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Michael Strassfeld papers

Ms. Coll. 1218

Michael Strassfeld papers

Ms. Coll. 1218

Michael Strassfeld papers

Ms. Coll. 1218

Michael Strassfeld papers

Ms. Coll. 1218

Michael Strassfeld papers

Ms. Coll. 1218

Michael Strassfeld papers

Ms. Coll. 1218

Michael Strassfeld papers

Ms. Coll. 1218

Michael Strassfeld papers

Ms. Coll. 1218

Michael Strassfeld papers

Ms. Coll. 1218

Michael Strassfeld papers

Ms. Coll. 1218

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the University of Pennsylvania. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Strassfeld, Michael
Title:
Michael Strassfeld papers
Date [bulk]:
1968-2015
Date [inclusive]:
1901-2015
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1218
Extent:
31.4 linear feet (31 record cartons, 1 document box, 2 oversized folders)
Language:
English
Abstract:
Rabbi Michael Strassfeld (born February 8, 1950) is an American Reconstructionist Rabbi. Raised in a Orthodox Jewish household, Strassfeld was profoundly influenced by the burgeoning Jewish anti-establishment movement in the Boston area in the 1960s and early 1970s. The Michael Strassfeld papers contain the records of the his education and life's work. Represented are elements of his Orthodox upbringing, traditional Jewish education, influence of the Jewish anti-establishment and countercultural movements of the 1960s and early 1970s, and his training and practice as a Reconstructionist Rabbi.
Cite as:
Michael Strassfeld papers, 1901-2015 (Bulk: 1968-2015), Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: University Archives and Records Center
Creator:
Muybridge, Eadweard, 1830-1904
Title:
Eadweard Muybridge Collection
Date [inclusive]:
1870-1981
Call Number:
UPT 50 M993
Extent:
20 Cubic feet
Language:
English
ABSTRACT:
Eadweard Muybridge is a noted photographer who began his studies of animal locomotion in 1872 while trying to settle a bet for railroad tycoon Leland Stanford. In 1883 several important Philadelphians attended a meeting in the office of the provost of the University of Pennsylvania, and decided to provide Muybridge with the grounds of the Veterinary Hospital and a $5,000 advance to begin work on the landmark study, Animal Locomotion. This study, completed in 1887 and published under the sponsorship of the University, would prove to be of great use to artists, anatomists, physiologists, and athletes. The Eadweard Muybridge Collection documents his photographic career and the contributions he made to motion pictures. Documentation relating Muybridge's Animal Locomotion study, done under the auspices of the University of Pennsylvania, represents the bulk of this collection.
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Leibman, David J.
Title:
Leibman collection of buttons, stamps, and coins
Date:
circa 1820-1978
Call Number:
Print Coll. 32
Extent:
3.2 linear feet (29 boxes)
Language:
English
Abstract:
This collection contains over 750 buttons, pins, stamps, and coins that date from 1820 to 1978. The buttons reflect political, cultural and social movements during this time span, and document businesses; organizations including social groups, service groups, and unions; local and national campaigns for a variety of elected officials from alderman to president; event memorabilia; famous individuals; and military groups. While the bulk of the items are from the United States, researchers will find items from across the globe.
Cite as:
Leibman collection of buttons, stamps, and coins, circa 1820-1978, Print Collection 32, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
University of Pennsylvania.
Title:
Chaff. A Monthly Illustrated Paper, published by the Chaff Publishing Company of the University of Pennsylvania
Date [inclusive]:
1882-1883
Call Number:
AP85.P384U.882c
Extent:
1 volume
Language:
English
Abstract:
Chaff was an illustrated monthly humor magazine published by the “Chaff Publishing Company of the University of Pennsylvania” from October 1882 to June 1884. Penn Kislak Center holds Vol. I of  Chaff, published for the academic year 1882-1883.
Cite as:
Chaff. A Monthly Illustrated Paper, published by the Chaff Publishing Company of the University of Pennsylvania, 1882-1883, AP85.P384U.882c, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Grant, Elihu, 1873-1942
Title:
Elihu Grant Beth-Shemesh excavation records
Date [bulk]:
1928-1933
Date [inclusive]:
1928-1964
Call Number:
1032
Extent:
5.2 Linear feet ()
Language:
English
Abstract:
Located approximately 12 miles west of Jerusalem, this site was originally excavated in 1911 and 1912 by Duncan Mackenzie for the Palestine Exploration Fund. Under the sponsorship of Haverford College, Haverford professor Elihu Grant undertook excavation at this mound from 1928 to 1931 and again in 1933. When the Bet Shemesh (Ain Shems) artifacts, known as the Haverford Collection, were purchased by the University Museum in 1962, the field notes, notes on pottery, plans, drawings, photographs, and correspondence relating to these finds were also acquired.
Cite as:
[Item name]. Box [Box number]. Elihu Grant Bet-Shemesh excavation records. Penn Museum Archives. Accessed [Date accessed].
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927
Title:
George Byron Gordon Central America expedition records
Date [bulk]:
1893-1924
Date [inclusive]:
1893-1956
Call Number:
1100
Extent:
0.35 linear foot
Language:
English
Abstract:
George Byron Gordon led expeditions to Copan at the end of the nineteenth century and, with his brother MacLaren Gordon, to Alaska in 1905 and 1907. As Professor at the University of Pennsylvania and as Director of the Museum, Gordon was first to conduct regular lectures to undergraduate and graduate students in Anthropology and oversaw one of the the largest periods of Museum growth. The G.B. Gordon Central America collection includes diaries, surveying notes, reports and stories from the Copan Expeditions and the Yucatan Expedition in 1910, original stories, articles, and book reviews written by Dr. Gordon, communication with The British Museum about Maya site excavation, Gordon's introductions composed for speakers for the Saturday Afternoon Lecture Series, speeches to professional organizations, and class lectures.
Cite as:
[Item name]. Box [Box number]. George Byron Gordon Central America expedition records. Penn Museum Archives. Accessed [Date accessed].
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Library at the Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies
Creator:
Leeser, Isaac
Title:
Isaac Leeser collection
Date [bulk]:
1848-1867
Date [inclusive]:
1822-1868
Call Number:
ARC MS 2
Extent:
25 Linear feet
Language:
Multiple languages
Cite as:
Library at the Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies, University of Pennsylvania. Isaac Leeser Collection, Box 1, File Folder (FF) 1.
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Freedman, Molly
Creator:
Freedman, Robert, 1929-
Title:
Robert and Molly Freedman Jewish Sound Archive DVD collection
Date [inclusive]:
1919-2015
Call Number:
Freedman DVD
Extent:
354 items
Language:
English
Language Note:
The primary languages of materials collected are Yiddish, Hebrew, and Ladino, but the Archive collects Judaic audiovisual material in any and all languages in which they occur. Other languages well represented within the Archive include English, German, Polish, Russian, Spanish and "Yinglish."
Abstract:
The Robert and Molly Freedman Jewish Sound Archive aims to collect, preserve, and promote musical and spoken-word recordings of the Jewish people. This finding aid represents the Archive's materials on Digital Video Disc (DVD).
Cite as:
Robert and Molly Freedman Jewish Sound Archive DVD collection, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives
Creator:
Cammann, Schuyler V. R. (Schuyler Van Rensselaer), b. 1912
Title:
Schuyler V. R. Cammann papers
Date [inclusive]:
1946-1991
Call Number:
1146
Extent:
13 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
The collection of Schuyler Van Rensselaer Cammann’s papers, member of the Department of Oriental Studies at the University of Pennsylvania 1948-1982 and Associate Curator of the East Asian Collections 1948-1955, consist of 13 linear feet of correspondence; published and unpublished papers and book reviews; lectures; research notes; unpublished fiction; photographs; drawings; employment history at the University of Pennsylvania; teaching materials; and travels and tours. Professor Cammann wrote, lectured, taught, and consulted in several geographic areas (including China, Tibet, Mongolia, Japan) on such topics as textiles, carpets, art, ivory, snuff bottles, Magic Squares, and symbolism. He authored four books and hundreds of articles and reviews, and presented considerable number of lectures to various meetings, organizations and conferences.
Cite as:
[Item name]. Box [Box number]. Schuyler V. R. Cammann papers. Penn Museum Archives. Accessed [Date accessed].
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: University Archives and Records Center
Creator:
Gomberg, William, 1911-
Title:
William Gomberg Papers
Date [inclusive]:
1935-1985
Call Number:
UPT 50 G632
Extent:
4 Cubic feet
Language:
English
ABSTRACT:
William Gomberg came to the University of Pennsylvania in 1959 when he joined the faculty of the Wharton School, where he stayed for the remainder of his career as a Professor of Management and Industrial Relations. The William Gomberg Papers document his scholarly work in labor relations and management history.
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Biography/History

Rabbi Michael Strassfeld (born February 8, 1950) is an American Reconstructionist Rabbi. Born in Dorchester, Massachusetts, Strassfeld attended the Maimonides School, an Orthodox Jewish day school in Brookline, Massachusetts, graduating from high school in 1967. He went on to attend the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary at Yeshiva University in New York City for one year before transferring to Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, where he received a BA, magna cum laude with honors, in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies in 1971, and an MA in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies in 1972. From 1972 to 1976 Strassfeld completed coursework for a PhD in Jewish History from Brandeis. He attended the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in Wyncote, Pennsylvania, becoming an ordained Rabbi in 1991.

Raised in a Orthodox Jewish household, Strassfeld was profoundly influenced by the burgeoning Jewish anti-establishment movement in the Boston area in the 1960s and early 1970s. Strassfeld was one of the founders of Havurat Shalom, in Somerville, Massachusetts, established in 1968 as the first countercultural Jewish community in what would grow to become a national Havurah movement. Strassfeld was one of the leaders of retreats held at Weiss's Farm in Long Branch, New Jersey, which brought together members of some of the first Havurot in the US, and would eventually lead to the establishment of the National Havurah Institute and the National Havurah Committee.

After brief stints as Principal of the Temple Adas Israel Hebrew School in Hyde Park, Massachusetts (1971), and Assistant to Hillel Director at Brandeis University (1972), Strassfeld published in 1973 with first wife Sharon Strassfeld and colleague Richard Siegel, The Jewish Catalog, a do-it-yourself manual on how to be Jewish. The publication was extremely popular and was followed by second and third catalogs in 1975 and 1981. Strassfeld also published  The Jewish Calendar, from 1975 to 1993, and  The Jewish Holidays, in 1985.

Strassfeld was employed by Congregation Ansche Chesed in New York City for almost two decades. He served as Leader of High Holiday services from 1982 to 2001; Director of Program and Development from 1984 to 1988; Executive Director from 1988 to 1991; and, following his ordination, Rabbi from 1991 to 2001. Ansche Chesed is an egalitarian, participatory Conservative synagogue on Manhattan's Upper West Side. In 2001, Strassfeld became Rabbi of the Society for the Advancement of Judaism, a Reconstructionist synagogue also on the city's Upper West Side, where he served until his retirement in 2015.

Strassfeld was a founding chairperson of the National Havurah Committee from 1979 to 1982; a founding vice-president of the Abraham Joshua Heschel School, an egalitarian day school in Manhattan in 1983; a founding board member of Beyond Shelter, a coalition of Manhattan synagogues concerned with homelessness from 1987 to 1988; and a founding faculty member of the Institute for Jewish Spirituality in New York City, from 1999. Strassfeld was also a member of the board of Rabbis for Human Rights, North America, and received the Rabbi Israel & Libby Mowshowitz Prize from the New York Board of Rabbis in 2000.

Rabbi Strassfeld is married to Rabbi Joy Levitt. He and first wife Sharon Strassfeld have three children.

Biography/History

Eadweard James Muybridge was born on April 9, 1830 as Edward Muggeridge at Kingston-on-Thames, England, the son of John and Susannah (Smith) Muggeridge. In 1852, Muybridge immigrated to the United States. After a brief career in the printing business, Muybridge studied photography and eventually gained recognition for his landscape photographs of the American West. In 1872, the railroad tycoon and then-governor of California, Leland Stanford, asked Muybridge to help settle a $25,000 bet. The bet required Muybridge to take photographs of a running horse to prove that it had all four feet in the air at some point. However, his attempt was inconclusive. Five years later, 1877 Muybridge improved the mechanics of his photographic process using a bank of cameras with mechanically tripped shutters. With his new system, he photographed Stanford's horse Occident and proved that a running horse indeed lifted all four feet at some point. This incident inspired him to continue the study of animals in motion, a new venture in the field of science and photography.

With the financial backing of Stanford, Muybridge obtained more action photographs of animals culminating in the publication of The Horse in Motion (1877) and The Attitudes of Animals in Motion, A Series of Photographs Illustrating the Consecutive Positions Assumed by Animals in Performing Various Movements (1878). In 1878, Scientific American and La Nature published reproductions of photographs in the Horse in Motion. Subscribers could place these reproductions in their zoetrope to view the stop motion photographs in rapid succession. Muybridge took the animating capability of the zoetrope further by inventing the zoopraxiscope in 1879. The zoopraxiscope projected images of slides placed on a large disk onto a screen. Muybridge spent most of 1881-1882 in Paris and London exhibiting the zoopraxiscope and lecturing on animal motion.

Muybridge's ties to Philadelphia began when Fairman Rogers, then head of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and Thomas Eakins, artist and professor of drawing and painting at the Academy, corresponded with Muybridge about his Palo Alto photographs. In 1883, Rogers invited Muybridge to give two lectures at the Academy. Also in 1883 several important Philadelphians, including J.B. Lippincott and the provost William Pepper attended a meeting in the office of the provost of the University of Pennsylvania. During this meeting, the men decided to provide Muybridge with the grounds of the Veterinary Hospital and a $5,000 advance to begin work on the landmark study, Animal Locomotion. Starting in 1884, the University constructed an outdoor studio for Muybridge near 36th and Pine. The outdoor studio consisted of a three-sided black shed. White strings hung on the back wall of the shed to form a grid to measure the movement of a human or animal as it passed through the frames. For the production of the Animal Locomotion study, he improved his photographic techniques by using dry plate technology, rather than the wet plate technology he had previously used. He also equipped his three batteries of twelve cameras each with electronically released shutters, allowing shorter exposure times.

The Animal Locomotion study contains 781 photographs of males and females performing common actions, often nude; physically deformed males and females from the Philadelphia Hospital and a variety of animal species from the Philadelphia Zoo. This study, completed in 1887 and published under the sponsorship of the University, would prove to be of great use to artists, anatomists, physiologists, and athletes.

After the completion of Animal Locomotion, Muybridge returned to his birthplace to reside. At the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, he ran "Zoopraxographical Hall" in 1893 for which the University of Pennsylvania received an award. He later published Descriptive Zoopraxography (1893) and The Human Figure in Motion (1901). Muybridge died in England on May 8, 1904, survived by wife Flora Shallcross.

Biography/History

This collection contains over 750 buttons, pins, stamps, and coins that date from 1820 to 1978. The buttons reflect political, cultural and social movements during this time span, and document businesses; organizations including social groups, service groups, and unions; local and national campaigns for a variety of elected officials from alderman to president; event memorabilia; famous individuals; and military groups. While the bulk of the items are from the United States, researchers will find items from across the globe.

