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Main Content

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

circa 1850-2014, 45 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

circa 1930-1980, 5 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1892-1989, 17 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1879-circa 1980, 1 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1987, 1 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1942-1983, 1.5 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

circa 1890-1995 (bulk 1960-1995), 19 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1898-1982 [bulk 1910-1970], 4 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1944-1991, 4 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1839-1991 [bulk 1909-1960], 2.5 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1945-1991, 3 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1931-1983, 1.25 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1850-1994 [bulk 1920-1992], 4 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

circa 1950-1970, 12 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1966-1989, 6 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1925-2009 [bulk 1956-1990], 140 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

circa 1970-1991, 2 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1951-1994 [bulk 1968-1994], 8 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

circa 1912-1987, 6.5 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1963-1980, 2 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1904-1993 [bulk 1940-1989], 8 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1946-1990 [bulk 1970-1979], 40 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1881-1947 [bulk 1910-1925], 4 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1926-1990, 9 linear feet

01

African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections

1945-1989 [bulk 1965-1985], 5 linear feet

01

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the African American Museum in Philadelphia. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Title:
African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections
Date:
circa 1850-2014
Call Number:
01
Extent:
45 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Founded in 1976 in celebration of the nation's Bicentennial, the African American Museum in Philadelphia (AAMP) is the first institution funded and built by a major municipality to preserve, interpret and exhibit the heritage of African Americans. The museum is committed to telling the story of African Americans in all its permutations: family life, the Civil Rights movement, arts and entertainment, sports, medicine, architecture, politics, religion, law, and technology. The African American Museum in Philadelphia small collections, circa 1850-2014, consist of various small accumulations (less than one linear foot) of archival materials acquired from a variety of sources at various times. The collection focuses on, but is not limited to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, touching on all aspects of African American life and culture. It features a great variety of document types, such as correspondence, minute books, ephemera, photographs, clippings, scrapbooks, film reels, and much more.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Crite, Allan Rohan, 1910-2007
Title:
Allan Rohan Crite papers
Date:
circa 1930-1980
Call Number:
08
Extent:
5 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Allan Rohan Crite (1910-2007) was a renowned African American artist, whose works are featured in galleries, churches, and museums throughout the United States. The Allan Rohan Crite papers, circa 1930-1980, focus on Crite's artwork and career, with little about his private life and few personal papers. There are original and copies of his artworks; recordings and transcripts of lectures given by Crite on his artwork, African American art, religion, and other topics; newspaper clippings; correspondence; printed matter such as exhibition catalogs; and books written by Crite ( All Glory) or featuring his illustrations.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Jones, Anna Russell, 1902-1995
Title:
Anna Russell Jones papers
Date [inclusive]:
1892-1989
Call Number:
1986.040
Extent:
17 Linear feet
Location Note:
Most of the collection is in the Collections Storage Room. Boxes 1-10 are stored on Unit 9, Shelves 8-12. Boxes 11-36 are stored on Unit 5, Shelves 34-38. There are also oversized items in the map case, drawers 1.9-1.11. Additional oversized items are in the Basement Vault, in the Map Cabinet drawers 3 and 4. There are also framed items in Unit 18, Shelf 16. One framed items is on Painting Rack A.
Language:
English
Abstract:
Anna Russell Jones (1902-1995) was the first African American woman from Philadelphia to join the Armed Forces during World War II and the first African American graduate of the Philadelphia School of Design for Women (now Moore College of Art and Design). She was a talented artist who worked as a wallpaper and carpet designer, civil service illustrator, and freelance artist. Her life evidenced her interest in African American history and civil rights, commitment to public service, and fascination with medical practice. The Anna Russell Jones papers, 1892-1989, primarily document her time in the military and as a civil service illustrator through scrapbooks, photographs, illustrations, sketches, and related correspondence and personnel records. There are also materials relating to her art education and some family papers, as well as correspondence, artworks, and documents from later in Jones' life.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Banks, Antonio M.
Title:
Antonio M. Banks, Jr. family papers
Date:
1879-circa 1980
Call Number:
05
Extent:
1 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Antonio Banks, Sr. was born in Middlesex, Virginia in 1893, and settled in Philadelphia with his wife Florence. Their son, Antonio M. Banks, Jr., was born around 1925, earned a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Howard University, and worked in Philadelphia as a government engineer in public building service. The Antonio M. Banks, Jr. family papers, 1879-circa 1980, include notebooks, ledgers, receipts, cancelled checks, financial records, and deeds from Antonio M. Banks, Jr., his parents, and other family members. The collection also includes a large amount of printed materials and objects. Of special interest are photographs and clippings on an African American baseball team, Zulu Giants Baseball Club, circa 1930s.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Baltimore, Charles
Title:
Charles Baltimore photographs of Mayor Goode campaign
Date:
1987
Call Number:
03
Extent:
1 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
W. (Woodrow) Wilson Goode was Philadelphia's first African American mayor. Elected in 1983, Goode's popularity wavered in the wake of the MOVE bombing of 1985, an internationally infamous event in which police action against the MOVE organization in West Philadelphia resulted in multiple deaths and the destruction by fire of an entire city block. Nonetheless, Goode won a successful re-election campaign in 1987. The Charles Baltimore photographs of Mayor Goode campaign, 1987, consist of photographic prints, negatives, and contact pages taken by freelance photographer Charles Baltimore.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Farmer, Clarence
Title:
Clarence Farmer papers
Date [inclusive]:
1942-1983
Call Number:
07
Extent:
1.5 Linear feet
General Physical Description note:
1 box, 2 photo albums
Language:
English
Abstract:
Clarence Farmer (1915-2014) was a prominent African American in Philadelphia in the 1960s and 1970s, serving key bureaucratic posts in city government and active in supporting minority entrepreneurship and culture in the area. The Clarence Farmer papers, 1942-1983, include photographs, clippings, and ephemera from the early years of the Afro-American Historical and Cultural Museum (later renamed the African American Museum in Philadelphia); Police Advisory Board materials, 1960s; and clippings, photographs, and property documents relating to Farmer himself.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Bullock, Doris
Title:
Doris Bullock collection
Date:
circa 1890-1995 (bulk 1960-1995)
Call Number:
04
Extent:
19 Linear feet
General Physical Description note:
28 boxes
Language:
English
Abstract:
Doris Virginia Powers Bullock (1924-2000) was a school teacher and counselor in the School District of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was heavily involved in promoting and supporting African American culture, especially African American artists and opera singers. The Doris Bullock collection, circa 1890-1995 (bulk 1960-1995), contains a large amount of material relating to African American culture with an emphasis on theater, opera, visual arts, and politicians, as well as a small amount of personal material including photograph albums and correspondence.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Hinkson, DeHaven, 1891-1975
Title:
Dr. DeHaven Hinkson papers
Date [bulk]:
1910-1970
Date [inclusive]:
1898-1982
Call Number:
G83.003
Extent:
4 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Dr. DeHaven Hinkson (1891-1975) was a prominent African American physician in Philadelphia who served in both World War I and World War II. He was the one of the first African American doctors put on staff at Philadelphia General Hospital, and the first African American to be head of an army hospital. The Dr. DeHaven Hinkson papers, 1898-1982 (bulk 1910-1970), contain correspondence, news clippings, photographs, notebooks, pamphlets, military and medical artifacts, and numerous other materials documenting his medical training and career, military service, veteran's rights involvement, and membership in fraternal organizations.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Berry, Ernest R., 1930-1992
Title:
Dr. Ernest Berry papers
Date [inclusive]:
1944-1991
Call Number:
1990.011
Extent:
4 Linear feet
General Physical Description note:
11 boxes
Language:
English
Abstract:
Ernest R. (Royal) Berry (1930-1992) was an educator, performer, traveler, and collector of art. Based in the Philadelphia area for most of his life, Berry spent much of his time from 1958-1965 in Europe, completing certificate programs, teaching classes, and performing as an actor and singer. Berry joined the faculty of Cheyney University and remained there as a professor of psychology for over 20 years. The Dr. Ernest Berry papers, 1944-1991, largely consist of materials relating to Berry's travels in Europe in the late 1950s and early 1960s, his career at Cheyney University and related legal battle, and a large amount of ephemera, especially playbills, from arts and cultural events Berry attended. It includes scrapbooks, photograph albums, correspondence, clippings, and ephemera.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Minton, Russell F.
Title:
Dr. Russell F. Minton papers
Date [bulk]:
1909-1960
Date [inclusive]:
1839-1991
Call Number:
1987.029
Extent:
2.5 Linear feet
General Physical Description note:
5 document boxes and 1 small box
Language:
English
Abstract:
Dr. Russell F. Minton, born around 1900, was a prominent doctor in the Philadelphia area from the 1930s-1970s. Minton became a radiologist in 1940, and was involved with the merging of Mercy and Frederick Douglass Memorial hospitals. At Mercy-Douglass Hospital he served as chairman of the intern and resident training program, chief of the medical staff, chief of the Radiology Department, and Medical Director from 1949 until 1953. The Dr. Russell F. Minton papers, 1839-1991, bulk 1909-1960, contain correspondence, medical notes and reports, hospital records, newspaper clippings, speeches and articles, numerous photographs, Minton family genealogical items, and other materials. Many documents in the collection are associated with Dr. DeHaven Hinkson, another prominent African American physician in Philadelphia, and the reason for their inclusion with this collection is unclear.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Strothers, Eloise Owens, 1920-1991
Title:
Eloise Owens Strothers papers
Date [inclusive]:
1945-1991
Call Number:
86.064
Extent:
3 Linear feet
General Physical Description note:
6 boxes
Language:
English
Abstract:
Eloise Owens Strothers (1920-1991) was a Philadelphia municipal employee, labor activist, and singer known for over two decades as the "Grand Songbird of Elkdom." The Eloise Owens Strothers papers, 1945-1991, largely document Strothers's career as a soloist lyric soprano and interest in musical performance; there is less about her labor activism, Civil Rights involvement, and community service. The collection includes programs, photographs, newspaper reviews, performance announcements, letters, telegrams, and cards.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Wright, Emanuel C.
Title:
Emanuel C. and Dorothy Wright papers
Date [inclusive]:
1931-1983
Call Number:
06
Extent:
1.25 Linear feet
General Physical Description note:
4 boxes
Language:
English
Abstract:
Emanuel C. Wright was the son of Major Richard R. Wright Sr., a former slave and founder of National Freedom Day. Shortly after the death of his father in 1947, Emanuel Wright took over his father's position as president of the National Freedom Day Association. The Emanuel C. and Dorothy Wright papers, 1931-1983, include clippings, pamphlets, and typed papers about African American figures and events in the African American community; material relating to National Freedom Day; and information about family history.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
McGlinn, Frank Cresson Potts, 1914-2000
Title:
Frank McGlinn collection on African American theater
Date [bulk]:
1920-1992
Date [inclusive]:
1850-1994
Call Number:
92.024
Extent:
4 Linear feet
General Physical Description note:
13 boxes
Language:
English
Abstract:
The Frank McGlinn collection on African American theater, 1850-1994 (bulk 1920-1992), richly documents Philadelphia's theatrical past through the performances of African Americans. It consists largely of posters, programs, broadsides, clippings and advertisements. There are small amounts of photographs and correspondence (mostly in the form of invitations received). The collection is mainly about 20th century plays, performers, musicals and films.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Shapiro, Harry H. (Harry Hersh)
Title:
Harry H. Shapiro research files on civil rights and law
Date:
circa 1950-1970
Call Number:
02
Extent:
12 Linear feet
General Physical Description note:
28 half-size document boxes and five record cartons
Language:
English
Abstract:
Harry H. (Hersh) Shapiro was a civil rights scholar and a professor of political science at Rutgers University in the 1960s. He wrote several articles about law, slavery, and civil rights. The Harry H. Shapiro research files on Civil Rights and law, circa 1950-1970, consist primarily of case summaries and transcripts, academic legal articles, newspaper clippings, reports of civil rights commissions, and other related materials, as well as some drafts and published versions of Shapiro's articles. The collection focuses on civil rights, civil rights law, and enforcement and court cases relating to civil rights law.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Spence, Herbert
Title:
Herbert Spence papers
Date [inclusive]:
1966-1989
Call Number:
91.013
Extent:
6 Linear feet
General Physical Description note:
7 containers
Language:
English
Abstract:
Herbert "Herb" Melvin Spence was a musician and music teacher who retired from the School District of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1986. The Herbert Spence papers, 1966-1989, is made up largely of printed sheet music, musical education texts, and slides of Spence's travels abroad. There is only a small amount of personal papers, such as Spence's notes on music history, diplomas and plaques he received, programs for student recitals and other performances, and photographs of children in his classes, of Spence himself, and of famous African American musicians.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Franklin, Jack T., 1922-2009
Title:
Jack T. Franklin photographs
Date [bulk]:
1956-1990
Date [inclusive]:
1925-2009
Call Number:
1986.001
Extent:
140 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Jack T. Franklin (1922-2009) was a Philadelphia-based photojournalist and photographer known for his pictures of 1960s Civil Rights events. The Jack T. Franklin photographs, 1925-2009 (bulk 1956-1990), consist of over 500,000 negatives and photographs that document almost every social, cultural, and political event in the Philadelphia's African American community during Franklin's lifetime, as well as all of the major events of the 1960s Civil Rights movement. The collection includes contact sheets and prints, negatives, and color photographs.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Brown, Joan Myers
Title:
Joan Myers Brown Philadanco papers
Date:
circa 1970-1991
Call Number:
1992.017
Extent:
2 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
The Philadelphia Dance Company, more commonly known as Philadanco, was founded in 1970 by Joan Myers Brown. It was originally intended to provide quality dance instruction to minority dancers in Philadelphia. At first the Company performed at local community events and schools in the area, but later it built a strong international reputation for itself. The Joan Myers Brown Philadanco papers, circa 1970-1991, include business correspondence received by Brown, advertisements and season booklets, newspaper clippings, reviews, and photographs.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Coleman, Joseph E.
Title:
Joseph E. Coleman papers
Date [bulk]:
1968-1994
Date [inclusive]:
1951-1994
Call Number:
G94.019
Extent:
8 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Joseph E. Coleman (1922-2000), a chemist and lawyer, was the first African-American president of Philadelphia [Pa.] City Council. Serving in this capacity for 12 years from 1980 to 1992, Coleman turned the council into a more independent legislative body with greater authority that almost equaled that of the mayor. The Joseph E. Coleman papers, 1951-1994 (bulk 1968-1994), consist of various materials, including drafts for speeches, articles, testimonies, photographs, correspondence, campaign ephemera, and scrapbooks that document Coleman's time as a Philadelphia politician, including his time as a councilman and council president. Also included are corrected typescript drafts of novels authored by Coleman, and reprints of his scientific publications and patents.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Thompson, Lloyd P., 1895-1987
Title:
Lloyd Thompson and William Cash papers on Negro baseball leagues
Date:
circa 1912-1987
Call Number:
09
Extent:
6.5 Linear feet
General Physical Description note:
10 boxes and numerous framed photographs
Language:
English
Abstract:
One of the dominant teams in baseball's Negro Leagues in the 1920s was the Hilldale Club of Darby, Pennsylvania. Lloyd Thompson, a pioneering African American sports writer, was a member of Hilldale's Board of Directors and was the only individual involved in both its formation in 1910 and disbanding in 1932. William W. (Bill 'Ready') Cash was a well-known African American professional baseball player in the 1940s and 1950s, and later served on the Board of Directors for the Negro League Baseball Players Association. The Lloyd Thompson and William Cash papers on Negro baseball leagues, circa 1912-1987, largely pertain to the Hilldale Club, with a smaller amount of materials on Cash's career. The collection includes correspondence, season bookings and scorebooks, player statistics, Hilldale Club financial records, Delaware County Athletic Association and Jersey City Colored Athletes materials, clippings, and photographs.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Montgomery, M. Lee
Title:
M. Lee Montgomery papers
Date [inclusive]:
1963-1980
Call Number:
G91.008
Extent:
2 Linear feet
General Physical Description note:
5 document boxes
Language:
English
Abstract:
M. Lee Montgomery was a community activist in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The M. Lee Montgomery papers, 1963-1980, consists of reports, flyers, and publications about various issues and events pertaining to civil rights, African American education, and urban housing accumulated by Montgomery. Of special interest are minutes, notes, and other materials relating to the Resident Housing Authority Board of the Philadelphia Housing Authority, of which he was a charter member.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Hinderas, Natalie
Title:
Natalie Hinderas and Leota Palmer papers
Date [bulk]:
1940-1989
Date [inclusive]:
1904-1993
Call Number:
G94.025
Extent:
8 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Natalie Hinderas (1927-1987), born Natalie Leota Henderson to Abram L. Henderson and Leota Palmer (1904-1997), became a celebrated pianist and music instructor in Philadelphia. She was one of the first African Americans to gain worldwide fame as a classical pianist, and was the first African-American female pianist to be featured by a symphony orchestra. The Natalie Hinderas and Leota Palmer papers, 1904-1993 (bulk 1940-1989), consist mostly of materials relating to Natalie Hinderas, particularly her music career and education, with a significant amount of materials relating to Natalie's mother, Leota Palmer. There are also some personal papers. Materials include: correspondence, programs, scrapbooks, family photograph albums, newspaper clippings, and family property records/deeds from Ohio.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Bailey, Pearl
Title:
Pearl Bailey papers
Date [bulk]:
1970-1979
Date [inclusive]:
1946-1990
Call Number:
G95.013
Extent:
40 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Pearl Bailey (1918-1990) was an American entertainer notable for her sultry singing and mischievous humor. She appeared on Broadway, in movies, and on her own television show. Bailey also authored several books. In 1975 she was appointed special ambassador to the United Nations by President Gerald Ford; she received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Ronald Reagan in 1988. The Pearl Bailey papers, 1946-1990 (bulk 1970-1979), include scrapbooks, recordings, correspondence, photographs, newspaper clippings, writings, financial records, and other materials relating to Pearl Bailey. Most document her public life in the 1970s, especially her career as a singer and actress, a cultural ambassador, and an author. A smaller quantity of materials relate to her personal life, including her finances, family, and college education at Georgetown University.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Independent Order of Good Samaritans and Daughters of Samaria of the United States of America. Golden Star Lodge No. 4 (Philadelphia, Pa.)
Title:
Records of Golden Star Lodge No. 4 of Independent Order of Good Samaritans and Daughters of Samaria (Philadelphia, Pa.)
Date [bulk]:
1910-1925
Date [inclusive]:
1881-1947
Call Number:
10
Extent:
4 Linear feet
General Physical Description note:
9 boxes
Language:
English
Abstract:
The Independent Order of Good Samaritans and Daughters of Samaria was a gender-integrated temperance group and beneficial society. Predominantly African American soon after its founding in 1847, it became one of the largest African American fraternal groups. A Philadelphia branch, Golden Star Lodge, No. 4, was organized in 1880. The Records of Golden Star Lodge No. 4 of Independent Order of Good Samaritans and Daughters of Samaria (Philadelphia, Pa.), 1881-1947 (bulk 1910-1925), consist of various administrative, financial, and scattered membership records of the local lodge.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Hayre, Ruth Wright, 1910-1998
Title:
Ruth Wright Hayre papers
Date [inclusive]:
1926-1990
Call Number:
93.011
Extent:
9 Linear feet
General Physical Description note:
23 boxes
Language:
English
Abstract:
Dr. Ruth Wright Hayre (1910-1998) was a distinguished educator and administrator in Philadelphia's public school system, as well as a philanthropist. Among her many firsts, Dr. Hayre was the first African American high school teacher in the School District of Philadelphia (William Penn High School, 1946) and the first female president of Philadelphia's Board of Education (1990). The Ruth Wright Hayre papers, 1926-1990, document the education and professional career of Dr. Hayre thoroughly, and also contain material about her family and the associations and organizations to which she belonged.
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Summary Information

