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Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1932-1978
Creator:
Satterthwaite, Linton, 1897-1978
Extent: 18 linear foot
title
Linton Satterthwaite Papers
creator
Satterthwaite, Linton, 1897-1978
id
PU-Mu. 0051
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
18 linear foot
inclusive date
1932-1978
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
date_facet
1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s
bulk_date_facet
language_facet
English
name_facet
Satterthwaite, Linton, 1897-1978 Beyer, Hermann, b. 1880-d. 1942 Butler, Mary, 1903-1970 Coe, William R. , 1926-2009 Jones, Christopher, b. 1937 Kelly, D.H., b.1923 Mason, John Alden, 1885-1967 Proskouriakoff, Tatiana, 1909-1985 Satterthwaite, Linton, 1897-1978 Thompson, J. Eric S., Sir, b.1898-d.1975
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Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1936-1969
Creator:
Butler, Mary, 1903-1970
Tejeda Fonseca, Antonio, Artist
Extent: 2.8 linear foot
Mary Butler Lewis, professionally known as Dr. Butler, was one of a very small group of women archaeologists who worked in the United States during the early 20th century and the first female archaeologist to be awarded a Ph.D. from the Department of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania (1936). She was born on June 23, 1903 in Media, PA and educated at Vassar College, Radcliffe and the University of Pennsylvania. Mary Butler’s professional career was firmly rooted in the Museum of the University of Pennsylvania , where she served as a Research Associate in the American Section from 1940-1970. Her areas of professional interest included Mesoamerican archaeology and northeastern and central United States prehistory, specializing in ceramics and pottery sequences. At the time of her death in 1970, she was the historian-archaeologist for the restoration of the 18th century Morton Mortonson House in Norwood, PA. The Mary Butler Lewis collection spans the period from 1933 to 1969 and contains materials primarily related to her field research, professional activities, and articles and publications. The collection consists of thirteen archival boxes of data, which are divided into nine series: correspondence, professional organizations and activities; publications, articles, and lectures; Highland Maya excavations, Maya research (general), Hudson Valley Archaeological Survey, Pennsylvania, Western Pennsylvania, and Morton Mortonson House. In addition to correspondence, field notes and drawings, field catalogues, maps and plans, photographs, journals, reports, manuscripts and motion picture films are represented.
title
Mary Butler Lewis Papers
creator
Butler, Mary, 1903-1970 Tejeda Fonseca, Antonio, Artist
id
PU-Mu. 1097
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
2.8 linear foot
inclusive date
1936-1969
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Mary Butler Lewis, professionally known as Dr. Butler, was one of a very small group of women archaeologists who worked in the United States during the early 20th century and the first female archaeologist to be awarded a Ph.D. from the Department of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania (1936). She was born on June 23, 1903 in Media, PA and educated at Vassar College, Radcliffe and the University of Pennsylvania. Mary Butler’s professional career was firmly rooted in the Museum of the University of Pennsylvania , where she served as a Research Associate in the American Section from 1940-1970. Her areas of professional interest included Mesoamerican archaeology and northeastern and central United States prehistory, specializing in ceramics and pottery sequences. At the time of her death in 1970, she was the historian-archaeologist for the restoration of the 18th century Morton Mortonson House in Norwood, PA. The Mary Butler Lewis collection spans the period from 1933 to 1969 and contains materials primarily related to her field research, professional activities, and articles and publications. The collection consists of thirteen archival boxes of data, which are divided into nine series: correspondence, professional organizations and activities; publications, articles, and lectures; Highland Maya excavations, Maya research (general), Hudson Valley Archaeological Survey, Pennsylvania, Western Pennsylvania, and Morton Mortonson House. In addition to correspondence, field notes and drawings, field catalogues, maps and plans, photographs, journals, reports, manuscripts and motion picture films are represented.
date_facet
1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s
bulk_date_facet
language_facet
English
name_facet
Butler, Mary, 1903-1970 Tejeda Fonseca, Antonio Burkitt, Robert James, 1869-1945 Butler, Mary, 1903-1970 Dieseldorff, Erwin P., 1868-1940 Termer, Franz, 1894-1968
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Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1903-1939
(Bulk: 1913-1930)
Creator:
Burkitt, Robert James, 1869-1945
Extent: 1.4 linear feet (the collection is contained in 3 manuscript boxes. correspondence is 16 folders; catalogues and reports are 14 folders; photographs are contained in 16 folders; and 13 folders of notes and studies on collection. )
Robert Burkitt lived and worked in Guatemala for most of his life. A graduate of Harvard University, he first traveled to Central America in 1894 with George Gordon as Gordon's assistant on the Fourth Coban Expedition. Burkitt became enamored with the culture and language of the Maya and never returned to North America. He traveled the countryside, corresponding with Gordon, and collecting items for the Museum under a loosely binding agreement with Gordon and later Horace Jayne. Burkitt's letters and catalogues are rich documents depicting the cultural, linguistic, topological, and historical features of the Guatemala Highlands. Burkitt wrote and worked from the areas of Chama, Chipal, Coban, Senahu, Chiantla, Chocola, and other areas of the Alta Verapaz region. He produced a detailed catalogue of his discoveries accompanied by photgraphs and drawings. Among Burkitt's discoveries is the Ratinixul Vase unearthed in 1923. His work was published in the Museum Journal in 1924 and 1930. Burkitt also wrote about the languages of the Maya, leaving an unfinished grammar and dictionary of the Kekchi language at his death in 1945.
title
Robert Burkitt expedition records
creator
Burkitt, Robert James, 1869-1945
id
PU-Mu. 1102
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
1.4 linear feet (the collection is contained in 3 manuscript boxes. correspondence is 16 folders; catalogues and reports are 14 folders; photographs are contained in 16 folders; and 13 folders of notes and studies on collection. )
inclusive date
1903-1939
bulk date
1913-1930
abstract/scope/contents
Robert Burkitt lived and worked in Guatemala for most of his life. A graduate of Harvard University, he first traveled to Central America in 1894 with George Gordon as Gordon's assistant on the Fourth Coban Expedition. Burkitt became enamored with the culture and language of the Maya and never returned to North America. He traveled the countryside, corresponding with Gordon, and collecting items for the Museum under a loosely binding agreement with Gordon and later Horace Jayne. Burkitt's letters and catalogues are rich documents depicting the cultural, linguistic, topological, and historical features of the Guatemala Highlands. Burkitt wrote and worked from the areas of Chama, Chipal, Coban, Senahu, Chiantla, Chocola, and other areas of the Alta Verapaz region. He produced a detailed catalogue of his discoveries accompanied by photgraphs and drawings. Among Burkitt's discoveries is the Ratinixul Vase unearthed in 1923. His work was published in the Museum Journal in 1924 and 1930. Burkitt also wrote about the languages of the Maya, leaving an unfinished grammar and dictionary of the Kekchi language at his death in 1945.
date_facet
1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s
bulk_date_facet
1910s 1920s 1930s
language_facet
English
name_facet
Burkitt, Robert James, 1869-1945 Burkitt, Robert James, 1869-1945 Butler, Mary, 1903-1970 Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927 Jayne, Horace Howard Furness, 1898-1975
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Card catalogs Correspondence Photographic prints Photographs