Biography/History

Chaff was an illustrated monthly humor magazine published by the "Chaff Publishing Company of the University of Pennsylvania" from October 1882 to June 1884. The masthead for the magazine quotes Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night: "If I lose a scruple of this sport let me be boiled to death with melancholy." The students who began  Chaff saw life at the University of Pennsylvania as an opportunity to make sport and conceived of the magazine as the vehicle for spreading it. Written and illustrated by current Penn students, it published fictional stories, cartoons, poems, dialogues and articles that commented on happenings at "dear old Penn" and captured the life of the average college student of the day.

In the first issue, the editors boldly declare, “[Chaff] has now become a fact, and he hopes to be a very wise, active, prominent, frisky fact.” They also address their detractors: "Some growler is heard in the distance: 'What do we want with a new paper, anyhow? What good'll it do us?' Dear growler, Chaff is like Beauty. He is his own excuse for being." When Chaff first appeared in the fall of 1882, the student-run Philomathean Society (popularly known as “Philo”) had already been publishing a student monthly called  The University Magazine for seven years. The  Magazine began in 1875 as a publication venue for student literature and over the years expanded to include university news and coverage of university sporting events; "The Growler" was the section of the paper reserved for complaints. But only Philo members were permitted to edit the publication.  Chaff, on the other hand, was started by an independent group of students. Rather than creating a rival literary publication or news magazine, they styled  Chaff after existing college humor magazines such as the Harvard Lampoon and the Princeton Tiger, which joked about student life at their particular institutions, conveying university news along the way.

The publication of Chaff touched off something of a rivalry between its editors and the Philomathean Society.  Chaff did not hesitate to poke fun at Philo, and in return the  University Magazine adopted a sometimes condescending tone toward Chaff. On October 20th, 1883, the  Magazine ran the following note: "[Chaff's] wit can be better appreciated by reading the MAGAZINE first, so that the information on college subjects can be obtained, and then the reader will do well to see how our contemporary touches them off. We commend it to our readers." Though  Chaff never intended to supplant or even supplement the  Magazine, the  Magazine is indeed helpful for the modern reader, providing "straight news" about the events and social settings  Chaff reports satirically. The University of Pennsylvania Archives has digitized every issue of the  University Magazine, and the issues, along with an excellent online exhibit, can be found on their website.

Over the course of Chaff’s life, a number of "characters" develop and begin to feature prominently in the magazine, including several editors, the Ancient, a wise counselor for the creators of the magazine, and the character of Chaff himself, depicted as a jester. The opening article of each issue takes the reader to  Chaff’s offices, where these characters discuss happenings at Penn and the state of the magazine. At the end of the second volume, the issue for June 1884,  Chaff dies in the opening article. The Ancient: "Shall I say (what is true) that nearly everything in our paper has been written by the members of the Board, and that we have received positively no help whatever from the college?" "No, don’t say that," Chaff replies, "for it will only give my enemies a chance to insinuate that I died laughing at my own jokes." The article is accompanied by a cartoon of Chaff the jester, lying on the floor, while the Ancient, dressed as a classical warrior, looks on in anguish. Apparently, the editors of  Chaff had difficulty finding students to contribute to their magazine and discontinued its publication, presumably because creating all the content for, editing and selling the magazine was too much work for a small group of busy Penn students. Soon after  Chaff died, the landscape of student publications shifted at Penn: a new student paper,  The Pennsylvanian, was organized in 1885 and soon supplanted the  University Magazine, and in 1899, a new humor magazine,  The Punch Bowl, was first published. Both of these publications proved to be more enduring than their predecessors:  The Pennsylvanian became daily and is still the university's student newspaper, and  The Punch Bowl continues to serve as Penn's humor magazine today.

The editors of the magazine for 1882 to 1883 included three members of the class of 1883--Edward G. Fullerton, John R. Moses, and Henry H. Poore--together with William MacPherson Hornor, Law '84, and Felix E. Schelling, Law '83. The October 20th, 1883 issue of the University Magazine lists  Chaff's editors for the year as Messrs. Bonnell, Schelling, Finletter, Westcott, Falkner, Fithian, Hornor, Earnshaw, Hagert and Shelton.

Biography/History

Dr. Elihu Grant, Professor of Biblical Literature at Haverford College from 1918 to 1938 and Director of the Haverford Graduate School beginning in 1923 became interested in Palestine and archaeological excavation on reading the reports of the excavations of R.A. Stewart Macalister at Gezer, Israel conducted from 1902 to 1909. His reading was augmented by his own tenure as Superintendant of the American Friends Schools in Remallah and Jerusalem.

Elihu Grant was born in Stevensville, PA in 1873, the oldest son of William Grant and Amanda Bird. His younger brother, William T. Grant achieved success as the owner of the W.T. Grant Company. Elihu was ordained a Methodist minister in 1900 and taught Biblical Literature at Smith College following his return to the U.S. from The American Friends School in Palestine. While at Smith, Grant became a Quaker and continued his life-long interest in the area of Palestine and its people. Between 1928 and 1933, Grant directed four archaeological campaigns at Beth Shemesh. On the first two expeditions, he was assisted by Clarence S. Fisher and on the final phase by Alan Rowe, both of the Penn Museum.

Grant's discoveries from the first year were lauded in Time Magazine as heralding "a Bronze-Age culture." Grant published his findings in four volumes which, at the time, were the first complete publication of a recent Palestinian excavation. Grant's legacy also includes the establishment of the Beth Shemesh Museum at Haverford College housing some of the objects from the expedition.

His other scholarly publications include The Peasantry of Palestine:The Life Manners and Customs of the Village, published in 1907 and The Bible as Literature co-authored with Irving Francis Wood in 1914.

Dr. Grant was associated with the American Schools of Oriental Research and held several positions, among them, Honorary Professor at the School in Jerusalem from 1929 to 1934, Trustee of the Schools from 1935 to 1938 and Annual Professor at the School in Baghdad for the 1937-1938 school year.

Grant retired from Haverford in 1938. Described by his colleagues in the Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research upon his death in 1942, as having a "shy and retiring personality, not always understood by his associates and friends," Grant was remembered as a professor admired by his students for his "broad learning, his beautiful facility of expression, his deep and genuine sincerity and his inspired teaching."

Biography/History

George Byron Gordon, explorer in Central America and Alaska, and first to teach undergraduate and graduate courses in Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania, was born in New Perth, Prince Edward Island, Canada on August 4,1870. He was the son of James Gordon and Jane MacLaren Gordon, one of six children. Gordon attended the University of South Carolina for one year in 1888 then completed his degree at Harvard University. Selected as an assistant to John G. Owens in 1892, Gordon accompanied Owens on the Harvard-sponsored excavation at Copan, Honduras. When Owens died in the field, Gordon was given the leadership to close down that portion of the work and then continued as Director of the next six sessions in Copan, until 1900. While performing these duties, Gordon attained his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1894.

Gordon joined the Free Museum of Science and Art(later the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology)in 1903 as Assistant Curator in the Section of General Ethnology. He led two expeditions to Alaska, in 1905 and 1907 with his brother MacLaren Gordon. The Gordons chose a new approach to exploration of the region. They descended the Yukon River to Tanana, then followed the Tanana south reaching formerly unknown Lake Minchumina, the source of the Kuskokwim River. Gordon named the hitherto unknown aboriginal tribe from this area as "Kuskwagamutes." His trip laid the groundwork for future exploration in the area and was described in Gordon's book, In the Alaskan Wilderness(Philadelphia:John C.Winston Company,1917).

While selected courses in Anthropology had been offered in the field at the University of Pennsylvania by Daniel Garrison Brinton, George Gordon was first to teach a regular schedule of undergraduate and graduate courses from 1907 through 1915. During this time, the Department of Anthropology was established by Frank G. Speck. Gordon was appointed Director of the Free Museum of Science and Art in 1910 and oversaw one of the largest periods of growth in its collection and prestige. He established the Museum Journal which later became the Museum Bulletin. Gordon is also known for his keen eye as a collector, purchasing the finest of antiquities and driving a hard bargain to obtain them. He oversaw additions to the Museum's collection of treasures from Mesopotamia, Palestine, Egypt, and the American Continent. Gordon's most lasting gift is the Museum's Chinese collection.

Gordon was a voracious reader and writer of both scholarly works and those in the literary vein. He wrote on the history of London in, Rambles in Old London(Philadelphia:George W. Jacobs& Co.,1924) and this collection contains examples of his attempts to publish more popular material.

In 1926, the University of Pennsylvania conferred the honorary degree of Doctor of Science on George Byron Gordon. Gordon died, following an accident at the Philadelphia Racquet Club, on January 30, 1927. At the time of his death, Gordon was Director of expeditions conducted by field staff in Beisan (Bet Sh'ean)in the area then known as Mesopotamia(Israel) and at Ur(Iraq).

Gordon was a member of the American Philosophical Society, the Franklin Inn Club, the Lenape Club, the Rittenhouse Club, the Explorer's Club of New York, the American Anthropological Association, the American Ethnological Society, and the Authors Club of London. He was also a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society.

Biography/History

Isaac Leeser was born in the village of Neuenkirchen, which at that time was part of the Prussian province of Westphalia, on December 12, 1806. Leeser's father, Uri Lippman (Uri ben Eliezer) was a merchant of limited financial means and educational background. The name "Leeser" is reputed to have been selected for Isaac by his paternal grandfather, Eliezer (i.e., Liezer). Little is known of Leeser's mother, Sara Isaac Cohen, who died when Leeser was eight. Her name only recently came to light when a Dutch descendant, Ms. Helga Becker Leeser, discovered it while doing genealogical research in the Dulmen Stadtarchiv name-taking act of September 22, 1813.

Isaac was the second of three children; his one older sister was named Leah Lippman and his younger brother was named Jacob Lippman. Leah married a butcher named Hirsch Elkus who moved the family to the small town of Denekamp, Holland located near the Dutch-German border. Leeser's younger brother Jacob died of smallpox at the age of twenty-five in 1834, one year after emigrating to America. Jacob contracted the disease from his brother Isaac after coming to Philadelphia to care for him. While surviving the disease and the trauma of his brother's death, Leeser' face remained deeply pock-marked, a disfigurement that would cause him great embarrassment throughout his life. Both Jacob and Isaac died bachelors.

Leeser received his early education in Dulmen (in Germany), where his family had moved no later than 1812. Leeser was raised by his paternal grandmother Gitla, a devout woman who strongly influenced Leeser. With the death of his father and grandmother in 1820, Leeser found himself orphaned at the age of 14. That same year Leeser left for Muenster where he attended the secular Gymnasium. While living in Muenster, Leeser was befriended by the city's district Rabbi, Abraham Sutro, who was a strong opponent of the burgeoning movement for Jewish religious reform. The relationship appears to have had a determining character on Leeser insofar as he would take up the cause of traditional Judaism against the Reformers later in America. Leeser emigrated to the United States at the age of 17, arriving on May 5, 1824. He came on the invitation of his maternal uncle Zalma Rehine who lived in Richmond, Virginia. Rehine, who ran a fairly prosperous dry-goods business, was married to Rachel Judah, whose mother was the sister of Reverend Gershom Seixas, one of early America's most important Jewish religious leaders. Rachel Judah's sister Rebecca was married to their first cousin, Isaac Seixas, who was Hazan of the Beth Shalom Synagogue in Richmond. Seixas befriended Leeser and taught him the Sephardic rite, the dominant Jewish rite then practiced in America. Rachel's brother Isaac Judah was another Richmond relative with whom Leeser formed a strong friendship. In all, Leeser would spend five years in Richmond, a time he would later describe as among his happiest, and in that time become Americanized in one of the more traditional, conservative Jewish communities of the South.

Leeser first achieved national renown in 1828 for his moving response, published in The Richmond Whig, to an attack on the Jews which had appeared in the  London Quarterly Review and then been re-printed in American newspapers. Leeser's response was widely circulated and eventually re-published in book form in 1841 as The Claims of the Jews to an Equality of Rights. In 1829, with his reputation established and at the urging of Jacob Mordecai, one of Richmond's leading Jewish figures, Leeser applied for and was elected to the post of Hazan (Cantor and Reader of the prayer service) of the Congregation Mikveh Israel in Philadelphia.

Leeser's tenure at Mikveh Israel was marked by constant bickering with the Board of the synagogue over the extent of the Hazan's authority, his status and independence, as well as over Leeser's on-going demands for a life-time contract and salary increase. The Board also resisted several innovations by Leeser, such as his introduction into the weekly service of a regular English language sermon, the first of its kind of note in the United States (first begun on June 2, 1830). Even as his relations with Mikveh Israel were to sour, however, Leeser was to begin a period of intense literary productivity and remarkable organizational activity.

During the 1830's, Leeser worked closely with Rebecca Gratz, the famous Jewish educator and civic leader, to establish the Free Sunday School movement in Philadelphia. Leeser's Hebrew Spelling-Book, which he published in 1838 (the first Hebrew Primer for children in the United States) was created specifically for use in the Hebrew school which he and Rebecca Gratz opened that same year.

Leeser's career as a translator also began in Philadelphia in 1830 with the publication of his rendering from German of J. Johlson's Instruction in the Mosaic Religion. Leeser, as part of his ongoing efforts to contribute to the development of Jewish education and culture in America, translated a number of important works into English from German, Spanish, French and Hebrew. Among his most important translations were Moses Mendelssohn's  Jerusalem, Joseph Schwartz' Descriptive Geography and Brief Historical Sketch of Palestine, as well as his renowned Bible translations, first of the Pentateuch and later of the entire Hebrew Bible.

Leeser first published his own major theological work, The Jews and the Mosaic Law, in 1834. Here can be found his expressed belief in the divine origin of the Pentateuch as well as his defense of Judaism, expanded upon from its earlier voicing in the  Richmond Whig (1828). Over the next thirty years, Leeser produced a flood of sermons and theological works, including his two-volume (later a third volume was added)  Discourses, Argumentative and Devotional, on the Subject of the Jewish Religion (1837) and his massive ten volume Discourses on the Jewish Religion published at the end of his life in 1867. In 1837, Leeser completed his English translation of the Sephardic prayer book in use at Mikveh Israel, The Form of Prayers According to the Custom of the Spanish and Portuguese Jews and two years later in 1839 published a new  Catechism for Younger Children, Designed as a Familiar Exposition of the Jewish Religion.

During the 1840's, Leeser began working as an editor and publisher. Among his many contributions to American literary culture were his editions of Louis Salomon's The Mosaic System in its Fundamental Principles (1841), Grace Aguilar's The Spirit of Judaism (1842), Benjamin Dias Fernandes' A Series of Letters on the Evidences of Christianity (1859), and Hester Rothschild's "Meditations and Prayers" (1866). In 1843, Leeser began publishing what would become perhaps his greatest literary achievement: The Occident and American Jewish Advocate, a monthly (with the exception of a brief and unsuccessful appearance as a weekly) journal of news and opinion, which he was to edit and publish until his death in 1868.

Leeser continued to play an unceasing role in creating the cultural foundations of Jewish life in Philadelphia and throughout North America. In 1845, Leeser founded the first American Jewish Publication Society and in the same year published his translation of the Pentateuch entitled The Law of God, a bi-lingual edition which included the unpointed (unvocalized) Hebrew text. Three years later, in 1848, Leeser published with a local Episcopalian minister, Joseph Jacquette, a masoretic (pointed) Hebrew edition of the entire Hebrew Bible, Biblia Hebraica, the first of its kind to be printed in America. That same year, Leeser also managed to issue his translation of the Ashkenazic prayer book.

