides, called “Talks on Art Appreciation and History.” Upon leaving the museum in 1935, Fernald set out for Orlando, Florida where she corresponded with the museum sparingly for the next two years.

Fernald was most known for being a writer, art educator, painter, and lecturer and is remembered by numerous publications in The Museum Journal, various newspaper articles and reviews, lectures, and several books.

Biography/History

J. Alden Mason, noted archaeological anthropologist and linguist, was born in Orland, Indiana and attended school in Philadelphia attaining his A.B. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1907. He pursued his Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley completing his dissertation on the ethnography of the Salinan Indians of California. Mason was influenced by Alfred J. Kroeber while at Berkeley and Edward Sapir of the University of Pennsylvania. Following the completion of his Ph.D., Mason was chosen to represent the state of Pennsylvania for two seasons in Mexico at the International School of Archaeology and Ethnology, a joint enterprise between Mexico and the United States. He then spent more than a year in Puerto Rico recording folktales in original dialects. His association with the International School of Archaeology and Ethnology brought him into close contact with Franz Boas of Columbia University.

In 1914, Mason traveled to Puerto Rico to learn about the folktales of the native people. He visited Utuado, Coamo, San German, and Loiza and transcribed in the local dialect various tales, poetry, and some music. His field notebooks contain the names of the storytellers along with brief comments from Mason about their appearance, dialect, or diction. Some of these stories, songs, and poems have been transcribed and published. Wax recordings of the material exist at the Research Center in Anthropology, Folklore and Linguistics at the University of Indiana. Several stories were translated and sent to Mason's daughter, Kathy.

Mason's curatorial career began in 1917 as an Assistant Curator of Mexican and South American Archaeology at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. He married Florence Roberts in 1921. Mason remained at the Field Museum until 1924 when he assumed an Assistant Curator position at the American Museum of Natural History. Mason held this position briefly as he moved to The University Museum at the University of Pennsylvania as Curator in 1925. He gave 25 years of service to the Museum, becoming Emeritus Curator of the American Indian Section in 1955.

Collections added during the Mason curatorial years include the remarkable gold objects from Cocle, Panama; the Piedras Negras expeditions; Shotridge's Northwest Coast collections; the vast Academy of Natural Sciences collections including the pre-1879 Haldeman and the large Gottschall Collections, originally loaned but then acquired in exchange; Frank Speck collections from eastern Canada; the large and meticulously documented Osborne (Guatemalan textiles) and Stephens (North American ethnographic) collections; various Colombian and Panamanian gold collections and the Mayer Brazilian, Broad Costa Rican, and Monday Mexican archaeological collections; and jade Northwest Coast objects from Emmons.

Mason published regularly in The Museum Journal, Journal of American Folklore, International Journal of American Linguistics, and American Anthropologist, serving as editor of American Anthropologist from 1945 to 1948. His published works included "The Language of the Papago Indians" and "The Languages of the South American Indians" among others.

In addition to linguistics, Mason developed wide interests in his fieldwork including archaeology, ethnology, and folklore, particularly from Latin America. After 1916, he focused on the Uto-Aztecan languages of northern Mexico and the southwestern part of the United States. He also worked in four eastern states in the United States, and Puerto Rico, Colombia, Panama, and Guatemala. He was Field Director of the first Eldridge R. Johnson Piedras Negras Expedition returning with "Lintel 3" a Maya carved stone wall-panel on loan to the Penn Museum from 1931 to 1946 and stone stelae dating to A.D. 514.

When Mason retired from the museum in 1955, he continued his contributions including a dig at Chiapas, Mexico in 1958 while serving as Editor and Archaeological Advisor to the New World Archaeology Foundation. Mason held this post until his death in 1967.

Biography/History

Objects from Africa and Oceania were at first overlooked by the Penn Museum. Africa, for example, was not in the minds of prominent Philadelphians who met in 1887 and contributed funds to establish the institution that would one day become The University Museum of the University of Pennsylvania. This changed, however, with the arrival of new museum director George Byron Gordon in 1910. Gordon quickly displayed interest in so-called “primitive” artifacts from Oldman, who shipped many Oceanian specimens, and J.F.G. Umlauff, a German with his own firm in Hamburg, Umlauff’s firm promoted its stock by sending museums its catalogues and photographs, which often showed its rooms absolutely crammed with African and Oceanian art. The firm was established by the patriarch of the Umlauff family, Johann Friedrich Gustav Umlauff (1833-89), and it was managed by his sons after his death (Thode-Arora 1992). The firm was officially founded in 1868 and it flourished for more than a century, closing shop only in 1974. The founder, Johann Gustav Umlauff, was originally a ship’s carpenter but in 1859 he purchased a bathhouse in Hamburg near the harbor, selling curios from overseas on the side. Later, Umlauff married a sister of the wild-animal dealer Carl Hagenbeck. Umlauff purchased a number of collections from Hagenbeck and from other prominent German collectors and dealers. Umlauff essentially profited from the substantial ethonographical “leftovers” as Hagenbeck branched out in the mid-1870s to what he named anthropological-zoological exhibitions, shows of exotic performers with their animals from overseas. J.F.G. Umlauff of Hamburg ultimately became Germany’s foremost dealer in natural history specimens and cultural objects. The Umlauffs not only bought various ethnographic objects and naturalia but also sold their possessions to many museums. The Penn Museum today still has some of these early African and Oceanian artifacts from the Umlauff firm in Hamburg.

Biography/History

Alan Rowe, born in Hornchurch, Essex, England in 1891 spent his life not only in his homeland but in Australia, Egypt, Palestine and Libya in pursuit of the study of Egyptology. Rowe was introduced to Egypt as a child when he was captivated by the collection of antiquities at the Whitechapel Museum. He was employed initially as a journalist and emigrated to Australia where he volunteered in Museums and gave lectures in history at the University of Adelaide.

Rowe's first field work came as an assistant to C.S.Fisher on the 1922 expedition to Palestine (Beth Shan). Following this experience, Rowe served as the chief archaeological assistant to George Reisner on the joint Harvard-Boston Museum of Fine Art expedition to Giza. While Reisner was away in America, Rowe discovered the tomb of Hetep-heres, a discovery of great import. Rowe continued to work on other sites in Egypt including Meydum for the University of Pennsylvania Museum and the minor site of Gezer. He was appointed curator of the Graeco-Roman Museum in Alexandria where he served from 1940 to 1949. During WWII, Rowe twice reported on the state of the monuments in Cyrenaica to the British War Office in Cairo.

Rowe turned to academia in 1950, working as a special lecturer in Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Manchester until 1952. His last four expeditions were to the tombs and cemeteries in Cyrene.

Rowe published several books and many articles based on his work. Unfortunately, he was unable to find a publisher for his Meydum manuscript, a goal he pursued until 1955.

Biography/History

The Harvard-Baghdad School Expedition (American Schools of Oriental Research, A.S.O.R) was sent to Excavate Nuzi near Kirkuk in Iraq. The expedition members consisted of staff from the Fogg Museum of Art, the Harvard Semitic Museum, and A.S.O.R., Baghad. Excavations commenced in 1927-1928, and were directed that season by E. Chiera (Professor of Assriology at the University of Pennsylvania and Field Director at A.S.O.R., Baghdad) who, in 1925, had excavated portions of the small mounds there (c.f. the Photograph Album Nuzi, 1925: Fieldnotes). Pfeiffer (Harvard University) resumed the work for the next season, 1928-1929. For the following two seasons, 1929 to 1931, R.F.S. Starr (Fogg Museum of Art) continued excavation as director. During this period, the University Museum extented financial aid and the services of a helper, C. Bache, in return for his field training.

Biography/History

Robert James Burkitt, born on January 18, 1869 in Athenry, County Galway, Ireland, was the son of Reverend Thomas Henry Burkitt and Emma Eliza Parsons. At age 14, due to economic conditions, he was sent to live with an aunt in Nova Scotia where he attended Dalhousie College. Burkitt took honors in mathematics there and enrolled at Harvard University to study mining. While he was known as a recluse among the Harvard students, Burkitt developed a friendship with George Byron Gordon based on their shared interests in engineering and their talents in drafting and art. Burkitt received his A.B. from Harvard in 1891.

Burkitt first traveled to Guatemala in 1894 as George Gordon's assistant on the Fourth Copan Expedition. In the five months of the expedition, Gordon instructed Burkitt in the basics of excavation. Gordon returned to Cambridge when the excavation was completed, but it is believed that Burkitt never returned to North America, becoming enamored of the culture and language of the Maya. In his early years in Guatemala, Burkitt visited the Kekchi-speaking Maya who lived in the Alta Verapaz. He wandered the countryside, visiting the Indian villages, learning the different languages and customs of the native people, and following native guides to sacred ruins. Burkitt never established a permanent residence in Guatemala, living with one group of friends or another. He rented an apartment in Guatemala City when business took him there, under his pseudonym, Mr. Brown.

