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Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1897-1898
Creator:
Rosher, Charles H.
Extent: 01 linear foot
Charles H. Rosher was a trained engineer who worked with W.M. Flinders Petrie on archaeological sites in Egypt. Flinders Petrie's recommendation of Rosher as a capable engineer to the Penn and Cairo Museums resulted in his employment to remove several monuments from a site in Tanis. As a part of his duties, Rosher was charged with obtaining a permit for the work. As the permit did not materialize, Sara Yorke Stevenson of the Egyptian section of the museum traveled to Cairo to expedite the process. The diplomacy required to obtain the necessary permits and approvals from the Egyptian governing authorities proved too difficult for even Mrs. Stevenson. While embroiled in the process however, she dismissed Rosher to work for three months with Flinders Petrie to gain basic archaeological skills. As fate would have it, due to delays, Petrie was not able to meet with Rosher nor to train him. Rosher did perform some work at Dendereh and surveyed at the Tanis site. A dispute over his request for more money from the museum led to Penn accepting Rosher's resignation. The permit was never issued to Penn to excavate or remove monuments at Tanis. The Charles S. Rosher collection consists of two drawings from his time in Egypt. These tiems are oversize and kept in the map case. The first drawing, done in 1898 for the American Exploration Society shows "Details of some of the Tombs Excavated at Dendera." It is a reproduction of an ink drawing on paper. There are two small copies of the larger work that have been encapsulated. The second drawing is "Dendera Sketch Map of the Ancient Cemetery excavated by W.M.Flinders Petrie on behalf of the Egypt Exploration Fund". The drawing was completed by Rosher from "surveys by himself and W.M. Flinders Petrie" during the years 1897-1898. This map is also a reproduction of an ink drawing on paper.
title
Charles H. Rosher Dendereh records
creator
Rosher, Charles H.
id
PU-Mu. 1007
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
01 linear foot
inclusive date
1897-1898
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Charles H. Rosher was a trained engineer who worked with W.M. Flinders Petrie on archaeological sites in Egypt. Flinders Petrie's recommendation of Rosher as a capable engineer to the Penn and Cairo Museums resulted in his employment to remove several monuments from a site in Tanis. As a part of his duties, Rosher was charged with obtaining a permit for the work. As the permit did not materialize, Sara Yorke Stevenson of the Egyptian section of the museum traveled to Cairo to expedite the process. The diplomacy required to obtain the necessary permits and approvals from the Egyptian governing authorities proved too difficult for even Mrs. Stevenson. While embroiled in the process however, she dismissed Rosher to work for three months with Flinders Petrie to gain basic archaeological skills. As fate would have it, due to delays, Petrie was not able to meet with Rosher nor to train him. Rosher did perform some work at Dendereh and surveyed at the Tanis site. A dispute over his request for more money from the museum led to Penn accepting Rosher's resignation. The permit was never issued to Penn to excavate or remove monuments at Tanis. The Charles S. Rosher collection consists of two drawings from his time in Egypt. These tiems are oversize and kept in the map case. The first drawing, done in 1898 for the American Exploration Society shows "Details of some of the Tombs Excavated at Dendera." It is a reproduction of an ink drawing on paper. There are two small copies of the larger work that have been encapsulated. The second drawing is "Dendera Sketch Map of the Ancient Cemetery excavated by W.M.Flinders Petrie on behalf of the Egypt Exploration Fund". The drawing was completed by Rosher from "surveys by himself and W.M. Flinders Petrie" during the years 1897-1898. This map is also a reproduction of an ink drawing on paper.
date_facet
1890s
bulk_date_facet
language_facet
English
name_facet
Rosher, Charles H. Flinders Petrie, William M. Rosher, Charles H. Stevenson, Sara Yorke, 1847-1921
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Drawings (visual works)
Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1915-1949
(Bulk: 1915-1918)
Creator:
Fisher, Clarence Stanley, 1876-1941
Extent: 7.7 linear foot
Clarence S. Fisher was born in Philadelphia in 1876 and attended the University of Pennsylvania, attaining a degree in architecture in 1897 but devoting his entire life to archaeology. His first archaeology field experience was as the architect for the initial Babylonian expedition to Nippur from 1898 to 1900. This was followed by a research fellowship in Babylonian archaeology at the University Museum. Fisher also worked as an assistant to Harvard Archaeologist, George Andrew Reisner in Egypt and Samaria. From Reisner, Fisher learned archaeological techniques and the methods of meticulous record keeping he would use in his later work. Fisher was appointed a curator of the Egyptian section of the University of Pennsylvania Museum by George B. Gordon in 1914. He spent the next nine years in the field collecting data in Dendereh, Giza, Memphis, and Dra Abu el-Naga. Fisher's expedition to the cemetery at Dendereh re-worked a site that had been explored by Charles S. Rosher and W.M. Flinders Petrie, producing more precise data and a wealth of objects from the burial sites. The Clarence S. Fisher Dendereh expedition records consist of seven archival boxes of correspondence, diaries, notebooks, plans, post-excavation notes and photographs. Additional material includes three card files with tomb notecards and object cards. In addition, there are seven large object register books stored in two boxes and oversize materials stored in the map case.
