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Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1826-1995
(Bulk: 1898-1960)
Extent: 16 linear feet
The American Section was one of the first to evolve during the early development of the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The University Archaeological Association established in 1887 and later, the American Exploration Society, established in 1892, exhibited several small collections in College Hall before the building campaign for the museum began. Charles Abbott was the first curator of the section succeeded by Henry C. Mercer and then Stewart Culin who was also named Director in 1899. Each succeeding curator was responsible for adding collections, many of them representing their own expeditions in the United States, Alaska, Mexico, Central America and South America. Records in the files are dated from 1826 through the 1980s. The transfer of materials to the Archives took place piecemeal and without a central organization. The current re-processing placed the files into three series, Deaccessions and Loans, Collectors and Collections and Exhibits.
title
American Section
creator
id
PU-Mu. 0044
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
16 linear feet
inclusive date
1826-1995
bulk date
1898-1960
abstract/scope/contents
The American Section was one of the first to evolve during the early development of the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The University Archaeological Association established in 1887 and later, the American Exploration Society, established in 1892, exhibited several small collections in College Hall before the building campaign for the museum began. Charles Abbott was the first curator of the section succeeded by Henry C. Mercer and then Stewart Culin who was also named Director in 1899. Each succeeding curator was responsible for adding collections, many of them representing their own expeditions in the United States, Alaska, Mexico, Central America and South America. Records in the files are dated from 1826 through the 1980s. The transfer of materials to the Archives took place piecemeal and without a central organization. The current re-processing placed the files into three series, Deaccessions and Loans, Collectors and Collections and Exhibits.
date_facet
1820s 1830s 1840s 1850s 1860s 1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s
bulk_date_facet
1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s
language_facet
English
name_facet
Abbott, Charles C., 1843-1919 Brinton, Daniel Garrison, 1837-1899 Bruckner, Geraldine M., b. 1901-d. 1982 Coe, William R. , 1926-2009 Culin, Stewart, 1858-1929 Dyson, Robert H., 1927- Eyman, Frances, 1921-1949 Farabee, William Curtis, b. 1865-d. 1925 Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927 Kidder, Alfred Vincent, 1885-1963 King, Mary Elizabeth, b. 1929 Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967 Mercer, Henry C., 1856-1930 Pepper, William, 1843-1898 Possehl, , Gregory L., Dr., b. 1941 Rainey, Froelich, Director of the University Museum Satterthwaite, Linton, 1897-1978 Shotridge, Louis Stevenson, Sara Yorke, 1847-1921
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Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1883-2014
(Bulk: 1920-1936)
Creator:
Scott, Alexander
Extent: 0.2 linear foot
Alexander Scott was born in 1854 in Camberwell, Surrey, the son of the famed British portrait painter for the Illustrated London News, Thomas Dewel Scott. He became known as a world traveler, landscape painter and collector of Asian antiquities. This collection was donated to the Penn Museum in 2011 by Anne Bowbeer, the wife of Alexander Scott's nephew, following the death of Mabel Scott Hall, Alexander Scott's widow
title
Anne Bowbeer Alexander Scott Collection
creator
Scott, Alexander
id
PU-Mu.1061
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
0.2 linear foot
inclusive date
1883-2014
bulk date
1920-1936
abstract/scope/contents
Alexander Scott was born in 1854 in Camberwell, Surrey, the son of the famed British portrait painter for the Illustrated London News, Thomas Dewel Scott. He became known as a world traveler, landscape painter and collector of Asian antiquities. This collection was donated to the Penn Museum in 2011 by Anne Bowbeer, the wife of Alexander Scott's nephew, following the death of Mabel Scott Hall, Alexander Scott's widow
date_facet
1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s
bulk_date_facet
1920s 1930s
language_facet
English
name_facet
Scott, Alexander Bowbeer, Anne Scott Hall, Mabel Scott, Alexander
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Photographs
Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1887-1910
(Bulk: 1891-1906)
Creator:
Pepper, William, 1843-1898
Extent: 2.8 linear foot (the board of managers records fill seven archival boxes plus a few oversize pieces)