Burkitt maintained a sporadic correspondence with his friend George Gordon who by 1910 was Director of the Free Museum of Science and Art (later renamed The University Museum). Burkitt had attained some recognition for articles on linguistics, "Notes on the Kekchi Language" having been published in American Anthropologist. Burkitt and Gordon entered into an agreement whereby Burkitt would devote a portion of each year to exploring and acquiring artifacts for the Museum for a monthly fee plus expenses. This agreement stood for many years despite attempts to get Burkitt to sign contracts and make changes to his highly eccentric style of work. Burkitt could be critical and prickly in his correspondence especially opinionated about the work of others on the Indian language and changes to his material when published.

Burkitt's letters and his Catalogue never fail to contain information on the folklore, ritual, crafts, and language of the Maya. The collection contains regular correspondence with George Gordon until Gordon's death in 1927. Burkitt then kept the Museum apprised of his exploits through letters to Miss McHugh, the Treasurer. When Horace H.F. Jayne took over as Director, Burkitt communicated with him. In addition to letters and records relating to shipments to the Museum, Burkitt kept extensive catalogue entries for each item accompanied by references to geography and the excavation process connected to their discovery. Photographs depict the sites, stages of excavation, and objects discovered. Many of the pictures are mounted by Burkitt. His own discoveries are accompanied by photographs of items purchased from collectors.

Burkitt discovered The Ratinlixul Vase, recovered in 1923. His works, published in the Museum Journal, included "A Journey in Northern Guatemala" in 1924 and "Excavations at Chocola and Explorations in the Highlands of Western Guatemala" in 1930.

Burkitt's interest in linguistics was ever present. He worked for many years on a grammar and dictionary of the Kekchi language; "investigating grammar in my own way". This work was not completed when he suffered a fatal stroke in 1945. Burkitt's papers were thought to be lost until Elin Danien, then Coordinator of Museum Events, visited Guatemala in 1985. Danien contacted relatives of Kensett Champney, a friend with whom Burkitt lived, and discovered that some early notebooks were indeed still in the family's possession.

Burkitt is buried in the British Cemetery in Guatemala City.

Biography/History

Sir Leonard Woolley directed the excavations at Ur in southern Iraq from 1922 to 1934 for the Joint Expedition of the British Museum and the University of Pennsylvania Museum. As part of this involvement, the University of Pennsylvania Museum sent Leon Legrain, Curator of the Babylonian Section, as a cuneiformist during the 1924–1925 and 1925–1926 seasons. Most of the records of the Ur expedition are located at the British Museum. The Museum Archives hold only a few records.

Biography/History

Vladimir Jaroslav Fewkes was born to a prominent family in Nymburk, Czechoslovakia on March 23, 1901. He arrived in Philadelphia in 1921. He spent ten months with two families, doing domestic work and learning English. Within a few years, he mastered English without a trace of accent, and was said to have had a scientific knowledge of fifteen European languages and a conversational knowledge of twelve. He paid his way through the University of Pennsylvania by working in hotels, clubs, and cafés. The Wharton School awarded Fewkes a Bachelor of Science degree in 1926; he then went on to achieve a Master of Arts degree in Anthropology in 1928 and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in 1930. During most of his five years of graduate study, he was an Assistant or Instructor in the Anthropology department, and thereafter a research associate in the University Museum. Between 1927-1937, he studied extensively the archaeology of Central Europe, using the earlier results as a basis for his dissertation. In 1927 he was named fellow at the American School for Prehistoric Research, and in 1928-1929 he did special work at Charles University in Prague. During the summer seasons of 1929-1931 he conducted a joint expedition in the Danube Valley for the University Museum and Harvard’s Peabody Museum, mostly at a late Neolithic village (dated circa 2000 B.C.) called Homolka. In 1931, he did archaeological reconnaissance of Yugoslavia, and in 1932 he headed the joint expedition of the Peabody Museum, the American School of Prehistoric Research, and the Fogg Museum of Art to Serbia. There he helped unearth painted pottery at Starčevo, a site belonging to the earliest farming and pottery-making phase of the Eastern European Neolithic dating back to the fourth millenium B.C. Until 1937 he was associate with the Peabody Museum, working on material obtained on expeditions to Central Europe. He was also associated with the American School of Prehistoric Research: as Associate Director from 1932-1937 and as Acting Director in 1938. During these years he directed its summer school at his excavations in Central Europe.

From the very beginning of Fewkes’s career in anthropological study he became interested in the problems of American archaeology. In 1929 he began cataloguing and revising archaeological collections in the New Jersey State Museum in preparation to open a new museum building. Despite his short stay of only a few months, Fewkes was undoubtedly the inspiration for the New Jersey Works Progress Administration (WPA) Indian Site Survey Project as well as the formation of the Archaeological Society of New Jersey. From 1937-1938, he superintended excavations at Irene Mound near Savannah, Georgia, a WPA project sponsored by the Savannah Chamber of Commerce. In 1938, he returned to Philadelphia to supervise a WPA project at the University Museum, where at first he was responsible for bibliographical research in ceramics, but later took over the ceramic technology laboratory, where he could focus on the technological problems that had always been his main interest (see separate finding aid for the records of the WPA-sponsored ceramics technology laboratory). In his later years he specialized in ceramic technology in which he performed long series of experiments and researches into the technical and chemical problems of pottery making, particularly in Catawba (which he wrote about in “Catawba Pottery Making”). Fewkes also held the distinguished position of chairman of the Committee on Ceramic Terminology and Classification (in the Society of American Archaeology).

Despite Fewkes’s successes in America, he received more honors by far in Central Europe. He was an honorary member of three Yugoslav, one Hungarian, and three American scientific societies; and a fellow, correspondent, or research associate of ten Czechoslovakian and three Yugoslav museums and institutes. He was awarded the White Lion of Czechoslovakia and was the only archaeologist to hold the Royal Crown of Yugoslavia. Prague’s Charles University and the University of Belgrade each awarded him an honorary degree. He was a member of most local and national American anthropological and archaeological organizations, a member of Sigma Xi, and was a contributing editor to the American Journal of Archaeology and to several scientific journals in Central Europe.

Fewkes was said to be an amiable man who made friends easily and enjoyed collecting coins, art work, and rare books. Sadly, his days of revelry took quite a toll on his liver and other vital organs which lead to his untimely death in 1941 at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital.

Much of this information was obtained from an obituary written by J. Alden Mason. Please see Fewkes’ biography file for the original.

Scope and Contents

The Helen E. Fernald papers consist of two archival boxes of textual material of 0.8 linear feet. These boxes make of one series: correspondence, which are contained in eleven folders. The records have been compiled to and from Helen E. Fernald in chronological order.

The correspondence, dated from 1921-1937, consist primarily of letters to and from Helen E. Fernald regarding collections, lectures Fernald taught, articles she published, and her day-to-day activity while abroad as well as statements of expense accounts and receipts from abroad.

Scope and Contents

John Alden Mason was hired from the Field Museum of Natural History, and his tenure (1926-1955) is well-documented, including a large professional correspondence with geographical subdivisions, offerings of collections (also geographically organized), in-house memos, a set of notebooks (1922-1952), lecture notes and bibliographies, and a long-term file on his lifelong interest in American rock art. Mason made 22 expeditions of varying scope during his active curatorship and his scholarly and field activities completely encompassed the Americas. Materials on his pre-1926 activities include the 1909 expedition for the Museum, 1913 Great Slave notes later published by Yale, 1914 Puerto Rican work for Columbia, Tepecano linguistics in west Mexico, and Santa Marta excavations for the Field Museum in Colombia. The bulk of Mason's correspondence and his linguistic fieldnotes were transferred to the American Philosophical Society on his death, and his library was sold to Southern Illinois University during his lifetime. He remained active as Emeritus Curator up to his death in 1967.

American Section files were unarranged when transferred to the Archives. Curatorial files have been subdivided into "curatorial" proper as a sub-series (arranged,in general, "chronologically" by holders of assistant curatorships); an "exchanges, loans, deaccessions and thefts" sub-series, grouping documents on the movements of American objects (to be used in connection with the records of the Registrar's Office, established in 1929); an "inventories" sub-series containing various topical and other lists of objects in the American collections; a "collectors and collections" sub-series arranged alphabetically (includes Heye and a separate alphabetical list for Alaska) by the name of the donor or seller or title of collection; and a "general administration" sub-series encompassing index cards, exhibit labels, various American Section reports starting with Mercer, documents on American topics with no discernible connection, miscellaneous financial transactions, etc.