Repository:
African American Museum in Philadelphia
Creator:
Solomon, Sam, 1915-1998
Title:
Sam Solomon boxing papers
Date [bulk]:
1965-1985
Date [inclusive]:
1945-1989
Call Number:
1989.048
Extent:
5 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
"Sam" Solomon was a boxing trainer, manager, and commentator active in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from the 1950s into the 1980s. He coached five champions including Leon Spinks, who defeated Muhammed Ali in a famous 1978 bout with Solomon in his corner. Solomon also worked with "Lady Tiger," an early female boxer, and other athletes well known locally. The Sam Solomon boxing papers, 1945-1989 (bulk 1965-1985), consist of Sam Solomon's records of his boxing coaching business, materials he collected about boxing, and a small amount of papers from his own boxing career and about baseball. It includes a large number of photographs, newsletters and ephemera, and financial records. There are also U-matic videocassettes and boxing gear.
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Biography/History

"Founded in 1976 in celebration of the nation's Bicentennial, the African American Museum in Philadelphia (AAMP) is the first institution funded and built by a major municipality to preserve, interpret and exhibit the heritage of African Americans. Throughout its evolution, the museum has objectively interpreted and presented the achievements and aspirations of African Americans from pre-colonial times to the current day.

"The museum is committed to telling the story of African Americans in all its permutations: family life, the Civil Rights movement, arts and entertainment, sports, medicine, architecture, politics, religion, law and technology."

Bibliography:

The African American museum in Philadelphia. "Museum History." Accessed February 18, 2014. http://www.aampmuseum.org/about-us.html.

Biography/History

Allan Rohan Crite (1910-2007), a renowned African American artist, was born in North Plainfield, NJ, but moved when he was an infant to Boston, MA with his parents. He started drawing when he was a child, having been encouraged by his mother, Annamae Palmer Crite (1891-1977). In 1936, Crite graduated from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Crite was one of the only African American artists to be employed by the Federal Arts Project, part of the Works Progress Administration program (WPA). He worked for the WPA for one year in the late 1930s before taking a job as a draftsman at the Boston Naval Shipyard in 1940.

Crite was primarily a painter, but also worked in printmaking and wrote and illustrated books. Most of Crite's early artwork in the 1920s and 1930s depicted everyday street scenes of African Americans in Boston. Crite was also a devout Episcopalian. From the 1930s onward much of his work was religious in nature, depicting African Americans in religious scenes, something which went against the stereotype of African Americans in art at the time. Crite gave many lectures on religious art during the 1950s and 1960s, and also created the Artists' Collective, a group for up and coming African American artists in Boston.

Bibliography:

The Archives of the Episcopal Church. "Leadership Gallery: Allan Crite." The Church Awakens: African Americans and the Struggle for Justice. Online exhibition. 2014. Accessed January 7, 2014. http://www.episcopalarchives.org/Afro-Anglican_history/exhibit/leadership/crite.php.

"Art makers: Allan Crite." The History Makers. 2014. Accessed on January 7, 2014. http://www.thehistorymakers.com/biography/allan-crite-40.

Biography/History

Anna Rachel (Rae) Malinda Russell was born in Jersey City, New Jersey in 1902 to John C. Russell (1867?-1911) and Anna M. Evans (1871?-1959). Anna had two older brothers, Thomas E. (1897-1927) and John W. (1899-1981) Russell. While she was still very young, Anna’s family moved to Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, where her father had found work as a Pullman porter on the Pennsylvania Railroad. After her father passed away in 1911, Anna's mother eventually settled the family in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Anna M. encouraged her daughter to educate herself, as a way for African Americans to succeed despite race-related societal obstacles. Anna Rae followed her mother’s advice, graduating from William Penn High School for Girls in 1920. She had a strong interest in art and one of her teachers, recognizing her artistic abilities, recommended her for a four year scholarship from the Philadelphia Board of Education that allowed her to attend the Philadelphia School of Design for Women (later known as the Moore Institute of Art, Science, and Industry, and now known as Moore College of Art and Design). Anna was the first African American woman to receive this award.

Anna majored in textile design and in 1925 became the first African American graduate of the Philadelphia School of Design for Women. At graduation, she received awards for her carpet and wallpaper designs and a drawing of hers was selected for the cover of the school catalog. After graduation, the Dean of Women at the School of Design recommended Anna for a job as a carpet designer at the James G. Speck Studio in Philadelphia. She was hired and remained there for four years. After leaving the Speck Studio, Anna was offered other jobs, but instead she decided to work as a freelancer and establish her own studio. She sold her wallpaper and carpet designs to firms in Philadelphia, New York, and Canada, a difficult and rare accomplishment for an African American woman in the 1930s. She also illustrated and sold Christmas cards depicting African American school children during this time.

Wallpaper and carpet sales declined during the Great Depression, and Anna began designing educational posters, some of which related to African American history and featured illustrations of prominent African Americans including George Washington Carver and Sojourner Truth. She sold the posters to various schools in Eastern states. The Free Library of Philadelphia purchased some of these posters and also displayed other works created by Anna such as paintings of Santa Claus and other Christmas scenes. Leading up to World War II, Anna gave public lectures and lessons on African American history.

When the United States entered World War II, Anna joined the Gray Lady Service of the American Red Cross. In September of 1942, shortly after finishing her training for the Red Cross, Anna was accepted into the United States Army as part of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC), later known as the Women’s Army Corps (WAC), becoming the first African American woman from Philadelphia to join the Armed Forces during World War II. Anna was stationed at Fort Huachuca, Arizona, a military base where African American troops were trained. For just over three years she worked as a graphic artist for the army, designing maps, posters, booklets and various other things for military publications. By the end of her service she had attained the rank of sergeant, and had received the WAAC Service Medal, the American Campaign Medal, the World War II Victory Medal, and the Good Conduct Medal.

In 1947, Anna returned to her alma mater, Moore College of Art and Design, to complete one year of post-graduate work in textiles. Among other educational pursuits at this time, she studied medical illustration under the G.I. Bill (Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944) at Howard University College of Medicine (Washington, D.C.) from 1948 to 1952. Anna worked at Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia as a licensed practical nurse in the 1950s and also was employed as a graphic artist and illustrator for several years in the civil service. Additionally, she continued to paint, sketch, draw, and do freelance artistic work in her spare time.

In 1952, Anna married William Albert Marsh Jones Jr. The two spent the next thirty-four years together, until his passing in 1986. Anna was awarded the Honor of Excellence Award from the Afro-American Historical and Cultural Museum (now African American Museum in Philadelphia) in 1986, and the following year received an Honorary Degree, Doctor of Fine Arts, from Moore College of Art. Anna died in Philadelphia in 1995.

William Albert Marsh Jones Jr. (1900-1986), often called “Albert”, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the oldest child of William Albert Marsh Jones Sr. and Clara B. J. Croston. Albert had four siblings: James R. S., Naomi Elizabeth, Chauncy D., and Clara M. His parents also had an adopted son, William M. Jones. Albert’s sister, Naomi (1902-1973), married John Thomas Jenkins in 1922 and had eight children. As a boy, Albert attended Hancock School in Philadelphia, and later played trombone in a band. In 1930 Albert became an elevator operator, a position he held for thirty years until his retirement in 1960. In 1964, Albert became the Court Crier for Judge A. Leon Higginbotham Jr. (1928-1998) when Higginbotham was appointed as a district judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Judge Higginbotham was a prominent African American civil rights advocate who would go on to become a federal appeals court judge.

Thomas Edward Russell (1897-1927) was the first child of John C. Russell and Anna M. Evans and Anna Russell Jones’s oldest brother. His middle name likely came from his father’s brother, Edward S. Russell, who lived with Thomas’ family in Jersey City, New Jersey before they moved to Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Thomas married Josephine L. Walker in 1924, but was tragically killed when he was hit by a car in the Overbrook neighborhood of Philadelphia in 1927.

John Warner Russell (1899-1981) was the middle child of John C. Russell and Anna M. Evans and Anna Russell Jones’s older brother. Warner, as he was known to family and friends, worked for the postal service and married Ann Elizabeth Broomes in 1947. Ann had a daughter from a previous marriage to James M. Broomes, Hortense Broomes Heath (died 1964).

Biography/History

Antonio Banks Sr. was born in Middlesex, Virginia in 1893. His wife, Florence, was also a native Virginian, although the couple spent most of their lives in Philadelphia. He worked a variety of jobs, including farm laborer, shipping clerk, and barber. He earned a certificate from Bodee Dental Institute in 1926. Antonio M. Banks Jr. was born around 1925. He earned a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Howard University in 1948 and worked in Philadelphia as a government engineer in public building service.

Biography/History

W. (Woodrow) Wilson Goode was Philadelphia's first African American mayor. He was born in North Carolina in 1938, where his parents were tenant farmers, although his family moved north to Philadelphia in 1954. Goode earned a bachelor's degree in political science from Morgan State University and a master's degree in governmental administration from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business.

Goode's political career began in 1969 with his appointment as executive director to the Philadelphia Council for Community Advancement, an organization dedicated to revitalizing neighborhoods and creating affordable housing. Goode briefly served as head of the Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission and managing director of Philadelphia under Mayor Bill Green. He was elected Mayor of Philadelphia in 1983, the first African American to hold that position. His popularity wavered in the wake of the MOVE bombing of 1985, when Philadelphia police targeted a fortified household occupied by the MOVE organization. Eleven people died and over sixty homes were destroyed in the incident, which made international headlines. Still, Goode was re-elected for a second term.

After Goode left the office of mayor in 1992, he remained active in the Philadelphia community.

Charles Baltimore is an educator, community organizer, and youth program manager based in the Philadelphia area. From 1980 to 1994, he worked as a freelance photographer with clients including President Ronald Reagan, Christian Dior Swimwear, and Philadelphia Mayor Wilson Goode.

Bibliography:

Lisowski, Joshua. "African American Migration: Wilson Goode." The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. October 21, 2013. Accessed December 20, 2013. http://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/archive/african-american-migration/b232z201309000042b/

Biography/History

Clarence Farmer (1915-2014) was a prominent African American in Philadelphia in the 1960s and 1970s, serving in key bureaucratic posts in city government, and active in supporting minority entrepreneurship and culture in the area.

From 1965 to 1967 he worked as executive secretary to the Police Advisory Board, a civilian group that investigates citizens' complaints against the police where the charge involved brutality, false arrest, discrimination, and other wrongful conduct. Next, he was appointed executive director of the Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations, a quasi-judicial agency empowered to enforce Philadelphia's civil rights laws and to deal with all matters of intergroup conflicts within the City. He was sworn in as the salaried chairman of the Human Relations Commission soon after, expanding the focus and power of the commission over the next 15 years. He mediated several conflicts with the black liberation group, MOVE, although he retired shortly before the 1985 confrontation and police bombing that resulted in the destruction of about 60 nearby houses and the deaths of 11 people. The Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations named its highest award the Clarence Farmer Award.

Farmer held key positions in several organizations that supported minority entrepreneurship. He was founder and president of the Greater Philadelphia Enterprises Development Corporation, a nonprofit organization that provided aid to minority entrepreneurs; chairman of the board of directors of the Job Loan and Venture Capital Corporation, a non-profit agency that disbursed money from Philadelphia banks to minority businessmen; and board chairman and president of Urban Community Bank, the first minority-owned commercial bank in Philadelphia in 15 years at the time of its founding in 1972.

Clarence Farmer was instrumental in the founding of the Afro-American Historical and Cultural Museum in 1976, later renamed the African American Museum in Philadelphia, serving as board chairman for 20 years. Additionally, Farmer served on boards for the Philadelphia Housing Development Corporation, Philadelphia Tribune, the Center for Urban Theological Studies, Wissahickon Boys Club, Mercy Douglass Hospital, and other organizations.

Farmer was born in Rochester, N.Y., attended Geneva College, and moved to Philadelphia in the late 1930s with his mother. He served in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Farmer married Marjorie Louise Nichols in 1943, and had two sons together: Clarence Jr. and Franklin. Clarence Farmer died in January 2014 at the age of 98.

Bibliography:

"Clarence Farmer Sworn in as Chairman of Commission." Washington Afro-American, August 5, 1969: page 17. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=YbYlAAAAIBAJ&sjid=8_QFAAAAIBAJ&pg=2538%2C4181338. Accessed December 26, 2013.

Cook, Bonnie L. "Clarence Farmer Sr., 98; Chaired Human Relations Panel." Philadelphia Inquirer, February 2, 2014. Accessed February 19, 2014. http://articles.philly.com/2014-02-02/news/46901241_1_human-relations-commission-move-members-west-philadelphia.