William Pepper, originally a Provost of the University of Pennsylvania, was the visionary behind the establishment of the University Archaeological Association in 1889, and the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology in 1891, the precursors to the University Museum. The groups were composed of wealthy Philadelphians, interested in the ancient world, and capable of soliciting subscriptions to the Associations from their friends and colleagues. The University's sponsorship of an expedition to Nippur, Babylonia in 1887, financed by private funds was the impetus for Pepper to work toward the establishment of organizations to support exploration and house artifacts from the ancient world. With the need for a fire-proof building to house the finds, supported by the Trustees, College Hall was designated as the first repository in response to a request from William Pepper. By 1892, the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology, affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania, was operating under an independent Board of Managers whose first President was Joseph Leidy. Pepper himself became President of the Department in 1894, working tirelessly along with Sara Yorke Stevenson, toward the funding and building of the Free Museum of Science and Art. Toward this goal, the American Exploration Society was created as an independent funding organization for the recovery of artifacts and the establishment of a museum of archaeology. The Board of Managers records consists of seven boxes of correspondence and financial records spanning the creation of the University Archaeological Association, the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology, the American Exploration Society and the Museum. The records are organized first by the entities that preceeded the museum and contributed to its creation. The next group of records are organized by the tenure of the Presidents of the Board of Managers.
title
Board of Managers
creator
Pepper, William, 1843-1898
id
PU-Mu. 0001.01
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
2.8 linear foot (the board of managers records fill seven archival boxes plus a few oversize pieces)
inclusive date
1887-1910
bulk date
1891-1906
abstract/scope/contents
William Pepper, originally a Provost of the University of Pennsylvania, was the visionary behind the establishment of the University Archaeological Association in 1889, and the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology in 1891, the precursors to the University Museum. The groups were composed of wealthy Philadelphians, interested in the ancient world, and capable of soliciting subscriptions to the Associations from their friends and colleagues. The University's sponsorship of an expedition to Nippur, Babylonia in 1887, financed by private funds was the impetus for Pepper to work toward the establishment of organizations to support exploration and house artifacts from the ancient world. With the need for a fire-proof building to house the finds, supported by the Trustees, College Hall was designated as the first repository in response to a request from William Pepper. By 1892, the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology, affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania, was operating under an independent Board of Managers whose first President was Joseph Leidy. Pepper himself became President of the Department in 1894, working tirelessly along with Sara Yorke Stevenson, toward the funding and building of the Free Museum of Science and Art. Toward this goal, the American Exploration Society was created as an independent funding organization for the recovery of artifacts and the establishment of a museum of archaeology. The Board of Managers records consists of seven boxes of correspondence and financial records spanning the creation of the University Archaeological Association, the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology, the American Exploration Society and the Museum. The records are organized first by the entities that preceeded the museum and contributed to its creation. The next group of records are organized by the tenure of the Presidents of the Board of Managers.
date_facet
1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s
bulk_date_facet
1890s 1900s
language_facet
English
name_facet
Pepper, William, 1843-1898 Baugh, Daniel, 1836-1921 Brinton, Daniel Garrison, 1837-1899 Coxe, Eckley B., 1839-1895 Culin, Stewart, 1858-1929 Egyptian Exploration Fund. Flinders-Petrie, W.M., Sir, 1853-1942 Harrison, Charles C., 1844-1929 Hearst, Phoebe Apperson, 1842-1919 Hilprecht, Hermann Volrath, 1859-1925 Houston, Samuel F., 1867-1952 Pepper, William, 1843-1898 Stevenson, Sara Yorke, 1847-1921 Strawbridge, Justus C., 1838-1911
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Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1876-1964
(Bulk: 1891-1916)
Creator:
Stephens, Charles H., 1864-1940
Extent: 2.8 linear feet
Charles Hallowell Stephens (1855-1931), followed several careers; illustrator, art teacher, collector of American Indian artifacts, and amateur anthropologist. Born and raised in Philadelphia he attended the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts studying under the tutelage of Thomas Eakins. The importance of Stephens for the Penn Museum resides in his extensive collection of Native American artifacts that was estimated to have about 2000 items, about 1700 of which were acquired by the Penn Museum in 1945. The collection is divided into eight series: Correspondence, Blackfoot, Sioux, Collection Materials, Correspondence on Data, Visual Material, American Pageant Association, and Photographs.