In addition to his professional activities as minister, educator, writer, translator, editor and publisher, Leeser also played a fundamental role in either proposing, founding, or leading many significant civic, religious, and charitable institutions. Leeser was the proposer of a "Plan of Union" of American Hebrew congregations (to be based on shared traditional principles and featuring a "Central Religious Council" modeled after the concept of the Bet Din); the proposer of the first Union of Hebrew Benevolent Societies; founder of the American Jewish Bible Society; founder of the Hebrew Education Society; founder of the Philadelphia Jewish Hospital; supporter of the Jewish Foster Home of Philadelphia.

Leeser was also a member of the Jewish Order of B'nai Brith; member of the Board of Hebrew Ministers; member of the committee of the Hebrew Fuel Society; vice-president until his death of the Board of Delegates of American Israelites -- the first American organization devoted to the cause of Jewish defense; founder, first provost, president of the faculty, and professor of Homiletics, Belles Lettres and Comparative Theology, at Maimonides College, "The First American Jewish Theological Seminary."

Leeser's stormy relationship with the Congregation Mikveh Israel lasted through 1850, at which point he left his ministry. Undeterred by this setback, Leeser embarked on an extensive journey across the United States, travelling over 5,200 miles from November 9, 1851 through February 27, 1852.

He visited isolated and emerging Jewish communities, where he lectured on a variety of topics and spoke out on behalf of Jewish causes. After returning to Philadelphia, Leeser continued his work as editor of The Occident, publisher, bookseller, dealer in Judaica and translator. In 1853, Leeser completed his monumental English translation of the entire Hebrew Bible, known popularly as "The Leeser Bible." In 1857, the same year in which the second (folio-size) edition of the "Leeser Bible" was issued, a new congregation was formed for him in West Philadelphia, where he served until his death eleven years later. The congregation, called Beth El Emeth, was composed chiefly of supporters of his who had formerly belonged to the Congregation Mikveh Israel. From his new pulpit, Leeser continued to advocate his longstanding goal of bringing unity to the American Jewish community under the banner of traditional Jewish practice.

In many ways, Leeser's personal life was filled with quiet anguish. He led a lonely, often sickly life. Reports have it that he caused a stir by living in a boarding house run by a non-Jewish woman, and he was rumored to have been eating there non-kosher food. According to several accounts, one of his ill-fated romantic hopes was dashed by the father of his beloved, Simha Peixotto. Conflict was characteristic of much of Leeser's public life as well. During the divisive Civil War years, to cite one example, Leeser feared he had been placed on a "suspect list" of southern sympathizers, and was warned by his friend Moses Aaron Dropsie that he might have to flee the city.

Isaac Leeser died in Philadelphia on February 1, 1868, at the age of 61, and was buried in the Beth El Emeth congregation cemetery in West Philadelphia located at 55th and Market Sts.

The Legacy

The Leeser legacy to American Jewish history is a well-documented life of pioneering accomplishments. As Bertram Korn succinctly puts it: "Practically every form of Jewish activity which supports American Jewish life today was either established or envisaged by this one man." Perhaps the most lasting testament to Leeser's energy and hopes can be found in the pages of his journal The Occident and American Jewish Advocate, of which he was the founder, editor, contributor, and occasional typesetter.  The Occident contains arguably the single most important historical record of Jewish life in the Western Hemisphere in the mid-nineteenth century. Chronicled there, for example, is Leeser's ongoing confrontation with the rising movement for Jewish religious reform. As editor of  The Occident, Leeser was able to give voice to his belief in and defense of observant Judaism and fiercely resisted many proposed changes to traditional Jewish rituals. Leeser's editorials also document his many public battles to defend religious freedom -- such as his losing effort to revoke Sunday closing laws and resistance to widespread missionizing activity. Finally, through the agency of  The Occident, Leeser sought to accomplish in print what he never succeeded in doing in practice: to bring together in one common forum the many American Jewish communities that were otherwise divided -- by either geography or ideology.

In addition to his journalistic endeavors, Leeser also was renowned for his many translations. His Bible translation was THE Scriptural version read by English-speaking American Jews prior to that issued by the Jewish Publication Society of America in 1917. Leeser also was actively involved in supporting Jewish causes around the world, as evidenced by his galvanizing of the American Jewish community in 1840 to protest the Damascus Affair, a blood libel leveled against Jews in Damascus, and again in 1858 in response to the Vatican's support of the notorious abduction of Edgardo Mortara, an Italian Jewish boy who had been secretly baptized and then taken from his parents. No less significant was Leeser's support of proto-Zionist Jewish settlement of Ottoman Palestine.

Biography/History

The Robert and Molly Freedman Jewish Sound Archive is located in Room 453 of the Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Archive was founded by Bob and Molly Freedman, its current curators. The Freedmans began collecting recordings of Jewish music early in their marriage and continue to build the collection by acquiring recordings wherever they travel. Sometime in the middle or late 1970s (the cusp of the “klezmer revival”), researchers began to visit the Freedman’s home in Philadelphia. Later Bob Freedman was asked to bring some of the music to a Jewish folklore class at the University of Pennsylvania, which subsequently developed into an annual visit by the Yiddish language classes to the Freedman’s apartment. In 1981, Bob Freedman bought his first computer and began to list the recordings. He subsequently developed the first Yiddish font for screen display and printer, and over the years developed a database of recordings. Eventually, the collection outgrew the space available in the Freedman home and in 1996 it was donated to the University of Pennsylvania, where it continues to grow.

Biography/History

Schuyler Van Rensselaer Cammann was born in New York City in 1912 and attended St. Paul's School (Long Island) and Kent School (Connecticut). He received his B.A. from Yale (1935), M.A from Harvard (1941), and Ph.D. (1949) from John Hopkins, where he studied under Owen Lattimore. Both the M.A. and Ph.D. were in Asian History. From 1935 to 1941 he taught English in the Yale-in-China program, and served as a Lieutenant in the U.S. Navy during World War II stationed in Washington D. C., western China and Mongolia. In 1948 Cammann joined the faculty of the Department of Oriental Studies at the University of Pennsylvania where he remained until his retirement in 1982. From 1948 till 1955 he was Associate Curator of the East Asian Collections for the University Museum. During his tenure at the museum he was a member of excavation teams at Gordion (Turkey) and Kunduz (Afghanistan). Also during that time he was a member of the panel for the popular T.V. program "What in the World" (1951–55). Important professional organization positions included Vice-President of the American Oriental Society and editor of its journal; President of the Philadelphia Anthropological Society and Philadelphia Oriental Club; fellow of the American Learned Societies and the American Anthropological Association.

Professor Cammann wrote, lectured, taught, and consulted in several geographic areas (including China, Tibet, Mongolia, Japan) on such topics as textiles, carpets, art, ivory, snuff bottles, magic squares, and symbolism. He authored four books and numerous articles and reviews, and presented considerable number of lectures to various meetings, organizations and conferences. After his retirement he continued to write as well as conduct several tours in Asia.

Schuyler Van Rensselaer Cammann died in an auto accident near his summer home in Sugar Hill, New Hampshire on September 10, 1991.

Biography/History

William Gomberg was born in the Brownsville section of Brooklyn, New York in 1911 the son of Alexander and Maries (Shuloff) Gomberg. After graduating from the City College of New York with a Bachelor of Science in 1933, he entered the field of labor relations. Gomberg began his career working for the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (IGLWU) as a collective bargaining agent representing the union in contract negotiations. In 1941, Gomberg became the head of the management engineering department of the IGLWU, a post he held until 1956. During this period he studied industrial engineering at New York University and receive his Master's degree in 1941. Six years later he got his Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Gomberg decided to enter into the academic world in 1956. He became a professor of industrial engineering at Washington University in St. Louis and held visiting professor posts at the University of California, Columbia's Graduate School of Business Administration, and Stanford University. In 1959 he joined the faculty of the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, where he stayed for the remainder of his career as a Professor of Management and Industrial Relations.

During his time at the Wharton School, Gomberg wrote extensively on the subjects of labor and management. Gomberg worked with Arthur B. Shostak in writing Blue Collar World (1964) and New Perspectives on Poverty (1965). His research varied from a study of the entrepreneurial potential of the Paiute Indians at Pyramid Lake to the effects of technology upon work. Much of his writings during the 1960s and 1970s concentrated upon the psychology of management. For much of this period he worked on collecting material for a history of management theory in the United States.

William Gomberg died on 8 December 1985 and was survived by his wife, Dr. Adeline Gomberg, and daughter, Paul Gomberg Higgins.

Scope and Contents

The Michael Strassfeld papers contain the records of the Reconstructionist Rabbi's education and life's work. Represented are elements of his Orthodox upbringing, traditional Jewish education, influence of the Jewish anti-establishment and countercultural movements of the 1960s and early 1970s, and his training and practice as a Reconstructionist Rabbi. The collection is made up of eight series: I. Education; II. Jewish counterculture and later progressive movements; III. Synagogues; IV. Observances; V. Teaching; VI. Works by Michael Strassfeld; VII. Books and other publications from the library of Michael Strassfeld; and VIII. Photographs from the publication of The Jewish Catalog. A ninth series, Judaic sound recordings, is in process and will be added to this finding aid when completed.

The series on "Education" contains mostly notes, research papers, and study materials created by Strassfeld from his years in high school at the Maimonides School to his undergraduate and graduate student years in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies at Brandeis University, as well as his study to become ordained as a Rabbi at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College. Additionally, there are study materials from continuing education courses at a number of institutes and study centers including the Institute for Jewish Spirituality, the Shalom Hartman Institute, and others.

The series of "Jewish counterculture and later progressive movements" includes materials concerning the Havurah movement, feminism, sexuality and gender, environmentalism, peace, the persecution of Soviet Jews, and youth movements, among others. Materials include newspapers and ephemera of the time, notes from meetings and retreats, and positional papers on a range of topics. Also in this series are materials from Strassfeld's co-founding and association with Havurat Shalom and the National Havurah Committee.

The third series on "Synagogues" contains the working papers of Strassfeld's time as lay employee and later Rabbi of Congregation Ansche Chesed (1982-2001), and as Rabbi of the Society for the Advancement of Judaism (2001-2015), both located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. Many of these files are managerial in nature, representing the day-to-day issues faced in managing and serving as a leader of two progressive and egalitarian houses of worship. Because of clergy-congregant privilege a small number of files in this series are restricted. More information on this can be found in the "Access Restrictions" note in this finding aid.

The series on "Observances" includes materials associated with sacred services at Strassfeld's two synagogues (as well as the occasional service while visiting another congregation). These materials include programs, readings, notes, and sermons for weekly services, special services, and holidays; the High Holidays services of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur; Prayer and lifecycle ceremonies including birth ceremonies, bar/t mitzvahs, and marriages; and Healing services and resources.

The series on "Teaching" covers courses taught by Strassfeld, mostly in his capacity as Rabbi at Congregation Ansche Chesed and the Society for the Advancement of Judaism, but also through conferences and community organizations.

The series "Works by Michael Strassfeld" is comprised of a range of writings, public presentations, and other creative works. Included are speeches given in various venues and on a range of occasions; a large collection of hand-written eulogies; files associated with the writing and publication of The Jewish Catalog; and an assortment of other writings and works such as magazine articles, books, and documentation on assembling Strassfeld's substantial collection of Jewish sound recordings.

The series of "Books and other publications from the Library of Michael Strassfeld" is comprised of approximately 333 individual titles. Included are the published works by Michael Strassfeld such as The Jewish Catalog, called the most successful book to come out of the Jewish counterculture, and its subsequent volumes;  The Jewish Calendar; and several other important titles. Also, there are books on a range of mostly Jewish topics which were selected by Strassfeld as a representation of works important to his development as a Rabbi. These have been divided into categories including: Comparative religion; The Holocaust; Jewish counterculture; Jewish community; Jewish feminism; Jewish fiction; Jewish guide books; Jewish historical sources; Jewish modernity; Jewish music; Jewish pastoral services; Jewish practices; Jewish spirituality; Jewish theology; Jewish youth and education; Rabbi manuals; Sidderum (prayerbooks); as well as non-Jewish books; and a selection of progressive Jewish periodical issues. Many of these works may be found elsewhere in the Penn Libraries, and complete bibliographic citations are given to facilitate finding copies within Franklin.

There is a series of "Photographs from the publication of The Jewish Catalog." These number over 250 individual prints, and contain scenes especially from the Havurah movement, depictions of Jewish practices and rituals, and scenes of Jewish life from around the world.

Two additional series will be added to this collection when their processing is completed. First is a collection of over 950 sound recordings (LPs, cassettes, and CDs) of Jewish music collected by Strassfeld over the course of his life. The collection emphasizes sacred Hasidic music, but also includes examples of the Jewish folk revival, and a small amount of Klezmer instrumental music and Yiddish song. The second is comprised of text, image and sound files on a portable hard drive.

Scope and Contents

The Eadweard Muybridge Collection document his photographic career and the contributions he made to motion pictures. Muybridge's Animal Locomotion study, done under the auspices of the University of Pennsylvania, represents the bulk of this collection. The Animal Locomotion study collotypes and publications contain a nearly complete set of collotype plates of images. Included in this series are original copies of the books Animal Locomotion, Prospectus and Catalog of Plates, 1887 and Descriptive Zoopraxography or the Science of Animal Locomotion, 1893. Reviews of the Animal Locomotion book and an offer to subscribe to the plates are also in the series.

Photographs comprise another series. Included in this series are photographs of Muybridge and non-collotype reproductions of the plates in the Animal Locomotion study. The correspondence contemporary with the study series contains letters regarding the creation and promotion of the Animal Locomotion study, including requests for equipment; project updates and lecture arrangements. Muybridge wrote many of these letters to Jesse Burk, the Secretary of the University. The letters date from 1887 to 1901.

Cameras and related apparatus include a race track camera, a copy camera, camera backs, lens and their mountings, plates and plate holders, cropping masks, contact printing frames, and a retouching desk. Also in the collection is a Milton Bradley zoetrope. These items have been identified with the assistance of Todd Gustavson, Curator of the Technological Department at George Eastman House.

Included in the miscellaneous documentation series are Muybridge's panoramic view of San Francisco; a program from a motion picture exhibition that preceded Muybridge's work, and the copyrights for Animal Locomotion among other documents. Much of the published material series concerns the history of Muybridge and his relationship to the advent of motion pictures.

Other collections at the University of Pennsylvania relate to Eadweard Muybridge. At the beginning of the twentieth-century, the University Recorder, George E. Nitzsche, conducted considerable research in documenting Muybridge's work and activities while at the University. His papers can be found in UPA 9. The Dr. William Pepper Papers at the Walter H. and Leonore Annenberg Rare Book and Manuscript Library of the University of Pennsylvania contain additional material.

Scope and Contents

This collection contains a wide variety of buttons, stamps, and coins collected by David. J. Leibman. The bulk of the items within the collection are buttons (more than 750), including both lithographic and celluloid buttons, as well as lapel studs. The buttons are mainly composed of metal, although some are of plastic. Most of the buttons have either a wire pin pinback or a safety pin style pinback, although some are missing any type of pinback. The collection also includes a variety of tab buttons. Located on the curl (or edge) or the back of many of the buttons are “union bugs” which feature the name of the union or company which has either sponsored and/or manufactured the buttons. Among the more common manufacturers are Bastian Brothers, Empress Novelty Company, Green Duck Company, Whitehead & Hoag, and N.G. Slater Corporation. Among the union bugs are the A.F.L.-C.I.O., Allied Printing Trades Council, the Amalgamated Lithographers of America, the I.P.E.U. (International Photo-Engravers' Union of North America), and L.P.I.U. (Lithographers and Photoengravers International Union).