Biography/History

Doris Virginia Powers Bullock, born on October 24, 1924, was a school teacher and counselor in the School District of Philadelphia. She received a Bachelor of Science in Education and a Master of Education from Temple University in 1950 and 1953, respectively. She taught at several junior high schools in the Philadelphia school district before becoming a counselor. In the mid 1960s, Doris joined the staff at Strawberry Mansion Junior High School and remained there until retirement in the early 1980s. During her work as a teacher and counselor, Doris also wrote a weekly column for the Philadelphia Afro-American, worked as an associate editor for both the student newspaper at Temple and  About Education, and contributed to other periodicals.

While she was a teenager, Doris was part of a social club called "The Gay Charmers." She met Leon Bullock at a dance sponsored by The Gay Charmers, and they later married in 1952. The club's activities exposed Doris to various facets of African American culture, particularly art and music. She found she had a passion for both art and music, but especially opera. She and Leon, who worked as a claims adjuster for the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transit Authority (SEPTA), became very involved in promoting and supporting African American artists and classical singers. They became friends with many artists and owned an extensive amount of artwork by African American artists, which they exhibited at the African American Museum in Philadelphia. Doris and Leon also hosted an opera singer during the Opera Company of Philadelphia International Vocal Competition. Doris served on the board of directors as Board Member Emeritus for the African American Museum in Philadelphia, helped establish Philadelphia Opera Ebony (now Opera North, Inc.), and served on the Board of Directors of the Dr. Ruth Wright Hayre Scholarship Fund. After many years of supporting the arts in Philadelphia, Doris Bullock passed away in 2000.

Biography/History

DeHaven Hinkson was born on December 5, 1891 in Philadelphia. In 1915 he graduated from Medico-Chirurgical College (now Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania) and began an internship at Frederick Douglass Memorial Hospital. During World War I, he was commissioned as a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army Medical Reserve Corps. From 1918-1919, he served with the 365th Field Hospital in France. After returning from the war, Hinkson set up a medical practice in Philadelphia and worked with gynecologists at Douglass Hospital. To further his medical education, which was difficult to do in the United States due to a lack of opportunities for African American doctors, Hinkson received a fellowship from the Barnes Foundation to study surgery, gynecology, and obstetrics at the University of Paris and the University of Vienna from 1932-1933. Albert C. Barnes also tried to install Hinkson at Philadelphia General Hospital in the mid 1930s, but failed in his initial attempts due to racial prejudice. Eventually, Hinkson and Dr. Douglass Stubbs became the first African Americans appointed to the staff of Philadelphia General.

Hinkson continued his connection with the military over the years through the Medical Reserve Corps, being promoted in rank along the way, and was a Major when he was called to serve in 1941. Hinkson was asked to establish a station hospital at the Tuskegee Army Air Force Base and consequently was the first African American to be head of an army hospital. At the end of the war, Hinkson was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, and he returned to his practice in Philadelphia, where he also served in the gynecologic departments of both Douglass and Mercy hospitals, becoming the head of the department at Douglass. After those two hospitals merged, Hinkson continued his affiliation. Hinkson died at the age of 84 in 1975. He was survived by his wife, Cordelia Chew, whom he married in 1921, and their two daughters.

Dr. Hinkson was a member of many professional associations and other organizations including the Retired Officers Association. He was a charter member of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity's Rho chapter in 1914, and belonged to and served on the executive board of the Alpha chapter of Sigma Pi Phi fraternity (Boule). He also served as president of the Armstrong Association (Urban League), and as a charter member and president of Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH). In addition, Dr. Hinkson was very involved with veteran's affairs, and was a charter member and president of the George T. Cornish Post #292, American Legion, which provides services and care for veterans.

Biography/History

Ernest R. (Royal) Berry (1930-1992) was an educator, performer, traveler, and collector of art. Born in Philadelphia in 1930, he earned a bachelor's degree from Cheyney State College in 1952 and masters' degrees from Howard University (Psychology, 1958) and Pennsylvania State University (Human Relations, 1954). Berry spent much of his time from 1958-1965 abroad. He earned numerous certificates from different European universities, including in child psychology, international affairs, and foreign languages; taught classes, and performed as an actor and singer on film, stage, and television. Berry earned PhD degrees from the University of Vienna (Education, 1963) and University of Munich (Psychology and Sociology, 1970).

In the mid 1960s Berry joined the faculty of Cheyney State College (now Cheyney University), an historically black college in the suburbs of Philadelphia. He remained there as a professor of psychology for over 20 years. In the 1980s, the faculty and students of Cheyney University filed concurrent suits against federal and state Department of Education officials and the school's president and board of trustees, alleging violations of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and contending that Pennsylvania operates a de jure segregated system of higher education. Berry was one of the lead litigants in Cheyney State College Faculty v. Hufstedler (No. 82-1282).

Bibliography:

Ernest Royal Berry resume. Document found in collection.

Biography/History

Dr. Russell F. Minton, Senior was born in Philadelphia around 1900. He graduated from Penn State University in 1924 with a major in chemistry, after which he served as head of the Chemistry Department at Tuskegee Institute. In 1929 he obtained his medical degree from Howard University Medical School. Upon receiving his medical degree, Minton was affiliated with both Frederick Douglass Memorial and Mercy hospitals in Philadelphia. Minton became a radiologist in 1940, and once Douglass and Mercy hospitals merged in 1948 to form Mercy-Douglass Hospital at 50th Street and Woodland Avenue, he held many important posts there. He served as chairman of the intern and resident training program, chief of the medical staff, chief of the radiology department, and Medical Director of Mercy-Douglass Hospital from 1949 until 1953. Additionally, Minton was appointed as a medical officer of the Civil Service Commission's Philadelphia regional office in 1966, the first African American physician to hold this post in any regional office. He held this position until retiring in 1975. Minton's wife, Marion Roland, whom he married in 1927, passed away in 1980. Minton himself died in 1997.

Minton was part of several professional groups and medical societies including the Alpha chapter of Sigma Pi Phi, also known as the Boule. Sigma Pi Phi, founded in 1904, was the first Greek letter fraternity to be founded by African American men. Dr. Minton served as Alpha chapter Archon (President) in the 1950s.

Biography/History

Eloise Owens Strothers (1920-1991) was a Philadelphia municipal employee, labor activist, and singer known for over two decades as the "Grand Songbird of Elkdom."

Eloise Strothers was born in Philadelphia in 1920 to Professor Frank V. and Florence C. Franklin. She was the sister of Jack T. Franklin, the noted photojournalist and photographer known for his images of 1960s Civil Rights events. Eloise married three times, most recently to Charles O. Strothers, a District of Philadelphia school teacher. She attended Simon Gratz High School and then Penn State University, where she focused on labor studies. She received her musical education from the Ornstein School of Music, Philadelphia Musical Academy, University of Illinois, Delaware State College, Southern University, and the University of Indiana.

Eloise Owens Strothers was supported by and was a member of many organizations devoted to Civil Rights and education. She was very active in the Improved Benevolent Protective Order of Elks of the World (IBPOE of W), serving as Grand Ruler of the Elks, Pride of North Philadelphia Temple No. 657. She was a member of Temple Divine Lover Church (at 1516 W. Girard Avenue in Philadelphia). Strothers was affiliated with the Coalition of 100 Black Women of Pennsylvania, the Afro-American Historical Museum (now the African American Museum in Philadelphia), the Utilities Emergency Committee, and the United Negro College Fund. She was appointed to the Mayor's Commission on Women by Philadelphia Mayors William Green and Wilson Goode.

Eloise worked for the City of Philadelphia for over 30 years, employed in the departments of Revenue, Collections, and Water until her retirement in 1985. She was deeply involved with the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), serving on the Executive Board of Local 696, a leader in District Council 33. Strothers was a founder (in 1979) and former chairperson of the Concerned Women of District Council No. 33, AFSCME. She was a member of the Affirmative Action and Education & Research committees.

An accomplished musician, Eloise was the National Soloist of the Improved Benevolent Protective Order of Elks of the World (IBPOE of W); soloist-lecturer for Yale University, Wells College, and other schools throughout the United States, Bermuda, and Puerto Rico; and appeared on several television shows. She was affiliated with the Fellowship Choir, the New York Playhouse, the WFLN Radio Chorus, the Repertory Opera Company, the Philadelphia Orchestra, and the Dra-Mu company. She worked with many notable musicians including Eugene Ormandy, Leonard Bernstein, Sir Thomas Beecham, and Duke Ellington.

Chronology of Eloise Owens Strothers' Life:

1920 Birth
1950 Won scholarship from the National Freedom Day Association attending the Ornstein School of Music, Philadelphia, performing as soloist at the 1950 Commencement ceremonies, Academy of Music
1951 Operatic debut in Carmen with the Dra-Mu Opera Company, in the role of Frasquita
1953 Christmas Cotillion singing "Cantique De Noel"
1954 Town Hall recital, accompanied by W. Russell Johnson, held by The Greater Philadelphia Press Club
1955 Soloist at Inaugural Ball for Governor George M. Leader in Zemba Mosque, Harrisburg
1956 Salaried soloist at First A.M.E. Zion Church of Brooklyn, NY (seems to have continued for nine years)
1956 Sang role of "Aida" with Windsor Ontario Symphony Orchestra in a concert version of the opera in Jackson Park, Windsor, Canada
1956-1957 Sang with the original Philadelphia Orchestra Chorus, under the baton of Eugene Ormandy, Franz Allers, Sir Thomas Beecham, and Leonard Bernstein
1958 Vocal artist during National Association of Negro Musicians (NANM) convention in Philadelphia
1959 Sang at inaugural ceremonies for Genevieve Blatt Secretary of Internal Affairs for the State of Pennsylvania
1961 Made official soloist for Grand Lodge of the Improved Benevolent Protective Order of Elks of the World, "Grand Song Bird"
1961 Appeared as soloist at the 52nd National convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)
circa 1947 Guest Soloist for 50th Anniversary of Puerto Rico, San Juan, given by Mayoress Dona Felisa Rincon De Gautier
1964 Soloist at Lincoln University Alumni Banquet
1966 Performing with Duke Ellington's Sacred Music Concert, both in Brooklyn, and in Philadelphia
1968-1970 Cast member in many local performances of "God's Trombones," musical play based on work by James Weldon Johnson
1974 Soloist on tribute program to the memory of Raymond L. Smith
1981-1985 Founder and Chairperson of Concerned Women's Committee of American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) District Council 33
1985-1988 Member on Mayor's Commission on Women
1991 Death

Biography/History

Emanuel C. Wright (born 1900) was the son of Major Richard R. Wright, Sr. and brother of Bishop Richard R. Wright, Jr. Major Richard R. Wright, Sr., a former slave, founded the National Freedom Day Association to commemorate the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, which ended slavery in the United States. National Freedom Day was first celebrated on February 1, 1942, although it was not officially recognized until 1948 when President Truman signed a bill proclaiming February 1st National Freedom Day in the United States. Shortly after the death of his father in 1947, Emanuel Wright took over his father's position as president of the National Freedom Day Association.

Biography/History

Philadelphia was the first important center of theater in the United States. The earliest documented performances date to 1749. By the 20th century, Philadelphia had been replaced by New York as the center of American theatre, but it still remained an important theatrical city.

Frank C. P. McGlinn (1914-2000) was a lawyer, corporate executive, humanitarian, museum trustee, and patron of the performing arts. He graduated from the University of North Carolina and the University of Pennsylvania Law School. He served in the military during World War II and was awarded the Purple Heart in 1944. After the war, he worked as a legal counselor, a marketing executive for several banks, and a consultant for over 40 years. He was active in various community organizations, but especially those associated with theater, throughout Southeastern Pennsylvania. Among other institutions, he served on the boards for Walnut Street Theater, Theater of the Living Arts, Philadelphia Free Library, William Penn Foundation, Temple University, and Afro American Historical & Cultural Museum (African American Museum in Philadelphia).

Bibliography:

Keating, Douglas J. "F. McGlinn, Theater Supporter" Philadelphia Inquirer, June 16, 2000. Accessed February 24, 2014. http://articles.philly.com/2000-06-16/news/25601758_1_advisory-boards-theater-walnut-street-theatre.

Biography/History

Harry H. (Hersh) Shapiro was a civil rights scholar and professor of political science at Rutgers University in the 1960s. He wrote several articles about law, slavery, and civil rights, his best known being "Involuntary Servitude: The Need for a More Flexible Approach" ( Rutgers Law Review, 65 (Fall 1964): 65-85). Shapiro began researching and writing a book on law and the enforcement of civil rights legislation provisionally titled "Constitutional Shield," although it was never published.

Biography/History

Herbert "Herb" Melvin Spence was a musician and music teacher based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He attended Fort Valley State College around 1950 before earning a Master of Music Education degree from Temple University in 1979. For many years he worked for the School District of Philadelphia, retiring from Samuel H. Daroff Elementary School in 1986.

Biography/History

Jack Theodore Franklin was born in Philadelphia in 1922. At about the age of 11, he received his first camera as a gift from his older sister (Eloise Owens Strothers) and from then on could barely be separated from it. During World War II, Franklin served as photographer for the United States 1862nd Aviation Engineers in the South Pacific and later studied photography at the U.S. Army Signal Corps Photographic Center in Astoria, New York, where he became an instructor. He returned to Philadelphia after the war and became active in documenting social events and political activities in the city, in addition to being employed as a photographer and darkroom technician at Merlin Studios in Philadelphia. Franklin embarked on his journalistic career as a staff and freelance photographer for The Philadelphia Tribune (the oldest African American newspaper in the country),  Ebony and  Jet magazines, and  The Pittsburgh Courier.  The Philadelphia Inquirer,  The Philadelphia Bulletin and  The Philadelphia Daily News, as well as other local and national publications and book publishers, purchased and published his photographs.

For decades he photographed political and social movements, including rallies, protest marches, and leaders of the Civil Rights Movement in Philadelphia, as well as in the south, becoming a major figure in photojournalism. He photographed the 1963 March on Washington; the 1965 Girard College Protests, led by lawyer and President of the local chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Cecil B. Moore, against the discriminatory policy of Girard College; the first major Black Power Rally, held in Philadelphia in 1966; and political rallies and events with guest speakers such as Martin Luther King, Jr., Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., Jesse Jackson and Stokely Carmichael, among others.

Throughout his career, Franklin photographed many notables including Thurgood Marshall, Cassius Clay (aka Muhammad Ali), Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Coretta Scott King, Malcolm X, Sidney Poitier, Julie and Harry Belafonte, James Baldwin, Rev. Leon Sullivan, Sammy Davis, Jr., Lena Horne, as well as Presidents Johnson, Nixon and Ford and Senator Robert F. Kennedy. He photographed many performers at the State and Uptown Theaters in Philadelphia, as well as other area venues, including Smokey Robinson and The Miracles, Aretha Franklin, James Brown, Patti LaBelle, Stevie Wonder, Sam Cooke, The Jackson 5, Nat King Cole, Josephine Baker, Duke Ellington, Count Basie, The Dixie Hummingbirds and The Ward Singers.

Jack T. Franklin died in Philadelphia in 2009.

Biography/History

The Philadelphia Dance Company, more commonly known as Philadanco, was founded in 1970 by Joan Myers Brown. It was originally intended to provide quality dance instruction to minority dancers in Philadelphia. At first the Company performed at local community events and schools in the area. Today, the Company has built a strong international reputation for itself, performing throughout the United States, Canada and the Caribbean. It offers workshops, master classes and a children's summer program. Former Philadanco dancers such as Denise Chase, Deborah Manning, David St. Charles, Kevin Brown and Gary Deloatch have gone on to perform with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre. Other dancers have performed with such companies as the Dance Theatre of Harlem and such Broadway shows as The Wiz and Timbuktu. In 1982, Philadanco moved to its own building at 9 North Preston Street. During the 1980s, Philadanco published its own newsletter, Philadanco News.

Ms. Brown is the Artistic/Executive Director and Founder of the Philadelphia Dance Company (Philadanco). In 1960, she founded the Philadelphia School of Dance and Arts. Joan Myers Brown was born in Philadelphia and attended West Philadelphia High School. Ms. Brown is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania's arts management program. Her teachers included Katherine Dunham, William Amour, Ziggy Johnson, Marie Bryant, Stanley Brown, Thomas Madras and Lois Smith. In 1960 she founded the Philadelphia School of Dance and Arts and in 1970 she founded Philadelphia Dance Company (Philadanco), for which she serves as Artistic/Executive Director.

In a 1981 interview with the Philadelphia Inquirer, Ms. Brown stated that her desire to found a Black ballet company grew out of her experiences as a young dancer. "When you're a teenager, that's when you create your dreams. And that's what I wanted to do. But I walked up and down Chestnut Street trying to enroll in a ballet school, and was told over and over, I'm sorry, we can't take you because you're black."