title
Charles H. Stephens Papers
creator
Stephens, Charles H., 1864-1940
id
PU-Mu. 1081
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
2.8 linear feet
inclusive date
1876-1964
bulk date
1891-1916
abstract/scope/contents
Charles Hallowell Stephens (1855-1931), followed several careers; illustrator, art teacher, collector of American Indian artifacts, and amateur anthropologist. Born and raised in Philadelphia he attended the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts studying under the tutelage of Thomas Eakins. The importance of Stephens for the Penn Museum resides in his extensive collection of Native American artifacts that was estimated to have about 2000 items, about 1700 of which were acquired by the Penn Museum in 1945. The collection is divided into eight series: Correspondence, Blackfoot, Sioux, Collection Materials, Correspondence on Data, Visual Material, American Pageant Association, and Photographs.
date_facet
1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s
bulk_date_facet
1890s 1900s 1910s
language_facet
English
name_facet
Stephens, Charles H., 1864-1940 Eyman, Frances, 1921-1949 Steele, George, Major, 1837-1916 Stephens, Alice Barber, 1858-1932 Stephens, Charles H., 1864-1940
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Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1868-1956
Creator:
Brinton, Daniel Garrison, 1837-1899
Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967
Extent: 1.2 linear foot (the collection consists of thirteen folders housed in two archival boxes)
Daniel Garrison Brinton is considered one of the founders of modern American Anthropology. He was also the first to hold a professorship in Archaeology in the United States. His library, which includes the Carl Hermann Berendt collection of manuscripts in the indigenous languages of Mexico and Central America, is considered the core of the University of Pennsylvania Anthropology Library. Among the collection are 4515 items; rare illustrations, contemporary photographs, portraits of individual authors, and texts in Spanish, French, Italian, and German. Brinton gathered his information from archival and library studies and did not participate in any archaeological expeditions. This small collection, attributed to Brinton by J. Alden Mason of the University Museum, consists of thirteen folders. Two contain linguistic notes on the Maya languages and another two contain drawings of pottery, objects, sites, and maps of Maya regions, primarily in Mexico. Some of the drawings are believed to be those of Carl Hermann Berendt, purchased by Daniel Brinton for the library at the University. The collection also has four scrapbooks and a book of poems written by Dr. Brinton. The collection is in fragile condition and many of the items are in need of conservation assessment, particularly the Berendt drawings.
title
Daniel Garrison Brinton Collection
creator
Brinton, Daniel Garrison, 1837-1899 Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967
id
PU-Mu. 1098
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
1.2 linear foot (the collection consists of thirteen folders housed in two archival boxes)
inclusive date
1868-1956
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Daniel Garrison Brinton is considered one of the founders of modern American Anthropology. He was also the first to hold a professorship in Archaeology in the United States. His library, which includes the Carl Hermann Berendt collection of manuscripts in the indigenous languages of Mexico and Central America, is considered the core of the University of Pennsylvania Anthropology Library. Among the collection are 4515 items; rare illustrations, contemporary photographs, portraits of individual authors, and texts in Spanish, French, Italian, and German. Brinton gathered his information from archival and library studies and did not participate in any archaeological expeditions. This small collection, attributed to Brinton by J. Alden Mason of the University Museum, consists of thirteen folders. Two contain linguistic notes on the Maya languages and another two contain drawings of pottery, objects, sites, and maps of Maya regions, primarily in Mexico. Some of the drawings are believed to be those of Carl Hermann Berendt, purchased by Daniel Brinton for the library at the University. The collection also has four scrapbooks and a book of poems written by Dr. Brinton. The collection is in fragile condition and many of the items are in need of conservation assessment, particularly the Berendt drawings.