title
Clarence S. Fisher Dendereh Expedition records
creator
Fisher, Clarence Stanley, 1876-1941
id
PU-Mu. 1011
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
7.7 linear foot
inclusive date
1915-1949
bulk date
1915-1918
abstract/scope/contents
Clarence S. Fisher was born in Philadelphia in 1876 and attended the University of Pennsylvania, attaining a degree in architecture in 1897 but devoting his entire life to archaeology. His first archaeology field experience was as the architect for the initial Babylonian expedition to Nippur from 1898 to 1900. This was followed by a research fellowship in Babylonian archaeology at the University Museum. Fisher also worked as an assistant to Harvard Archaeologist, George Andrew Reisner in Egypt and Samaria. From Reisner, Fisher learned archaeological techniques and the methods of meticulous record keeping he would use in his later work. Fisher was appointed a curator of the Egyptian section of the University of Pennsylvania Museum by George B. Gordon in 1914. He spent the next nine years in the field collecting data in Dendereh, Giza, Memphis, and Dra Abu el-Naga. Fisher's expedition to the cemetery at Dendereh re-worked a site that had been explored by Charles S. Rosher and W.M. Flinders Petrie, producing more precise data and a wealth of objects from the burial sites. The Clarence S. Fisher Dendereh expedition records consist of seven archival boxes of correspondence, diaries, notebooks, plans, post-excavation notes and photographs. Additional material includes three card files with tomb notecards and object cards. In addition, there are seven large object register books stored in two boxes and oversize materials stored in the map case.
date_facet
1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s
bulk_date_facet
1910s
language_facet
English
name_facet
Fisher, Clarence Stanley, 1876-1941 Coxe, Eckley B., 1839-1895 Fisher, Clarence Stanley, 1876-1941 Flinders Petrie, William M. Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927 Reisner, George Andrew, 1867-1942
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Card catalogs Field notes Maps Site plans
Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1890-1907
Creator:
Stevenson, Sara Yorke, 1847-1921
Extent: 0.8 linear foot (the egyptian section sara yorke stevenson records consist of two archival boxes of correspondence, collection information and financial records)
Sara Yorke Stevenson, the first curator of the Egyptian section of the Free Museum of Science and Art, was a vital force in the creation and success of the museum. Along with William Pepper, Stevenson worked tirelessly through the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology and the American Exploration Society to gain subscriptions, build the Museum and acquire a collection of antiquities. In addition to being the first curator of the Egyptian Section, Stevenson was the Secretary of the Board of Managers and of the American Exploration Society. She served as President of the Board from 1904 to 1905. While Stevenson was performing the dual role of Secretary of the Board of Managers and Curator, the museum relied on the London-based Egypt Exploration Fund to provide a share of the findings of archaeologist W.M. Flinders Petrie to the museum. Stevenson cultivated a relationship with Flinders Petrie and well connected Egyptians such as Yacoub Artin Pasha. Mrs Stevenson traveled to Egypt in 1898 cementing connections and investigating other possible sites for exploration. The Egyptian Section Sara Yorke Stevenson records consist of two archival boxes of correspondence, collection information and financial records.
title
Sara Yorke Stevenson Egyptian Section records
creator
Stevenson, Sara Yorke, 1847-1921
id
PU-Mu. 0057
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
0.8 linear foot (the egyptian section sara yorke stevenson records consist of two archival boxes of correspondence, collection information and financial records)
inclusive date
1890-1907
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Sara Yorke Stevenson, the first curator of the Egyptian section of the Free Museum of Science and Art, was a vital force in the creation and success of the museum. Along with William Pepper, Stevenson worked tirelessly through the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology and the American Exploration Society to gain subscriptions, build the Museum and acquire a collection of antiquities. In addition to being the first curator of the Egyptian Section, Stevenson was the Secretary of the Board of Managers and of the American Exploration Society. She served as President of the Board from 1904 to 1905. While Stevenson was performing the dual role of Secretary of the Board of Managers and Curator, the museum relied on the London-based Egypt Exploration Fund to provide a share of the findings of archaeologist W.M. Flinders Petrie to the museum. Stevenson cultivated a relationship with Flinders Petrie and well connected Egyptians such as Yacoub Artin Pasha. Mrs Stevenson traveled to Egypt in 1898 cementing connections and investigating other possible sites for exploration. The Egyptian Section Sara Yorke Stevenson records consist of two archival boxes of correspondence, collection information and financial records.
date_facet
1890s 1900s
bulk_date_facet
language_facet
English
name_facet
Stevenson, Sara Yorke, 1847-1921 American Exploration Society. Egyptian Exploration Fund. Flinders Petrie, William M. Muller, W. Max, 1862 to 1919 Parrish, Dillwyn, 1894-1941 Pepper, William, 1843-1898 Ranke, Hermann, 1878-1953 Stevenson, Sara Yorke, 1847-1921 Wanamaker, John, 1838-1922
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