The collection is arranged in thirteen series: I. Advertising; II. Alphabet buttons; III. Campaign and political buttons; IV. Event memorabilia; V. Heroes/the Famous; VI. Military; VII. Organizations' buttons; VIII. Ships; IX. Sports; X. Tourism; XI. Coins; XII. Stamps; and XIII. Miscellaneous buttons and charms. The first series, Advertising, includes buttons for a number of businesses including the automobile industry (Buick, Chrysler, and General Motors), insurance companies (Metropolitan Life and National Life and Accident), a hotel, a photographic company, a beverage company, and others. There are also a few more patriotic buttons encouraging buyers to focus on American goods and to boycott Japanese and Nazi products.

Series II. Alphabet buttons includes buttons with a single letter of the alphabet in either gold or silver on a background of red, blue, green, or black. Most of the alphabet is represented, including 21 of the 26 letters. Only B, J, K, L, and Y have been omitted. These buttons appear to have been produced by the Green Duck Company in Chicago.

Series III. Campaign and political buttons comprises the largest number of buttons in the collection and these buttons document a wide variety of political campaigns and candidates in the United States from the 1920s to the 1970s. Both Democrat and Republican candidates are well represented as are both the primary and general elections. The buttons document more than 100 candidates in a variety of elections, including the president and vice president, senators and congressmen, governors, mayors, assemblymen, commissioners, councilmen, and judges. Candidates represent several states including Connecticut, Illinois, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania. These buttons are arranged alphabetically by candidate name.

Series IV. Event memorabilia includes buttons largely from the United States dating from 1898 to 1967. These buttons memorialize internationally important events such as The World's Fair in New York, V-J Day, and the Conference for the Reduction and Limitation of Armaments in Geneva, as well as more local events celebrating charter days, centennials, state fairs, and food days. These buttons are arranged alphabetically by event name.

Series V. Heroes/ the Famous document individuals who surged into the public eye. These individuals include religious figures, political leaders (non-US), military figures, explorers (John Glenn and Charles Lindberg), and Rin Tin Tin. These figures are arranged alphabetically by individual.

Series VI. Military includes buttons, insignia, and pins for American, Canadian, British, French, German, and Spanish armies dating largely from the 19th and 20th centuries. Researchers will find a number of items from the Civil War, and the first and second World Wars. Items are arranged alphabetically by the country of origin when known, and by identifying feature when the origin is unknown. A few items relate to liberty loans, war work campaigns, and the American Red Cross and are arranged by their organization name.

Series VII. Organizations' buttons are arranged alphabetically by organization name and document unions, social groups, service organizations, and beneficial groups. Unions included are the American Federation of Labor, International Union of the United Automobile, Aircraft and Agricultural Implement Workers of America, the Teamsters, and the URCLPWA. Researchers will also find the American Legion, the Elks, the Fraternal Order of the Eagles, the Freemasons, and the Lu Lu Shriners as well as the American Peace Movement, the American Red Cross, the Community Chest, and the Order of the Oaks.

Series VIII. Ships includes a small number of buttons documenting famous ships of the days. These buttons are arranged alphabetically ship name.

Series IX. Sports includes buttons for boxers, baseball players, football players, bowlers, and jockeys as well as a number of sports teams. Items are arranged alphabetically by player or team name. There are also buttons for the 3rd Pan-American Games held in Chicago, Illinois in 1959.

Series X. Tourism documents both countries and states within the United States. These buttons are arranged alphabetically by country and alphabetically by state. The bulk of the country buttons include the country's flag while the state buttons include the state's seal. The majority of these buttons appear to have been issued by the Sweet Caporal Cigarette Company, probably as a collectible series. One or two indicate that the advertiser was the Chew Sweet 16 Gum Company.

Series XI. Coins includes coins from France, Germany, Great Britain, India, Italy, Russia, Sweden, and the United States. The bulk of these coins are monetary, but there is one that commemorates Charles Lindbergh's first non-stop flight from New York to Paris. Finally, there are two coins that are so worn that they were not identified. It is possible that these predate the earliest known date (1820) of material within the collection. Items are arranged alphabetically by country issuing the coin.

Series XII. Stamps includes a small number of stamps from British Guiana, Germany, and Monaco. Thirteen of the sixteen stamps are from Monaco and date from the 1890s to the 1950s.

The final series, XIII. Miscellaneous buttons and charms are a group of items that have little context surrounding them. These items are arranged alphabetically by slogan or symbol on the button or charm.

Scope and Contents

Penn’s Kislak Center holds Vol. I of Chaff, published for the academic year 1882-1883. Another copy of the first volume, along with the second and final volume, is held by the University Archives.

Each issue opens with an article from the editors and contains fictional stories, poems, dialogues, puns, and jokes, mostly related to life at Penn and student life in general. Puns and jokes are often one-liners at the bottom of a page. Many issues of the magazine also contain a section called "Our Chaff," which humorously reports the latest university news. In addition, each issue features cartoons and reports on the latest university sporting news, be it football, rowing, or cricket.

A recurring subject in the library’s issues of Chaff is "co-education," the possibility of beginning to educate women alongside men at the university. In the fall of 1882, students were openly debating the issue as the trustees of the university put co-education at Penn to a vote. The conversation about co-education continued even after the trustees voted against it, and  Chaff was there to offer its opinion. "An Alarmed Correspondent" contributed a series of scenarios imagining "Co-Education in the University in 1900," including a female Social Sciences professor forcing her male students to admit that the "chief end of man" is to make money for their wives to spend (November, 1882). A month later, the cartoon "The Present State of Co-Education" shows that men and women continue to be separated at the university, to the chagrin of women (December, 1882). A March 1883 cartoon depicts a woman in bloomers angrily pointing her umbrella at a scroll of paper with the caption "Several of our prominent business men have been visited by ladies, who have persuaded them to sign a petition to the trustees, asking for a re-consideration of co-education."

Though women were not permitted to study alongside men at Penn, the search for love is often featured in Chaff’s pages. A few examples: "The Bashful Smythe" (October, 1882) is the story of a shy young man's unsuccessful attempts to woo a bride during his summer at the shore. In the same issue appears a poem entitled "A September Soliloquy," written from the perspective of a woman saddened at her lack of prospects after a summer of flirtation. "One Kiss" (April, 1883) laments the fact that a coy young woman refuses to be kissed; the May, 1883 issue has "At Our Private Theatricals," a cartoon recording the conversation between a man and a woman backstage at a theatrical production.

Chaff also comments on the formation of the Inter-Collegiate Press Association in 1882. The editors of the Acta Columbiana, one of Columbia University's student publications, formed the association, as Penn’s  University Magazine reports in its July 5th, 1883 issue, "to raise the standard of college journalism by admitting to membership such papers only as have attained, in the judgment of the Board of Reference, a certain standard of excellence."  Chaff and the humor magazines of other universities, publications which considered their own standards to be high, were angry at not being included. In the February 1883 issue,  Chaff reports meeting with the  Harvard Lampoon and  Princeton Tiger to form the "Spiritual Conference of College Tooters," or S.C.C.T. as an alternative to the I.C.P.A. The April, 1883 issue includes dispatches from a further meeting. Compare the  University Magazine’s pride at its inclusion in the I.C.P.A. in its January 5th, 1883, issue.

Sporting events also feature prominently in the magazine, with an "Athletics" section at the back of each issue. Chaff's contributors report on university races and games as they occur and also comment on the state of university athletics, especially rowing. For example, the March, 1883 issue gives a history of rowing at the university, while the April, 1883 discusses Penn's rowing rivals and their prospects in contests against Penn. Cricket and football are also discussed, and the January, 1883 issue encourages Penn students to take up canoeing for their recreation. On the final page of Volume I, a student imagines what will happen if he loses the bet he's placed in Penn’s favor in a rowing race against Princeton in the poem "If."  Chaff’s coverage of sporting events tends to be more serious than satirical; in the final issue of the publication (not held by the library, but held at the University Archives), the editors of Chaff encourage Penn students not to give up sport, for sport is an essential factor in the overall success of both students and the university at large.

Scope and Contents

Dr. Elihu Grant, Professor of Biblical Literature at Haverford College from 1918 to 1938 and Director of the Haverford Graduate School beginning in 1923 became interested in Palestine and archaeological excavation on reading the reports of the excavations of R.A. Stewart Macalister at Gezer, Israel from 1902 to 1909 augmented by his own tenure as Superintendant of the American Friends Schools in Remallah and Jerusalem.

Beth Shemesh(Ain Shems,located approximately 12 miles west of Jerusalem, was originally excavated in 1911 and 1912 by Duncan Mackenzie for the Palestine Exploration Fund. Between 1928 and 1933, Grant directed four archaeological campaigns at Beth Shemesh. On the first two expeditions, he was assisted by Clarence S. Fisher and on the final phase by Alan Rowe, both of the Penn Museum. Grant's discoveries from the first year were published in Time Magazine. The complete findings were published by Elihu Grant and G. Ernest Wright in a series entitled Ain Shems Excavations, Parts I, II, III, and IV, published between 1929 and 1939. Beth Shemesh artifacts are a part of the collection at the Palestine Museum. A few objects are held at Bryn Mawr College and others, mainly fragments, are in a collection at Haverford College.

The Elihu Grant Bet-Shemesh excavation records consists of ten boxes of correspondence, notebooks, object and field notes, photographs, drawings, registers, a pottery corpus plus oversized items. Correspondence and notebooks fill one box, as do photographs and the 1933 field notes. There are three boxes of object notes and drawings. The pottery corpus fills two boxes. A card file box holds the object card registry and a large flat box, the hand-written registers from 1928 through 1933.

Elihu Grant's original order is maintained although some effort is needed to discern the different systems applied during the years of the exploration. Grant himself indicated in Ain Shems IV published by Haverford College in 1939, that the "numbers of strata are not the same in the respective campaigns 1929, 1930, 1931 and 1933." A difference is also seen in the labeling of the objects and organization of the object and field notes from year to year. The material from 1928, mostly object notes from the burials (T1, T2, T3), are labeled with the tomb number and object number with occasional modifications to the location, such as "tunnel leading to", and "Southeast of the Wall". Most 1928 object notes indicate a level II location; both Arab and Byzantine burials.

In 1929 and 1930 Grant used a grid system like that used by Albright in Tell Beit Mirsim to indicate the object's location. All finds are recorded by day, locus and square. In 1929, the grids used letters QRSTUVWXY and numbers twenty-five to thirty. Data from 1929 appears to reflect mostly level II and level III locations. Room numbers 71 to 130 correspond to letter and number designations on the grid, thus Grant lists both grid location and room number on most cards for 1929. The 1930 objects appear to be from levels II, III and IV with a grid system also used. The grid and room locations appear to be used interchangeably on these records.

In 1933, the only year in which field notes are separated out from the other data, all levels, II, III, IV and V, are represented in the notes. Each level housed rooms whose numbers also appeared on the cards. Level II included rooms 300 to 398; level III, rooms 399 to 476; level IV, rooms 477 to 488; and level V, rooms 489 to 596. Grant also developed registry numbers for the 1933 objects; "33.month.object number."

Grant's object notes and drawings are on either pre-printed five-by-eight cards or pieces of graph paper cut to this size. The cards are used interchangeably despite their headings of "progress card", "field notes", "survey card" or graph paper without headings. The actual field notes are on cards six-by-nine inches in size with the heading "Ain Shems". These cards date from 1933 and are housed in Box five.

Grant used the Albright system of pottery classification for the pottery finds. In the system, there are thirteen main groups allotted Roman numerals I through XIII. Categories within the group are designated by a capital letter following the Roman numeral. Additional subcategories can be shown with the addition of a small arabic numeral after the capital letter. The pottery plates from the corpus reflect this system of categorization.

The correspondence series has three folders, the first containing letters dated from 1928 to 1936 and correspondence with Johns Hopkins University, the University of Chicago, Brown University and the American School of Oriental Research in Jerusalem. There is also correspondence regarding olive presses and the chemical analyses of "encrusted residue in a jar" from Bet-Shemesh.

The notebooks of Elihu Grant are hand-written with dates and pages missing. Some writings detail findings, names of workers, descriptions of the area and a list of photographs taken by Najeeb Albina. One group is labelled as a "Beth Shemesh diary" by Fisher. There are some object lists and records and notes on the topics of "level II", "an Arab burial", "other extra mural", "the pottery fragments", among other untitled pages. The soft-cover notebooks contain object lists and some pottery identification data.

The Progress and object notes series holds the cards labelled as "very important evidence for stratification and line house of 1928; detailed notes." The cards contain drawings of many areas of the excavation. The remainder of the progress and object notes are from different areas and on varying sizes of paper, some in fragile condition. The original order is maintained. The most extensive notes come from the 1929 expedition. Some of the notes and object drawings are separated by dividers that are original. With others, there are no dividers and the researcher will need to carefully check the cards for location information.

The field notes series details notes from the 1933 expedition. This data is the most extensive observed about the site. There are diagrams of the burial strips and detailed notes about the burials on cards with additional drawings. Several diagrams of the room locations for level II are present and additional notes give details about the various rooms on level II. There is some data on paper sheets, in fragile condition, that may all come from the 1929 expedition but only one sheet indicates this date.

The series, Pottery Corpus, contains not only the corpus but also data from the "Pottery project." The "pottery project" described by Grant as "freshly made up sheets and no comparisons with other material have yet been made." In most instances, however, they resemble the data on pottery already included in the corpus.("Project: Include every published piece in the corpus.") The pottery project and corpus feature a drawing of one object per page with a location and brief description. A few objects have numbers but the majority do not. The pottery corpus itself has a preface that includes a list of room designations in various levels, laboratory notes and an outline of the pottery classification system. The original order is maintained for all of the corpus. The object field register cards arrived in random order and no changes have been made. They are in a small card file box representing "all small objects exclusive of actual pottery." Except for the earliest cards, which have no date, the cards are dated and have an object number and location indicated. If the object has been photographed, a negative number is provided. A minority of cards have the letter "H" in front of the number. These may refer to objects kept at Haverford College. The records indicate that Haverford holds "mainly fragments" and the object cards with the letter "H" almost always are fragments or pieces of objects. The box also holds an alphabetical index of object types from the collection.

The series designated for the registers is contained in a large flat box with the field registers from the 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931 and 1933 expeditions. The registers are placed with the earliest on top beginning with the 1928 register. The upper pages of the top register are curled, ripped and flaking from age. The underlying registers are in somewhat better condition. Grant relies on similar systems of organization for the 1928, 1929, and 1930 lists; the objects are listed in number order from 1 to 1767. The 1931 expedition begins again with number one and numbers the objects in sequence to 248. In 1933, the objects begin with number one but use Grant's system "year.month.object number" to replace the single numbering system. For 1933, the sequence is: 33.3.1 to 33.3.203 33.4.1 to 33.4.571 33.5.1 to 33.5.170 This yields a total of 944 objects from that year. Each page of the register lists the object number, a description, the material, size, provenance and a reference, if appropriate. At times, there are comments written on the pages, probably by Elihu Grant.

Grant separated the object drawings and the grid and section drawings. What are labeled as object drawings by Grant resemble the object note cards in content. Some drawings or portions of them have been cut from the cards but the written data remains in these instances. The larger drawings, some by Mary Louise Baker, are original object drawings, drawings of pottery and other objects for publication. The media include pencil, ink and watercolor. There is a group of section drawings and plans, some original and some photocopies.