date_facet
1860s 1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s
bulk_date_facet
language_facet
English
name_facet
Brinton, Daniel Garrison, 1837-1899 Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967 Berendt, Carl Hermann, 1817-1878 Brinton, Daniel Garrison, 1837-1899 Guzman, Panteleon de, 1652-1708
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Drawings (visual works) Faculty papers
Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1888-1926
Extent: 0.4 linear foot (the records of the egypt exploration fund fill one archival box of correspondence and financial records)
Amelia B. Edwards, a novelist and travel writer, traveled in Egypt from 1873 to 1874 to escape bad weather in her native England. Her stay in Egypt inspired the book, A Thousand Miles Up the Nile. A best seller at the time, Edwards story presented a view of nineteenth century Egypt along with descriptions of the previously unknown antiquities of the ancient civilization. After returning to England, Edwards and Reginald Stuart Poole of the Department of Coins and Metals of the British Museum co-founded the Egypt Exploration Fund. Its 1882 mission was to "explore, survey and excavate ancient sites in Egypt and Sudan and publish the results of this work." The work of W.M. Flinders Petrie was of great interest to the amateur Egyptologist Edwards, and she supported Flinders Petrie's appointment as successor to Edouard Naville in Egypt. Petrie arrived in Egypt in 1884 with funds from University College, London. He later became the first Edwards professor of Egyptology at the University of London. Subscriptions to the Fund came from all over the world. An office was founded in Boston to do the work of the fund in the United States. Organizations such as the Free Museum of Science and Art who subscribed to the fund were able to share in the artifacts recovered by Flinders Petrie's work. The Egypt Exploration Fund records fill one archival box. There are seven folders of correspondence and financial records including several circulars from the London and Boston offices of the Fund.
title
Egypt Exploration Fund
creator
id
PU-Mu. 0032
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
0.4 linear foot (the records of the egypt exploration fund fill one archival box of correspondence and financial records)
inclusive date
1888-1926
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Amelia B. Edwards, a novelist and travel writer, traveled in Egypt from 1873 to 1874 to escape bad weather in her native England. Her stay in Egypt inspired the book, A Thousand Miles Up the Nile. A best seller at the time, Edwards story presented a view of nineteenth century Egypt along with descriptions of the previously unknown antiquities of the ancient civilization. After returning to England, Edwards and Reginald Stuart Poole of the Department of Coins and Metals of the British Museum co-founded the Egypt Exploration Fund. Its 1882 mission was to "explore, survey and excavate ancient sites in Egypt and Sudan and publish the results of this work." The work of W.M. Flinders Petrie was of great interest to the amateur Egyptologist Edwards, and she supported Flinders Petrie's appointment as successor to Edouard Naville in Egypt. Petrie arrived in Egypt in 1884 with funds from University College, London. He later became the first Edwards professor of Egyptology at the University of London. Subscriptions to the Fund came from all over the world. An office was founded in Boston to do the work of the fund in the United States. Organizations such as the Free Museum of Science and Art who subscribed to the fund were able to share in the artifacts recovered by Flinders Petrie's work. The Egypt Exploration Fund records fill one archival box. There are seven folders of correspondence and financial records including several circulars from the London and Boston offices of the Fund.
