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Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1868-1956
Creator:
Brinton, Daniel Garrison, 1837-1899
Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967
Extent: 1.2 linear foot (the collection consists of thirteen folders housed in two archival boxes)
Daniel Garrison Brinton is considered one of the founders of modern American Anthropology. He was also the first to hold a professorship in Archaeology in the United States. His library, which includes the Carl Hermann Berendt collection of manuscripts in the indigenous languages of Mexico and Central America, is considered the core of the University of Pennsylvania Anthropology Library. Among the collection are 4515 items; rare illustrations, contemporary photographs, portraits of individual authors, and texts in Spanish, French, Italian, and German. Brinton gathered his information from archival and library studies and did not participate in any archaeological expeditions. This small collection, attributed to Brinton by J. Alden Mason of the University Museum, consists of thirteen folders. Two contain linguistic notes on the Maya languages and another two contain drawings of pottery, objects, sites, and maps of Maya regions, primarily in Mexico. Some of the drawings are believed to be those of Carl Hermann Berendt, purchased by Daniel Brinton for the library at the University. The collection also has four scrapbooks and a book of poems written by Dr. Brinton. The collection is in fragile condition and many of the items are in need of conservation assessment, particularly the Berendt drawings.
title
Daniel Garrison Brinton Collection
creator
Brinton, Daniel Garrison, 1837-1899 Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967
id
PU-Mu. 1098
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
1.2 linear foot (the collection consists of thirteen folders housed in two archival boxes)
inclusive date
1868-1956
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Daniel Garrison Brinton is considered one of the founders of modern American Anthropology. He was also the first to hold a professorship in Archaeology in the United States. His library, which includes the Carl Hermann Berendt collection of manuscripts in the indigenous languages of Mexico and Central America, is considered the core of the University of Pennsylvania Anthropology Library. Among the collection are 4515 items; rare illustrations, contemporary photographs, portraits of individual authors, and texts in Spanish, French, Italian, and German. Brinton gathered his information from archival and library studies and did not participate in any archaeological expeditions. This small collection, attributed to Brinton by J. Alden Mason of the University Museum, consists of thirteen folders. Two contain linguistic notes on the Maya languages and another two contain drawings of pottery, objects, sites, and maps of Maya regions, primarily in Mexico. Some of the drawings are believed to be those of Carl Hermann Berendt, purchased by Daniel Brinton for the library at the University. The collection also has four scrapbooks and a book of poems written by Dr. Brinton. The collection is in fragile condition and many of the items are in need of conservation assessment, particularly the Berendt drawings.
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1860s 1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s
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English
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Brinton, Daniel Garrison, 1837-1899 Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967 Berendt, Carl Hermann, 1817-1878 Brinton, Daniel Garrison, 1837-1899 Guzman, Panteleon de, 1652-1708
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Drawings (visual works) Faculty papers
Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1879-1955
Creator:
Baker, Mary Louise, b. 1872-d. 1962
Extent: 5 linear feet
During her employment as museum artist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology from 1908-1936, M. (Mary) Louise Baker established an international reputation as the preeminent archaeological artist of her time with unmatched technical skill in scientific illustration. Her work at the University Museum included paintings of Maya pottery for limited edition folio volumes; paintings and reconstructions of Ur of the Chaldees’ royal tombs findings for Sir C. Leonard Woolley and of the Palace of Merenptah at Memphis, and a reconstructed drawing of the Piedras Negras Lintel 3. She spent much of her career dividing her time between the positions of museum artist and as art teacher at the George School in Bucks County, PA. A life-long Quaker, M. Louise Baker was born in Alliance, Ohio, on August 4, 1872. At the age of 19, she came to Pennsylvania to complete her education. By 1900, she had decided to concentrate on art and enrolled at the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Art. Early in her career, Baker was a free-lance artist for commercial illustrations and children’s magazines. She also did scientific drawings for archaeologist Clarence B. Moore at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. In 1908, she was hired by Dr. George Byron Gordon at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. During her career as an archaeological artist, Baker traveled to parts of the world where women never ventured unattended. The M. Louise Baker collection spans the years from 1889 to 1962 and contains her unpublished autobiography; 54 detailed diaries from 1889 to 1960; sketches, commercial art, illustrated stories and poems for children’s publications from her early career; scrapbooks which she compiled; drawings and paintings. A large portion of the collection, including Baker’s unpublished memoir, family photographs, scrapbooks, and diaries, was donated to the Penn Museum Archives in 2011 by Baker family members after a connection with Museum Research Associate Dr. Elin Danien. It is housed in ten archival boxes, plus additional drawings and paintings housed in the Oversize Plans and Drawings Collection and other examples of Baker’s work relating to Ur and Egypt on display in Museum exhibit galleries. The Penn Museum owns over 500 works by Baker, including all her work for the Maya Pottery publications, much of it unpublished.
title
M. Louise Baker papers
creator
Baker, Mary Louise, b. 1872-d. 1962
id
PU-Mu. 1107
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
5 linear feet
inclusive date
1879-1955
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
During her employment as museum artist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology from 1908-1936, M. (Mary) Louise Baker established an international reputation as the preeminent archaeological artist of her time with unmatched technical skill in scientific illustration. Her work at the University Museum included paintings of Maya pottery for limited edition folio volumes; paintings and reconstructions of Ur of the Chaldees’ royal tombs findings for Sir C. Leonard Woolley and of the Palace of Merenptah at Memphis, and a reconstructed drawing of the Piedras Negras Lintel 3. She spent much of her career dividing her time between the positions of museum artist and as art teacher at the George School in Bucks County, PA. A life-long Quaker, M. Louise Baker was born in Alliance, Ohio, on August 4, 1872. At the age of 19, she came to Pennsylvania to complete her education. By 1900, she had decided to concentrate on art and enrolled at the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Art. Early in her career, Baker was a free-lance artist for commercial illustrations and children’s magazines. She also did scientific drawings for archaeologist Clarence B. Moore at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. In 1908, she was hired by Dr. George Byron Gordon at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. During her career as an archaeological artist, Baker traveled to parts of the world where women never ventured unattended. The M. Louise Baker collection spans the years from 1889 to 1962 and contains her unpublished autobiography; 54 detailed diaries from 1889 to 1960; sketches, commercial art, illustrated stories and poems for children’s publications from her early career; scrapbooks which she compiled; drawings and paintings. A large portion of the collection, including Baker’s unpublished memoir, family photographs, scrapbooks, and diaries, was donated to the Penn Museum Archives in 2011 by Baker family members after a connection with Museum Research Associate Dr. Elin Danien. It is housed in ten archival boxes, plus additional drawings and paintings housed in the Oversize Plans and Drawings Collection and other examples of Baker’s work relating to Ur and Egypt on display in Museum exhibit galleries. The Penn Museum owns over 500 works by Baker, including all her work for the Maya Pottery publications, much of it unpublished.
date_facet
1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s
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language_facet
English
name_facet
Baker, Mary Louise, b. 1872-d. 1962 Allen, E. Constance Baker, Mary Louise, b. 1872-d. 1962 Fisher, Clarence Stanley, 1876-1941 Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927 Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967 Wooley, C. Leonard, Sir, b. 1880-d.1960
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Diaries Drawings (visual works)