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Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1868-1956
Creator:
Brinton, Daniel Garrison, 1837-1899
Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967
Extent: 1.2 linear foot (the collection consists of thirteen folders housed in two archival boxes)
Daniel Garrison Brinton is considered one of the founders of modern American Anthropology. He was also the first to hold a professorship in Archaeology in the United States. His library, which includes the Carl Hermann Berendt collection of manuscripts in the indigenous languages of Mexico and Central America, is considered the core of the University of Pennsylvania Anthropology Library. Among the collection are 4515 items; rare illustrations, contemporary photographs, portraits of individual authors, and texts in Spanish, French, Italian, and German. Brinton gathered his information from archival and library studies and did not participate in any archaeological expeditions. This small collection, attributed to Brinton by J. Alden Mason of the University Museum, consists of thirteen folders. Two contain linguistic notes on the Maya languages and another two contain drawings of pottery, objects, sites, and maps of Maya regions, primarily in Mexico. Some of the drawings are believed to be those of Carl Hermann Berendt, purchased by Daniel Brinton for the library at the University. The collection also has four scrapbooks and a book of poems written by Dr. Brinton. The collection is in fragile condition and many of the items are in need of conservation assessment, particularly the Berendt drawings.
title
Daniel Garrison Brinton Collection
creator
Brinton, Daniel Garrison, 1837-1899 Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967
id
PU-Mu. 1098
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
1.2 linear foot (the collection consists of thirteen folders housed in two archival boxes)
inclusive date
1868-1956
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Daniel Garrison Brinton is considered one of the founders of modern American Anthropology. He was also the first to hold a professorship in Archaeology in the United States. His library, which includes the Carl Hermann Berendt collection of manuscripts in the indigenous languages of Mexico and Central America, is considered the core of the University of Pennsylvania Anthropology Library. Among the collection are 4515 items; rare illustrations, contemporary photographs, portraits of individual authors, and texts in Spanish, French, Italian, and German. Brinton gathered his information from archival and library studies and did not participate in any archaeological expeditions. This small collection, attributed to Brinton by J. Alden Mason of the University Museum, consists of thirteen folders. Two contain linguistic notes on the Maya languages and another two contain drawings of pottery, objects, sites, and maps of Maya regions, primarily in Mexico. Some of the drawings are believed to be those of Carl Hermann Berendt, purchased by Daniel Brinton for the library at the University. The collection also has four scrapbooks and a book of poems written by Dr. Brinton. The collection is in fragile condition and many of the items are in need of conservation assessment, particularly the Berendt drawings.
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1860s 1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s
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English
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Brinton, Daniel Garrison, 1837-1899 Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967 Berendt, Carl Hermann, 1817-1878 Brinton, Daniel Garrison, 1837-1899 Guzman, Panteleon de, 1652-1708
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Drawings (visual works) Faculty papers
Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1932-1978
Creator:
Satterthwaite, Linton, 1897-1978
Extent: 18 linear foot
title
Linton Satterthwaite Papers
creator
Satterthwaite, Linton, 1897-1978
id
PU-Mu. 0051
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
18 linear foot
inclusive date
1932-1978
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
date_facet
1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s
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language_facet
English
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Satterthwaite, Linton, 1897-1978 Beyer, Hermann, b. 1880-d. 1942 Butler, Mary, 1903-1970 Coe, William R. , 1926-2009 Jones, Christopher, b. 1937 Kelly, D.H., b.1923 Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967 Proskouriakoff, Tatiana, 1909-1985 Satterthwaite, Linton, 1897-1978 Thompson, J. Eric S., Sir, b.1898-d.1975
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Mayan calendar
Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1944-1958
Extent: 0.75 linear feet
Born in Russia in 1909, Tatiana Proskouriakoff came to the United States in 1916. She received a BS degree in Architecture from Penn State University in 1930. Because of the lack of architecture jobs during the Depression, she enrolled in graduate studies in anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. Through her volunteer archaeological drawings at the University Museum, she was invited by Linton Satterthwaite to participate in two seasons of field work at the Maya site of Piedras Negras, starting what became a brilliant career in Maya scholarship. Proskouriakoff produced a series of reconstructive drawings depicting ancient Mayan cities, which were published as “An Album of Maya Architecture.” She secured positions at the Carnegie Institute of Washington under Sylvanus Morley and at the Peabody Museum of Harvard University. Her painstakingly detailed studies of Mayan glyphs became a turning point in the decipherment of Maya hieroglyphic writing. She died in 1985 as one of a pioneering generation of Mayanists. The Tatiana Proskouriakoff collection of personal papers includes representative personal documents and her correspondence between 1944 and 1985. Other related records and drawings for her at the Penn Museum Archives are found in the Piedras Negras excavation records and the Linton Satterthwaite papers. Her artist’s wooden stool is also located in the Museum.
title
Tatiana Proskouriakoff Papers
creator
id
PU-Mu. 1116
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
0.75 linear feet
inclusive date
1944-1958
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Born in Russia in 1909, Tatiana Proskouriakoff came to the United States in 1916. She received a BS degree in Architecture from Penn State University in 1930. Because of the lack of architecture jobs during the Depression, she enrolled in graduate studies in anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. Through her volunteer archaeological drawings at the University Museum, she was invited by Linton Satterthwaite to participate in two seasons of field work at the Maya site of Piedras Negras, starting what became a brilliant career in Maya scholarship. Proskouriakoff produced a series of reconstructive drawings depicting ancient Mayan cities, which were published as “An Album of Maya Architecture.” She secured positions at the Carnegie Institute of Washington under Sylvanus Morley and at the Peabody Museum of Harvard University. Her painstakingly detailed studies of Mayan glyphs became a turning point in the decipherment of Maya hieroglyphic writing. She died in 1985 as one of a pioneering generation of Mayanists. The Tatiana Proskouriakoff collection of personal papers includes representative personal documents and her correspondence between 1944 and 1985. Other related records and drawings for her at the Penn Museum Archives are found in the Piedras Negras excavation records and the Linton Satterthwaite papers. Her artist’s wooden stool is also located in the Museum.
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1940s 1950s
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English
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Correspondence