The J. Alden Mason curatorial years (1922-1967) produced three archival boxes of correspondence and in-house memos, along with Section reports, research notes and articles and notes for publication. This material, in addition to personal records of Dr. Mason and evidence of his scholarship were arranged into series and placed in chronological order.

The Correspondence series is divided into location specific writings and notes and in-house materials with specific sections devoted to J. Alden Mason's trips to Central America and Guatemala. Correspondence with specific scholars/excavators are contained in their own folders and include Robert Zingg, Anna O. shepard, George S. Fisher. Letters relating to collections offered to the Museum, proposals for reseach and professional contacts of Dr. Mason complete the series.

The highlights of the Research series are notes related to specific excavations or museum objects, for example, the Walum Olum and petroglyphs.

The Personal series provides a window into Mason's years as a graduate student and his trip to Europe in 1924.

Added to this collection are a group of small collections sent to the museum or to Mason personally. This series is filed in Box 14.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of three series – correspondence, catalogues, and albums – which involve the exchange of African and Oceanian artifacts from J.F.G. Umluff in Germany to George B. Gordon of the Penn Museum. This transfer occurred during the years 1912-1943, with most of the activity happening between 1912 and 1932. This deal between Gordon and Umlauff was significant because it marked one of the first times the Penn Museum showed interest and acquired “primitive” artifacts from Africa and Oceania. Overall, this collection is compiled to reflect this historic meeting between Gordon and Umlauff. The first aspect of the collection is the correspondence section, which is comprised of many letters and notes that track the exchange between Gordon and Umlauff. The next section of the collection is the catalogues, which consists of many lists containing item inventory that is being interchanged. Lastly, the final section is albums, which consists of the very photos and albums which were sold from the Umlauff firm in Germany to Gordon’s Penn Museum. These three sections – the correspondence, catalogues, and albums – comprise this collection and reveal the history of Umlauff and Gordon’s exchange. The first section in the collection is correspondence, which consists of a series of letters written between Gordon and Umlauff discussing their future sale. The dates of the letters are between 1912 and 1943, with the majority being between 1912 and 1933 and many concentrated in 1912 alone. The letters in the collection are all from J.F.G. Umlauff writing to Gordon; the letters written from Gordon to Umlauff are in another collection. Most of the letters express Umlauff’s desire for Gordon to pay for the items he has bought; he requests invoices and various other methods to get Gordon to begin to purchase the items he has bought. There are also many telegrams and some withdrawal sheets with similar purposes. Overall, this section is mainly concerned with letters written from Umlauff to Gordon with the interest of facilitating their transactions. The second series in this collection is catalogues, which consists of numerous lists of the artifact inventory that Umlauff sold to Gordon. There are essentially two separate lists which comprise the catalogue section: numbered lists and non-numbered lists which are instead labeled by various island groups. The numbered group list runs from 1-40; however, not all lists are present. These lists also have titles, which are locations from various places in Africa and Oceania. Likewise, the non-numbered lists are labeled by location names. Lastly, the final series in the collection is albums. This section is comprised of various albums of the actual artifacts – primarily photos – that Umlauff sold to Gordon. These photos are separated by region in separate albums. As in the lists, the albums are separated primarily into regions and islands in Africa and Oceania, respectively.

Scope and Contents

Alan Rowe, born in Hornchurch, Essex, England in 1891 spent his life not only in his homeland but in Australia, Egypt, Palestine and Libya in pursuit of the study of Egyptology. He excavated with C.S. Fisher at Beth Shan and George Reisner at Giza before serving as Field Director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum Expedition to Meydum, Egypt.

In addition to his expeditions, Rowe lectured in history at the University of Adelaide, Australia and in Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Manchester.

The Meydum, Egypt Expedition records consist of twelve archival boxes plus oversize materials. The majority consist of correspondence, reports, and preparation for publication. The collection is divided into twelve series. In addition to the correspondence, field reports, notebooks and publication materials are financial reoords, various lists and photographs. The group is completed by other graphic materials such as plans, maps and squeezes.

The records had been reviewed and box lists made prior to processing. The order of the records was largely maintained with re-organization of some of the correspondence and publication records needed for clarity. For example, many of the communications with Museum Director Horace Jayne were interspersed with materials from other series.

Rowe detailed his work in lengthy letters to Horace Jayne and former director Battiscombe Gunn, in field notebooks and diaries. He wrote often to his researchers to obtain information about translations, grafitti and coins. The materials are rich in information. He maintained typed copies of much of the research findings for publication purposes. Additional communications with Battiscombe Gunn are found in the publications series.

Rowe displayed his photographs in three hardback albums with a corresponding register and indexes by year. The large groups of plans and maps reflect Rowe's prganization by publication volume, topography, location, structure and/or type of find.

Scope and Contents

Where possible, a chronological order was imposed on the Near East records. Photographs were retained with the documents when they directly referred to content. Otherwise, the photographic collections hold material relating to excavations, objects, and travel photographs (see inventory). Large maps and drawings, when available are kept in the Oversize collections, and watercolors, small prints and drawings are in the Print Cabinet (see inventories).

Scope and Contents

The Robert Burkitt Excavation Records consist of 1.4 linear feet of correspondence, catalogues and reports, photographs, and notes and studies on the collection. The records have been compiled from the material sent to the Museum by Robert Burkitt from his exploration and excavations in Guatemala during the years 1913 through 1939 and the work on the collection by J. Alden Mason. Notes on the collection by William R. Coe comment on Burkitt and the work of Mary Butler, an expert on the pottery of the region. Studies of the collection by students of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania are also included.

The correspondence from Burkitt to the Museum is arranged chronologically. His catalogue and reports contain catalogue numbers that are not chronological but are referenced to his letters. The photographs, numbered from 101 to 326 then 804 to 807 were divided into folders using the numbers. Mason's notes are undated but those from William R.Coe date from 1953. The studies on the collection are from 1977 and 1978. Mason's notes were divided into three folders, a notebook, a chart and chart notes, and notes on Chama. Coe's material was also divided into folders of notes, photographs, and drawings.

The correspondence series reflects Burkitt's tendency to write infrequently, mostly to his friend George Gordon, and with a great attention to detail. Some letters are very long and contain information on his travels in the area. Burkitt included drawings and comments on the existing maps of the areas. Political commentary is sometimes included and Burkitt shows worries about the security of the mail to and from the museum. At times, the letters are lists of objects being sent to the museum, lists of expenses, and shipping information. Communications are written from Coban, Senahu, San Cristobal, Chiantla, Verapaz and the ruins near Chipal. Later letters come from Ciudad Guatemala and Belize.

The letters from the period 1924 to 1926 are sometimes accompanied by responses from George Gordon which have been photocopied from Gordon's collection of letters. (see Letters G.B. Gordon-Burkitt, Special Collections, Bound Volumes, Letterbooks, G.B. Gordon).

A separate folder was created for one correspondence from Robert Burkitt's father, J.H. Burkitt, to the Museum dated 1915. Reverend Burkitt sought information about the whereabouts of his son. The Catalogues and Reports of the Robert Burkitt excavation records contain descriptions of all of the items sent to the Museum from the Guatemala sites. All entries in this folder are hand-written in phonetic English. The notes are in good condition and accompanied by small, exquisite drawings of the items. Divided into three columns on each page, the first column contains the number assigned by the museum, the second, the number of the item assigned by Burkitt in numerical order, and the third a description of the item. The first portion of the catalogue consists mostly of pottery. Burkitt often writes several pages of information about an object or region.

Burkitt's later entries are type-written in the same phonetic style. For these entries, Burkitt makes use of hand-drawn maps of the area showing the arrangement of the mounds and graves in it. He includes rubbings of fragments, carvings, and pots found. Burkitt refers to the number of the photograph in the collection which corresponds to the item of the dig.

The original photographs of Robert Burkitt are contained in envelopes or mounted by Burkitt on heavy paper with notes and encased in mylar. Pictures of the objects are usually mounted. Burkitt meticulously referenced the photos to the text of the catalogue. In addition, the negative numbers are provided on the back of many photographs. The photographs depict the regions of Chocola, Kixpek, Ratinixul, Belize, Quatsoltenango, San Vicente, El Castillo, Alta Verapaz, Aintun, the Sayte River region, Coban, Xolchun, and Kuchumata, among others. In addition to objects found by Burkitt, there are also photographs of items from the Kanter Collection, part of another "private collection in Polo Gordo", and the collection of Henry Kummerfeldt.

Four folders contain photographs related to Burkitt's correspondence with George Gordon in July, October, and November 1913. One folder of these photographs is undated. Material published in the Museum Journal in 1918 and 1930 are contained in a separate folder, with negatives for only a few. The negatives, in envelopes, may reflect a need for conservation assessment.

