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filtered Subject: Person: Hilprecht, H. V. (Hermann Vollrat), 1859-1925
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Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1887-1910
(Bulk: 1891-1906)
Creator:
Pepper, William, 1843-1898
Extent: 2.8 linear foot (the board of managers records fill seven archival boxes plus a few oversize pieces)
William Pepper, originally a Provost of the University of Pennsylvania, was the visionary behind the establishment of the University Archaeological Association in 1889, and the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology in 1891, the precursors to the University Museum. The groups were composed of wealthy Philadelphians, interested in the ancient world, and capable of soliciting subscriptions to the Associations from their friends and colleagues. The University's sponsorship of an expedition to Nippur, Babylonia in 1887, financed by private funds was the impetus for Pepper to work toward the establishment of organizations to support exploration and house artifacts from the ancient world. With the need for a fire-proof building to house the finds, supported by the Trustees, College Hall was designated as the first repository in response to a request from William Pepper. By 1892, the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology, affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania, was operating under an independent Board of Managers whose first President was Joseph Leidy. Pepper himself became President of the Department in 1894, working tirelessly along with Sara Yorke Stevenson, toward the funding and building of the Free Museum of Science and Art. Toward this goal, the American Exploration Society was created an an independent funding organization for the recovery of artifacts and the establishment of a museum of archaeology. The Board of Managers records consists of seven boxes of correspondence and financial records spanning the creation of the University Archaeological Association, the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology, the American Exploration Society and the Museum. The records are organized first by the entities that preceeded the museum and contributed to its creation. The next group of records are organized by the tenure of the Presidents of the Board of Managers.
title
Board of Managers
creator
Pepper, William, 1843-1898
id
PU-Mu. 0001.01
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
2.8 linear foot (the board of managers records fill seven archival boxes plus a few oversize pieces)
inclusive date
1887-1910
bulk date
1891-1906
abstract/scope/contents
William Pepper, originally a Provost of the University of Pennsylvania, was the visionary behind the establishment of the University Archaeological Association in 1889, and the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology in 1891, the precursors to the University Museum. The groups were composed of wealthy Philadelphians, interested in the ancient world, and capable of soliciting subscriptions to the Associations from their friends and colleagues. The University's sponsorship of an expedition to Nippur, Babylonia in 1887, financed by private funds was the impetus for Pepper to work toward the establishment of organizations to support exploration and house artifacts from the ancient world. With the need for a fire-proof building to house the finds, supported by the Trustees, College Hall was designated as the first repository in response to a request from William Pepper. By 1892, the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology, affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania, was operating under an independent Board of Managers whose first President was Joseph Leidy. Pepper himself became President of the Department in 1894, working tirelessly along with Sara Yorke Stevenson, toward the funding and building of the Free Museum of Science and Art. Toward this goal, the American Exploration Society was created an an independent funding organization for the recovery of artifacts and the establishment of a museum of archaeology. The Board of Managers records consists of seven boxes of correspondence and financial records spanning the creation of the University Archaeological Association, the Department of Archaeology and Paleontology, the American Exploration Society and the Museum. The records are organized first by the entities that preceeded the museum and contributed to its creation. The next group of records are organized by the tenure of the Presidents of the Board of Managers.
date_facet
1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s
bulk_date_facet
1890s 1900s
language_facet
English
name_facet
Pepper, William, 1843-1898 Baugh, Daniel, 1836-1921 Brinton, Daniel Garrison, 1837-1899 Coxe, Eckley B., 1839-1895 Culin, Stewart, 1858-1929 Egyptian Exploration Fund. Flinders-Petrie, W.M., Sir, 1853-1942 Harrison, Charles C., 1844-1929 Hearst, Phoebe Apperson, 1842-1919 Hilprecht, H. V. (Hermann Vollrat), 1859-1925 Houston, Samuel F., 1867-1952 Pepper, William, 1843-1898 Stevenson, Sara Yorke, 1847-1921 Strawbridge, Justus C., 1838-1911
name_with_roles_facet
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topical_subject_facet
genre_form_facet
Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1881-1900
Creator:
Haynes, John Henry
Hilprecht, H. V. (Hermann Vollrat), 1859-1925
Peters, John P. (John Punnett), 1852-1921
Extent: 20 linear feet
In 1887, the University of Pennsylvania agreed to sponsor an expedition to the Near East. The idea was conceived by Reverend John Punnett Peters, University of Pennsylvania Professor of Hebrew. Nippur was a pre-Biblical city-state located in the region between the Tigris and Euphrates, the area believed to be the "cradle of civilization." The museum conducted four expeditions between 1889 and 1898. The textual records for Nippur consist of 20 linear feet of files are arranged by Expedition (I, II, III, IV), as well as publications, maps and drawings. The documents for each expedition are separated according to type: Field Notes, Reports and Narratives, Correspondence, Financial Records.
title
Nippur, Iraq expedition records
creator
Haynes, John Henry Hilprecht, H. V. (Hermann Vollrat), 1859-1925 Peters, John P. (John Punnett), 1852-1921
id
PU-Mu. 1017
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
20 linear feet
inclusive date
1881-1900
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
In 1887, the University of Pennsylvania agreed to sponsor an expedition to the Near East. The idea was conceived by Reverend John Punnett Peters, University of Pennsylvania Professor of Hebrew. Nippur was a pre-Biblical city-state located in the region between the Tigris and Euphrates, the area believed to be the "cradle of civilization." The museum conducted four expeditions between 1889 and 1898. The textual records for Nippur consist of 20 linear feet of files are arranged by Expedition (I, II, III, IV), as well as publications, maps and drawings. The documents for each expedition are separated according to type: Field Notes, Reports and Narratives, Correspondence, Financial Records.
date_facet
1880s 1890s 1900s
bulk_date_facet
language_facet
English
name_facet
Haynes, John Henry Hilprecht, H. V. (Hermann Vollrat), 1859-1925 Peters, John P. (John Punnett), 1852-1921 Fisher, Clarence Stanley, 1876-1941 Haynes, John Henry Hilprecht, H. V. (Hermann Vollrat), 1859-1925 Peters, John P. (John Punnett), 1852-1921 University of Pennsylvania. Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
name_with_roles_facet
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topical_subject_facet
genre_form_facet
Correspondence Field notes Maps