Joan wounded up studying with Syvilla Fort and Karel Shook at the Katherine Dunham School in New York and with Anthony Tudor, who for a while left New York to teach in Philadelphia. He put Joan in a production of Les Sylphides, which caused quite a stir. But Tudor went back to New York and Joan found that she had to turn elsewhere to continue dancing. She toured as a jazz dancer with Cab Calloway, Sammy Davis, Jr. and Pearl Bailey, then for six years was the lead dancer and choreographer with Smart Affairs, Larry Steele's Atlantic City revue. That's when she decided to return to Philadelphia and start her own school.

Ms. Brown has received many awards, including the United Negro College Fund Award, 1990; the Stella Moore Award, 1990; the National Endowment for the Arts Choreographic Fellowship, 1979; the Essence Woman Award, Hazlett Award, the Cotillion Society Ballet Award; Governor's Recognition Citation; B.U.A. Award and recognition from the West Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce and the National Council of Negro Women. She has served on many boards and panels affiliated with the arts including the Philadelphia Dance Alliance, the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance, and the Pennsylvania State Arts Council. In 1985 the City of Philadelphia honored Ms. Brown with a resolution.

Under Ms. Brown's leadership, Philadanco has received funding from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), the William Penn Foundation and the National Choreographers Plan.

Biography/History

Joseph E. Coleman (1922-2000) was the first African-American president of Philadelphia [Pa.] City Council. Serving in this capacity for 12 years from 1980 to 1992, he "presided over a sea change that transformed the council from an unruly gang to a body near equal with the mayor."

Born and raised in Mississippi, Coleman was educated as a chemist and then as a lawyer, earning his law degree from Temple University. A Democrat, Coleman entered the political scene in Philadelphia beginning in 1968 when he served on the city's planning commission. Coleman was first elected in 1972 as a councilman representing the Eighth District. As councilman, he was significantly involved with the Philadelphia Urban Homestead Program--a municipal program council passed in 1973 to serve as a comprehensive resource center for the rehabilitation of vacant properties by homesteaders.

Coleman started his term as council president in 1980 shortly after the Abscam scandal, and was thus charged with cleaning up council's image in its wake. (Abscam was an FBI sting operation that eventually came to focus on public corruption ultimately leading to the conviction of numerous politicians throughout the country, including several congressmen and members of the Philadelphia City Council, including Coleman's predecessor, Council President George Schwartz.) Coleman's time as council president coincided with the administration of former Philadelphia Mayor Wilson Goode, the city's first black mayor. Goode's administration was tainted by the controversial MOVE police action and house bombing in 1985 that devastated several city blocks and killed 11 people.

While working to improve Philadelphia City Council's image, Coleman also focused his efforts to increase the body's oversight of mayoral projects and plans. Under his leadership, council's authority expanded considerably, becoming more of an independent legislative body rather than just another agency of the administration. Although viewed by many of his colleagues as soft-spoken and amiable, "Coleman, along with fellow council members John Street, David Cohen and Lucien Blackwell, gained the sobriquet "the gang of four," from disgruntled colleagues who felt they were left out of key deliberations with the Goode administration."

Coleman was the author of Another Chosen People--American Negroes (1961) as well as several unpublished works. Upon retiring in 1992, Joseph Coleman lived quietly with his wife, Jessie Bryant Coleman, until 1997 when his daughter Stephanie Coleman Epps was shot to death in front of her two children by a former lover. Joseph Coleman died after a lengthy illness on the last day of the millennium, leaving behind his wife, son, and a large extended family.

Several organizations throughout the city of Philadelphia have recognized Coleman and his legacy. The Community Education Centers, Inc. named its Philadelphia-area treatment center after him. Coleman Hall provides an array of residential reentry treatment services designed to reduce recidivism. In 2002, the Philadelphia Free Library system's Northwest Regional Library, located in Germantown, was renamed the Joseph E. Coleman Northwest Regional Library. Albright College also created a scholarship award in Coleman's honor. The Distinguished Joseph E. Coleman Award provides financial assistance ranging from $8,000 to $12,000 to African-American students who show academic excellence as well as community and/or extracurricular involvement.

Bibliography:

Quoted text from: McDonald, Mark. "The End Of An Era: Joseph Coleman Dies At 78". The Philadelphia Inquirer. January 3, 2001. Accessed October 30, 2013. http://articles.philly.com/2001-01-03/news/25308868_1_council-president-8th-council-district-abscam.

Biography/History

Until Jackie Robinson broke the color line in professional baseball in the 1950s, African American baseball players played in what were known as the "Negro Leagues." The Hilldale Club of Darby, Pennsylvania was one of the all-Black clubs that belonged to one of those leagues. During the club's existence from about 1910 to 1932, it played in the Negro World Series twice, in 1924 and 1925, winning against the Kansas City Monarchs 5 games to 1 in 1925. Hilldale was one of the only Black ball clubs that owned its own ballpark and was also noted for some of the finest ballplayers of the day.

The only individual involved in both the formation and disbanding of Hilldale was Lloyd Thompson, a member of the Board of Directors of the Hilldale Baseball Club from 1922 to 1930. He was also the founding secretary of the short-lived East-West League in 1932. As secretary, Thompson kept statistics and scores of ball games. Thompson was also a pioneer Black sports writer, reporting on the Negro Leagues for local newspapers.

William W. (Bill 'Ready') Cash was born in Georgia in 1919 and came to Philadelphia in 1924. He started as a catcher for the Camden Grants and later played for the Philadelphia Daisies in 1942, and the Philadelphia Stars from 1943 to 1949. From 1952 to 1953, Cash played for the farm teams of the Chicago White Sox. He retired in the late 1950s, considered by many to be an outstanding catcher throughout his 17 year career. After retiring, Cash worked for the Westinghouse Electric Company in Lester, Pennsylvania. He was honored at the Negro League Museum in 1981. He also served on the Board of Directors for the Negro League Baseball Players Association and founded the Parkway Little League, working with youngsters in the Philadelphia area.

Edward Bolden was a U.S. Postal employee who was an important figure in baseball history. He was the founding president of the Eastern Colored League in 1923, and in 1924, along with Andrew 'Rube' Foster, he helped organize the Negro World Series, a post-season championship between teams from the Negro National League and the Eastern Colored League. From about 1915 to 1933, Bolden managed the Hilldale Ball Club. He later founded the Philadelphia Stars which won the 1934 Negro National League Championship.

Biography/History

M. Lee Montgomery was a community activist in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was born in Pensacola, Florida in 1919, but spent most of his life in the vicinity of Philadelphia and southern New Jersey, where he passed away in 2003.

Montgomery served in the Army Air Corps during World War II and achieved the rank of Captain in the Army Reserves. He earned a master's degree in social work before securing positions at Temple University as Assistant Vice President, Office of Urban Affairs, and Deputy Director of the Multi-Purpose Training Center. He was active in planning the first Black Power conference (held in Newark, New Jersey in 1967). He and his brother, Dr. William Montgomery, presented the first black conference on higher education in Pennsylvania in 1972.

Montgomery was a charter member of the Resident Advisory Board (RAB), a nonprofit organization composed of members from Resident Organizations that operate in public and assisted housing throughout Philadelphia. Created in 1969 and incorporated in 1971, RAB works to improve the living conditions of public and assisted housing residents in Philadelphia through the coordination of resident and resident organizations.

Later, Montgomery was employed by New York City's Community Empowerment Program, Heritage News, the Delaware Valley's  The Black Suburban Journal, and MATAH Network.

Bibliography:

"M. Lee Montgomery." Obituary. Philadelphia Inquirer, April 5, 2003. Accessed December 20, 2013. http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/philly/obituary.aspx?n=m-lee-montgomery&pid=914955

Biography/History

"Natalie Hinderas was born Natalie Leota Henderson to Abram L. Henderson and Leota Palmer (1904-1997) on June 15, 1927, in Oberlin, Ohio. She became a celebrated pianist and music instructor in Philadelphia. She was one of the first African Americans to gain worldwide fame as a classical pianist. Hinderas was also the first African-American female pianist to be featured by a symphony orchestra.

"Her parents were both musicians in their own right. Her father was an accomplished jazz pianist while her mother, trained in classical music, also taught courses in institutes of higher education such as Fisk University and Philadelphia's Settlement Music School. Growing up in this musical atmosphere, young Natalie began playing piano at the age of six. By the time she was eighteen, she had graduated from Oberlin Conservatory with a degree in Music. Following her time at Oberlin she continued to hone her craft by studying at Julliard with Olga Samaroff who encouraged her to change her name from Henderson to Hinderas which because of its European sound, would open more opportunities for her. Her first high profile recital performance as a professional came in 1951 in New York and was reviewed well by the musical critics of the New York Times.

"For the next three decades, Hinderas would perform all over the world and become one of the country's most acclaimed pianists. In 1966, she joined the teaching staff at Temple University's Boyer College of Music. She was promoted to full professor in 1973 and taught there until her death in 1987... Hinderas was married to fellow musician Lionel Monagas and had one child, a daughter named Michele Lisa. She passed away after battling cancer in 1987."

Bibliography:

Quoted text from: Finding aid for "Natalie Hinderas Collection, 1969-1987." Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection, Temple University Libraries, Collection BM012NH. Accessed October 29, 2013. http://library.temple.edu/collections/scrc/natalie-hinderas-collection-0.

Biography/History

"[Pearl Bailey was born Pearl Mae Bailey in Newport News, Va., on March 29, 1918. She grew up for the most part in Philadelphia] where her mother resettled with her four children - Pearl was the youngest - after divorcing her father, an evangelical minister, and remarrying [around the time that Pearl was four]. Pearl originally wanted to be a teacher, but left William Penn High School at fifteen when she realized she wanted to be an entertainer even more. Singing and dancing were certainly an important part of her childhood; she began doing both in her father's church when she was just three, and, indeed, much of her talent was shaped by the lively worship of the holy roller churches she attended.

"Philadelphia, in those years, was an important hub on the vaudeville circuit. Pearl's older brother, Bill Bailey, a dancing protégé of legendary hoofer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, had already made a name for himself when Pearl decided to enter a talent contest at the aptly named Pearl Theater, where he was appearing. She won - $5 and a two-week engagement. She won another contest that summer in Washington, D.C., then honed her talent - and personality - in the vaudeville theaters of Scranton, Wilkes-Barre, Pottsville, and other Pennsylvania coal towns before moving on to the smoky night clubs of Baltimore and Washington. Barely twenty, she began touring as a featured vocalist with a string of swing-era Big Bands, and when World War II broke out, began a lifelong association with the USO, entertaining American troops.

"Bailey's big break came in 1944. The Village Vanguard, a popular New York club, booked her as a solo performer. More importantly, the club's owner encouraged her to engage more with her audiences between songs - and even in songs - with the endearingly mischievous, suggestive, good-natured chit-chat and bons mots that ultimately became her on-stage signature. Her popularity soared, and she quickly rose from nightclub headliner to big-band star with Cab Calloway's orchestra, and then to Broadway sensation when lyricist Johnny Mercer and composer Harold Arlen tapped her in 1946 for their all-black musical, St. Louis Woman. "Pearl Bailey pulls the show up by its shoestrings every time she makes an entrance," one reviewer rhapsodized. The theater establishment agreed, honoring her as the best newcomer to Broadway that year.

"For the next five decades, Bailey remained a multi-media star. She moved easily from the stage to the recording studio to the screen - most notably in movies like 1954's Carmen Jones, Oscar Hammerstein's languid, all-black adaptation of the opera "Carmen;" the 1956 comedy,  That Certain Feeling, with Bob Hope; and the 1959 film version of George Gershwin's classic Porgy and Bess - and, of course, back to the intimacy of the nightclubs and cabarets that best showcased her personality. Her style also translated well into television. From the late 1950s to the early 1970s, she regularly appeared on  The Ed Sullivan Show,  The Perry Como Show, and other variety programs, briefly hosted her own  Pearl Bailey Show, and later had a supporting role on the sitcom  Silver Spoons. She also managed to write six books, including two volumes of memoirs.

"Bailey's most celebrated triumph arrived in an unlikely form - as the redoubtable Yonkers matchmaker Dolly Levi in the 1967 revival of the 1964 Broadway smash, Hello, Dolly! The role was so identified with Carol Channing, the ash-pale actress who created it, that the producers daringly reconceived the play with an all-black cast at the height of the Civil Rights movement. Bailey, gushed the  New York Times critic, "took the whole musical in her hands and swung it around her neck as easily as if it were a feather boa." The show ran for two years, and she later toured with it twice. At a special performance in Washington with Lyndon Johnson in the audience, she waved to the president at the curtain and announced, "I didn't know this child was going to show up," then playfully reduced the leader of the Free World to chorus boy, gleefully coaxing him to the stage for a reprise of the show's title song.

"If all of that says much about Pearl Bailey, it barely scratches the surface of who she was and what she believed. In an age when interracial unions were virtually taboo, she married white jazz drummer Louis Bellson Jr. in 1952, simply because she loved him, and they remained together until her death in 1990. As a humanitarian, she regularly spoke out for the oppressed and disenfranchised - 'Every man has a place in this world,' she insisted, 'but no man has a right to designate that place' - and while the old USO trouper was always willing to spread American good will, she warned President Nixon when he offered her his fanciful ambassadorship in an era troubled by racial tensions, that 'I will do anything for my country, but no one can use me.'

"Bailey was so noted for her conscience and convictions - 'I bleed for the world,' she liked to say, 'and if we get a few more bleeders out there, we'll get something done' - that three future presidents - [Gerald] Ford, [Ronald] Reagan (who also bestowed on her the Presidential Medal of Freedom), and [George H. W.] Bush gave her the more serious appointment of special representative to the United Nations. When Georgetown University bestowed an honorary degree on her in 1970, the one-time high-school dropout decided she would earn one properly - through hard work and study. In 1985, at the age of sixty-seven, she graduated from Georgetown with a degree in theology. She considered it, unquestionably, her proudest achievement."

In 1990, Pearl Bailey passed away from a heart attack at a hotel in Philadelphia where she was staying while undergoing therapy for a knee replacement surgery she had six weeks before.

Bibliography:

Quoted text from: ExplorePAhistory.com. "Pearl Bailey Historical Marker." 2011. Accessed on April 28, 2014. http://explorepahistory.com/hmarker.php?markerId=1-A-25C.

Biography/History

The Independent Order of Good Samaritans and Daughters of Samaria was established in New York City in 1847 as a temperance group and a beneficial society. Although founded by white men and women, within a few years African Americans began joining the order, for the most part segregated into separate lodges. Whites began withdrawing from the order around the time of the Civil War, and before long it was an exclusively African American organization. It was probably one of the largest African American fraternal groups.

The motto of the Order of Good Samaritans and Daughters of Samaria was, "Love, Purity, and Truth." Its objects included promoting temperance reform, securing charity for the unfortunate, and burying deceased members of the order. Membership was open to women between the ages of 15 and 50, and men between 18 and 50. Abstinence from "intoxicating drinks" was required; members found violating this requirement on one occasion would be suspended, and upon a second violation be expelled. Members could also be expelled for betraying secrets of the order.

A Philadelphia branch, Golden Star Lodge, No. 4, of the Independent Order of Good Samaritans and Daughters of Samaria, was organized November 17, 1880 under the jurisdiction of the Right Worthy District Grand Lodge, No. 2, of Pennsylvania and Delaware. That year, the national order counted around 20,000 members in up to 375 lodges located across the United States, Canada, and the Caribbean.

Bibliography:

"Constitution and By-Laws of Golden Star Lodge, No. 4, of the Independent Order of Good Samaritans and Daughters of Samaria." Philadelphia: Bowie, October 1911. Booklet found in collection.

Skocpol, Theda, Ariane Liazos, and Marshall Ganz. What a Mighty Power We Can Be: African American Fraternal Groups and the Struggle for Racial Equality. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2006. Accessed February 7, 2014. http://books.google.com/books?id=Ku9aOC9OxnMC. Pages 46-47.

Biography/History

Dr. Ruth Wright Hayre (1910-1998) was a distinguished educator and administrator in Philadelphia's public school system, as well as a philanthropist. Dr. Hayre was the first African American high school teacher in the School District of Philadelphia (William Penn High School, 1946), the first African American high school principal in Philadelphia (William Penn High School, 1955), the first African American public school superintendent (District Four, 1963), and the first female president of Philadelphia's Board of Education (1990).