Notes and Studies on the Collection are contained in eight folders. The material reflects comments and charts by J. Alden Mason and notes from William Coe. Coe's notes notes relate not only to Burkitt but also to Mary Butler, a research associate at the University of Pennsylvania who was an expert on the pottery of the Maya Indians of Guatemala. The mounted drawings of pottery included with this series are believed to be part of Mary Butler's work. Many of the drawings are numbered and are from Chipal and Chama. A separate "analysis" of a "small tubular object"(# 11258) by A.E.Parkinson is also contained with the series on notes and studies.

The series also contains hand-written course notes and papers written by students for the class, "W. Coe Anthropology Class: Studies of Burkitt and Butler". The papers deal with the sites at Tambor, Kixpek, Chama, Chicun, San Pedro Carcha, and an analysis of Mary Butler's excavations and work in Guatemala. Site diagrams are present for the San Pedro Carcha area.

Scope and Contents

The records consist of general correspondence, indexes and catalogs, publications, and Legrain research. Most of the correspondence appears to be letters and reports exchanged between the Director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum (1922–1927, G. B. Gordon; 1928, J. McHugh, Secretary; and 1929–1933 H. H. F. Jayne) and F. Kenyon, the Director of the British Museum, and Woolley. Indexes include a field photograph catalog covering the twelve seasons of work as well as typewritten copy of the field object catalog (with Museum object numbers annotated in red ink). The publications series holds correspondence, notes, drafts, photographs, and manuscripts pertaining to the volumes of the publications of the Ur Excavations (Volumes III, IV, VI, VII, and X). The Archives holds other records relating to Ur which may be unpublished, these have been placed in a separate series: Legrain Research. The Near East Section curatorial records and the Directors' correspondence (Jayne to British Museum, 1925–1940) contain related material.

Where possible, a chronological order was imposed on the Near East records. Photographs were retained with the documents when they directly referred to content. Otherwise, the photographic collections hold material related to the excavations, artifacts, and travel photographs (see Standard Size Print collection). Oversize material is housed in the Map Cases and the Print Cabinet depending on size.

Scope and Contents

The textual records from the personal papers of Vladimir J. Fewkes consist of 1.5 linear feet of correspondence, fieldwork and research notes and catalogues, published and unpublished writings, and school notes. The arrangement of the records reflects the major groupings apparent, and has been divided into the following series: alphabetical correspondence, fieldwork and research, other research, writings, education-related papers, and personal papers.

The correspondence is arranged alphabetically by recipient/correspondent. Most of the correspondence is located in this first series; however, expedition-related correspondence can be found at the beginning of each set of excavation records.

The fieldwork and research series is arranged chronologically by site and includes correspondence, field notes and drawings, photographs, financial records, catalogues, and reports. He did extensive research in Central Europe, as well as Works Progress Administration work on the east coast of the United States.

Records pertaining to research that could not be incorporated into the fieldwork and research series were arranged separately in an “other research” series. This includes notes for an apparently unwritten book tentatively entitled Nature, Man, Culture, a collaboration with five other anthropologists (1939); pottery drawings by Sidney Auerbach (1939); and notes on pottery making.

The writings series includes three essays by Vladimir J. Fewkes: “A War Scattered Family” (this one lists an anonymous author but was most likely written by Fewkes), “Delayed But Undismayed,” and a radio talk dated 1930 entitled “The Scope and Task of Archaeology.” This series also includes book reviews that Fewkes wrote for various periodicals, including the American Journal of Archaeology and the Science Service.

The education-related series includes notes from anthropology classes he took while a graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania. Many of the classes he took were taught by Frank G. Speck and Irving A. Hallowell, two founders of the anthropology department at Penn. This series also includes the abstract from his PhD dissertation when he presented it in 1931. A copy of Fewkes' course transcript is available in his biography file, the original of which can be found in the University of Pennsylvania Archives.

Finally, there is a folder which includes some personal effects such as an eyeglass prescription, his wife’s Red Cross card, and photographs of a wooden Madonna and Child. There is also a miscellaneous folder for a few things that did not fit into any of the afore-mentioned categories.

For additional and sometimes overlapping records relating to Fewkes, see also Administrative Records—Works Progress Administration.

The V.J. Fewkes Collection was discovered in the Harrison Auditorium basement and transferred to the archives in 1979. In 1981 it was processed by Trudy Van Houten. The original order of documents within the folders and the original order of the folders themselves were preserved. However, this order in 1979 was most likely not the order in which Fewkes himself had left the records. Therefore, a new, more organized and accessible order has been imposed to facilitate the use of the collection.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  6/27/2012

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  6/19/2015

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  6/20/2013

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  7/25/2016

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  July 2009

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  August 2009

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  August 2009

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  8/2009

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Gina Gariffo

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Bryce Little Jody Rodgers

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Ian Lachow

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Jody Rodgers

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by K. Moreau

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Jody Rodgers

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by K. Moreau

Revision Description

 5/9/13

Revision Description

 2/23/12

Use Restrictions

Although many items from the archives are in the public domain, copyright may be retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law. The user is fully responsible for compliance with relevant copyright law.

Use Restrictions

Although many items from the archives are in the public domain, copyright may be retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law. The user is fully responsible for compliance with relevant copyright law.

Use Restrictions

Although many items from the archives are in the public domain, copyright may be retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law. The user is fully responsible for compliance with relevant copyright law.

Use Restrictions

Although many items from the archives are in the public domain, copyright may be retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law. The user is fully responsible for compliance with relevant copyright law.

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Yamanaka and Co..
Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
Personal Name(s)
  • Bishop, Carl Whiting, b. 1881-d.1942
  • Fernald, Helen E., 1921-1964
  • Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927
  • Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
  • Loo, C.T., b.1880-d.1957
Subject(s)
  • Antiquities
  • Art history

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Controlled Access Headings

Personal Name(s)
  • Butler, Mary, 1903-1970
  • Fisher, George S.
  • Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927
  • Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
  • Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967
  • McHugh, Jane
  • Mercer, Henry C., 1856-1930
  • Shepard, Anna Osler, 1903-1973
  • Uhle, Max, 1856-1944
  • Vaillant, George C., b.1901-d.1945
Subject(s)
  • Anthropological museums and collections
  • Anthropology
  • Archaeological expeditions

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
Geographic Name(s)
  • Solomon Islands
Personal Name(s)
  • Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927
  • Hall, Henry Usher, b. 1876-d. 1944
  • Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
  • Umlauff, J.F.G
  • Umlauff, Johannes , 1874-1951
Subject(s)
  • Anthropology
  • Antiquities
  • Ethnology
  • Maasai (African people)

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Card catalogs
  • Diaries
  • Manuscripts for publication
  • Maps
  • Photographs
Geographic Name(s)
  • Egypt
Personal Name(s)
  • Cerny, Jaroslav, 1898-1970
  • Crum, W.E. (Walter Ewing), 1865-1944
  • FitzGerald, Gerald Milnes, 1882-1978
  • Gunn, Battiscombe G., 1883-1950
  • Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
  • Moss, Rosalind L.B., 1890-1990
  • Reisner, George Andrew, 1867-1942
  • Rowe, Alan, 1892-1968
Subject(s)
  • Archaeology--Burials
  • Plans and drawings

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • American School of Oriental Research in Baghdad.
  • University of Pennsylvania. Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Field notes
  • Photographic prints
Geographic Name(s)
  • Kirkūk (Iraq)
Personal Name(s)
  • Bache, Charles, 1902-1942
  • Chiera, Edward, 1885-1933
  • Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
Subject(s)
  • Antiquities
  • Excavations (Archaeology)

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Card catalogs
  • Correspondence
  • Photographic prints
  • Photographs
Personal Name(s)
  • Burkitt, Robert James, 1869-1945
  • Butler, Mary, 1903-1970
  • Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927
  • Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
Subject(s)
  • Archaeological expeditions
  • Archaeology--History
  • Excavations (Archaeology)
  • Maya language

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Card catalogs
  • Correspondence
Geographic Name(s)
  • Tall al-Muqayyar (deserted settlement)
Personal Name(s)
  • Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927
  • Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
  • Legrain, Leon, 1878-1962
Subject(s)
  • Archaeological expeditions
  • Excavations (Archaeology)

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Faculty papers
Geographic Name(s)
  • Sierra Mound
Personal Name(s)
  • Fewkes, Vladimir
  • Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
Subject(s)
  • American of Prehistoric Research
  • Catawba Indian Nation
  • Ethnology
  • Works Progress Administration

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Collection Inventory

Fernald, Helen Elizabeth, b. 1921-d. 1937. Correspondence, 1921-1937 (Bulk, 1921-1935) .