The photograph series spans the 1928 through 1933 expeditions. A copy of a postcard from the expedition is titled, "Elihu Grant Excavation Ain Shems, Beth Shemesh, 1930" and pictures Grant and members of his team. There is a group of loose prints of published pottery and some miscellaneous prints from the 1930 and 1933 expeditions. Smaller photographs are mostly views of scenery, with some people and some water views.

Grant's photographic album, in nine folders, is designated as volumes I, II, and III. The album contains views of the site, objects in situ and views of personnel and the camp. It totals 184 pages.

The collection also includes oversized items filed in the print cabinet or map case. These items include drawings and plans. Within the group are original object drawings, drawings of pottery and other objects for publication, grid and section drawings. The media include pencil, ink and watercolor. Some plans are photocopies only.

Scope and Contents

George Byron Gordon was born in New Perth, Prince Edward Island, on August 4, 1870. Educated at the University of South Carolina and Harvard University, he was chosen to accompany John G. Owens on the first Copan Expedition in Honduras sponsored by Harvard. Owens died during this expedition and Gordon was named to close down the trip and subsequently, to head six additional trips to Copan lasting until 1900. Gordon also worked in Alaska with his brother, MacLaren Gordon. They discovered Lake Minchumina, the source of the Kuskokwim River.

Gordon joined the staff of the Free Museum of Science and Art(later the Penn Museum) in 1903 as assistant curator of the Section of General Ethnology. He was first to establish regular courses in Anthropology at the University and taught graduate and undergraduate students from 1907 to 1915. During this time, Gordon was named Director of the Museum. He oversaw a period of tremendous growth in both the collection and prestige of the Museum. Gordon established the Museum Journal and purchased items from Mesopotamia, Palestine, Egypt, the American Continent, and, most notably, China, for the collection.

Gordon died in an accident in January 1927. At the time he was supervising the field work in Bet Sh'ean and Ur.

The George Gordon Central America collection fills ten folders in an archival box. The collection consists of diaries, surveying notes, reports and stories from the Copan Expeditions and the Yucatan Expedition in 1910, original stories, articles, and book reviews written by Dr. Gordon, communication with The British Museum about Maya site excavation and Gordon's introductions composed for speakers for the Saturday Afternoon Lecture Series, professional organizations, and class lectures.

The first four folders deal with the Copan Expeditions and hold a group of books and three manuscripts. Gordon's diary from the fourth Expedition and smaller book in very fragile condition contain written entries, small pictures and maps. A letter from the law firm of Lowell, Stimson and Lowell dated 2/25/1893 instructs Gordon in the steps he is to take to close down the first Copan expedition following the death of John G. Owens. A bound book, also from the first expedition, is full of surveying data and drawings.

The data related to the trip to Yucatan in 1910 includes a small ten-page diary written in tiny script. There is a list of "Photos from Yucatan" in very fragile condition. A drawing depicts the "right shore of Usumasintla, Guatemala."

Maya Archaeology notes and reports relates to communication between Gordon and Sir Frederick Kenyon, Director of The British Museum. Additional material includes two pages of hand-written Maya text on Museum stationary and Dr. Gordon's contributions to the "Memoirs" of The Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University. A manuscript is also with this material, dealing with "An Unpublished Inscription from Quirigua."

Stories, Articles, and Book Reviews authored by Gordon are titled "The Mystery of the Spanish Main", "London's Loom of Time" and "The 'Eathen". A rejection letter from Charles Scribner and Sons is dated 6/6/22. An additional story, "The Home Coming" is hand-written and tells of the funeral and interment of Edith Cavell, a British nurse executed in 1915 for aiding in the escape of Allied soldiers from occupied Belgium.

Gordon's composed several typewritten introductions for the speakers series at the museum, entitled "A Course of Lectures on The History of Mankind." There is some indication that the series may have run from 1903 to 1904 in the materials. The speakers included Professor J.B. Carter, Director of the American School of Classical Studies in Rome; Dr. Edward Sapir, Human Research Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania; composer, Mr. Arthur Harwell; and Mr. Lawrence Binyon, Deputy Keeper of Oriental Arts at The British Museum.

The speeches given by Dr. Gordon include those to the American Anthropological Association, the American Folklore Society and Section H of the "British Association." Gordon's class lectures are on topics such as the linguistic families in America, the physical characteristics of humans, the scope and limitations of Anthropology, the biological development of mankind, diseases of mankind, and the races peculiar to Asia.

Scope and Contents

The Isaac Leeser Collection spans the years 1822 through 1868, with the bulk of the collection concentrated between the years 1848 and 1867. Categories of documents to be found include correspondence, literary productions, financial records--largely relating to The Occident, and legal and printed materials.

Notable among the literary productions are: the complete manuscript of Leeser's translation from the original German into English of Moses Mendelssohn's famous work Jerusalem; a nearly complete manuscript translation of J. Johlson's  Instruction in the Mosaic Religion, drafts of various published and unpublished discourses and sermons by Leeser, an incomplete manuscript of Leeser's  Jews and the Mosaic Law; Leeser's school notebooks from his youth in Germany--the oldest materials in the collection--dated 1822. Among the fragmentary writings is a report, apparently translated into English, from the "Committee central for the building houses [sic] for the poor and the pilgrims in Jerusalem to the noble benefactors and the friends of this undertaking." The central committee is named as Jacob Ettlinger, Rabbi at Altona, Josef Hirsch, merchant at Halberstadt, and Dr. Israel Hildesheimer, Rabbi at Eisenstadt. The local committee is named as Moses Sachs, Josef Goldberger, Selig Hausdorf, and Meyer Schonbaum. Also of note are several letters and drafts of writings by and in the hand of Grace Aguilar, the prominent nineteenth century British Jewish literary figure. Several letters from Rebecca Gratz are also found in the correspondence series.

Of particular note is Leeser's correspondence with the Jewish community of Latin America. Leeser maintained a close relationship with Jews in Barbados, Curacao, Grenada, Jamaica, St. Thomas and Venezuela.

Unfortunately, virtually nothing of Leeser's strictly personal correspondence is to be found--a fact that may be explained in part by one report that "after his death (Leeser's) executors found among his many effects many strictly private letters, concerning family and business affairs. Every vestige of this correspondence was entirely destroyed" [see Edward Wolf's statement in The Dropsie College Register, Summer Term (1913), p. 13].

Nonetheless, among the surviving remnant of Leeser's personal papers is his correspondence with individuals from several significant southern Jewish communities, such as Boston (MA), Charleston (SC), Savannah (GA), Mobile (AL), New Orleans (LA), Richmond (VA), as well as many other letters from Jews in Baltimore (MD), Cleveland (OH), London (England), Louisville (KY), Montreal (Quebec), San Francisco (CA), St. Louis (MO), St. Paul (MN) and New York city as well as several other cities in New York state as well as in Texas.

In addition to Leeser's personal papers, a complete set of The Occident, including a bound volume of the advertising supplements (to vols. 13-24), is held at the Library at the Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies, and now forms part of the Leeser Collection. Many of the first editions of Leeser's published works also are held by the Institute. The so-called "Leeser library," which is composed of Leeser's own personal library and those books added to his collection by the Hebrew Education Society after his death (and catalogued by Cyrus Adler in 1887), constitutes an important part of the Institute's unique collection of rare nineteenth century Judaica Americana. The Institute also possesses copies of several unpublished dissertations about Leeser.

Parts of the Leeser Papers were microfilmed by the American Jewish Archives (AJA) in 1955-56 and copies of those microfilms, as well as copyflow made from them, are available at the Library of the Katz CAJS. These microfilms are significant because they contain reproductions of original sources whose present location are unknown. The copyflow made from these microfilms is found in box 25 of this collection. No item-level indices yet exist either to these microfilms or to the Library of the Katz CAJS current holdings.

Scope and Contents

Historically, "Jewish music" has been notoriously difficult to define. For the purposes of the Freedman Jewish Sound Archive, Jewish music may include all genres of music produced by the Jewish people throughout the diaspora. This may include: Israeli music including jazz, rock, and pop; Jewish song in Yiddish, Hebrew, Ladino, or any number of diasporic languages; Instrumental music, including klezmer and classical music; Folk music from many countries and geographic regions; Theater music including Tin Pan Alley and the Broadway musical; Music of the holocaust; Music with Jewish literary origins; Religious music, including Chassidic and cantorial liturgical music; Music representing the Ashkenazi, Sephardi, or "Oriental" traditions of Judaism; Jewish music heavily influenced by non-Jewish music traditions and vice versa. In addition, the Freedman Jewish Sound Archive also collects spoken-word recordings that elucidate the Jewish experience including: Oral histories; Recitation of poetry or prose; Humor and comedy; Theatre performances; Radio programs. This finding aid represents the Archive's materials on Digital Video Disc (DVD). It is organized in alphabetical order by artist and title.

Scope and Contents

The records consist of 13 linear feet of correspondence; published and unpublished papers and book reviews; lectures; research notes; unpublished fiction; photographs; drawings; employment history at the University of Pennsylvania; teaching materials; and travels and tours.

The materials were received from Cammann’s widow, and were stored in the basement of the University of Pennsylvania Library for about ten years. The files as received were largely unorganized, and the arrangement of this record group was completed by the Archive’s staff. The Publications and Research series were left mainly as found, but for the other series the Archives established a more consistent order than originally present. Whenever possible the titles of the original folders were retained.

The materials are divided into seven series: correspondence, personal, publications, research, travel/tours, and visual records.

Related materials can be found in Asian Section Records, Biographical Files, Portrait Collection, and What in the World Television Program.

Scope and Contents

The William Gomberg Papers document the scholarly work in Gomberg's two main fields of specialization, labor relations and management history.

The bulk of the collection contains the writings and research material of William Gomberg during most of his career from 1950 to 1980. This consists of typescripts and reprints of numerous articles written by as well as talks given by Gomberg. Most significant are the research files for his proposed history of the American system of industrial management. The writings series consists almost entirely of secondary source material from newspaper and magazine from circa 1965 to 1975. There is are only a few draft outlines of the text for a few chapters as well as some correspondence regarding his proposals for the book.

There is some early documentation regarding Gomberg's early activities with the labor movement. This is seen in correspondence he had with the Socialist Party in New York in 1937 regarding his resignation, copies of the arbitration decision of Ford Motor Company in 1949, and the text of speeches given in the late 1940s. His continued interest in the topic is reflected in his writings and studies on such subjects as collective bargaining and the efforts to unionize faculty members at the City University of New York.

The remainder of the collection consists primarily of copies of newspaper clippings relating to Gomberg, a small selection of course outlines during his tenure at the Wharton School, and conference proceedings.

ARRANGEMENT

The materials in the Eadweard Muybridge collection is organized into six series: Animal Locomotion study collotypes and publications, 1887; photographs, 1882-1917; correspondence contemporary with the study, 1887-1901; miscellaneous documentation, 1870-1899; camera and related apparatus; and other published materials, 1885-1981, including secondary sources and clippings from periodicals. The first, second, and fourth series are arranged alphabetically, then numerically by number if applicable. The third and sixth series are arranged chronologically. The sixth series is arranged by box number.

ARRANGEMENT

The collection is arranged in six series: Biographical, 1949 - 1987; Correspondence, 1937, 1949 - 1985; Conferences, 1946 - 1966; Academic, 1964 - 1985; Writings, 1957 - 1984; Lectures and Speeches, 1948 - 1972. All the series, except Lectures and Speeches, are arranged alphabetically by subject. The Lecture and Speeches are arranged chronologically.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2016 December 14

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: University Archives and Records Center,  October 2000, January 2005, September 2008

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2016 August 19

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2012

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  April 27, 2011

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  December 2009

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Library at the Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies,  1992 June 12

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  May 23, 2016

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Penn Museum Archives,  7/2009

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: University Archives and Records Center,  August 2000

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by John F. Anderies

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Amy Miller, revised by DiAnna Hemsath and Mary D. McConaghy

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Siduri Beckman

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Ellen Williams

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Jody Rodgers

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Jody Rodgers

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Arthur Kiron

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by John Anderies

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by L. Rosen

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by J.M. Duffin

Sponsor

The processing of this collection was made possible through generous funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, administered through the Council on Library and Information Resources' "Cataloging Hidden Special Collections and Archives" Project.

Revision Description

 3/15/2012

Revision Description

Elizabeth Peters 2016 June 16

Access Restrictions

The collection is open for research. A small number of files are restricted due to personally identifiable information or clergy-congregant privilege. Researchers interested in viewing restricted files in this collection should email the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rarebooks, and Manuscripts for permission. The following files are restricted for clergy-congregant privilege: Box 9, Folder 34, 38, and 39; Box 11, Folder 26; and Box 12, Folder 53. Box 19, Folder 4 is restricted because it contains personally identifiable information.

Access Restrictions

Access to collections is granted in accordance with the Protocols for the University Archives and Records Centers.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

The collections of the Robert and Molly Freedman Jewish Sound Archive are located at the University of Pennsylvania, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center, Room 453. Access to the collection is by appointment. Please email libyidsong@pobox.upenn.edu to inquire about the collection or to schedule an appointment.

Access Restrictions

Access to collections is granted in accordance with the Protocols for the University Archives and Records Centers.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Although many items from the archives are in the public domain, copyright may be retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law. The user is fully responsible for compliance with relevant copyright law.

Use Restrictions

Although many items from the archives are in the public domain, copyright may be retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law. The user is fully responsible for compliance with relevant copyright law.

Use Restrictions

The majority of the original documents in the Leeser collection are in relatively good condition. Nonetheless, while much of the paper is not suffering from rapid acidic decay, many letters, for example, are written on fragile paper. Acidic and fragile documents have been interleaved with acid-free paper. Extra caution should be taken in handling anything marked: "* fragile *."

NOTE: All materials must be kept in the exact order in which they are found.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Library at the Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Although many items from the archives are in the public domain, copyright may be retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law. The user is fully responsible for compliance with relevant copyright law.

Custodial History note

From the Library of Dropsie College.

PROVENANCE

This collection consolidates all University Archives' holdings related to Eadweard Muybridge. George E. Nitzsche served Penn in the early 20th century as its first publicity officer and after 1910, as its first and only "Recorder." He had a strong professional interest in documenting the University of Pennsylvania's role in advancing the medium of film. Nitzsche preserved some of Muybridge's equipment and negatives and assembled a partial run of the Muybridge collotypes. Nitzsche gave a large collection of negatives to the George Eastman House in the 1920's. He stored the remaining materials at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology. In 1964, after his death, the Museum transferred the Nitzsche collection to the University Archives. The City of Philadelphia's Commercial Museum received a collection from of Muybridge apparatus and collotypes, including a set of gelatin negatives. Provost William Pepper donated the collection to the Commercial Museum after receiving it from the Photogravure Company. On October 1, 2001, after the closing of the Commercial Museum, by decree of the Orphan's Court Division of the Court of Common Pleas of Philadelphia County, the City donated its Muybridge collection to the University Archives.

PROVENANCE

Donated by Adeline Wishengrad Gomberg in 1992 (1992:55).

Source of Acquisition

Gift, Michael Strassfeld, 2015

Source of Acquisition

Gifts of David J. Leibman, 2012 and 2013.

Source of Acquisition

Gift, Robert and Molly Freedman, and others.

Processing

The Leeser Collection was found in considerable disarray at the time of processing. Upon initial inspection, the Leeser Papers were identified as constituting two distinct collections -- Leeser material and material about Leeser, mainly in the form of three related (and incomplete) unpublished biographies of Leeser by Emily Solis-Cohen which she attempted during the 1930's. These two distinct collections have been separated according to standard archival practice, following the rule of provenance.