Ruth Wright Hayre graduated from high school at age 15 and received a scholarship to attend the University of Pennsylvania. Three and a half years later, Hayre graduated with a bachelor's degree in education. By 1930 she had a master's degree in English literature, also from the University of Pennsylvania. After receiving her degrees, Hayre worked as a teacher, and later, as a principal in Arkansas before moving on to teach in both Dayton, Ohio and Washington, D.C. She married Talmadge Hayre in 1937 and returned to Philadelphia in 1939, when he accepted a position at Cheyney State College. In 1942 Hayre started working as a junior high school teacher in Philadelphia, until she became the first African American high school teacher in Philadelphia at William Penn High School in 1946. This set her on the path to the distinguished positions listed above: high school principal, public school superintendant, and Board of Education president.

Ruth Hayre came from a line of prominent African Americans in the Philadelphia area. Her father, Bishop Richard R. Wright, Jr., was the first African American to receive a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, served as President of Wilberforce University, and was appointed a bishop in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Her grandfather, Richard Robert Wright, Sr., was the first African American paymaster for the United Stated Army (1898), served as President of Georgia State Industrial College for Colored Youth (1891-1921), now Savannah State University, and founded Citizens and Southern Bank of Philadelphia.

Bibliography:

Ruth Wright Hayre resume and autobiography. Items found in collection.

"Wright-Hayre Fund." The Philadelphia Foundation. 2014. Accessed January 8, 2014. https://www.philafound.org/Giving/DonorStories/WrightHayreFund/tabid/673/Default.aspx.

Dean, Mensah M. "Educator Ruth Hayre Dies; Set Many Firsts for Philly Schools in Stellar Career." Philadelphia Daily News, January 31, 1998. Accessed January 8, 2014. http://articles.philly.com/1998-01-31/news/25748617_1_board-member-black-teachers-school-board.

Biography/History

"Sam" Solomon was a boxing trainer, manager, and commentator from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania whose proteges included champion Leon Spinks.

Born in 1915, Solomon grew up in Philadelphia and took up boxing at the age of 15. A star athlete, in addition to becoming a local boxing champion, he played catcher in the Negro Baseball League for the Central Stars. Solomon stopped boxing himself around the time of his marriage in 1937.

Solomon began coaching boxers in the 1950s and would continue to do so for almost 30 years, working out of several Philadelphia gyms including historic Frazier Gym. He coached five champions: heavyweights Ernie Terrell, Leon Spinks and Trevor Berbick, and light heavyweights Matthew Saad Muhammad and Leslie Stewart. Solomon was with Spinks when he defeated Muhammed Ali in a famous 1978 bout. Solomon's best-known local fighters included Eugene "Cyclone" Hart and "Lady Tiger," an early female boxer.

For over three decades Solomon worked for the Pennsylvania Railroad, primarily as a mail handler. After his retirement in 1975, he owned a grocery store and a laundromat in West Philadelphia. Solomon died in 1998.

Bibliography:

Smith, Ramona. "Samuel Solomon, Veteran Boxer, Trainer." Philadelphia Inquirer, December 18, 1998. Accessed January 28, 2013. http://articles.philly.com/1998-12-18/news/25721287_1_ernie-terrell-boxing-marvis-frazier.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of various small accumulations (less than one linear foot) of archival materials acquired from a variety of sources at various times. It touches on all aspects of African American life and culture, from business and politics, to arts and sports, to family life and personal experiences. The focus is Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, although not all the materials are limited to this region. The collection features a great variety of document types, such as correspondence, minute books, ephemera, photographs, clippings, scrapbooks, film reels, and much more. Most of the collection is organized into sub-collections by donor or creator name. There is also a segment of "Small Collections Arranged by Subject," and loose and special format materials.

The named sub-collections, listed here in alphabetical order by donor or creator, are as follows:

  • Aeltesten Trustees (in German), 1897-1915
  • [Ancient Order of Foresters of America] A.O.F. of A. minute book, 1889-1891
  • [Ancient Order of Foresters of America] Foresters of America minute book, 1949-1950
  • Anderson, Bert memorabilia of Charles Dawson
  • Anderson, Gwendolyn, papers
  • Barkely, Lillian, collection
  • Barnes, Harry W., Jr., photo from a program of National Medical Association
  • Batteaste, Irene, photographs and newspaper clippings
  • Baylor, Owen, collection of Philadelphia Orchestra programs and press releases
  • Bowers, Carnella, film reels of John Heinz
  • Brewer, Delores, documents and photographs of Mercy Douglas Hospital and Frederick Douglass Hospital
  • Carmen, Charles, Ghanian stamp collection
  • Churn, Charlotte, collection on classical music and theater
  • Clyde Pelzer Funeral Home ephemera and financial records
  • Collection on MOVE
  • Collections of Citizens / Greater Philadelphia Enterprises Development Corporation (GPEDC)
  • Colvard, Alberta, collection
  • Contino, Francis, collection on politics and civil rights
  • Daniels, Arthur and Edith, papers
  • Dixie Hummingbirds photographs and clippings
  • Ferguson, May, papers
  • Gray, Brooks E., papers, booklets, and programs on African Americans in the military, including World War II
  • Haines, Walter Sr., photos and patents for necktie designs
  • Harris, Lillian, photograph collection of performing artists
  • Hightower, Dorothy, scrapbooks and documents of Roland Johnson
  • Holder, Oscar Elliott and Cora Elizabeth, scrapbooks
  • Hopkins, Dr. Frederick M., clippings and photographs scrapbooks (includes Niagara Falls vacation), circa 1915-1950
  • Hughes, Madelyn, photos, diplomas, programs, and scrapbook
  • Hull, Alma, collection (including correspondence with Marian Anderson, James and Ethel DePreist)
  • Jackson, Judge Ricardo, family photographs
  • Jefferson, Bernice A., papers
  • Jenkins, Leroy, programs, newspapers, and bulletins
  • Johnson, Judy, memorabilia
  • Junior Service League plaques, awards, and programs
  • Kennard, Mary, materials on Mother Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church
  • Lindsey, Grace collection
  • Lloyd, Theophilus J. "Sonny," materials on basketball history
  • Logan, Floyd, papers, photos, and awards (educator's roundtable)
  • Marks, D. H., collection
  • McCabe, J. Grant, III, records of St. John's Settlement House
  • McCalla, John Moore, scrapbook of trip to Liberia, 1860
  • McKnight, Lucille, collection
  • Mills, Maude Frisby, collection
  • Mitchell, Janice and Louis D., collection
  • Nix, Robert N. C., papers
  • Randleman, Irene, photo album and diploma
  • Reeder, Samuel and Bessie, film reel, programs, and documents
  • Smith, Arthur C., photographs
  • Smith, Kathryn B., Claflin College year book and family photos
  • Smith, Marie Steward, papers
  • Stemons, Arizona Cleaver, papers
  • Trent, Raymond F., collection
  • Twyford sheet music collection
  • Unidentified membership ledger, 1878-1880
  • Upshur, William A., Jr., binder, scrapbook, and photographs
  • Vance, Gertrude, collection on Charles McCabe
  • Walton, George Everett, collection on Philadelphia Concert Orchestra
  • Wesley, Dr. Charles, papers, correspondence, reports
  • Wood, A.R. Maynor, papers
  • Zamsky ephemera collection

The segment "Small Collections Arranged by Subjects" is described in an item-level inventory, available on-site. It consists mostly of printed ephemera such as programs, booklets, postcards, and similar materials. There are also some photographs, correspondence, certificates, and various other original documents. This segment is organized into the following subjects:

  • African and Caribbean
  • Arts
  • Black historiography
  • Education
  • Family
  • Business, fraternal, and charitable organizations
  • Media
  • Medical
  • Military
  • Museum-related
  • Music
  • Politics and civil rights, pre 1960
  • Politics and civil rights, post 1960
  • Religion
  • Sports
  • Small artifacts (postcards, cased photographs, buttons, and medallions)

Lastly, the collection consists of various loose materials and special format documents (most of which are stored together by format) assembled by the African American Museum in Philadelphia. These include accumulated photographs, postage stamps, stereographic cards, postcards, posters, large-format designs and plans, and other materials.

Scope and Contents

This collection focuses on Crite's artwork and career, with little about his private life and few personal papers. Crite's artworks are well represented in the form of dozens of linoleum block prints on paper and two paper sculptures, as well as photocopies of Crite's sketch book, a few photographs of artworks, and a book of photocopies of artworks with descriptions and prices. The collection also includes newspaper clippings, correspondence, printed matter such as exhibition catalogs, and books both written by Crite ( All Glory) and those featuring his illustrations. Of special interest are several lectures given by Crite delivered at church and school groups between 1940 and 1960 on his artwork, African American art, religion, and other topics. There are 13 audiocassette recordings of the speeches (recorded later, from Crite's original lecture scripts) and transcriptions of the tapes with (photocopy) illustrations, 1978.

Scope and Contents

This collection chronicles the life of an African American woman who, in serving in the military during World War II and in training and working as a professional artist from the 1920s through the late 20th century, was at the vanguard of her race and gender. Her personal interests included African American history and civil rights, medical illustration, carpet and fabric design, and religion (Christianity). This collection documents the life of Anna Russell Jones, particularly her time in the military, her career as a civil service illustrator and freelance designer, and her art education and job searches. Also covered are other aspects of Jones' personal life and the lives of her family members, particularly her husband (William Albert M. Jones), mother (Anna Evans Russell), and brother (J. Warner Russell). The collection is organized into five series by format type: "Series I. Papers, 1897-1989"; "Series II. Photographs and scrapbooks, circa 1892-1987"; "Series III. Artwork, circa 1940-1970"; "Series IV. Objects, circa 1940-1982"; and "Series V. Printed materials, circa 1900-1961." Correspondence, photographs, scrapbooks, paintings on paper, pen and ink illustrations, ephemera, printed materials, certificates, personnel records, and other papers comprise the collection.

Series I. Papers, 1897-1989 includes a large amount of correspondence, particularly relating to Jones's freelance work as a carpet designer; personnel records and papers from Jones's job searches; and documents and ephemera relating to her education. A quantity of papers pertain to Jones's husband, William Albert M. Jones. Additional family members are represented in certificates, correspondence, genealogical information, and other documents.

The largest segment of Series II. Photographs and scrapbooks, circa 1892-1987 date from Jones' period in the Women's Army Corps (WAC) during World War II. Featured are many photographs of Jones and her compatriots, as well as scrapbooks she assembled documenting WAC training, daily life at Fort Huachuca, and furlough travel. Additionally, the series includes photographs of Russell family members, Anna's marriage to William Albert M. Jones, and other family photographs. There are also two scrapbooks Anna Russell Jones compiled for classes on art education and art history.

Series III. Artwork, circa 1940-1970 is the largest series in this collection, comprised primarily of carpet designs, medical illustrations, government and military illustrations, and posters, many of which are of prominent figures in African American history, all created by Anna Russell Jones. There are also some greeting cards, religious artwork, sketches, and other artwork by Jones, as well as a small amount of art reference materials.

The highlight of Series IV. Objects, circa 1940-1982 is Anna Russell Jones's WAC uniform. The collection also includes a military medal for good conduct, several printing blocks, a wooden plaque carved by Jones, and many other items.

Series V. Printed materials, circa 1900-1961 is comprised of military news, newsletters, and publications, many of which feature artwork created by Jones; newspaper clippings collected by Jones about herself, World War II, African Americans in the military, and other topics; books, periodicals, and pamphlets about African American history and civil rights; and a large amount of books and publications on art technique and art history. An inventory is available on-site.

Scope and Contents

This collection is comprised of materials from Antonio M. Banks Junior and his parents, Antonio Banks Senior, and Florence Banks. The collection includes several school notebooks, circa 1945, and personal account and appointment books from Antonio Banks Junior. There are also some ledgers relating to his father, Antonio Banks Senior, including England and Walton Co (3rd and Vine Street, Philadelphia), ledger 1920-1922, and barber accounts, 1924. There are also various receipts, cancelled checks, financial records, and deeds from the family. There are photographs of the family and friends as well as Philadelphia scenes. Of special interest are photographs and clippings on an African American baseball team, Zulu Giants Baseball Club, circa 1930s.

A rough inventory of the collection exists on-site. It lists the following documents:

  • Deed Charles Koenigenun to Joseph Shoemaker 1879
  • Deed William Miller To Emily Cersher Sept. 1915
  • Inter Club Alliance Treasure Book
  • Miscellaneous Business Cards
  • Miscellaneous Notebooks (6)
  • Miscellaneous Receipts
  • Mortgage Clearance Ceremonies of Zion Baptist Church Certificate of acknowledgement 1955 Antonio Banks
  • Photo of Ben Franklin Bridge
  • Railroad Pass March 11, 1924
  • Real Estate Receipts 1926, 1927, 1928
  • Real Estate Title From Antonio Banks to Martin Flood 1925
  • Relocation Ceremonies of Zion Baptist Church Program
  • School Roster Antonio Banks

According to the on-site inventory, the collection also includes the following printed materials:

  • Constitution And By-Laws of Crispus Attucks, Post No. 151 American Legion, 1939
  • Historic Views of Gettysburg Text by Robert C. Miller 1907
  • Holy Bible
  • Lincoln And Men of Wartimes by A.K. McClure, LL.D 1892, The Times Publishing Co.
  • Speeches And Addresses by Abraham Lincoln
  • The Death of Crispus Attucks by Lorenzo Harris 1934
  • The Forty-Third Anniversary of Crispus Attucks Post No. 151, June 16, 1962
  • The Latest Philadelphia Street Guide

Objects also form a large part of the collection, enumerated in the on-site inventory as follows:

  • 1 Wall hanging with three people
  • 3 Flowered wall hangings
  • Coronet and Case
  • Eyeglasses and Case
  • Face Powder
  • Hampton Button
  • Home Nursing Pin
  • Howard University Pennant
  • Metal Receipt Box
  • Money Bag Central - Penn National Bank of Philadelphia No. 5
  • Pennant: 37th Annual Grand Lodge Convention Brooklyn New York 1936
  • Shaving Brush and Holder
  • Tennis Racket
  • Tuskegee Button

Scope and Contents

The collection consists of photographic prints, negatives, and contact pages from the 1987 Philadelphia mayoral re-election campaign of Wilson Goode. Most of the photographs are black and white, but some are in color.

Scope and Contents

A large portion of this collection relates to the establishment and early years of the Afro-American Historical and Cultural Museum (later renamed the African American Museum in Philadelphia), circa 1975-1985: black and white photographs, clippings, and ephemera from its construction, exhibitions, and events. There are also Police Advisory Board materials including reports of the board, correspondence, and publications used as reference, 1960s. Additionally, the collection contains clippings about Farmer, a large number of photographs of him at events he attended, and several property documents (1942-1951).

Scope and Contents

This collection contains a large amount of material relating to African American culture with an emphasis on theater, opera, visual arts, and politicians. There are clippings, full issues of periodicals, flyers, and other ephemera and printed materials. There is an alphabetical file of theaters, as well as a roughly alphabetical file of actors, including a file of autographs from both local and national stars. There are also some materials on the African American Museum in Philadelphia.

The collection features a small amount of personal and primary materials, including: notes and correspondence; several photograph albums depicting family and events, circa 1890-1990; and two autograph albums with photos, circa 1920s-1940s.

Various types of audio visual materials are in the collection, including 22 VHS and 5 reel-to-reel tapes, several audiocassettes, a film negative, and five LP records. There are also a few works of art, namely a pen and ink drawing, two etchings, and two paintings (possibly acrylic on paper). Finally, the collection includes a box of plaques/certificates, dozens of buttons (both political and non-political), and a cotton bud.

An inventory that covers part of the collection is available on-site.