Biographical/Historical note

Helen Elizabeth Fernald was born in 1891 in Baltimore, Maryland and died in 1964. Fernald attended high school in Amherst, Massachusetts where she graduated in 1910. Going on to receive her A.B. from Mount Holyoke in South Hadley, MA in 1914, Fernald was both an O.B.K. and Mary Lyon Scholar in Art and Archeology in Zoology. After graduation, Fernald attended art school at the Art Students League in New York City, from 1914-1915. While attending art school, Fernald worked as an artist and technician in the Department of Zoology at Columbia University. This position was held for three years, from 1915-1918. During this time, Fernald did her graduate work at Columbia Teachers’ College from 1916-1918. Then, from 1918-1921, Fernald became both an Instructor and Demonstrator in History of Art at Bryn Mawr College. During her three years at Bryn Mawr from 1918-1921, Fernald also did graduate work at the institution.

From 1921-1935 Fernald was an employee of The University Museum in Philadelphia, PA. From 1921-1925, she was the head of the Educational Department. From 1925-1930, Fernald was the Assistant Curator of Far Eastern Art and from 1930-1935, she was the Curator.

In the summer of 1921, Fernald traveled abroad to Italy, Switzerland, France, and England. Because of this, she was unable to start her new position at The University Museum until September as head docent. Much of her time was spent looking for Far Eastern art pieces for the museum’s collection. Once Fernald became the Assistant Curator of Far Eastern Art, she was sent to study in Museums and Private Collections in Paris, at the British Museum in London and attended the International Congress of Oriental Societies at Oxford in 1928. Fernald’s time was spent looking at collections, lecturing and writing. At this time, Fernald was a member of both the American Oriental Society and the Philadelphia Art Alliance. During this time in Paris, Fernald was searching for frescoes and visited many private collections, especially the collection of Mr. C.J. Loo.

In April of 1929, Fernald was approved to go to China, and so, from June-December of 1929, she was sent by the museum to Japan, Korea, and China to study collections or conduct scientific researches. Despite the summer heat, Fernald managed to have a successful trip for the museum.

From 1932-1935, Fernald taught two courses at the museum: Series of seven Round Table Talks and Chinese Painting Seminar as well as teaching 23 lectures illustrated with lantern slides, called “Talks on Art Appreciation and History.” Upon leaving the museum in 1935, Fernald set out for Orlando, Florida where she corresponded with the museum sparingly for the next two years.

Fernald was most known for being a writer, art educator, painter, and lecturer and is remembered by numerous publications in The Museum Journal, various newspaper articles and reviews, lectures, and several books.

Controlled Access Headings
Personal Name(s)
  • Fernald, Helen E., 1921-1964
Box

1921-1926.

1

1927.

1

1928.

1

1929.

1

1930.

1

1931.

1

1932.

1

1933.

2

1934.

2

1935.

2

1929-1937.

2

Collection Inventory

Correspondence, 1926-1958.

Box

North American Curatorial 1926-1955.

12

Middle America Curatorial 1926-1967.

12

South America Curatorial 1926-1955.

12

Collections Offered-Middle America 1928-1958.

12

Collections Offered-South America 1898-1948 (1 of 2).

12

Collections Offered-South America 1898-1948 (2 of 2).

12

Collections Offered-North America 1927-1953.

12

Proposal for founding Institute of Latin American Culture Researches (early 1930s).

Box

In-House Correspondence 1926-1929.

12

In-House Correspondence 1930 (Central America trip).

12

In-House Correspondence 1934-1939.

12

In-House Correspondence 1938 (Guatemala trip).

12

In-House Correspondence 1940-1951.

12

Professional 1926-1958.

12

A.E. Anderson 1934 (Huastecan vessels).

12

Oetteking, Bruno.

12

Anna O. Shepard 1942-1943 (Mexican object in plumbate report).

12

Robert Zingg 1953 (Maya lectures, Mexican codices).

13

Margaret Plass 1955.

13

Shell Heap-Damariscotta, ME 1955.

13

American Section, 1930-1948.

Box

Educational Slide Lectures 1930-1931 (correspondence).

13

Educational Slide Lectures 1930-1931 (drafts and lists).

13

"Value of Some of My Indian Material"-Catalogue of section purchases 1933-1934.

13

Section memos and financial records 1929, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1952.

13

Section Reports 1931,1941-1943 (1 of 2).

13

Section Reports 1931,1941-1943 (2 of 2).

13

Records Placed in Vault 1942.

13

List of Pueblo Bonito sherd lots available-AMNH 1943.

13

Section Reports 1944-1948 (1 of 2).

13

Section Reports 1944-1948 (2 of 2).

13

Research, 1937-1956.

Box

Notes on the Walum Olum.

13

Washington County excavation notes-George S. Fisher 1937.

13

James W. Dickey report on excavation at Tunja and Puerta Servies,Colombia 1937.

13

Proposals for research by members of American section 1939.

13

Notes on Shotridge and Shotridge Collection c.1942.

13

Notes on Eight Chiriqui Whistles 1944.

13

Maya Pottery-list of original drawings 1950.

13

Research on Henry C. Mercer for article-Pennsylvania Archaeologist 1956.

13

S.W. Fernberger Peyote study.

13

Petroglyph Correspondence 1933-1957.

13

Petroglyph Manuscript and notes 1939, 1950.

13

Petroglyph photos and drawings 1914,1936,1942 (1 of 2).

13

Petroglyph photos and drawings 1914,1936,1942 (2 of 2).

Publications, 1927-1955.

Proposed Publications by American Section 1928.

Box

Drafts of Published Articles (n.d.-1927) (1 of 2).

14

Drafts of Published Articles (n.d.-1927) (2 of 2).

14

Personal, 1913-1968.

Box

Mason's class notes and bibliographies as a student 1913-?.

14

Diary of European trip 1924.

14

Notes on American artifacts in European Museums 1924.

14

Lectures and academic record 1925-1964.

14

Bibliography of Mason's writings; list of negatives 1959-1968.

14

Mary Butler's file on Mason, papers, library 1968.

14

Non-Museum Collections, 1926-1941.

Box

Nicaragua Clay Cylinder Cells (B. Marin) n.d.

14

Caribbean-Antigua, B.W.I. 1931.

14

Hernandez de Alba, Hacienda Segovia 1936.

14

Gold Objects-Veraguas, Panama 1940.

14

A.T. Anderson Excavation-Melbourne, FL. 1941.

14

Collection Inventory

Correspondence, 1912-1943.

Box

1912, 1912.

1

1913-1943, 1913-1943 (Bulk, 1913-1931) .

1

Catalogues.

Box

Herero Sammlung.

1

New Guinea.

1

New Britain, New Ireland, Matty Islands, New Zealand.

1

Solomon Islands, New Caledonien.

1

List 1: Afrika Allgemein.

1

List 2: OST-Afrika.

1

List 4: Admiralitaets Inseln.

1

List 7: Karolinen Inseln.

1

List 15: Massai.

1

List 19: Marquesas.

1

List 23: Viti Inseln.

1

List 32: Togo Fetische.

1

List 38: Nubien Sudan.

1

List 39: Franz Inseln.

1

List 40: Schilluk.

1

Albums.

Box

Tahiti and Hervey Islands. Katalog No. 300.

1

Pacific Islands. Katalog No. 301.

1

Kamerun Sammlung 1914 Katalog No. 222.

2

Kamerun-Sammlung 1914 Katalog No. 223.

2

Carolinen Sammlung.

3

New Zealand Sammlung.

3

Baininng & Sulka Sammlung.

3

New Guinea.

3

Kamerun Sammlung.

3

Massai.

3

Herero Sammlung. Katalog No. 163.

3

Collection Inventory

Correspondence.

Box

Cairo Museum.

1

Cairo Museum-Memphis-Meydum transition.

1

Horace Jayne (1 of 3).

1

Horace Jayne (2 of 3).

1

Horace Jayne (3 of 3).

1

Battiscombe Gunn.

1

George A. Reisner.

1

Re: Research.

1

Re: Coins.

1

Re: Meydum manuscript 1951-1955.

1

General 1928-1932.

1

Financial 1928-1932.

Box

Correspondence 1936-1937.

1

Kodak receipts, correspondence 1929-1930.

1

Reports-January 1928-December 1929.

1

Reports-January 1930-December 1930.

1

Records-January-March 1931; September-December 1931; January-June 1932.

1

Field Reports 1928-1931.

Box

Monthly reports (1 of 2).

1

Monthly reports (2 of 2).

1

Field notes.

Box

Rowe 1928.

1

Rowe 1931.

1

Diary (1 of 3).

1

Diary (2 of 3).

1

Diary (3 of 3).