Original transcriptions and/or translations of Leeser material prepared by Emily Solis-Cohen for her biography have been photocopied on to acid-free paper and have been attached to the corresponding originals in the Leeser Collection. The acidic originals of the Solis-Cohen material can be found in the Emily Solis-Cohen Collection and have been arranged to correspond to the chronological arrangement established for the Leeser Collection. Virtually all of the translation work appears to have been done by Dr. Solomon Grayzel, later a professor of Jewish history at Dropsie College, who apparently was hired (whether this was a contractual arrangement is not known) by Emily Solis-Cohen to aid her research. Grayzel's work is generally reliable although his dating of correspondence is sometimes estimated or inferred.

An undetermined amount of the transcription work appears to have been similarly commissioned by Emily Solis-Cohen and not done by her personally. Researchers may wish to keep the aforementioned facts in mind when using the Leeser Collection--i.e., to check the original documents rather than relying solely on the transcriptions and/or translations despite their obvious convenience.

A large part of the physical processing of the Leeser collection involved piecing together Leeser's drafts and writings from the hundreds of stray sheets of paper found scattered throughout the collection. The effort to match and reconstruct Leeser's writings was undertaken with great caution but no doubt errors may have crept in. It should be repeated that this collection was found in great disarray. The process of piecing together the collection required much guess-work in order for it to be fully processed. The methods used and steps taken for matching and reconstructing the writings were as follows:

1) Pagination

The term "pagination" used here is only meant to indicate those sheets upon which page numbers were found written. Unfortunately, several different sets of numbers, symbols and pagination sequences, some belonging to Leeser (usually related to the Occident) and some apparently written by or for Emily Solis-Cohen, were found inscribed on most of the stray pages. An effort was made to evaluate these different systems as they were found in order to identify them. When sequentially matching numbers within an identifiable system were found, they were grouped together.

2) Paper Features

The term "paper features" is meant to indicate such factors, in descending order of priority as: the size, color (or discoloration) of paper; colors of ink; number of lines to a page and/or creases or folds on the page that resemble the creases or folds of other pages (i.e., paper creases occasionally will show that sheets once folded together match). It was not assumed that writings were always composed consistently on the same size paper or written with the same color ink.

3) Catch-words

The term "catch words" is meant to indicate the occurrence of the word to appear on the following page at the end of the preceding page (a scribal practice not uncommon to Hebrew manuscript writing).

4) Handwriting.

The term "handwriting" is meant to refer to the distinctive scripts and distinctive hands found. This type of approach, even when it is scientifically based, is always uncertain, but did help to distinguish, at minimum, material written in Leeser's hand from material not written by him.

5) Context

The term "context" is meant to indicate the actual textual logic involved in the matching of sheets of paper. This method was always the final method of verification used and simply involved reading the last few lines of one sheet and then seeing if a given sheet followed naturally from it. The criteria used for this evaluation were generally grammatical or topical. For example, if the preceding page to be matched ended with a period then the first line on the next page would grammatically be expected to be the beginning of a new sentence. Similarly, if the topic of the previous page's discussion was ritual sacrifice then one would expect that the following page would not immediately begin with a discussion of the fate of Jews in Switzerland. While exceptions to each of these methods may be imagined, these strategies were generally found to be effective.

A thorough knowledge of the contents of The Occident in advance of processing would have been of great help. This certainly would have expedited a comparison between the fragments in the collections with the known, published works of Leeser. If this method were to be pursued in the future, use of Abraham Shinedling's unpublished index to  The Occident would probably be of valuable assistance, despite its reputation as being idiosyncratic. It is available on microfilm from the American Jewish Archives in Cincinnati and is reputed to be composed of approximately 500,000 index card entries.

NOTES FOR RESEARCHERS

The unmatched fragments which have not yet been fully identified are listed as miscellaneous sub-series six of series II, i.e., "Fragmentary writings." Each fragment or fragmentary grouping has been provided with a brief identification. The term "brief identification" written on the upper right-hand side of the file folder is meant to indicate any identifying heading -- i.e., "sermon," "in Leeser's hand" or "not Leeser" (i.e., not written in his hand), "n.d." (no date), "n.p." (no page numbers) the listing of the page number or numbers appearing on the fragment, "for The Occident" (abbreviated as "Occ" ) etc., assigned in the hope of eventually assisting a more complete identification and/or reconstruction of the remaining fragments. Many of these attempts to provide "brief identifications" are only preliminary guesses and should not be taken as fixed groupings.

Researchers should keep the "fragmentary writings" sub-series in mind as they go through the collection. It may be the case that the attachment to, beginning, continuation, or end of a previously arranged, identified (albeit fragmentary) letter or other document may be found in this sub-series.

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Related Materials

Related Archival Materials note

At the American Jewish Historical Society: Records of Jewish Counter Culture Collection, undated, 1966-2010 (bulk 1967-1972), I-504

At the Wisconsin Historical Society Library and Archives: Arthur Ocean Waskow Papers, 1943-1977 (bulk 1961-1977), Mss 5; PH 6607

At the Jewish Theological Seminary of America Library: Temple Ansche Chesed (New York, N.Y.), Records, [ca. 1876-1989]

Related Archival Materials note

The objects that are described in this collection mostly reside at the Penn Museum, although a study collection of about twenty items are at Bryn Mawr College. Haverford College holds 115 or so objects -- mainly fragments. Only four have field numbers. They were all donated by a David Dunn, circa 2001.

A copy of a letter from Machteld Mellink to someone else at Bryn Mawr about the study collection resides in the files of the Keeper of the Near East section.

Related Archival Materials note

-George B. Gordon Director's Office Records-

-George B. Gordon General Ethnology Section Records-

-George Byron Gordon Personal Papers-

Related Materials

What appear to be drafts of Leeser's tombstone inscription, as well as the eulogy delivered at his funeral, both written in the hand of Sabato Morais, are found in the Library of the Katz CAJS's Morais Papers, Box 11, FF14.

Related Archival Materials note

All materials in the Archive are cataloged in the Freedman Jewish Sound Archive database, which is accessible online. Books and other selected materials may also be found within the Library's online catalog, Franklin.

Removals

Post-Biblical lectures 1-43, in the hand of S. Morais, have been removed to the Morais Collection.

The legal papers of Marcus Cauffmann have been removed and grouped with related papers found in the Sulzberger Collection.

An engraving (framed) of Leeser has been removed and is located in an oversized storage in the Archives room (other visual images of Leeser may be found in Box 9, FF11-12).

The Occident volumes have been removed to the stacks of the Library at the Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies (Call number BM1 .O33 1843 Per B-2).

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Brandeis University.
  • Havurat Shalom (Somerville, Mass.).
  • Reconstructionist Rabbinical College (Wyncote, Pa.).
  • Society for the Advancement of Judaism (New York, N.Y.).
  • Temple Ansche Chesed (New York, N.Y.).
Form/Genre(s)
  • Photographs
  • Prayer books
  • Printed ephemera
  • School records
  • Sermons
  • Writings (document genre)
Personal Name(s)
  • Strassfeld, Michael
Subject(s)
  • Communities--Religious aspects--Judaism
  • Counterculture--United States--History--20th century
  • Jews--Music
  • Jews--Social life and customs
  • Jews--United States--History--20th century
  • Judaism--Study and teaching
  • Reconstructionist Judaism--United States
  • Religion
  • Synagogues--United States--Organization and administration

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. School of Veterinary Medicine.
Subject(s)
  • Animal locomotion.
  • Human locomotion.
  • Motion pictures--Pennsylvania.
  • Photography--Equipment and supplies.
  • Photography--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia.

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Advertisements
  • Buttons (information artifacts)
  • Memorabilia
  • Postage stamps
Subject(s)
  • Armed Forces--Insignia
  • Political campaigns
  • Sports--Collectibles

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Cartoons (humorous images)
  • Periodicals
  • Poems
Subject(s)
  • College publications
  • College wit and humor
  • Education
  • Students--United States

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Haverford College.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Card catalogs
  • Correspondence
  • Field notes
Geographic Name(s)
  • Bet-Shemesh (extinct city)
  • Israel
Personal Name(s)
  • Fisher, Clarence Stanley, 1876-1941
  • Grant, Elihu, 1873-1942
  • Rowe, Alan, 1892-1968
Subject(s)
  • Archaeological expeditions
  • Excavations (Archaeology)

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Faculty papers
  • Field notes
Geographic Name(s)
  • Guatemala
Personal Name(s)
  • Bowditch, Charles P., 1842-1921
  • Cavell, Edith, 1865-1915
  • Gordon, G. B. (George Byron), 1870-1927
Subject(s)
  • Archaeological expeditions
  • Archaeological surveying
  • Excavations (Archaeology)
  • Guatemala--Antiquities

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Manuscripts
Geographic Name(s)
  • Congregation Mikveh Israel (Philadelphia, Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Hart, Abraham, 1810-1885
  • Johlson, J.
  • Lindo, A.A., (Abraham Alexandre)
  • Mendelssohn, Moses, 1729-1786
  • Morais, Sabato, 1823-1897.
Subject(s)
  • Jewish periodicals
  • Jews--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia
  • Mendelssohn, Moses, 1729-1786. Jerusalem.
  • Occident and American Jewish advocate.
  • Sermons, English--19th century

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Audiovisual materials
  • DVDs
  • Sound recordings
Subject(s)
  • Folk songs
  • Hasidim--Music
  • Jewish wit and humor
  • Jews--Music
  • Klezmer music
  • Synagogue music
  • Theater, Yiddish

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Photographs
Personal Name(s)
  • Bodde, Derk, b. 1909-d. 2003
  • Cammann, Schuyler V. R. (Schuyler Van Rensselaer), b. 1912
Subject(s)
  • Art history
  • Costume--Asia--History
  • Magic squares
  • Material culture

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Wharton School.
Subject(s)
  • Collective bargaining--History.--United States
  • Industrial relations--History.--United States
  • Management science.
  • Research, Industrial--Management.

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Previous Use

Apparently, and not unusually, the fate of the Leeser collection received by Dropsie College from the Hebrew Education Society has been determined by its users. When the transfer of the Leeser Library to Dropsie College was effected, various calls for a biography of Leeser were made. Unfortunately, several unsuccessful attempts to answer those calls resulted, in part, in the chaotic condition in which the papers were recently found. As Dr. Jacob Rader Marcus notes in his recent book, United States Jewry, 1776-1985, "(The) Emily Solis-Cohen collection in the Marcus collections (located at the American Jewish Archives in Cincinnati) no doubt was originally part of the Leeser collection (at Dropsie College) (p. 732, note 15)." Marcus also records other Leeser material found in "the Leeser papers in the Marcus Collections" and "Leeser Papers in the Emily Solis Cohen Collection in the Marcus Collections" (p. 733, note 15). Additional information pertaining to the dispersal and current location of that Leeser material originally received by the Dropsie College may be found in Lance Sussman's helpful bibliographical essay in his dissertation [see above, Sussman: 1987].

Bibliography

Kern, Emily. "University Magazine (1875-1885)." Penn University Archives and Records Center. http://www.archives.upenn.edu/histy/features/studtorg/umag/hist1.html.

Selected Bibliography

The following bibliography represents those selected secondary sources, in addition to the dispersed Leeser collection itself, upon which the above outline was based. For the authoritative biography of Leeser, see most recently Sussman (1995).

Adler, Cyrus. Catalogue of the Leeser Library (Philadelphia: E. Hirsch and Company, 1883).

Ashton, Dianne. Women and Judaism in Antebellum America (Detroit, MI: Wayne State University Press, 1997).

Davis, Moshe. The Emergence of Conservative Judaism (Philadelphia: The Jewish Publication Society of America, 1963).

Diner, Hasia R.. A Time for Gathering: the Second Migration, 1820-1880 (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992).

Glanz, Rudolf. "Where the Jewish Press was Distributed in Pre-Civil War America," Western States Jewish Historical Quarterly vol. 5 (1972), pp. 1-14.

Grunberger, Michael, editor. From Haven to Home: 350 years of Jewish life in America. (New York: George Braziller in association with the Library of Congress, 2004).

Karp, Abraham. "America’s Pioneer Prayer books" Jewish Book Annual, vol. 34 (1976/77), pp. 15-25.

Kiron, Arthur. "An Atlantic Jewish Republic of Letters?" Jewish History, vol. 20, nos. 1-2 (2006), pp. 171-211.

Korn, Bertram W.. "Isaac Leeser: Centennial Reflections," American Jewish Archives, vol. 19 (1967), pp. 127-141.

Korn, Bertram W.. "The First American Jewish Theological Seminary: Maimonides College, 1867-1873," in Eventful Years and Experiences (Cincinnati: American Jewish Archives, 1954), pp. 151-213.

Marcus, Jacob Rader. United States Jewry, 1776-1976 [4 vols.] (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1989-1993).

Mendelsohn, Adam. "The Emergence of the Anglophone Jewish Diaspora in the mid-Nineteenth Century," American Jewish History vol. 93, no. 2 (2007), pp. 177-209.

Sarna, Jonathan D.. American Judaism: A History (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2004).

Sellers, Maxine. "Isaac Leeser, Architect of the American Jewish Community," (Ph.D. dissertation: University of Pennsylvania, 1966).

Sulzberger, Mayer. "No Better Jew, No Purer Man," originally appeared in the Occident, vol. 25, March (1868), pp. 593-601; reprinted in  American Jewish Archives, vol. 21-22 (1969-70), pp. 140-148.

Sussman, Lance J.. "Another Look at Isaac Leeser and the First Jewish Translation of the Bible in the United States" Modern Judaism, vol. 5 (1985), pp. 159-190.

Sussman, Lance J.. "Isaac Leeser and the Protestantization of American Judaism," American Jewish Archives, vol. 38, April (1986), pp. 1-21.

Sussman, Lance J.. "The Life and Career of Isaac Leeser (1806-1868): A Study of American Judaism in Its Formative Period (Ph.D. dissertation: Hebrew Union College, 1987).

Sussman, Lance J.. Isaac Leeser and the Making of American Judaism (Detroit, MI: Wayne State University Press, 1995).

Whiteman, Maxwell. "Isaac Leeser and the Jews of Philadelphia" Publications of the American Jewish Historical Society, vol. 48 (1959), pp. 207-244.

Whiteman, Maxwell. "The Legacy of Isaac Leeser" in Jewish Life in Philadelphia: 1830-1940, ed. Murray Friedman (Philadelphia: Ishi, 1983), pp. 26-47.

Wolf, Edward. "Transfer of Custody of Leeser Library," The Dropsie College Register, Exercises on Founder's Day, March 10, 1913, published Summer Term, 1913 (Philadelphia: Dropsie College, 1913), pp. 26-39.

Published Articles

“About the Japanese language” From the November 1943 issue of American Radio Relay League, West Hartford, Conn. [Not in contained files.]

"Acquiring merit in Lama lands” 14.2 (1949) 3-19 [Not in contained files.]

“America's trade with Canton, 1784-1844” William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, University of California, Los Angeles, (1977) 31-78

“Ancient symbols in modern Afghanistan” 2 (1957) 5-34

“The animal style art of Eurasia” 17.2 (1958) 232-239 [Not in contained files.]