Scope and Contents

The collection largely documents Hinkson's medical training and career, military service, veteran's rights involvement, and membership in fraternal organizations. Relating to his medical career, the collection includes correspondence (notably some letters from physician and art collector Dr. Albert C. Barnes), pamphlets and brochures about medical topics, hospital photographs, and a patient notebook covering various medical topics such as gas attacks and eclampsia (circa 1913-1935). Material pertaining to his military service includes correspondence from World War I and World War II, materials about an attempt to establish Colored Infantry Regiment in 1940 including briefs and correspondence with members of Congress, and documents from Hinkson's time at a station hospital in Arizona (1942). Relating to Hinkson's advocacy for veteran's rights, the collection includes documents and speeches from the Allied Veterans Association and materials from the George T. Cornish Post #292 of the American Legion. There are also materials relating to other fraternal organizations in which Hinkson was involved, notably Alpha Phi Alpha and the Alpha chapter of Sigma Pi Phi, including pamphlets, brochures, annual reports, and photographs, mostly dating from circa 1955-1963. Hinkson collected newspaper clippings on topics he was interested in, such as African American history and veterans, and such clippings are represented in the collection dating from the 1940s to the 1970s. There is also research on the history of African American soldiers, including the Civil War's United States Colored Troops (USCT) at Camp William Penn, to which corps an ancestor of Hinkson belonged.

Some objects are stored with this collection, including a medal, textiles, two military hats, belts, an American Association of Vienna book (1931-1932), a leather doctor bag, soldier sewing kit, and shaving kit.

Some documents in the collection are associated with Dr. Russell F. Minton, another prominent African American physician in Philadelphia. It is unclear if any of these materials may have been created or collected by Minton instead of Hinkson.

A rough inventory of the Hinkson collection is available on-site.

Scope and Contents

This collection largely consists of materials relating to Berry's travels in Europe in the late 1950s and early 1960s, his career at Cheyney University and related legal battle, and a large amount of ephemera, especially playbills, from arts and cultural events Berry attended. It includes scrapbooks, photograph albums, correspondence, clippings, and ephemera.

Most of the materials relating to Berry's travels in Europe in the late 1950s and early 1960s are contained in over one dozen scrapbooks. There are foreign press clippings, some of which are in German or other European languages, about Berry's career as a singer/performer. There are also photographs (black and white), playbills, and ticket stubs and travel ephemera.

A large amount of materials in the collection relates to arts and culture. There are numerous playbills, in scrapbooks and loose, as well as headshots from mostly African American performers (some signed). Berry supported numerous local arts and performance organizations in the Philadelphia area, and there are programs and other pieces of ephemera from various of these in the collection. There is also correspondence about art objects that Berry purchased.

A sizeable amount of papers from Berry's academic career are also included in the collection. There are files on Cheyney University and on Berry's involvement with the Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties. Of note are legal documents from and clippings about the suits Cheyney University faculty brought against the University and the Department of Education.

Scope and Contents

The collection consists primarily of materials relating to Russell Minton's medical training and career, such as handwritten letters, notes, and journals; typed notes and reports; laboratory and hospital records; clippings about Minton's career; speeches and published papers/articles written by Minton; certificates; programs; and numerous photographs, many of Mercy-Douglass hospital circa 1940s-1960s. The notes about medicine, circa 1912-1914, are the largest subgrouping in the collection. There are also a quantity of later writings and articles by Minton, many pertaining to medical topics and African Americans in medicine. Some writings are about civil rights generally. Additionally, there are some documents from the Sick Committee of Golden Star Lodge #4 of the Independent Order of Good Samaritans and Daughters of Samaria, an organization which provided insurance for sickness, burial, and funeral expenses.

There is also a box of family related material including a Minton family Bible with genealogical information dating back to 1828, nineteenth century family photographs, and nineteenth century sheet music. Additionally, the collection includes three Louis Jordan records and a headless green army figure.

Some documents in the collection are associated with Dr. DeHaven Hinkson, another prominent African American physician in Philadelphia. It is unclear if any of these materials may have been created or collected by Hinkson instead of Minton.

Scope and Contents

This collection of over 300 items includes programs, photographs (some taken by Strothers's brother, Jack Franklin), newspaper reviews, performance announcements, letters, telegrams, and cards. The materials largely document Strothers's career as a soloist lyric soprano (which began in 1951 and continued into the 1980s) and interest in musical performance; there is less about her labor activism, Civil Rights involvement, and community service.

The collection includes a large number of theater programs from events featuring African American performers at major concert halls in Philadelphia, New York, and Washington, D.C., as well as programs from local theaters and companies in Philadelphia. A script and lecture notes from a lecture/concert Strothers gave on African American Music History is also in the collection. There are some programs from shows in which Strothers performed, as well as some photographs and clippings of her performances. A quantity of materials relates to the Improved Benevolent Protective Order of Elks of the World (IBPOE of W), including programs, photographs, and papers; materials relating to Strothers' appointment in 1962 as National Song Bird for the Elks; and materials relating to the Elks Education Department Fez Club, which was founded by Eloise's mother, Florence Franklin, in 1948. There are some other items from Strothers's family, notably some photographs by her brother, photographer Jack T. Franklin. Additionally, the collection includes correspondence (mostly thank-you notes and invitations), 1950-1972, sheet music, and several awards.

Scope and Contents

The collection largely contains secondary materials related to African American history such as pamphlets, magazines, and newspaper clippings focusing on African American figures and events in the African American community. There are also some typed speeches written by teachers about these same topics. A few materials relate to the National Freedom Day Association including correspondence and photographs of National Freedom Day ceremonies, circa 1949-1982. There is also a small amount of family history research material.

Scope and Contents

Covering a period of 142 years (1850-1992), the Frank McGlinn Collection richly documents Philadelphia's theatrical past through the performances of African Americans. It consists largely of posters, programs, broadsides, clippings and advertisements. There are smaller amounts of photographs and correspondence (mostly in the form of invitations received). The collection is mainly about 20th century plays, performers, musicals and films. The earliest document, a broadside about the performance of the celebrated "Nightingale Ethiopian Serenaders" at Temperance Hall, April 8, 1850, supports theater historian Gerald Bordman's claim that Philadelphia was the last important bastion of minstrelsy. ( The Concise Oxford Companion to Theatre, p. 334). Nothing is known about the Nightingale Ethiopian Serenaders and information is difficult to obtain because minstrel groups changed their names frequently. The only other item from the 19th century is a broadside for the Creole Burlesque Company at the South Street Theatre, dating from probably the 1870s. Other early items include a program for  Uncle Tom's Cabin at the Chestnut Street Opera House, 1904 and a broadside for the 1916,  Ziegfeld Follies which starred Black comedian Bert Williams.

The Harlem Renaissance is well represented in the Frank McGlinn Collection. There are programs or broadsides for "All God's Children Got Wings," 1928; "Porgy," 1928 original play; "Connie's Hot Chocolate," 1929; "Runnin' Wild," 1924; "In Abraham's Bosom," 1928; "Deep River," 1926; and "Dixie to Broadway." For many theatrical and musical productions, documentation is from the Philadelphia production or appearance of the show. Many shows, however, are New York based.

The Philadelphia focus of Frank McGlinn's collection is visible in the documents concerning three Philadelphia/Delaware Valley African Americans. The concert career of Philadelphia-born Marian Anderson is represented by several concert programs, advertisements, invitations and a poster. The latter is most likely a poster of a concert in the 1960s.

The theatre and film career of Chester, Pennsylvania native Ethel Waters is represented by clippings of obituaries, a photo and advertisements of shows, including Cabin in the Sky.

A substantial portion of the Frank McGlinn Collection is devoted to the career and legacy of Paul Robeson, 1898-1976. While Robeson was not a native of Philadelphia, he lived in the city during the last ten years of his life. The Paul Robeson materials span four decades of his life and consist of programs and clippings. They cover performances during Robeson's lifetime and criticism and commemorative events after his death. There is a program from the 1928 London production of "All God's Children Got Wings." Robeson had earlier starred in the 1924 American production of the play. A booklet on the motion picture, Borderline dates from 1930. It is the only item in the collection relating to Robeson's film career; it features advertisements for Robeson's records as well. The 1940s were a productive decade for Robeson, theatrically and politically. There are several programs of concerts Robeson gave in Philadelphia at this time. Also, programs for  John Henry and  Othello are available. As a reaction to his political activism, the United States State Department canceled Robeson's passport in 1950. His performing career in theater and film came to a stop, but Robeson continued to give concerts and to speak out on human rights. In 1958, Robeson won back his American passport and was able to travel overseas. A concert program in the collection from the Royal Albert Hall, London, dated August 10, 1958, represents this period of Robeson's life.

Paul Robeson moved to Philadelphia in 1966 to live with his sister Marian in West Philadelphia. He died in Philadelphia on January 23, 1976. The Frank McGlinn Collection, unfortunately, has no information pertaining to these last years of Robeson's life.

There are more than a dozen clippings of theater reviews or editorials about the play Paul Robeson, by Philip Hayes Dean, which premiered in 1977. The play, conceived as a dramatic interpretation of Robeson's life, was nonetheless perceived as a documentary and sparked controversy. Members of Robeson's family and his friends said the play was inaccurate. Writer James Baldwin went so far as to accuse Dean of portraying Robeson as a "chocolate John Wayne." The clippings cover the period 1977-1991 and include reviews of performances by James Earl Jones and Avery Brooks who played the title role in different productions of the play.

The collection includes autographed photographs of Gregory Hines, Robert Guillaume, James Earl Jones, Lena Horne, and Oprah Winfrey. There are also numerous critical and historical articles about African American performers.

Scope and Contents

The collection consists primarily of research materials gathered by Shapiro about civil rights, civil rights law, and enforcement and court cases relating to civil rights law. The files are organized topically and include case summaries and transcripts, academic legal articles, newspaper clippings, reports of civil rights commissions, and other related materials. There are some drafts of and published versions of articles written by Shapiro.

Scope and Contents

This collection is made up largely of printed sheet music, musical education texts, and slides. There is only a small amount of personal papers, such as Spence's notes on music history, diplomas and plaques he received, programs for student recitals and other performances, and photographs of children in his classes, of Spence himself, and of famous African American musicians. The sheet music ranges from spirituals to musicals to classical and other genres. There are over three dozen audiocassette tapes, both mass produced and privately recorded, of musical performances, choirs, jazz, singers, etc. There are also many books on music education and music theory. The slides are in 16 slide carousels and date from 1971-1988. Most are from travels, to destinations in Europe, California, Mexico, Hong Kong, Japan, South America, and the Middle East. Accompanying these slides, and presumably collected from Spence's journeys, are rocks from Christian sites in Egypt and Israel, and from Greek sites. Also included are a small number of personal slides depicting events such as birthday parties, graduations, sports games, awards ceremonies, and Spence's classes. Inventories for the sheet music, texts, and audio recordings are available on-site; there is also a handwritten listing of the slides.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of over 500,000 negatives and photographs that document almost every social, cultural, and political event in Philadelphia's African American community during the years that Jack Franklin was active as a photographer (1960s-1990s), as well as many of the major events of the 1960s Civil Rights movement in the United States. About 1,000 of the images, mostly relating to Civil Rights, well-known entertainers, or other topics of high interest, have been digitized and are available on the African American Museum in Philadelphia's website at http://aampmuseum.pastperfect-online.com.

Most of the collection is organized into three series: I. Contact sheets and prints, II. Black and white negatives, and III. Color photographs. There are also two World War II albums of the military base and island natives in Guam, where Franklin was stationed; some Franklin family photographs, circa 1920s-1950s; research on Franklin, including obituaries of him, audiocassette interviews, and publications in which his photographs appeared; correspondence with other organizations putting together Franklin exhibitions; camera equipment; and copies of Franklin's photographs on slides, CDs, and in a computer database.

Series I, Contact sheets and prints, is organized into three subseries: A. Chronological, B. Alphabetical, and C. Subjects. The largest section in the Subjects subseries is Civil Rights, which is further divided by event, person, or topic. Many of these images have been digitized and are available online. Other subjects in the subseries include celebrities, churches, and businesses.

Series II, Negatives, is divided into two series: A. Chronological, B. Alphabetical. There are a few negatives from the 1940s and 1950s, but they are mostly from 1960 to 1990.

Series III, Color photographs, consists of 4"x5" prints labeled in groups by subject or date but in no discernible order, ranging from 1990 to circa 1997.

Scope and Contents

The Philadanco Collection has documentation of the dance company from its inception in 1970 up to 1991. There is also material relating to the career of the founder of the company, Joan Myers Brown. The correspondence is basically incoming and concerns business matters with the exception of a letter to Ms. Brown from her niece. The correspondence has an uneven span from 1951 to 1991. The clippings and photos bear testimony to Ms. Brown's remarkable career.

The advertisements and season booklets carry much valuable biographical information about the Company's dancers. This material dates mainly from the 1980s. The newspaper clippings or reviews, however, span over 20 years including the foundation of the Company. During the 1980s, Philadanco began publishing its own newsletter. The Company traveled to Bermuda in 1986 and 1992, and there are programs and reviews of that booking. Mainly, reviews and programs are for performances in the Philadelphia and Delaware Valley area. There are a number of undated clippings as well as miscellaneous publications which carried advertisements or stories about Philadanco. There is an obituary of Danny Sloan, founder of the Danny Sloan Dance Company.

Finally, there is an album of photographs of the Philadanco Company. Some photos are identified by name of dancers, choreographer and year, but most are not. Some were apparently publicity photos while others appear to be performance pictures. All photographs are in black and white.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of various materials that document Coleman's time as a Philadelphia politician, including his time as a councilman and council president. Materials include drafts for speeches, articles, testimonies, photographs (many are unidentified), correspondence, campaign ephemera, and scrapbooks with clippings and photographs.

Also in the collection are Coleman's writings, including literary efforts he pursued during retirement, such as corrected typescript drafts of novels "The Rebellious Southerner" (1994) and "My Darling Caesar" (1994), as well as "The Reflections and Speeches of a Black Politician" authored by Coleman and W. Collins Pugh (1994). There are also reprints of Coleman's scientific publications and patents, 1951.

Scope and Contents

Most of the materials in the collection are from Lloyd Thompson and pertain to the Hilldale Club; a smaller amount are from William Cash. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Season Bookings and Scorebooks, Player Statistics, Financial Records, Delaware County Athletic Association and Jersey City Colored Athletes, Clippings, and Photographs. There are also some objects related to this collection, including a catcher's mitt and facemask and several autographed baseballs. A more detailed inventory is available on-site.

The Correspondence concerns five individuals: William Cash, Lloyd Thompson, Bob Thompson, (son of Lloyd Thompson), John Drew, and Edward Bolden. Bolden's correspondence is mainly about routine business matters. Bob Thompson, son of Lloyd Thompson, is represented by one letter addressed to Darby (PA) High School Alumni. There are letters from Ted Radcliffe and James Loche to John Drew, owner of the Hilldale Club, regarding contracts with the ball clubs. Cash is represented by one letter from Dr. Lawrence D. Hogan concerning a loan of his baseball collection. (In the 1980's, Cash was president of the Cobbs Creek Little League and kept the business meeting minutes of that organization as well as literature on Little League baseball.) Lloyd Thompson's correspondence is both incoming and outgoing. It concerns business affairs of Black baseball, especially the East-West League of 1932. A number of letters to Thompson are from people applying for jobs with the East-West League. Two letters from 1924 and 1925 from Thompson to his wife reveal something about "life on the road" with a baseball team. As a result of Thompson's place in baseball business, he knew many players and kept records of baseball scores and trivia, which was useful to him as a sports writer. The essays and notes about baseball are both handwritten and typed, though it is uncertain for what publication Thompson was writing. Unfortunately, these materials are not dated.

The Season Bookings and Scorebooks for Hilldale date from 1918 (eight years after the team's founding in 1910) to 1932, when the team folded.

For the 1925 season there are Statistics for Hilldale and non-Hilldale baseball players.

The Hilldale Financial Records consist primarily of expenditures and receipts from 1914-1932, box office accounting records from 1926 through 1932 seasons, and a financial report for the ill-fated East-West League and for the 1924 Negro World Series. There are also business transaction forms from the 1930s about the ball park owned by the Hilldale team, minutes for the Hilldale Club stockholders, and a copy of the constitution and bylaws of the Philadelphia Baseball Association (of which Hilldale was a member).

The Delaware County Athletic Association and Jersey City Colored Athletics series consists of ample documentation for the Delaware County Athletic Association from 1916-1918 and one business card (undated) for James Thomas, booking manager of the Jersey City Colored Athletics.

The Clippings focus on the key persons in this collection: Bill Cash, Lloyd Thompson and Edward Bolden. James 'Cool Papa' Bell, 'Cyclone Joe' Williams, Bill Yancey and Biz Mackey are the other baseball personalities represented here. There are four carbon typescripts, written by Lloyd Thompson, and presumably intended for newspaper columns.