2

Tomb cards 1930-1932.

Box

A.N.N.I. 1932.

3

A.N. cemetery, mastaba plans.

3

A.N. sites 1931.

3

A.N.S. 1931-1932.

3

Mastaba (1-395) 1931-1932.

3

Tombs (T328-T399) 1930-1931.

3

Tombs (T200-T546) 1931.

3

Tombs (T547-T607) 1931.

3

Object cards.

Box

By tomb number.

4, 5

By location.

5

By type, composition.

5, 6

Field negatives.

6

Object registers.

Oversize

1929 (29-11-12).

1

1930 (30-1-12).

1

1931 (30-1-4).

1

1931 (30-11-12).

1

1932 (32-1).

1

Lists 1929-1932.

Box

Packing lists 1930-1932.

2

Division lists by photo number.

2

Division lists by object register number.

2

Publication 1928-1933.

Box

Grafitti correspondence.

2

Grafitti notes.

2

Research notes (1 of 2).

2

Research notes (2 of 2).

2

List of personnel.

2

Museum Journal.

2

Museum Journal 1931 (annotated).

2

Illustrated London News.

2

Miscellaneous articles.

2

J.Y. Brinton article 1932.

2

Notes on translations; axe head.

2

Lists-tombs, photos, objects.

7

Unpublished Manuscript Vol. I (1 of 2).

7

Unpublished Manuscript Vol. I (2 of 2).

7

Unpublished Manuscript Vol. II.

7

Unpublished Manuscript Vol. III.

7

Unpublished Manuscript Vol. IV.

7

Unpublished Manuscript Vol. V.

7

Misc. articles and bibliographies Vol. I (1 of 2).

7

Misc. articles and bibliographies Vol. I (2 of 2).

8

Misc. articles and bibliographies Vol. II (1 of 2).

8

Misc. articles and bibliographies Vol. II (2 of 2).

8

Notes, bibliography.

8

Bibliography cards (1 of 2).

8

Bibliography cards (2 of 2).

8

Photographs.

Box

Photo Register.

9

Photo Index 1929-1930.

9

Photo Index 1930-1931.

9

Photo Index 1931-1932.

9

Photo album 1 (1-370).

10

Photo album II (371-869).

11

Photo album III (870-1121).

9

Additional photo albums in flat storage boxes.

flat box

Maps, Plans 32842-38933.

EG13

Excavations 1-72.

EG13

Excavations 73-254.

EG13

Excavations 255-370.

EG13

Excavations 370-481.

EG13

Excavations 482-555.

EG13

Excavations 556-680.

EG13

Excavations 681-770.

EG13

Excavations 771-868.

EG13

Excavations 869-921.

EG13

Excavations 922-1022.

EG13

Excavations 1023-1242.

EG14

Meydum-General Views.

EG14

Aerial Views.

EG14

Archaeol. Objects 36058-36303.

EG14

Stone Sculpture 33987-36723.

EG14

Stone Vessels.

EG14

Stone Tools.

EG14

Mummies 34708-34782.

EG14

Mummies 36228-36422.

EG14

Mummies 36434-36640.

EG14

Mummies 39811-36302.

EG14

Mummies-Skeletal Remains 34509-34670.

EG14

Mummies Field Nos. 83-93.

EG14

Wall Painting.

EG14

Linen Basketry 34346-36625.

EG14

Pottery Vessels 34738-34794.

EG15

Pottery Vessels 36173-36525.

EG15

Pottery Vessels 36527-36600.

EG15

Pottery Vessels 36604-80630.

EG15

Jar Stoppers.

EG15

Pottery Lamps 34664-36612.

EG15

Ostraca 34731-36594.

EG15

Terracottas 34635-36645.

EG15

Bricks.

EG15

Wood.

EG15

Glass.

EG15

Faience.

EG15

Ivory.

EG15

Bronze, Iron.

EG15

Jewelry 31655-36652.

EG15

Scarabs, Scarabands, Seals.

EG15

Graffiti 34478-38277.

EG15

Papyri.

EG15

Coins.

EG15

Meydum-Unnumbered.

EG15

Abu Nur (near Meydum) by Neg. Nos. 36438-36558 (106).

EG15

Abu Nur (near Meydum) by Neg. Nos. 34692-34918 (77).

EG15

Plate Photos for Rowe's unpublished Ms.- Vol.II XVII-XXVIII.

EG16

Plate Photos Rowe's unpubl. Ms.-XI-XXXII.

EG16

Plate Photos Rowe's unpubl. Ms.-XVIII-XXXVIII.

EG16

Plate Photos Rowe's unpubl. Ms.-XL-65.

EG16

Maps and Plans.

Drawer
Meydum publication plates Volume I.
M-11-2
Drawer

Plate I-Reconstruction of Meydum Pyramid Site Looking Northwest.

M-11-2

Plate II-Sketch Showing Stepped Appearance of the King's Pyramid and Mastabah 17.

M-11-2

Plate III-Meydum Pyramid Site-Restored from Details Published by Petrie.

M-11-2

Plate IV-Stages in the Construction of the Meydum Pyramid.

M-11-2

Plate V-Details of Staged Funerary Buildings.

M-11-2

Plate VI-Quarrymen's Gang.

M-11-2

Plate VII- Map of Northern and Middle Egypt.

M-11-2

Plate VIII-Composite Map of Meydum Prior to the Excavations.

M-11-2

Plate IX-The Meydum Pyramid in Relation to other Royal Tombs of Egypt.

M-11-2

Plate X-Meydum Pyramid-Entrance, Passage and Chambers.

M-11-2

Plate XI-Meydum Pyramid Temple.

M-11-2

Plate XII-Meydum Pyramid Causeway.

M-11-2

Plate XIII-Brick Furnace above the Causeway.

M-11-2

Plate XIV-Pyramid, North Face.

M-11-2

Plate XV-Pyramid-East Face; Pyramid Passage; Pyramid Causeway; East Peribolus Wall.

M-11-2
Meydum plates Volume II.
M-11-3
Drawer

Plate I-Plan of Pit and Chamber Section (Looking South).

M-11-3

Plate II-Section Through Pit and Chamber, Nefert's Burial, Mastaba No. 6 Looking West.

M-11-3

Plate III-Reconstruction of the Wooden Coffin of Nefert.

M-11-3

Plate IV-Details of Crenellations.

M-11-3

Plate V-Plan of Mastaba No. 7.

M-11-3

Plate VI- Section Looking West, Drawings of Objects, Mastaba No 7.

M-11-3

Plate VII-Plan of Mastaba No 8.

M-11-3

Plate VIII-Plan of Pit and Chamber, Drawings of Objects.

M-11-3

Plate IX-Section Through Pit and Chamber of NY-HEP.

M-11-3

Plate X-Plan of Northern Pit and Chamber, Drawing of Objects.

M-11-3

Plate XI-Section Through Northern Pit and Chamber.

M-11-3

Plate XII-Plan and Section of Intrusive Pit, Drawings of Objects.

M-11-3

Plate XIII-Plans and Sections of Classified Tombs in Northern Cemetery.

M-11-3

Plate XIV-Plans and Sections of Unclassified Tombs in Northern Cemetery.

M-11-3

Plate XV-Objects from Northern Cemetery.

M-11-3

Plate XVI-Plans and Sections of Late Dynastic Tombs in Northern Cemetery.

M-11-3

Plate I-Printed Reproduction on Paper (see A).

M-11-3
Meydum plates-volume III and extra.
M-11-4
Drawer

Plate I-General Plan of Mastaba 17.

M-11-4

Plate II-Plan and Section of North End of Mastaba.

M-11-4

Plate III-Plans and Sections of East Side of Mastaba.

M-11-4

Plate IV-Details of Builders Level Marks and Guide-Lines on Mastaba.

M-11-4

Plate V-Detailed Plan and Sections of Stone Chapel.

M-11-4

Plate VI-Detailed Plan and Section of Original Sarcophagus Chamber.

M-11-4

Plate VII-Sketch Plan and Sections of the Tomb of Gemesh.

M-11-4

Plate VIII-Drawings of Wooden and Pottery Coffins.

M-11-4

Plate IX-Drawing of the Coffin of Iah-tef-nekht.

M-11-4

Plate X-Drawings of Coffins from Intrusive Tombs.

M-11-4

Plate XI-Drawings of Coffins from Intrusive Tombs.

M-11-4

Plate XII-Drawings of Coffins from Intrusive Tombs.

M-11-4

Plate XIII-Drawings of Coffins from Intrusive Tombs.

M-11-4

Plate XIV-Drawings of Large Objects from Intrusive Tombs.

M-11-4

Plate XV-Drawings of Large Objects from Intrusive Tombs.