date_facet
1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s
bulk_date_facet
language_facet
English
name_facet
Edwards, Amelia B., 1831-1892 Flinders-Petrie, W.M., Sir, 1853-1942 Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927 Naville, Edouard, 1844-1926 Pepper, William, 1843-1898 Stevenson, Sara Yorke, 1847-1921 Williams, Talcott, 1849-1928
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Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1879-1955
Creator:
Baker, Mary Louise, b. 1872-d. 1962
Extent: 5 linear feet
During her employment as museum artist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology from 1908-1936, M. (Mary) Louise Baker established an international reputation as the preeminent archaeological artist of her time with unmatched technical skill in scientific illustration. Her work at the University Museum included paintings of Maya pottery for limited edition folio volumes; paintings and reconstructions of Ur of the Chaldees’ royal tombs findings for Sir C. Leonard Woolley and of the Palace of Merenptah at Memphis, and a reconstructed drawing of the Piedras Negras Lintel 3. She spent much of her career dividing her time between the positions of museum artist and as art teacher at the George School in Bucks County, PA. A life-long Quaker, M. Louise Baker was born in Alliance, Ohio, on August 4, 1872. At the age of 19, she came to Pennsylvania to complete her education. By 1900, she had decided to concentrate on art and enrolled at the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Art. Early in her career, Baker was a free-lance artist for commercial illustrations and children’s magazines. She also did scientific drawings for archaeologist Clarence B. Moore at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. In 1908, she was hired by Dr. George Byron Gordon at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. During her career as an archaeological artist, Baker traveled to parts of the world where women never ventured unattended. The M. Louise Baker collection spans the years from 1889 to 1962 and contains her unpublished autobiography; 54 detailed diaries from 1889 to 1960; sketches, commercial art, illustrated stories and poems for children’s publications from her early career; scrapbooks which she compiled; drawings and paintings. A large portion of the collection, including Baker’s unpublished memoir, family photographs, scrapbooks, and diaries, was donated to the Penn Museum Archives in 2011 by Baker family members after a connection with Museum Research Associate Dr. Elin Danien. It is housed in ten archival boxes, plus additional drawings and paintings housed in the Oversize Plans and Drawings Collection and other examples of Baker’s work relating to Ur and Egypt on display in Museum exhibit galleries. The Penn Museum owns over 500 works by Baker, including all her work for the Maya Pottery publications, much of it unpublished.
title
M. Louise Baker papers
creator
Baker, Mary Louise, b. 1872-d. 1962
id
PU-Mu. 1107
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
5 linear feet
inclusive date
1879-1955
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
During her employment as museum artist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology from 1908-1936, M. (Mary) Louise Baker established an international reputation as the preeminent archaeological artist of her time with unmatched technical skill in scientific illustration. Her work at the University Museum included paintings of Maya pottery for limited edition folio volumes; paintings and reconstructions of Ur of the Chaldees’ royal tombs findings for Sir C. Leonard Woolley and of the Palace of Merenptah at Memphis, and a reconstructed drawing of the Piedras Negras Lintel 3. She spent much of her career dividing her time between the positions of museum artist and as art teacher at the George School in Bucks County, PA. A life-long Quaker, M. Louise Baker was born in Alliance, Ohio, on August 4, 1872. At the age of 19, she came to Pennsylvania to complete her education. By 1900, she had decided to concentrate on art and enrolled at the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Art. Early in her career, Baker was a free-lance artist for commercial illustrations and children’s magazines. She also did scientific drawings for archaeologist Clarence B. Moore at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. In 1908, she was hired by Dr. George Byron Gordon at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. During her career as an archaeological artist, Baker traveled to parts of the world where women never ventured unattended. The M. Louise Baker collection spans the years from 1889 to 1962 and contains her unpublished autobiography; 54 detailed diaries from 1889 to 1960; sketches, commercial art, illustrated stories and poems for children’s publications from her early career; scrapbooks which she compiled; drawings and paintings. A large portion of the collection, including Baker’s unpublished memoir, family photographs, scrapbooks, and diaries, was donated to the Penn Museum Archives in 2011 by Baker family members after a connection with Museum Research Associate Dr. Elin Danien. It is housed in ten archival boxes, plus additional drawings and paintings housed in the Oversize Plans and Drawings Collection and other examples of Baker’s work relating to Ur and Egypt on display in Museum exhibit galleries. The Penn Museum owns over 500 works by Baker, including all her work for the Maya Pottery publications, much of it unpublished.
date_facet
1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s
bulk_date_facet
language_facet
English
name_facet
Baker, Mary Louise, b. 1872-d. 1962 Allen, E. Constance Baker, Mary Louise, b. 1872-d. 1962 Fisher, Clarence Stanley, 1876-1941 Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927 Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967 Wooley, C. Leonard, Sir, b. 1880-d.1960
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Diaries Drawings (visual works)
Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1881-1900
Creator:
Haynes, John Henry
Hilprecht, H. V. (Hermann Vollrat), 1859-1925
Peters, John P. (John Punnett), 1852-1921
Extent: 20 linear feet
In 1887, the University of Pennsylvania agreed to sponsor an expedition to the Near East. The idea was conceived by Reverend John Punnett Peters, University of Pennsylvania Professor of Hebrew. Nippur was a pre-Biblical city-state located in the region between the Tigris and Euphrates, the area believed to be the "cradle of civilization." The museum conducted four expeditions between 1889 and 1898. The textual records for Nippur consist of 20 linear feet of files are arranged by Expedition (I, II, III, IV), as well as publications, maps and drawings. The documents for each expedition are separated according to type: Field Notes, Reports and Narratives, Correspondence, Financial Records.