The Photographs series includes both team and individual player photos. There are team pictures of the Hilldale Club for some, but not all, seasons between the years 1912 and 1924. Some individual player photographs are identified by player name but many are not. Photographs range in size from postcard size to a 24-inch panoramic shot of the ballpark where the Negro World Series was played.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of reports, flyers, and publications about various issues and events pertaining to civil rights, African American education, and urban housing accumulated by M. Lee Montgomery. Of special interest are minutes, notes, and other materials relating to the Resident Housing Authority Board of the Philadelphia Housing Authority, of which he was a charter member.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists mostly of materials relating to Natalie Hinderas, with a significant amount of materials relating to Natalie's mother, Leota Palmer. Most materials relate to Hinderas's music career and education; there are also some personal papers. Materials include: correspondence, programs, scrapbooks, family photograph albums, newspaper clippings, and family property records/deeds from Ohio from 1904.

An inventory for the collection exists on site.

Scope and Contents

This collection includes scrapbooks, recordings, correspondence, photographs, newspaper clippings, writings, financial records, and other materials relating to the life and career of Pearl Bailey. Most document her public life in the 1970s, especially her career as a singer and actress, a cultural ambassador, and an author. A smaller quantity of materials relate to her personal life, including her finances, family, and college education at Georgetown University.

Scrapbooks constitute the largest segment of this collection. They are comprised of correspondence--including letters from well-known performers, politicians, and intellectuals--and invitations, clippings, photographs, ephemera, and other documents. Mostly from the 1970s, they are organized roughly by date and subjects such as particular shows/performances, trips abroad, or books. An inventory of the scrapbooks is available on-site.

The collection also includes a large number of recordings in the form of LPs (33 and 78 rpm) and reel-to-reel tapes, as well as some audiocassette tapes and 8 mm films. There are recordings of Pearl Bailey, recordings of Louie Bellson, other jazz and swing artists, and some Broadway productions. An item listing of the recordings is available on-site.

Also in this collection are some of Bailey's writings, such as poems, speeches, and book manuscripts; personal insurance and financial papers; a large number of photographs and negatives; a few telephone and address books; and various other materials. A rough inventory listing is available on-site.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of various administrative, financial, and membership records of Golden Star Lodge #4 of the Independent Order of Good Samaritans and Daughters of Samaria. It includes minute books, 1889-1898 and 1909-1915, and some loose minutes; printed constitutions and by-laws; correspondence; treasurer's reports, ledgers, receipts, and other financial documents; Sick Committee reports; doctors' notices, death notices, and funeral arrangements; and scattered membership applications, certifications, and recommendations. There are some textiles and paper fans in the collection.

Scope and Contents

This collection documents the education and professional career of Dr. Hayre thoroughly, and also contains material about her family and the associations and organizations to which she belonged.

The collection is organized into series, and then folders sorted alphabetically: Series I. Personal (includes diary from a 1930s trip to Europe, academic records, personal correspondence, resume/biography, professional development, wedding announcement, daughter's school reports); Series II. School District (includes William Penn High School for Girls plans and reports); Series III. Scholarship Fund (applications and administrative files); Series IV. Subject Files (includes materials on organizations for which she served on the board or of which she was a member, such as the African American Museum in Philadelphia, Mother Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, and numerous other organizations); Series V. Speeches and Notes (from lectures and events); Series VI. Clippings (photocopies); Series VII. Photographs (mostly dating from 1930s-1990; includes several scrapbooks with clippings and letters, and one scrapbook compiled by a school upon Hayre's appointment to the school board).

Most of the boxes have inventories.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of Sam Solomon's records of his boxing coaching business, materials he collected about boxing, and a small amount of papers from his own boxing career and about baseball. It includes a large number of photographs, newsletters and ephemera, and financial records. There are also U-matic videocassettes and boxing gear.

The records of Solomon's boxing coaching business consist of ledgers, 1970-1983 (with gaps); management contracts, 1961-1982; and some correspondence, receipts, and other administrative records.

There are many materials relating to individual boxers in this collection, most of whom Solomon worked with, and some who may have just been of interest to him. There are resumes and biographies, press releases about fights, boxer ratings, bout schedules and advertisements, souvenir programs and ticket stubs, boxing scorecards/results, a quantity of clippings (circa 1971-1987), and a large number of photographs of boxers, in and out of the ring, some identified, some signed. There are many boxing magazines and newsletters from around the country but especially Philadelphia-based, notably a run of "Tonight's Boxing Program" (Philadelphia, Pa.) issues dating from 1970-1991.

There are about 11 U-matic videocassettes in the collection, labeled as follows:

  • "The Contender - Ernie Terrell," undated
  • A tribute to Rev. Leon Sullivan, undated
  • Billy Daniels vs. Cleveland Williams, undated
  • Cyclone Hart vs. Benny Buscoe, undated
  • Cyclone Hart vs. Benny Buscoe, undated
  • Ernie Terrell vs. Muhammed Ali, undated
  • Hart vs. Gregory, undated
  • Philadelphia Boxing Connection, undated
  • Solomon interview and still, 1989 April 26 (boxing reel #8)
  • Solomon interview, 1989 April 26 (boxing reel #7)
  • Sugar Ray Robinson vs. Jake La Motta, undated
  • Unlabeled, undated

Some items of boxing gear are also included in the collection: one mouth guard, two red robes, two sets of gloves, one yellow jacket, one blue sweater, one gray sweater, one red sweater jacket, one black jacket, and four different colored socks.

A rough, handwritten inventory is available on-site.

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

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African American Museum in Philadelphia

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Faith Charlton through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by staff of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories using data provided by the African American Museum in Philadelphia

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Eric Ledell Smith, encoded by staff of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Faith Charlton through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by staff of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories using data provided by the African American Museum in Philadelphia

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Faith Charlton through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories using data provided by the African American Museum in Philadelphia

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Sarah Leu through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Access Restrictions

Contact African American Museum in Philadelphia for information about accessing this collection.

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Materials collected at various times from various sources by the African American Museum in Philadelphia.

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Annamae Palmer Crite Collection

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Gift of Anna Russell Jones, 1986 (accession AAMP.1986.040)

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Accession AAMP.G83.003.

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Accession AAMP.1990.011.

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Gift of Russell F. (Jr.) and Betty Ann Minton (AAMP.1987.029).

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Gift of Eloise Owens Strothers, 1986 (AAMP.86.064).

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Gift of Dorothy Wright, 1987.

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Gift of Frank C. P. McGlinn, 1992 (AAMP.92.024).

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Accession AAMP.91.013.

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Gift of Jack Franklin (AAMP.1986.001).

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Gift of Joan Myers Brown, 1992 (AAMP.1992.017).

Immediate Source of Acquistion Note

Accession AAMP.G94.019.

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Gifts of Lloyd Thompson, 1985 (85.041) and William Cash, 1987 and 1989 (85.054 and 89.010).

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Accession AAMP.G91.008.

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Gift of Marcellas Henderson, 1994 (AAMP.G94.025).

Immediate Source of Acquistion Note

Accession AAMP.G95.013.

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Accession AAMP.93.011.

Immediate Source of Acquisition Note

Accession AAMP.1989.048.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

This collection was processed in 2014 by staff of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR). The HCI-PSAR project was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

Processing Information Note

Summary descriptive information on this collection was compiled in 2012-2014 as part of a project conducted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania to make better known and more accessible the largely hidden collections of small, primarily volunteer run repositories in the Philadelphia area. The Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories (HCI-PSAR) was funded by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

This is a preliminary finding aid. No physical processing, rehousing, reorganizing, or folder listing was accomplished during the HCI-PSAR project.

In some cases, more detailed inventories or finding aids may be available on-site at the repository where this collection is held; please contact African American Museum in Philadelphia directly for more information.

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Related Materials

Related Archival Materials Note

The Smithsonian's Archives of American Art has some materials from Allan Crite in its collections.

Boston Athenaeum: Allan Rohan Crite papers, 1948-2002, undated, MSS. .L757

Related Archival Materials Note

African American Museum in Philadelphia: Dr. Russell F. Minton papers, AAMP.1987.029.

Related Archival Materials Note

African American Museum in Philadelphia: Dr. DeHaven Hinkson papers, AAMP.1983.003.

African American Museum in Philadelphia: Records of Golden Star Lodge No. 4 of Independent Order of Good Samaritans and Daughters of Samaria (Philadelphia, Pa.), 1881-1947 (bulk 1910-1925).

Related Archival Materials Note

African American Museum in Philadelphia: Jack T. Franklin photographs.

Related Archival Materials Note

African American Museum in Philadelphia: Ruth Wright Hayre papers, 1926-1990, coll. 93.011

Temple University Libraries, Special Collections Research Center: Walter C. Beckett papers, 1920-1968, acc. 65.

Related Archival Materials Note

Historical Society of Pennsylvania: Frank McGlinn collection of ephemera, 1880-1993, collection 3314.

Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: Frank C. P. McGlinn papers, 1920s-1970s, collection 04685.

The Philadelphia Free Library's Theater Collection (Rare Book Department) contains many items donated by Frank McGlinn.

Related Archival Materials Note

African American Museum in Philadelphia: Eloise Owens Strothers papers.

Related Archival Materials Note

Temple University Libraries, Special Collections Research Center: Philadelphia Dance Company Records, 1968-2004.

Related Archival Materials Note

Howard University, Moorland-Spingarn Research Center: Edward Bolden papers, 1910-1980s.

Related Archival Materials Note

Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection, Temple University Libraries: Natalie Hinderas Collection, 1969-1987, Collection BM012NH.

Related Archival Materials Note

African American Museum in Philadelphia: Dr. Russell F. Minton papers, AAMP.1987.029.

Related Archival Materials Note

African American Museum in Philadelphia: Emanuel C. and Dorothy Wright papers, 1931-1983.

Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection, Temple University Libraries: Ruth Wright Hayre Collection, 1890, 1896-1994.

Separated Archival Materials Note

31 books donated with the collection were removed to the African American Museum in Philadelphia library.

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Controlled Access Headings

Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Subject(s)
  • African American athletes
  • African American churches
  • African American entertainers
  • African American fraternal organizations
  • African American musicians
  • African American soldiers
  • African Americans
  • African Americans in medicine
  • Civil rights
  • Local history

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • United States. Works Progress Administration
Geographic Name(s)
  • Boston (Mass.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Crite, Allan Rohan, 1910-2007
Subject(s)
  • African American artists
  • African American painting
  • Block printing--20th century
  • Linoleum block-printing
  • Linoleum block-printing, American
  • Religious art

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Moore College of Art and Design.
  • United States. Army. Women's Army Corps
  • United States. Army
Geographic Name(s)
  • Fort Huachuca (Ariz.)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Jones, Anna Russell, 1902-1995
  • Jones, William Albert, 1900-1986
Subject(s)
  • African American women
  • African American women artists
  • Artists
  • Civil service
  • Graphic artists
  • Illustrators
  • Medical illustrators
  • Women artists
  • Women in the civil service
  • Women textile designers
  • World War, 1939-1945

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Controlled Access Headings

Family Name(s)
  • Banks family
Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Banks, Antonio M.
  • Banks, Antonio, 1893-1973
  • Banks, Florence
Subject(s)
  • African American baseball players
  • African Americans

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Goode for Mayor
Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Goode, W. Wilson
Subject(s)
  • African American mayors
  • African American politicians
  • Mayors
  • Political campaigns
  • Political candidates
  • Politicians

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • African American Museum in Philadelphia
  • Philadelphia (Pa.). Commission on Human Relations
  • Philadelphia (Pa.). Police Advisory Board
Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Farmer, Clarence
Subject(s)
  • African Americans
  • Discrimination
  • Museums
  • Police misconduct
  • Police--Complaints against

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • African American Museum in Philadelphia
  • Strawberry Mansion Junior High School (Philadelphia, Pa.)
Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Bullock, Doris
Subject(s)
  • African American actors
  • African American artists
  • African American opera singers
  • African American politicians
  • African American women educators
  • Performing arts sponsorship

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Mercy-Douglass Hospital (Philadelphia, Pa.)
  • Sigma Pi Phi
Geographic Name(s)
  • Paris (France)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Hinkson, DeHaven, 1891-1975
  • Minton, Russell F.
Subject(s)
  • African American physicians
  • African American soldiers
  • African American veterans
  • Medicine
  • Professional associations
  • United States--Armed Forces--African American officers
  • Veterans
  • Veterans--Services for--United States
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • World War, 1939-1945

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Cheyney University of Pennsylvania
Geographic Name(s)
  • Cheyney (Pa.)
  • Germany
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Berry, Ernest R., 1930-1992
Subject(s)
  • African American educators
  • African American singers
  • African American universities and colleges
  • Blacks--Segregation
  • Performing arts
  • Singers

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Independent Order of Good Samaritans and Daughters of Samaria of the United States of America
  • Mercy-Douglass Hospital (Philadelphia, Pa.)
Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Hinkson, DeHaven, 1891-1975
  • Minton, Russell F.
Subject(s)
  • African American physicians
  • African Americans in medicine
  • African Americans--Civil rights
  • African Americans--Medical care
  • Medicine

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • AFSCME
  • Improved, Benevolent, Protective Order of Elks of the World
Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Franklin, Jack T., 1922-2009
  • Strothers, Eloise Owens, 1920-1991
Subject(s)
  • African American women
  • African American women singers
  • Singers
  • Sopranos (Singers)

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • National Freedom Day Association
Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Wright, Emanuel C.
Subject(s)
  • African Americans
  • National Freedom Day

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Controlled Access Headings

Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Anderson, Marian, 1897-1993
  • Robeson, Paul, 1898-1976
  • Waters, Ethel, 1896-1977
Subject(s)
  • Actors
  • African American theater
  • African Americans in the performing arts
  • Entertainers
  • Theater

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Controlled Access Headings

Geographic Name(s)
  • United States
Personal Name(s)
  • Shapiro, Harry H. (Harry Hersh)
Subject(s)
  • African Americans--History
  • Civil rights
  • Discrimination--Law and legislation
  • Race discrimination

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Controlled Access Headings

Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Spence, Herbert
Subject(s)
  • African American music teachers
  • African American musicians
  • Music teachers
  • Music--Instruction and study
  • Travel

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Controlled Access Headings

Geographic Name(s)
  • Guam
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
  • Washington (D.C.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Franklin, Jack T., 1922-2009
Subject(s)
  • African American civil rights workers
  • African American photographers
  • African Americans
  • Civil rights movements
  • Photographers
  • World War, 1939-1945--Campaigns--Pacific Area

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Philadelphia Dance Company
Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Brown, Joan Myers
Subject(s)
  • African American dance teachers
  • African American dancers
  • Dance
  • Dance companies
  • Dancers

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Controlled Access Headings

Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Coleman, Joseph E.
Subject(s)
  • African American politicians
  • Authors, Black
  • Chemists
  • City council members
  • Housing
  • Local government
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)--Politics and government--20th century
  • Politicians

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • East-West League (Baseball league)
  • Hilldale Club (Baseball team)
  • Philadelphia Stars (Baseball team)
Geographic Name(s)
  • Darby (Pa.)
  • Delaware County (Pa.)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Bolden, Edward, 1878-1946
  • Cash, Bill ("Ready"), 1919-2011
  • Thompson, Lloyd P., 1895-1987
Subject(s)
  • African American athletes
  • African American baseball players
  • Baseball
  • Baseball teams
  • Negro leagues
  • Sports

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.). Housing Authority
  • Philadelphia Resident Advisory Board
Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Subject(s)
  • African American children--Education
  • African Americans--Education (Higher)
  • Housing authorities
  • Public housing
  • Urban development

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Temple University
Geographic Name(s)
  • Elkins Park (Pa.)
  • Oberlin (Ohio)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Hinderas, Natalie
  • Palmer, Leota, 1904-1997
Subject(s)
  • African American musicians
  • African American women
  • Music
  • Music--Instruction and study
  • Women pianists

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • United Nations
Geographic Name(s)
  • Lake Havasu City (Ariz.)
  • New York (N.Y.)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
  • Washington (D.C.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Bailey, Pearl
  • Bellson, Louis
  • United States. President (1974-1977 : Ford)
Subject(s)
  • Actresses
  • African American women
  • Ambassadors
  • Authors
  • Celebrities
  • Entertainers
  • Jazz singers

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Independent Order of Good Samaritans and Daughters of Samaria of the United States of America. Golden Star Lodge No. 4 (Philadelphia, Pa.)
  • Independent Order of Good Samaritans and Daughters of Samaria of the United States of America
Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Subject(s)
  • African Americans
  • Fraternal organizations
  • Secret societies
  • Temperance--Societies, etc
  • Women--Societies and clubs

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • School District of Philadelphia, Pa.
  • University of Pennsylvania
  • William Penn High School (Philadelphia, Pa.)
Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Hayre, Ruth Wright, 1910-1998
Subject(s)
  • African American educators
  • African American school superintendents
  • African American women educators
  • African American women school principals

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Controlled Access Headings

Geographic Name(s)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Solomon, Sam, 1915-1998
  • Spinks, Leon, 1953-
  • Terrell, Ernie, 1939-
Subject(s)
  • African American athletes
  • African American boxers
  • African Americans
  • Boxers (Sports)
  • Boxing
  • Boxing managers
  • Boxing trainers
  • Coaches (Athletics)
  • Sports

Return to Top »

Collection Inventory

Collection Inventory

Collection Inventory

Series I.  Papers, 1897-1989.