“Archaeological evidence for Chinese contacts with India during the Han Dynasty” 5.1 (1956) 5-34

“Aspects of Persian rug symbolism”, Sheffield City Art Galleries, Sheffield, England. 1976. 23-32

“Avorio e osso” 2 (1959) 258-263

“Bactrian nickel and Chinese bamboo” 62.4 (1962) 92-94

“The Bactrian nickel theory” 62.4 (1958) 411-414

“The bell that lost its voice” 57 (Dec.,1946) 186-188

"Bibliographic notes on Tibet” (1961) New York 253-257 [Not in contained files.]

“Birds and animals as Ming and C´hing badges of rank” 21.3 (1991) 88-94

“Buddhism in the life of Yunnan” American Red Cross Town Club, Yunnan, China (1945) 48-51

“Carvings in walrus ivory” 18.3 (1954) 3-31

“Chess with Mongolian lamas” 55.9 (1946) 407-411

“The Ch'iang people of Western Szechuan: the miscalled 'West China Jews'” 3 (1990) 64-88

“China's new road to the sea : a first-hand report of the remarkable highway from Yunnan to Burma, by a man who traveled it while under construction” (March, 1939) 125-127

“Chinese belt toggles.” (new series) 7.2 (1962) 72-78

“Chinese carvings in hornbill ivory” 5.3 (1951) 393-399

“Chinese court and dragon robes” (Dec., 1950) 206, 220

“Chinese 'Églomisé' snuff-bottles” 3.3 (1957) 84-89

“Chinese hexagrams, trigrams, and the binary system” 135.4 (1991) 576-589

“Chinese impressed gourds reconsidered” (new series) 10.4 (1964) 217-224

“Chinese influence in colonial Peruvian tapestries” Journal 1.3 (1964) 21-34

"Chinese inside-painted snuff bottles and their makers” 20 1-2 (1957) 295-326 [Not contained in files.]

“The Chinese and Japanese indexes to F. D. Lessing’s Lamaist Iconography of the Yung-ho-gung Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Ind. (1966) 4-11 [Not contained in files.]

“Chinese mandarin squares” 17.3 (1953) 5-44

“Chinese mirrors and Chinese civilization” Archaeology 2.3 (1949) 114-117 [Not contained in files.]

“Chinese snuff bottles as viewed by some old Chinese scholars. Part I” (12.2), 1980. 4-7

“Chinese snuff bottles as viewed by some old Chinese scholars, Part II” 12.4 (1980) 10-12, 35

“A Chinese soapstone carving from Yucatan American” 18.1 (1952) 68-69 [Not contained in files.]

“A Chinese textile in seventeenth century Spain” 1.4 (1965) 57-62

“Ch'ing Dynasty 'mandarin chains' (17.2), 1985. 15-19 [also appears in Ornament 4.1 (1979) 25-29]

“Christopher the Armenian and the three princes of Serendip” 4.3 (1967) 229-258

“Cosmic symbolism on carpets from the Sanguszko group” P. Chelkowski (Editor), University Press New York. (1974). 181-208

“Cosmic symbolism on the dragon robes of the Ch'ing Dynasty” (February, 1948) 126-129

“Costume in China, 1644 to 1912” 75.326 (1979) 2-19

“Costume” 4 (1961) 27-29

“The cult of the jamb-iya : dagger wearing in Yemen” 19.2 (1977) 27-34

“The development of the mandarin square” 8.2 (1944) 71-130

“The eight trigrams : variants and their uses” 29.4 (1990) 301-317

“Embroidery techniques in Old China” 16 (1962) 16-39

“The evolution of magic squares in China” 80.2 (1960) 116-124

“Exhibit of the month” 58.3 (1956) 540-543

“The four great kings of heaven, Part II” 16, series A (1945) 78-84

“Glimpses of the Lama religion in Tibet and Mongolia” 14.2 (1949) 3-33

“Imperial dragon robes of the later Ching” 3.1 (1950) 7-16

“In memoriam: Helen Burwell Chapin” 70. 3 (1950) 189-191

“In memoriam: Carl Schuster” 3.3 (1972) 2-4

“The interchange of east and west” The Philomathean Society of the University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia (1959) 3-28

“The interplay of art, literature, and religion in Safavid symbolism” (1978) 124-136

“Islamic and Indian magic squares, Part I” 8.3 (1969) 181-209

“Islamic and Indian magic squares, Part II” 8.4 (1969) 271-299

“Ivory carving. II”, (1967) 813-815

“Jewelry from a bird” (July,1954) 34-36

“En kinesisk malning fran Ming-dynastin” (1965) 27-45

“The lion and grape patterns on Chinese bronze mirrors” 16 (1953) 265-291

“The magic square of three in old Chinese philosophy and religion” 1.1 (1961) 37-80

“Magic square” (1969) 573-575

“Magical and medicinal woods in old Chinese carvings” 74.292 (1961) 116-125

“The making of dragon” vol. xl, livr. 4-5 (1951?) 297-321

“Meaning in Oriental rugs” Exchange (January/February, 1978) 31-36

“A Ming Dynasty pantheon painting” 18 (1964) 38-46

“Ming festival symbols” 7 (1953) 66-70

“Ming Mandarin squares” 4.4 (1977) 5-14

“Mongol costume: historical and recent” 23 (1963) 157-166

“New light on Huc and Gabet : their expulsion from Lhasa in 1846” 1.4 (1942) 348-363

“Notes on ivory in Hawaii” 63.2 (1954) 133-140

“Notes on the development of Mandarin squares: some newly discovered Ming textiles” (1942) 96-98

“Notes on the origin of Chinese Kesi tapestry” 20.8 (1989) 74-81

“Notes on two Tibetan crystal masks” 4 (1939) 36-37 [Not contained in files.]

“Old Chinese badges of rank” (July, 1954) 56-57, 60

“Old Chinese Magic Squares” 8.1 (1962) 12-51

“Old Chinese Mandarin squares” (April, 1954) 48-49

“Old symbols of cosmology” 7.2 (1990) 38-45

“On the Declaration of Modern Temple in Taiwan and Hong Kong” 87.1 (1967) 22-32

“On the decoration of Modern Temples in Taiwan and Hong Gong” 88.4 (1968) 785-790 [Not contained in files.]

“Oriental ivory carvings: China and Japan” Encyclopedia Britannica 12 (1958-73) 843-845

“The origin of the trigram circles in ancient China” Bulletin of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (Östasiaska Museet), Stockholm No. 62 (1990) 187-211

“Origins of Japanese tattooing” (83.4) (1974) Letters [Not contained in files.]

“Origins of the court and official robes of the Ch'ing Dynasty” 12. 3 (1959) 189-201

“Other Mandarin Squares: Korean, Anamese, and Unfamiliar Examples” (March-April, 1992) 115-126.

“The Panchen Lama's visit to China in 1780 : an episode in Anglo-Tibetan relations” 9.1 (1949) 3-19

“The paradise of Bhaishajyaguru” series 6, 5 (1944) 283-298

“Paradox' in Persian carpet patterns” 1.3 (1978) 250-257

“Presentation of dragon robes by the Ming and Ch'ing court for diplomatic purposes” 3.3 (1953) 193-202

“A prince of the Lama Church” University Museum Bulletin 14.2 (1949) 19-32 [Not contained in files.]

“A rare "jade book" : a Manchu emperor's edict carved on panels of jade” 22.3 (1980) 27-33

“A rare Ming textile in Sweden” 17 (1963) 33-37

“A rare Tang mirror” 9.2 (1946) 92-114

“Rebus” (1967) 21

“Religious symbolism in Persian art” 15.3 (1976) 193-208

“Remembering again : the life and work of Ananda K. Coomaraswamy” 3.2 (1978) 84-91

“The renewed attempt to revive the Bactrian Nickel theory” 62.1 (1962) 92-94

“A reply to Robert Hillenbrand’s review article, 'Recent work in Islamic iconography'” Oriental Art new series, 25.2 (1979) 267-268 [Not contained in files.]

"A robe of the Ch'ien-Lung Emperor” 10 (1947) 9-19

“Short history of Yunnan” Red Cross Town Club, Kunming China (1945) 36-40

“Some early Chinese symbols of duality” 24.3 (1985) 215-254

“Some strange Ming beasts” new series, 2.3 (1956) 94-102

Mal¨mo Museum Sweden (1974).

“The story of hornbill ivory” 15.4 (1950) 18-47

“A student's view of Coomaraswamy” (S. Durai Raja Singam, Editor) Kuantan, Malaya (1952) 17

“Substance and symbol in Chinese snuff bottles, part I” 8.1 (1976) 3-11

“Substance and symbol in Chinese snuff bottles, part II” 8. 2 (1976) 14-22

“Suggested origin of the Tibetan mandala paintings” 8.2 (1950) 107-119

“Symbolic expressions of Yin-Yang philosophy” (C. LaBlanc and S. Blader, eds.) Hong Kong University Press, Hong Kong (1987) 101-116.

“Symbolic meanings in Oriental rug patterns” 3.3 (1972) 5-54

“Symbolism in carpets” New York (1985) 36-41

“The symbolism in Chinese rug patterns” (Abstract of delivered paper) Washington, D.C. (1980) 11-12 [Not contained in files.]

“The symbolism of the cloud collar motif” 33.1 (1951) 1-9

“Symbols in Chinese art and architecture” American Red Cross Embassy Club Peiping Press Peiping, China (1946) 99-105

“Symbols in Yunnan art and architecture” American Red Cross Town Club, Kunming, China [1945]. 56-63

“The systematic study of oriental rugs: techniques and patterns” 95.2 (1975).248-260

“Temples in the clouds” lxxviii, no. 5 (1942) 5-8, 37-38.

“Ten tours around Kunming” American Red Cross Town Club Kunming, China (1945) 12-35

“Tibetan monster mask” 12,Series A (1940) 9-19

“A Tibetan painting in the Freer Gallery : The paradise of Bhaisajyaguru” 25 (May, 1944) 283-298 [Not contained in files.]

“The "TLV" pattern of cosmic mirrors of the Han Dynasty” 68.4 (1948) 159-167

“Toggles and toggle-wearing” 16.4 (1960) 463-475.

“Two rare Ming textiles” (new series) 10 .3 (1964) 2-7

“Types of symbols in Chinese art” 55 .5 (1953) 195-231

Collection Inventory

Series I. Education.

A. Chumash (high school), 1960s.

Box
1
Folder
1-2

B. Brandeis University.

Box Folder

The Book of Amos exam, undated.

1 3

Brandeis papers, 1972, undated.

1 4

Brandeis papers, undated.

1 5

Doctoral examination bibliography, undated.

1 6

Franco-German Jewry in the Middle Ages, doctoral exam, 1974.

1 7

Jewish Studies booklet, undated.

1 8

Letters of Mendelssohn, undated.

1 9

Liturgy class notebook, undated.

1 10

Liturgy doctoral exam, undated.

1 11

Maimonidean controversy paper, undated.

1 12

Messianism, 1974.

1 13

Notebook for History of the Biblical Text, 1969-1970.

1 14

Notebook for Psalms, 1969-1970.

1 15

Notebook for Studies in the Biblical Cult, 1970-1971.

1 16

Notebook for the Categories of Spiritual Life, 1968-1970.

1 17

Notebook on various subjects, 1973, undated.

1 18

Notes on the Holocaust, undated.

1 19

Paper on Rabbi Meir of Rothenburg, 1971.

1 20

Paper on the History of Jewish Education in Spain, undated.

1 21

Psalm 19, 1969-1970, undated.

1 22

Syllabi for Near Eastern and Jewish Studies courses, 1968-1973, undated.

1 23

Theory of History, 1975.

1 24

Various Brandeis materials, 1968-1979, undated.

1 25

Various notes for Brandeis papers, undated.

1 26

Various research papers, 1970, undated.

1 27

C. Reconstructionist Rabbinical College.

Box Folder

Application essay and acceptance letter, 1989.

1 28

Bible (Tikva Frymer-Kensky), 1990.

1 29

College Report letter, 1992.

1 30

Contemporary Jewish thought (Nancy Fuchs-Keimer), 1990.

1 31

Courses and credits, 1989-1991, undated.

1 32

Genesis (Tikva Frymer-Kensky), undated.

1 33

Graduation, 1991.

1 34

Modern Jewish thought (David Teutsch), 1990.

1 35

Purim, past and future, undated.

1 36

Reconstructionism II (David Teutsch), 1990.

1 37

Seminar in Modern Jewish history II (Shulamit Magnus), 1991.

1 38

Unidentified binder of readings, undated.

2 1

Unidentified binder of readings, undated.

2 2

Unidentified readings, notes, writings, undated.

2 3

D. Institute for Jewish Spirituality.

Box Folder

Meditva, Los Angeles, 1997 Fall.

2 4

Ansche Chesed, Jewish Spirituality Center, 1998-1999, undated.

2 5

Ansche Chesed, The Awakened Heart retreat, 1999.

2 6

Retreat, 1998-2001.

2 7

Retreat, Makom Meditation Center at Jewish Community Center, 1999.

2 8

Retreat, 2000.

2 9-10

Retreat notes, 2000.

2 11

Retreat readings, 2000.

2 12

Best practices retreat, 2000.

2 13

The Spirituality Institute: Urban Retreat Program, 2000.

2 14

Spirituality Institute, 2000.

2 15

Institute for Jewish Spirituality and Mindfulness Institute membership lists, 2000, undated.

2 16

The Spirituality Institute: Rabbinic Program, 2000-2001.

2 17

The Spirituality Institute: Rabbinic Program, 2001.

2 18

Retreat, 2001.

2 19-20

Strategic planning, 2001.

2 21

First retreat notes, 2002.

2 22

Retreat, 2002-2003.

2 23

Retreat, 2003.

2 24

Retreat readings, 2003.

2 25

Institute of Jewish Spirituality, 2004.

2 26

Retreat, 2005.

3 1

Retreat 3, 2005.

3 2

Educators retreat, 2005.

3 3

Prayer as spiritual practices, 2005.

3 4

Alumni survey, 2005.

3 5

Pointers on Learning Hasidut by Krassen, 2005.

3 6

Retreat, 2006.

3 7-8

Retreat e-mail list, 2006-2007.

3 9

Retreat, 2007.

3 10-11

Hevraya discussion, 2007 October.

3 12

Mei Hashiloach readings, 2008.

3 13-14

Retreat, 2009.

3 15

Readings, interim, 2011.

3 16

January retreat, 2011.

3 17

Prayer retreat, 2012.

3 18

Prayer as practice, 2012.

3 19

Prayer leadership retreat, 2013.

3 20

Retreat, Yom Iyyum, 2013.

3 21

Prayer retreat, 2014.

3 22

Hevraya exchange, 2014.

3 23

Rabbi retreat, undated.

3 24

Rabbinic Leadership Program, undated.

3 25

Young reconstructionists, undated.

3 26

Dharma and Torah, undated.

3 27

Musar, undated.

3 28

E. Shalom Hartman Institute.

Box Folder

Rabbi's study seminar, 1994.

3 29-30

Jerusalem retreat: Building Jewish Foundations, 1999.

3 31

Foundations for a Thoughtful Jewish Life: Understanding Jewish Ethics, 2000.

3 32

Standing Before God: Mitzvah and Holachah, 2006.

3 33

Foundations of Community, chapters 1-3, 10, 12, undated.

3 34

Foundations of the Ethical, chapters 1-3, 5, undated.

4 1

Foundations of the Ethical, chapters 9-11, undated.

4 2

F. Other Study Courses.

Box Folder

ALEPH Kallah 6, 1995.

4 3

ALEPH Kallah 7, 1997.

4 4

Course in Musar, I, 2003-2004.