M-11-4

Plate XVI- Drawings of Small Objects from Intrusive Tombs.

M-11-4

Plate XVII- Drawings of Miscellaneous Objects from Mastaba Debris.

M-11-4
Extra drawings.
M-11-4

Mastaba 17 West side, extreme North part.

Mastabe 17 Plan of the north side showing intrusive burials.

Mastabe 17 Section S-T from East to West looking South.

Mastaba 17 Sections U-V from South to North, looking West.

Drawer

Mastaba 17 West side, extreme North part.

M-11-4

Mastaba 17 East side, South part.

M-11-4

Mastaba 17 East side, North part.

M-11-4

Mastaba 17 Offering niche; section O-P West, looking North.

M-11-4

Mastaba 17 Offering niche; elevation looking West.

M-11-4

Mastaba 17 Section Q-R From West to East looking North.

M-11-4

Mastaba 17 General Plan.

M-11-4

Stone Chapel- Plan.

Stone Chapel- Section K-L from South to North looking West.

Stone Chapel- Section M-N, from East to West looking South.

Drawer

Sketch Plans of the Tomb of Gemesh.

M-11-4

Sketch of Objects Found Outside the Coffin of Gemesh.

M-11-4

Sketch of Objects Found in the Coffin of Gemesh.

M-11-4
Meydum Plates Volume IV.
Drawer

PLATE I Plan of Tomb 277.

M-11-5

PLATE II Plan of Tomb 202 Dynasty IV (This Drawing Is Found As(7)of Composite Plate 4.

M-11-5

PLATE III Plan and section of Tomb 393 Type S.P.IIIvth Dynasty.

M-11-5

PLATE IV Plans and Sections of Tombs 552(=?)-Type SR III; 556 and 559-fourth Dynasty.

M-11-5

PLATE V Plans and Sections of Tombs Nos. 1 and 4-fourth Dynasty (No 4 Is that of Heknen).

M-11-5

PLATE VI Plans and Sections of Mastaba 293 and Tombs Nos 310, 295, 292 IVth Dyn. (with Late Dyn. intrusions).

M-11-5

PLATE VII Plans and sections of Tomb nos. 312,315, 318, 460, (?)512 Fourth Dynasty.

M-11-5

PLATE VIII Objects from the fourth Dynasty Tombs.

M-11-5

PLATE IX General Map of Meydum site; Detailed "Map A".

M-11-5

PLATE X Meydum site-Detailed map B and C.

M-11-5
Meydum Plates Volume V.
Drawer

PLATE I (Tombs 581, 587, 591 and Pottery Types).

M-11-6

PLATE II (Tombs 316, 324, 389, 478, 478A).

M-11-6

PLATE III Tomb 313 Dynasty XII Onward.

M-11-6

PLATE IV Tomb 314 Tomb groups-Small objects.

M-11-6

PLATE V Tomb 314-Concl. 315, 316, 317, 318-Tomb groups small objects.

M-11-6

PLATE VI Tomb 266, 277, 278, 287, 293, 295, 302,321, 324-Tomb groups Small objects.

M-11-6

PLATE VII Tomb 261B, 264, 265, 266, 267, 276, 277, 278, 281, 282, 287, Tomb Groups Large Objects.

M-11-6

PLATE VIII Tomb 261B, 264, 265, 266, 267, 276, 277, 278, 281, 282, 287, Tomb Groups Large Objects.

M-11-6

PLATE IX Miscellaneous and Tomb groups Small and Large objects.

M-11-6

PLATE X Unspecified.

M-11-6

PLATE XI Unspecified.

M-11-6

PLATE XII Roman tombs 462, 464, 465, 467, 468.

M-11-6

PLATE XIII Roman tombs 472, 473, 495.

M-11-6

PLATE XIV From Roman tombs.

M-11-6

PLATE XV From Christian tombs.

M-11-6

PLATE XVI Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XVII Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XVIII Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XIX Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XX Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XXI Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XXII Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XXIII Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XXIV Wooden coffins.

M-11-6

PLATE XXV Coffins, pottery and stone.

M-11-6

PLATE XXVI Miscellaneous.

M-11-6
Meydum Plates with no Volume Number (Group !).
Drawer

PLATE I Plan and section of Tomb 277.

M-11-7

PLATE II Plan and section of Tomb 202.

M-11-7

PLATE III Plan and section of Tomb 393.

M-11-7

PLATE IV Plan and section of Tomb 352 (in Mastaba 14).

M-11-7

PLATE V Plan and section of Tomb 1 and 4.

M-11-7

PLATE VI Plan and section of Mastaba 293 with Tomb Pits 310. 295, 292.

M-11-7

PLATE VII Plan and section Unclassified tombs 312, 315, 318, 460, 481, 512.

M-11-7

PLATE VIII Some Objects from Fourth Dynasty Tombs.

M-11-7

PLATE IX General Map Showing 1929 - 1932 Excavation at Meydum, and Detailed Map A.

M-11-7

PLATE X Meydum Detailed Maps-Band C.

M-11-7
Drawer
Meydum Plates with no volume number (Group 2).
M-11-1
Drawer

Pl. 1 Tomb groups-small objects.

M-11-1
Map-case

Pl. 3 Tomb groups-small objects.

M-11-1

Pl. 4 Map of Meydum showing excavations of 1929-1930 with plans.

M-11-1

Pl. 5 Tomb groups-small objects.

M-11-1

Pl. 6 Tomb groups-large objects.

M-11-1

Pl. 7 Tomb groups-large objects.

M-11-1

Pl. 9 Tomb groups-large objects.

M-11-1

Pl. 10 Tomb groups-large objects.

M-11-1

Pl. 12 Plan of tomb 251.

M-11-1

Pl. 14 Plans of tombs and furnace.

M-11-1

Pl. 15 Plans of tombs 311, 312, 315, 316.

M-11-1

Pl. 16 Tomb 314.

M-11-1

Pl. 17 Coffin of Sat-her-em-hat.

M-11-1

Pl. 18 Coffin of Khenty-khety-em-hat.

M-11-1

Pl. 19 Wooden coffins.

M-11-1

Pl. 20 Wooden coffins.

M-11-1

Pl. 21 Coffins-wooden & pottery.

M-11-1

Pl. 22 Wooden coffins.

M-11-1

Pl. 23 Wooden coffins.

M-11-1

Pl. 24 Wooden coffins.

M-11-1

Pl. 25 Wooden coffins.

M-11-1

Pl. 26 Coffin of Iah-tef-nekht.

M-11-1

Pl. 27 Coffins-wooden, pottery & stone.

M-11-1

Pl. 30 From and near Mastaba.

M-11-1

Pl. 31 Miscellaneous tombs.

M-11-1
Meydum Miscellaneous.
Drawer

"Coffin Tomb 362 Meydum 1930" Watercolor 6" by 16".

M-11-8

"Reconstruction of Meydum Pyramid Site Looking Northwest" Watercolor with Caption 20" by 20".

M-11-8
Meydum The Great Pyramid.
Drawer

"Cross Section and Plan [of Great Pyramid at Meydum]." Architect's Plan. Scale 1:1000" 22.5" x 13.5".

M-11-9

Plan of Interior of Great Pyramid at Meydum-Architects Plan Scale 1:100 ft. 24" by 30".

M-11-9

"The Great Pyramid" Cross Section and 3 Interior Plans- Archtects Plan Scale 1:100 ft. 24.5" by 30".

M-11-9

As Above- Encapsulated.

M-11-9

As Above- Encapsulated.

M-11-9
Meydum Miscellaneous.
Drawer

Restoration of Wall Painting (E641) Watercolor 12" x 9".

M-11-10
Meydum Topographical Map Series.
Drawer

58 Architect's Maps of Meydum-Captions in Arabic Various sizes.

M-11-11
Meydum the Great Pyramid.
Drawer

"Successive Schemes of Saqqarah Pyramid." 1:50 m. Ink on paper. Written on bottom "A. S. A. vol. XXIX, pl. VIII".

M-11-12
Meydum-Maps, Sketches, Site Plans and Floor Plans of Tombs.
Drawer

9A Tomb plans. Scale 1/50. Pencil on paper. Tombs: 391, 394, 399, 431, 433, 436, 442, 445, 390, 409, 413,414, 432, 434, 437, 438, 440, 443.

M-11-13

11A Tomb Plans Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 Tombs 517-522, 513, 524 On Reverse: 11B-Tomb Plans. Pencil on Paper. Scale 1/50.Tombs: 505-512, 514-516, and 523.

M-11-13

Tomb Plans Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 Tombs 461, 466, 471,485, 486, 488, 491, 492 On Reverse: 13B-Tomb Plans. Pencil on Paper. Scale 1/50.Tombs: 472, 473, 482-484, 489, 495.