Box Folder

Anderson, Marian. Autographed program, 1965.

11 1

Art supply and education advertisements, circa 1945-1965.

11 2

Autograph book, 1945.

11 3

Business ledger, 1928-1936.

11 4

Business. Record books for Christmas cards, 1939-1942.

11 5

Calendars and maps, 1934-1954.

11 6

Certificates and diplomas, 1911-1984.

11 7

Civil service personnel records, 1949-1971.

11 8

Correspondence, 1920, 1927-1929.

11 9

Correspondence, 1930-1939.

11 10

Correspondence, 1940.

11 11

Correspondence, 1949.

11 12

Correspondence, 1942-1949.

12 1

Correspondence, 1950-1951.

12 2

Correspondence, 1952-1963.

12 3

Correspondence, 1972-1987.

12 4

Correspondence, undated.

12 5

Correspondence regarding carpet design, 1929.

12 6

Correspondence regarding carpet design, 1930.

12 7

Correspondence regarding carpet design, 1931-1932.

12 8

Correspondence regarding carpet design, 1933-1934.

12 9

Correspondence regarding carpet design, 1935.

12 10

Correspondence regarding carpet design, 1936-1948.

12 11

Correspondence regarding carpet design, 1950, undated.

12 12

Correspondence. Greeting cards, undated.

12 13

Correspondence. Letters of introduction and recommendation, 1950-1962.

12 14

Correspondence. Letters regarding non-government employment, 1938-1946.

12 15

Correspondence. Letters regarding fair employment and housing, 1942-1960.

12 16

Correspondence. Postcards (with writing), 1909-1947.

12 17

Correspondence. Postcards (blank), circa 1909-1947.

13 1

Correspondence. Photo postcards of South Broad Street USO Club (Philadelphia, Pa.), circa 1945.

13 2

Court personnel salary information, 1964.

13 3

Diary, 1937.

13 4

Education. Cardozo Night High School (Washington, D.C.), 1950-1951.

13 5

Education. Class notes, 1947.

13 6

Education. College of Swedish Massage, circa 1944.

13 7

Education. Course in plastic study, 1944.

13 8

Education. Howard University, 1946-1965, 1988.

13 9

Education. Howard University College of Medicine annual report (mentions Anna Russell Jones), 1951.

13 10

Education. Jules E. Mastbaum Vocational-Technical School (practical nursing), 1957.

13 11

Education. Philadelphia School of Design for Women (Moore College of Art and Design), 1924-1965, 1987.

13 12

Education. Temple University, 1947.

13 13

Education. University of Pennsylvania commencement instructions, 1943.

13 14

Education. William Penn High School for Girls commencement program, 1915.

13 15

Education. William Penn High School for Girls autograph book, 1920.

13 16

Education. William Penn High School for Girls yearbook and commencement program, 1920.

14 1

Event invitations and programs, 1908-1989.

14 2

Family history narratives and research, undated.

14 3

Family members certificates, 1926, 1946.

14 4

Family Bible (with genealogy information, 1897-1927), 1854.

28

Family Bible - loose items removed, circa 1900-1930.

15 6

Financial papers, 1939, 1949.

14 5

Fort Huachuca printed matter, 1943-1944.

14 6

Golden Star Lodge No. 4 papers, 1931, undated.

14 7

Government and military employment applications and correspondence and discharge papers, 1943-1963.

14 8

Government employment records, 1957-1965.

14 9

Job application materials, circa 1941-1965.

14 10

Jones, William Albert M., diploma, 1914.

25 3

Jones, William Albert M., papers, 1930-1988.

14 11

Jones, William Albert M., court transcripts, 1964-1967.

14 12

Jones, William Albert M., papers regarding Judge A. Leon Higgenbotham, Jr., 1964-1988.

15 1

Jones, William Albert M., notes from Anna Russell Jones, undated.

15 2

Jones, William Albert M., political letters, 1961.

15 3

Jones, William Albert M., wallet and cards, 1930-1960, undated.

15 4

Jones, William Albert M., papers of his father (William A. M. Jones Sr.), 1908, 1921.

15 5

Memorial service guestbook for Ann E. Russell, 1974.

15 7

Memorial service programs, 1927-1981.

15 8

Military papers, 1944-1946.

15 9

Political and social reform papers, circa 1930-1965.

15 10

Notebook, daily record of work projects, circa 1950-1959.

15 11

Notebook, mostly on African American historical figures, circa 1950-1970.

15 12

Papers and jottings, 1920-1966, undated.

15 13

Philadelphia city employees, publications and ephemera, 1958-1967.

15 14

Religious papers, circa 1938-1986.

15 15

Russell, John Warner, papers, 1922-1981.

16 1

Stephen Smith Home for the Aged ephemera, 1959-1964.

16 2

Women's Army Corps (WAC) papers, 1943-1945.

16 3

World's Fair publicity, 1939.

16 4

Series II.  Photographs and scrapbooks, circa 1892-1987.

Box Folder

Evans, Malinda. Metal-mounted photograph, undated.

16 4

Jones, Anna Russell. Photographs, circa 1910-1987.

16 5-6

Jones, Anna Russell. Photographs in uniform, 1942-1945.

16 7-8

Jones, William Albert M. Photographs, circa 1900-1960.

16 9

Russell, Anna (Evans). Photographs, circa 1920-1960.

16 10

Russell, John Clayborn. Photographs, circa 1909.

16 11

Russell, J. Warner. Photographs, circa 1910-1960.

16 12-13

Russell, Thomas. Photographs, circa 1910-1925.

16 14

Class scrapbook. Moore Institute of Art: Art Education Methods, 1947-1948.

19

Class scrapbook. History of Art, undated.

20 2

Military photographs, circa 1942-1960.

16 15

Military scrapbook, 1942-1945.

20 3

Military scrapbook pages, 1942-1945.

18 3-14

Military. Women's Army Corps (WAC/WAAC) real photo postcards, 1942-1943.

16 16

Military. "The 'Three Musketeers' of W.A.C.'s go West on 'Holiday' Furlough" scrapbook, 1945.

20 1

US Army Electronics Material Agency (USA EMA) event photographs, circa 1964.

16 17

Vacation photo albums, circa 1965.

16 18

Vacation souvenir photos from Vancouver (B.C.), 1945.

16 19

Wedding photographs (Anna Russell and W. Albert Jones), 1952.

17 1-2

Wedding cards scrapbook (Anna Russell and W. Albert Jones), 1952.

20 4

Photograph album, circa 1925-1930.

17 3

Photograph album, circa 1925-1940.

17 4

Family photographs (oversized), circa 1910-1945.

24

Family photograph album, 1945-1973 (Bulk, 1971-1973) .

17 5

Family photographs (color), circa 1960-1980.

17 6

Various identified photographs, circa 1870-1970.

17 7-9

Various unidentified photographs, circa 1892-1960.

17 10

Various unidentified photographs, circa 1892-1960.

18 1-2

Detached scrapbook covers, 1942-1945, undated.

25 4

Empty scrapbook album, undated.

25 1

Series III.  Artwork, circa 1940-1970.

Box Folder

Art reference, undated.

21 1

Artwork (oversized).

10

Black and white artwork, undated.

21 2
Map-case Drawer

Black history posters (9).

Basement 3

Black history posters (6).

Basement 4
Box Folder

Carpet designs (small), undated.

21 3

Carpet designs (on film), undated.

21 4
Boxes

Carpet designs (oversized).

1-6
Map-case Drawer

Carpet design (1 oversized).

Basement 4
Unit Shelf

Carpet design (1 framed).

18 (basement) 16
Box Folder

Christmas drawings, undated.

21 5

Color artwork, undated.

21 6

"God Answers Prayer" by Elizabeth M. A. Abbott (illuminated by Anna Russell Jones), undated.

21 7

Government/military. 25th Infantry coat of arms (carved wood), circa 1942.

23 4

Government/military. Fort Huachuca printed matter featuring Anna Russell Jones artwork, 1943.

21 8

Government/military. Illustrations, 1944-1964.

21 9
Unit Shelf

Government/military. Illustrations (3 framed).

18 (basement) 16
Box Folder

Government/military. US Army Electronics Material (USA EMA) illustrations (photographs), undated.

22 1

Government/military. Women's Army Corps (WAC) illustrations, 1943-1945.

22 2

Greeting cards designed by Anna Russell Jones, circa 1940-1960.

22 3

King David Lodge sketches, undated.

22 4

Material samples, undated.

22 5

Medical art references, circa 1949-1951.

22 6

Medical illustrations (small), 1946-1950.

22 7

Medical illustrations (on film), undated.

22 8
Boxes

Medical illustrations (oversized).

7-8
Unit Shelf

Medical illustration (1 framed).

18 (basement) 16
Box Folder

Medical illustrations, Howard University (photographs), 1952.

22 9
Map-Drawer Map-Drawer Map-Drawer

Oversized artwork.

1.11. 1.09. 1.10.
Unit Shelf

Painting (1 oversized).

18 (basement) 16
Box

Posters (oversized).

9
Map-case Drawer

Posters (oversized).

Basement 4
Box Folder

"A Psalm of Life" By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (illuminated by Anna Russell Jones), undated.

22 10

Series of ink drawings, 1957.

22 11

Sketchbooks (animals, portraits, medical), undated.

22 12

Sketches, undated.

22 13
Unit Shelf

Sketches (framed).

18 (basement) 16
Painting-Rack

Wallpaper design (1 framed).

A

Series IV.  Objects, circa 1940-1982.

Box

Casket key, undated.

30

Cosmetic compact engraved "A R from Vocal Pedagogy Class '49", 1949-1952.

30
Oversize

Drawing stand and swivel chair.

off-site
Box

Embroidered pillow, undated.

28

Jones, William Albert M. Inspiration plaque, undated.

30

Jones, William Albert M. Plaque from Zoar United Methodist Church, 1982.

30

Military medal (good conduct), circa 1945.

23 1

Name plate, "Mrs. Anna R. Jones", After 1952.

30

Nametag, "A. R. Russell", undated.

30

Pastel set in wooden box.

30

Pen and ink stand with world monuments, undated.

30

Printing blocks (8), circa 1945.

27

Red Arrow token and cloth bag, undated.

30

Textiles, undated.

31

U.S. Post Office tie clip, undated.

23 2

WAC uniform, circa 1940-1945.

29

Wooden carved plaque by Anna Russell Jones, "Christ Liveth", Before 1952.

30

Wooden picture frame, undated.

30

Series V.  Printed materials, circa 1900-1961.

Boxes

Books and publications on art technique and history.

34-36
Box

Books and periodicals on various topics, especially African Americans.

33

Booklets on various topics, 1931-1954.

32 1

Empty 78 rpm record covers, 1920s.

25 2

Military pamphlets and publications, 1941-1945.

32 2

Newsletters, pamphlets, and reprint articles about African Americans, 1938-circa 1964.

32 3

Newspaper clippings on Anna Russell Jones, 1942.

26 1

Newspaper clippings, World War II and African American soldiers, 1942-1945, 1970.

26 2

Newspaper clippings, 1941-1977.

26 3

Military news. "93rd Blue Helmet" vol. I (4 issues, gaps), 1942 December - 1943 February.

26

Military news. "Apache Sentinel" vol. I (13 issues, gaps), 1943 October - 1944 February.

26

Military news. "The Buffalo 92d Infantry Division " vol. 2 (12 issues, gaps) and vol. 4 (5 issues, gaps), 1943 May - 1944 July.

26

Collection Inventory

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Collection Inventory

Collection Inventory

Collection Inventory

Collection Inventory

Collection Inventory

Collection Inventory

Collection Inventory

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Correspondence, 1969-1981.

From Louise Handy to John Alexander, 1969 December 29.

From Ralph J. Bunch to Frank McGlinn, 1969 September 12.

From Arthur Hall to Frank McGlinn, 1974 December.

From Aretha Franklin to Frank McGlinn, 1975 April 18.

From NU-TEC to Frank McGlinn, 1981 December 22.

Invitations, 1978-1992.

Addressed by Leopole Senghor, President of Senegal, 1978 June 7.

Grace Bumbry at Carnegie Hall, 1990 November 27.

Dedication of Marian Anderson Sickel Cell Care & Research Center, 1991 January 20.

7th Annual Celebration of Black Writing Conference, 1991 February 16.

For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf, 1992 March 27-28.

Benefit Concert by Main Line Interdenominational Choir, 1992 April 4.

Photographs, 1929, 1981, undated.

Ethel Waters in "As Thousands Cheer", undated.

William Warfield, promotional photo autographed, 1981 August 13.

Leslie Uggams, autographed, undated.

Hallelujah, scene from film directed by King Vidor, 1929.

Pearl Bailey and Carl Van Vechten, [postcard], undated.

Gregory Hines (autographed).

Robert Guillaume (autographed).

James Earl Jones (autographed).

Lena Horne (autographed).

Oprah Winfrey (autographed).

Queen (autographed).

Manuscripts, 1969, 1985.

"The Home of the New Freedom Theatre [Philadelphia], A Historical Site," excerpted from The Edward Forrest House: A Historical Landmark, by the John Wanamaker, Jr. High School History Club, 7 pages, 1985.

"Proposal: Improvisational Drama for the Classroom," program to be established at the Intensive Learning Center, Philadelphia, PA, by Peter Shubs; Prepared for Prospective Sponsor Circulation, 1969 August.

Broadsides, 1850-1954.

Anna Lucasta, undated.

Creole Burlesque Company, Philadelphia, circa 1870-1910.

Deep River, 1926 September 27.

Dixie To Broadway, 1925 January 19.

Ethiopian Serenaders of Philadelphia, 1850 April 8.

The Green Pastures, Philadelphia, 1933 January 16.

Hall Johnson Singers, Philadelphia, 1931 May 21.

The Hot Mikado, Philadelphia, circa 1939.

House of Flowers, 1954.

In Abraham's Bosom, Philadelphia, 1928 April 30.

Porgy & Bess, undated.

Run Little Chillun, Philadelphia, 1933 November 20.

Runnin' Wild, Philadelphia, 1924 May 12.

Uncle Tom's Cabin, Philadelphia, 1904 April 25.

Ziegfeld Follies of 1916, Pittsburgh, 1916 November 27.

Advertisements, 1923-1993.

Afro- Asian Festival, Philadelphia, undated.

Academy of Music Series, Philadelphia, 1969-1970.

American Music Theatre Festival, Philadelphia, undated.

Anna Lucasta, undated.

Black [film] Artists On the Screen, undated.

Ballets Africains, Philadelphia, undated.

Blood Knot, undated.

Blues in the Night, undated.

Bumbry, Grace, Philadelphia, 1964 February 17.

The Diary of Black Men, Philadelphia, 1988.

Dusky Sally, Philadelphia, 1988 February 13.

The Gospel at Colonus, Philadelphia, undated.

Hot Machete, undated.

The Hot Mikado, circa 1939.

House of Flowers, Philadelphia, circa 1954.

In White America, Philadelphia, 1992 October 21.

Jazz is Too..., 1990.

Katherine Dunham & Her Company, November 22-December 17, undated.

Katherine Dunham and her Company, undated.

Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill, Philadelphia, 1988.

Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill, 1988 September 7.

Master Harold & The Boys, Philadelphia, 1984 January 10.

Mister Johnson, March 12, 19, undated.