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Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1952-1973
(Bulk: 1960-1971)
Creator:
Bass, George Fletcher, 1932-
Extent: 27 linear foot (the collection consists of twenty-seven archival boxes of data of which seventeen boxes contain correspondence. there are six boxes of expedition records and four boxes of photographs)
George Fletcher Bass, a pioneer in the field of Underwater Archaeology, was born in South Carolina in 1932. Planning to follow in the footsteps of his father and grandfather who were Professors of English, he enrolled at Johns Hopkins University. A trip to Rome and the sight of the Roman antiquities altered Bass'life. After returning to Johns Hopkins, Bass spent two years at the School of Classical Studies in Athens followed by enrollment at Penn for his Ph.D. studies in classical archaeology. Bass was chosen in 1960 by Rodney Young, Professor and Chairman of Classical Archaeology at Penn and the Curator of the Mediterranean Section of the Penn Museum to direct the underwater excavation of a Bronze-Age shipwreck in Cape Gelidonya, Turkey. This event marked the beginnings of underwater archaeology as a discipline and as Bass'life's work. Bass conducted additional expeditions in Turkey at Yassi Ada, sponsored by the University Museum and the American Institute of Nautical Archaeology as well as the Thera Excavations sponsored by the Greek Department of Antiquities. Additional excavations were conducted in Italy at a Neolithic and Bronze Age site near Gravina di Puglia. Bass participated in or supervised additional work at Bodrum and Antolya, Turkey. In 1972, George Bass established the Institute of Nautical Archaeology and decided to make this organization the next step in his career. He became not only the founder but the director of the Institute which is now housed at Texas A&M University. The George F. Bass Underwater Archaeology papers are composed of twenty-seven boxes of correspondence, expedition records, photographs and drawings mainly from his work at Cape Gelidonya and Yassi Ada.
title
George F. Bass Underwater Archaeology papers
creator
Bass, George Fletcher, 1932-
id
PU-Mu. 1054
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
27 linear foot (the collection consists of twenty-seven archival boxes of data of which seventeen boxes contain correspondence. there are six boxes of expedition records and four boxes of photographs)
inclusive date
1952-1973
bulk date
1960-1971
abstract/scope/contents
George Fletcher Bass, a pioneer in the field of Underwater Archaeology, was born in South Carolina in 1932. Planning to follow in the footsteps of his father and grandfather who were Professors of English, he enrolled at Johns Hopkins University. A trip to Rome and the sight of the Roman antiquities altered Bass'life. After returning to Johns Hopkins, Bass spent two years at the School of Classical Studies in Athens followed by enrollment at Penn for his Ph.D. studies in classical archaeology. Bass was chosen in 1960 by Rodney Young, Professor and Chairman of Classical Archaeology at Penn and the Curator of the Mediterranean Section of the Penn Museum to direct the underwater excavation of a Bronze-Age shipwreck in Cape Gelidonya, Turkey. This event marked the beginnings of underwater archaeology as a discipline and as Bass'life's work. Bass conducted additional expeditions in Turkey at Yassi Ada, sponsored by the University Museum and the American Institute of Nautical Archaeology as well as the Thera Excavations sponsored by the Greek Department of Antiquities. Additional excavations were conducted in Italy at a Neolithic and Bronze Age site near Gravina di Puglia. Bass participated in or supervised additional work at Bodrum and Antolya, Turkey. In 1972, George Bass established the Institute of Nautical Archaeology and decided to make this organization the next step in his career. He became not only the founder but the director of the Institute which is now housed at Texas A&M University. The George F. Bass Underwater Archaeology papers are composed of twenty-seven boxes of correspondence, expedition records, photographs and drawings mainly from his work at Cape Gelidonya and Yassi Ada.
date_facet
1950s 1960s 1970s
bulk_date_facet
1960s 1970s
language_facet
English
name_facet
Bass, George Fletcher, 1932- Bass, George Fletcher, 1932- Katzev, Michael, 1939-2001 Rainey, Froelich, Director of the University Museum Throckmorton, Peter, 1928-1990 Young, Rodney S. (Rodney Stuart), 1907-1974
name_with_roles_facet
geographical_subject_facet
topical_subject_facet
genre_form_facet
Penn Museum Archives [Contact Us]
1969-1988
Creator:
Eiseman, Cynthia Jones, 1944-
Owen, David L.
Extent: 0.2 linear foot
In July of 1970, in the straits of Messina about 100 meters from the village of Porticello, underwater excavation of a vessel subsequently determined to be 5th century B.C. Roman, commenced under the direction of David I. Owen, assistant curator of the Underwater Archaeology Section of the University of Pennsylvania Museum. The Porticello Shipwreck spans the period from 1969-1988 and primarily contains letters, field notes, object descriptions, drawings and photographs (prints, slides, and negatives) of objects and under water excavations relating to the project. The collection is divided into six series: Correspondence; Field Notes; Catalogues; Publications; Drawings; Photographs.
title
Porticello shipwreck expedition records
creator
Eiseman, Cynthia Jones, 1944- Owen, David L.
id
PU-Mu. 1055
repository
University of Pennsylvania Penn Museum Archives
extent
0.2 linear foot
inclusive date
1969-1988
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
In July of 1970, in the straits of Messina about 100 meters from the village of Porticello, underwater excavation of a vessel subsequently determined to be 5th century B.C. Roman, commenced under the direction of David I. Owen, assistant curator of the Underwater Archaeology Section of the University of Pennsylvania Museum. The Porticello Shipwreck spans the period from 1969-1988 and primarily contains letters, field notes, object descriptions, drawings and photographs (prints, slides, and negatives) of objects and under water excavations relating to the project. The collection is divided into six series: Correspondence; Field Notes; Catalogues; Publications; Drawings; Photographs.
date_facet
1960s 1970s 1980s
bulk_date_facet
language_facet
English
name_facet
Eiseman, Cynthia Jones, 1944- Owen, David L. Eiseman, Cynthia Jones, 1944- Owen, David L. University of Pennsylvania. Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
name_with_roles_facet
geographical_subject_facet
topical_subject_facet
genre_form_facet