M-11-13

6A "Crenellated Wall to the North of the Pyramid" Ink and Pencil on Paper Scale 1/100 Dated 14/1/1931 On Reverse: 6B- "Plan of Tomb 389 (West of the Pyra.[mid]) Pencil on Paper. Dated 10/1/1931.

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4B "Tombs on the East Side of Mas.[taba] [17]" Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 Tombs: 463, 474, 475, 478, 479, 480, 487, 490, 493, 496.

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14A "Roman Tombs" Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 Tombs: 460, 464, 465, 476, 477. On Reverse: 14B- "Roman Tombs" Pencil on Paper. Tombs: 462, 467-470, 481.

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1A Tomb of Mas.[taba] 16" Ink and Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 Dated 23/11/1931. Also Plan of "Top of Entrance" Pencil on Paper. Scale 1/100. Dated 6/1/1932. On Reverse: 1B- Plan of "Tomb of Hek-nen, Mast.[aba] No 4" Ink and Pencil on Paper. Scale 1/50.

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Plans of Tomb 393 Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 On Reverse: 3A "Mastaba No. 7" Ink and Pencil on Paper. Scale 1/100. 5 Plans.

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[A] "Sarcophagus of Cheops, Giza" and "Sarcophagus of Mastaba 17, Meydum" Printed Reproduction, 2 Plans.

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[B] "N.W. Level-and Incline-Indicaton Wall of Mastaba 17" Pencil on Paper-Plan Scale 1/25 On Reverse: Writing and Sketching in Pencil.

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12A "Mastaba No. 8" Pencil on Paper Scale 1/100 Plan On Reverse: 3 Plans-Subject Unidentified-Pencil on Paper Scale 1/100 and 1/50.

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[C] "Mastaba No. 8 NY HEP" 5 Plans Ink and Pencil on Paper Various Scales On Reverse: Tomb Plans. Pencil on Paper. Scale 1:50. Tombs: 401, 402, 408, 410, 411, 412, 417- 419, 420, 421, 423, 424, 427, 439, 441, 444, 448, 449, 457, 458, 459.

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[D] Plan of Tomb ANS 30 With Captions. The captions concern location of objects in the tomb. Pencil on Paper.

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[E] Cross section diagrams of pottery from Meydum (?) Pencil on Paper.

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[F] As above-Ink and Pencil on Paper.

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5B Tomb Plan- Pencil on Paper. Scale 1:50. Dated "29/1/32.

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G Plan- Unspecified Ink and Pencil on Paper.

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[H] Map of Tomb at Meydum Pencil on Paper. Scale 1:100. Plan. Cross section of Pyramid at Meydum. Pencil on Paper. Scale 1:50. Both plans are dated "31/12/30".

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[I ] "Dra-Abu-Ner, Meydum" Ink on Paper Ink on Paper Scale 1/1000.

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"Southern Side of Mastaba 17" Ink and pencil on Paper Scale 1/100 Dated "15/1/1931" and "18/1/1931".

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7B "Cross section A-B and Tomb 592" Plans Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50.

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2A "Mastaba 14 Cross section E-F, C-D and [Topview} Ink and Pencil on Paper. Dated "15/1/1931".

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10A Plan of Tomb 200 Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 Dated 28/1/1931 On Reverse: Tomb 379 Plan Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 Dated 27/1/1931.

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7 Plans of Tombs 398, 400, 405, 406, 415, 426, 428, 435, 450, 451. Pencil on Paper Scale 1:50 On Reverse: Plans of Tombs 403, 429, 454, 422, 452, 392, 456, 453, 455. Pencil on Paper Scale 1:50.

M-11-13

8A "Mastaba No. 16 Nefer Maat" Pencil on Paper Scale 1/50 On Reverse: "Mastaba No. 9 of Ra Nefer" and "6 of RaHotep". Pencil on Paper. Scale 1:50.

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"Plans and Sections of Tombs and Section through the Cemetery on Lines A-B, C-D" Plan Printed Reproduction on Posterboard. 40.5" by 28".

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Drawer

Map From Meydum Grid system Unidentified 13 Fragments Ink on Linen.

M-11-15

"Map of the Northern and Middle Showing the Relative Positions of Meydum and Other Pyramid Sites Dating to the Ancient and Middle Empires c. 3000-c. 1800 B. C." 5 Pieces Printed Reproduction.

M-11-15
Meydum Squeezes.
Drawer

15 Squeezes of Meydum Found with some Meydum Notes. A. R. S. 8 June '60 (Box 22). Poor Quality.

M-11-14

Collection Inventory

General Correspondence, 1927-1931.

Scope and Contents note

Guidelines for Nuzi excavations, 1927 and 1929; reports from the field, some with sketches of the ezcavation, from Starr to D.G. Lyon and other Harvard scholars, and to H .Jayne; letters, reports and financial statements from C. Bache to H. Jayne, news releases, a note (1930) on the exhibition of the Harvard Mesopotamian Expedition and an epigraphical report fromT.J. Meek to D. Lyon. Arranged chronologically.

Box

Harvard Baghdad School Expedition, general correspondence, 1929-1931.

1

Field Notes, 1929-1930.

Scope and Contents note

Notes from field by Charles Bache. Original notebook aka. Containes material from excavations at Beech Bottom, W. VA. It is filed under Noerth America/Mid. Atlantic and other small expeditions, 1911-1969/Beech Bottom/Box 16. (L-1-5). Notebook labelled “Beech Bottom” and “Charles Bache”.

Box

Charles Bache Field Notebook, Kirkuk, Dec.-Mar.

1

Photographs, 1925-1930.

Scope and Contents note

Photographic catalogue; two sets of photographs, one from Chiera’s 1925 excavation and the other from 1929-1930 season. Arranged by season.

Box

Photograph catalogue of survey and excavation.

1

Publications, 1928-1942.

Scope and Contents note

Preliminary report (1928); notes, annotated draft and final dissertation manuscript. Arranged topically.

Box

Kirkuk, Preliminary Report, 1928.

1

Real Estate Transactions-Tablet translations, 1942.

1

Real Estate Transactions-Tablet translations, 1942.

1

Real Estate Transactions-Tablet translations.

1

Collection Inventory

Correspondence, 1903-1939.

Box

List of letters to Robert Burkitt.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (1 of 10) 1904-1913.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (2 of 10) 1913.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (3 of 10) 1914-1915.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (4 of 10) 1916-1917.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (5 of 10) 1918-1919.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (6 of 10) 1920.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (7 of 10) 1921-1923.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (8 of 10) 1924.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (9 of 10) 1925.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon (10 of 10) 1926.

1

Robert Burkitt to George Gordon and Miss McHugh 1927.

1

Robert Burkitt to Miss McHugh 1928-1929.

1

Robert Burkitt to Horace Jayne and Miss McHugh 1930-1932.

1

Robert Burkitt to Horace Jayne and Miss McHugh 1933-1939.

1

Letter of Rev. J.H. Burkitt (father of Robert Burkitt) 1915.

1

Notes and Studies on Collection, 1953-1978.

Box

J. Alden Mason notes (1 of 3) 1953-1978.

4

J. Alden Mason notes (2 of 3).

4

J. Alden Mason notes (3 of 3).

4

William R. Coe Notes on Burkitt and Butler (1 of 3).

4

William R. Coe Notes on Burkitt and Butler ( 2 of 3).

3

William R. Coe Notes on Burkitt and Butler (3 of 3).

Box 3

Kixpek, El Quiche, Guatemala.

The Burkitt Excavations at Chama; A Preliminary Report.

The Robert Burkitt Skeletal collection from Highland Guatemala.

William Coe Anthropology Class Studies of Burkitt and Butler.

Catalogues and Reports, 1913-1930.

Box

Checklist of numbers and provenience.

2

Catalogue numbers 1 to 99 (1 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 100 to 200 (2 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 201 to 331 (3 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 332 to 623 (4 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 624 to 786 (5 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 787 to 803 (6 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 804 to 811 (7 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 812 to 962 (8 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 962 to 1090 (9 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 1091 to 1109 (10 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 1110 to 1115 (11 of 12).

2

Catalogue numbers 1116 to 1154 (12 of 12).

2

Typed Draft of "Explorations in the Highlands of Western Guatemala".

2

Photographs, 1913-1930.

Box

Photographs 101 to 156 (1 of 8).

2

Photographs 157 to 203 (2 of 8).

2

Photographs 204 to 243 (3 of 8).

2

Photographs 244 to 261 (4 of 8).

2

Photographs 262 to 287 (5 of 8).

2

Photographs 288 to 326 (6 of 8).

2

Photographs 804-1 to 804-24 (7 of 8).

2

Photographs 804-25 to 807 (8 of 8).

2