title
Nippur, Iraq expedition records
creator
Haynes, John Henry Hilprecht, H. V. (Hermann Vollrat), 1859-1925 Peters, John P. (John Punnett), 1852-1921
id
PU-Mu. 1017
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
20 linear feet
inclusive date
1881-1900
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
In 1887, the University of Pennsylvania agreed to sponsor an expedition to the Near East. The idea was conceived by Reverend John Punnett Peters, University of Pennsylvania Professor of Hebrew. Nippur was a pre-Biblical city-state located in the region between the Tigris and Euphrates, the area believed to be the "cradle of civilization." The museum conducted four expeditions between 1889 and 1898. The textual records for Nippur consist of 20 linear feet of files are arranged by Expedition (I, II, III, IV), as well as publications, maps and drawings. The documents for each expedition are separated according to type: Field Notes, Reports and Narratives, Correspondence, Financial Records.
date_facet
1880s 1890s 1900s
bulk_date_facet
language_facet
English
name_facet
Haynes, John Henry Hilprecht, H. V. (Hermann Vollrat), 1859-1925 Peters, John P. (John Punnett), 1852-1921 Fisher, Clarence Stanley, 1876-1941 Haynes, John Henry Hilprecht, H. V. (Hermann Vollrat), 1859-1925 Peters, John P. (John Punnett), 1852-1921 University of Pennsylvania. Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
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Correspondence Field notes Maps
Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1875-1904
Creator:
Stevenson, Sara Yorke, 1847-1921
Extent: 0.4 linear foot
Sara Yorke Stevenson was closely involved with creating both the University Archaeological Association and the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology, the two organizations that merged and eventually became the Penn Museum. In 1891, she accepted an appointment as curator of the Egyptian Section; in 1892, she also became curator of the Mediterranean Section. In addition to her curatorial responsibilities, she succeeded Stewart Culin as secretary of the Board of Managers in 1894 and served as secretary until 1904, when she became president and chairman. In early 1905, however, she resigned both from the Board and as curator. The textual records comprising the Sara Yorke Stevenson curatorial subgroup consist primarily of correspondence about developing the Mediterranean collection. These records are divided into two series. Series 1 includes correspondence about acquiring potential collections; Series 2 contains documentation about collections that have been acquired.
title
Sara Yorke Stevenson Mediterranean Section records
creator
Stevenson, Sara Yorke, 1847-1921
id
PU-Mu. 0060
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
0.4 linear foot
inclusive date
1875-1904
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Sara Yorke Stevenson was closely involved with creating both the University Archaeological Association and the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology, the two organizations that merged and eventually became the Penn Museum. In 1891, she accepted an appointment as curator of the Egyptian Section; in 1892, she also became curator of the Mediterranean Section. In addition to her curatorial responsibilities, she succeeded Stewart Culin as secretary of the Board of Managers in 1894 and served as secretary until 1904, when she became president and chairman. In early 1905, however, she resigned both from the Board and as curator. The textual records comprising the Sara Yorke Stevenson curatorial subgroup consist primarily of correspondence about developing the Mediterranean collection. These records are divided into two series. Series 1 includes correspondence about acquiring potential collections; Series 2 contains documentation about collections that have been acquired.
date_facet
1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s
bulk_date_facet
language_facet
English
name_facet
Stevenson, Sara Yorke, 1847-1921 Drexel, Lucy Wharton, b. 1838-d.1912 Frothingham, Arthur L. Hearst, Phoebe Apperson, 1842-1919 Stevenson, Sara Yorke, 1847-1921 Wanamaker, John, 1838-1922 Williams, Talcott, 1849-1928
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