4 5-6

Eretz Israel: In the Eyes of Her Beholders, 2003.

4 7

Hebrew College Me'ah: Medieval readings, 2005.

4 8-9

Jerusalem retreat: The Individual and the Collective, Talmudic and Maimonidean texts, 2001.

4 10

Joint summer program: The Land of Israel - From Myth to Relaity, 2003.

4 11

Kosher and Halal food regulations course, 2002.

4 12

Mysticism seminar, undated.

4 13

Rabbinical Assembly: Homiletics, undated.

4 14

Readings on reconstructionism, undated.

4 15-16

Spiritual leadership class (Shefa Gold), undated.

4 17

The Turning of the Secular Year, meditation retreat, 1997-1998.

4 18

The World of the High Holy Days, undated.

4 19

Series II. Jewish counterculture and later progressive movements.

A. Subject files.

Box Folder

Agus, Robert, correspondence, undated.

5 1

Aliya in Jewish law, undated.

5 2

Amital, Yehuda, at Jewish Community Center, 1996.

5 3

Am Chai, Chicago, 1979.

5 4

Analysis, Institute for Jewish Policy Planning and Research of the Synagogue Council of America, 1976, 1980.

5 5

Anti-Viet Nam War at Yeshiva College, 1968.

5 6

"Aquarian Minyan: Shabbat Morning Service for the Bar Mitzvah of Elishama Hesed Goldfarb", 1994.

5 7

Bad Boy, Bar Mitzvah, 1970.

5 8

Beit Havurah, undated.

5 9

Bible commentary, 1979-1980, undated.

5 10

"Blessings of Leadership: Honoring Rabbi David A. Teutsch", 2002.

5 11

Bnei Akiva, 1965.

5 12

B'nai Or Religious Fellowship, 1980-1998, undated.

5 13

B'nai Or Siddur project, 1986.

5 14

Boston Bet Din, 1968-1974.

5 15

Breira, 1977-1978.

5 16

Carlebach, Shlomo, 1995, 1998.

5 17

Chutzpah, 1972.

5 18

Coalition for Alternatives in Jewish Education, 1977-1978.

5 19

Cohen and Schor, "Gender Variation in the Careers of Conservative Rabbis", 2004.

5 20

Cohen, Steven, survey on gays, lesbians and the conservative movement, and other materials on homosexuality, 2006-2007.

5 21

Combined Jewish Philanthropies, The Jewish Advocate, 1969.

5 22

Concerned Jewish Students / Combined Jewish Philanthropies, 1969-1977, undated.

5 23

Conservative Judaism, 2007-2008, 2014.

5 24

Consultation on the Environment and Jewish Life, 1992.

5 25

Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Fund letter, 1975.

5 26

Cowan, Paul, tribute, 1988.

5 27

Davka magazine, Spring 1974.

5 28

Denver conversion experiment, 1983.

5 29

Dorff, Elliot, on homosexuality, 1992.

5 30

Dorff, Elliot, et al., on homosexuality, 2006.

5 31

Eco-Kosher, 1990-1993, undated.

5 32

"An Egalitarian Hagadah," by Aviva Cantor, 1982.

5 33

Ezrat Nashim, undated.

5 34

Fabrangen: A Jewish Communical Experience, thesis by Miriam Feinberg, 1978.

5 35

Fabrangen newsletters, etc., 1973-1976.

5 36

Feminism, 1974-1989, undated.

5 37

Feminism, 1984, undated.

5 38

Feminism, 1985-1990, undated.

5 39

Feminism / Drorah Setel, 1985, undated.

5 40

Four Worlds Journal, 1984-1985.

5 41

Gendler, Everett, 1976, 1990, undated.

5 42

Genesis 2, 1970-1980.

5 43

Guide to Jewish Student Groups, 1971.

5 44

Halacha havurah / Bet dia, 1976.

5 45

Halacha newsletter, 1993.

5 46

Hasidic Jews confornt hippies (Chabad), New York Times, 1968.

5 47

Havurah list, 1973.

5 48

Hersel, Matt, "Why and How to Keep Kosher", undated.

5 49

Heschel, Abraham J., 1970-1982.

5 50

Hillel at Brandeis University, programming, 1969-1975, undated.

5 51

Hillel Free University (Brandeis, Rutgers, and Boston Universities), 1971-1974.

5 52

"Homosexuality and Judaism: A Reconstructionist Workshop Series", 1992.

5 53

Huges, H. Stuart, campaign, undated.

5 54

Imahot Nusach process, undated.

6 1

Institute for Jewish Life, 1972-1975, undated.

6 2

Institute for Jewish Life, undated.

6 3

Jewish Community Center, groundbreaking, 1999.

6 4

Jewish Liberation Journal, 1969-1970.

6 5

Jewish Liberation Journal, 1970-1972.

6 6

Jewish Orthodox Feminist Alliance / Women's Tefillah Network, 1997, 2001-2002.

6 7

Jewish Peace Fellowship, Trees for Vietnam, 1971.

6 8

The Jewish Radical, 1969, 1971.

6 9

Jewish Spectator, 1973.

6 10

Jewish Student Projects, Greater Boston, 1970-1973, undated.

6 11

Jewish women, 1974-1979, undated.

6 12

Jews for Urban Justice, 1966-1971.

6 13

Jungreis, Esther, 1973.

6 14

Kamenetz, Rodger, "Has the Jewish Renewal Movement Made It Into the Mainstream?" in Moment: The Jewish Magazine for the '90s, 1994.

6 15

Kesher, 1974-1988.

6 16

Law Committee, the Rabbinical Assembly, 1975-2004. undated.

6 17

Letters from "famous" people, 1971-1991.

6 18

Lilith: A Quarterly Magazine (premiere issue), 1976.

6 19

Lishma, undated.

6 20

Maurice Gordon Bar Mitzvah protest, 1969.

6 21

McGovern campaign, 1970-1972.

6 22

Meir Kahane, 1970-1971, undated.

6 23

Menorah: Sparks of Jewish Renewal, 1980-1984.

6 24

Minyan mailing lists [Restricted], undated.

6 25

Miriam Sang to Them, Project KESER's Second Global Women's Pre-Passover Seder, 1996.

6 26

Mishkan-a (Lynne Gottlieb), undated.

6 27

Mishkan Shalom Statement of Principles, 1989.

6 28

National Conference of Synagogue Youth, Mitzvos, 1966.

6 29

National Conference of Synagogue Youth, New England region, 1966-1971.

6 30

Network: A Monthly Forum of the Jewish Student Movement, 1974-1975.

6 31

New Jewish Agenda, 1980.

6 32

New Jewish Agenda, "New Jewish Rituals" book, undated.

6 33

New Jewish Times: A Journal of Planetary Renewal, 1983.

6 34

New Menorah: The B'nai Or Journal of Jewish Renewal, 1985-1996.

6 35

North American Jewish Students' Network, 1975-1978, undated.

6 36

Not the Jewish Press, parody, 1982.

6 37

Olympics proposal protest, undated.

6 38

Palmer, Parker, 1990, undated.

6 39

Pardes, 1972.

6 40

Passover Hagaddah Project, undated.

6 41

Proposal for Pavsha Newsletter, 1979.

6 42

Pumbedissa, 1993-1997.

6 43

Rabbinical Assembly CJLS position paper on homosexuality, 1992, 2007, undated.

6 44

Radical Haggadot, 1973, 1975, undated.

6 45

Radius Institute, 1985.

6 46

Reform texts on homosexuality, 1987-1992, undated.

6 47

Richman, Elizabeth, and Stephanie Ruskay, "A Rabbinic Approach to Economic Justice", 2007.

6 48

Riemer, Jack, "They Called Him Comfort", undated.

6 49

Research Centre of Kabbalah, 1976, 2004.

6 50

Rosenberg, M. Jay, "The Press of Freedom: To Uncle Tom and Other Such Jews," Village Voice, 1969.

6 51

Roth, Joel, on homosexuality, 1991, 2005.

6 52

S3K Report, 2006-2009.

6 53

Schachter, Zalman, writings, undated.

6 54

Schachter, Zalman, writings, undated.

7 1-2

Shalom Center Report, 1990-1992, undated.

7 3

Shamrei Adamah (Environment), 1990-1992, undated.

7 4

Soloveitchik, Haym, 1994-1999, undated.

7 5
Drawer Folder

"Soviet anti-semitic propoganda-1970 style" [with cartoon caricatures], poster pubished by American Jewish Conference on Soviet Jewry, Conference on the Status of Soviet Jews, 1970.

108
Box Folder

Student events, 1971-1972.

7 6

Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry, 1966, undated.

7 7

Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry, 1969-1971, undated.

7 8

Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry, 1970-1971, undated.

7 9

Tzedakah collectives, 1975-1977, undated.

7 10

Tzedakah collectives: Jewish photography contest, 1976.

7 11

Tzedakah collectives, and New Israel Fund, 1975-1981, undated.

7 12

Various conservative movement papers on homosexuality, 1991-2007, undated.

7 13
Drawer Folder

"Vietnam moratorium, October 15, gather 1 p.m., Cambridge Common for march to Boston Common rally, 3:30 p.m.", poster, 1969.

108
Box Folder

Waskow, Arthur, 1976, 2004-2005, undated.

7 14

Weiss's Farm heavies / Bet din, undated.

7 15

Weiss's Farm retreat / New York Havurah, 1974-1976.

7 16

Weiss's Farm, post meeting notes, 1975.

7 17

Weiss's Farm retreat, 1975.

7 18

Weiss's Farm retreat, 1977.

7 19

Weiss's Farm, seperate seating, 1975.

7 20

Wermen-Kelman, Levi, "Letter from a Zionist Friend", 1968.

7 21

Why I am not a conservative Jew (response to position papers on homosexuality), undated.

7 22

"A Woman's Passover Haggadah," by E.M. Broner, 1977.

7 23

World Conference on Soviet Jewry, 1971.

7 24

Yom Tov Shemi position paper, undated.

7 25

B. Havurat Shalom.

Box Folder

Gemeinschaftsleben als Konstrucktionsproblem, dissertation about Havurat Shalom, by Yizhak Ahren, 1976.

7 26

"The Greening of American Jewry," by Bill Novak, 1971.

7 27

Havurah, 1969-1974.

7 28

Havurah, 1971-1974, undated.

7 29

"The Havurah as Context for Adult Jewish Learning," by Joseph Riemer, 1989.

7 30

Havurah proposals, 1970.

7 31

Havurat Shalom, 1972-1978, undated.

7 32

Havurat Shalom, undated.

7 33

Havurat Shalom, 25th reunion, 1993.

7 34

Havurat Shalom, 40th reunion, 2008.

7 35

Havurat Shalom, 45th reunion, 2013.

8 1

"Havurat Shalom: A Visitor's Impression," by Ben Yonah, 1975.

8 2

"Havurat Shalom: An Appreciation at 10," by Joel Rosenberg, 1978.

8 3

Havurat Shalom Community Seminary prospectus, 1969-1974.

8 4

Havurat Shalom, High Holidays, undated.

8 5

Havurat Shalom reunion, 1995.

8 6

Havurat Shalom Siddur, 1985.

8 7

Kavesh, Bill, Tasting food services, undated.

8 8

Kashrut exam, Nehemiah food seminar, undated.

8 9

Kotzker song, undated.

8 10

Letter from Arthur Green to Shlomo Riskin, 1969.

8 11

"Meanings, Morals and Mysteries: Literary Appraisals to Torah," by Joel Rosenberg, undated.

8 12

Seder tifillah (prayerbook for Havurat Shalom), undated.

8 13

Untitled collection of poetry, typed, undated.

8 14

Y'did Nefesh, translated by Zalman Schachter, undated.

8 15

C. National Havurah Committee.

Box Folder

About Havurah articles, 1982.

8 16

Havurah, 1980-1981, undated.

8 17

Havurah [newsletter], 1980-1995.

8 18

Havurah Bible project, 1983-1987, undated.

8 19

Havurah Conference, 1978-1979, undated.

8 20

Havurah Conference, 1979.

8 21

Havurah Conference, 1979-1980, undated.

8 22

Havurah Conference, 1980.

8 23

Havurah Conference, participants lists, 1979-1996, undated.

8 24

Havurah Conference, program booklets, 1979-1997.

8 25

Havurah movement articles, 1973-1984.

8 26

National conference planning, 1977-1979, undated.

8 27

National Havurah Committee, 1974-1990, undated.

8 28-29

National Havurah Committee, 1988-1999, undated.

8 30

National Havurah Committee, 1992-1993.

8 31

National Havurah Committee, feminist issues, undated.

8 32

National Havurah Committee, mailing, 1980.

8 33

National Havurah Committee, minutes, evaluation, 1980-1982, undated.

8 34

National Havurah Committee, minutes, 1981-1982.

8 35

National Havurah Committee, theology event, 1985.

8 36

Notes on "Prayer and Community," by Prell, undated.

8 37

Organizational Ambivalence - The National Havurah Committee, by Waxman, 1999.

9 1

Pre-Summer Institute, 1980, undated.

9 2

Summer Institute, 1974-1980, undated.

9 3

Summer Institute, 1980.

9 4-5

Summer Institute, 1981.

9 6-8

Summer Institute, 1982.

9 9-10

Summer Institute, 1983.

9 11

Summer Institute, 1984.

9 12

Summer Institute, 1985.

9 13

Summer Institute, 1986.

9 14-15

Summer Institute, 1990.

9 16

Summer Institute, 1991.

9 17

Summer Institute, 1992.

9 18

Summer Institute, 1993.

9 19

Summer Institute, 1994.

9 20

Summer Institute, 1996.

9 21

Summer Institute, Home and homelessness in Jewish sources class, 1996.

9 22

Summer Institute, Circumcision class, 1996.

9 23

Summer Institute, 1997.

9 24

Summer Institute, Schachter class, undated.

9 25

Union of American Hebrew Congregations, Havurah survey, 1979.

9 26

Series III. Synagogues.

Conditions Governing Access note

A small number of files in this series are restricted due to clergy-congregant privilege: Box 9, Folder 34; Box 9, Folder 38; Box 9, Folder 39; Box 11, Folder 26; Box 12, Folder 53. Researchers interested in viewing restricted files in this collection should email the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rarebooks, and Manuscripts for permission.

A. Ansche Chesed.

Box Folder

Abraham Joshua Heschel School, 1983-1987, undated.

9 27

Abraham Joshua Heschel School letter, 1995.

9 28

Ansche Chesed: 160 Years journal, 1989.

9 29

Ansche Chesed brochures, 1995-2002, undated.

9 30

Ansche Chesed bulletin columns, 1991-1999.

9 31

Avi Chai conference, 1994.

9 32

Chapel dedication, 1992.

9 33

Chapel Minyan [RESTRICTED], 1993-2000, undated.

9 34

Chapel Minyan planning committee, 1996-1997.

9 35

Derek Reut, 1976-1978, undated.

9 36

Derek Reut / Minyan, 1977-1985, undated.

9 37

Emails answered [RESTRICTED], 1999.

9 38

Emails to do [RESTRICTED], 1999.

9 39

Farewell address, 2001.

9 40

The future of Ansche Chesed, 1986-1993, undated.

9 41

Good ideas, 1995-1996.

9 42

Good ideas, future projects, computer flyers, 1986-1992, undated.

9 43

Good ideas, government, neighborhood, 1987-1989.

9 44

Grant, public relations, 1995-1997, undated.

9 45

Guide to the West Side, 1984, 1989, undated.

9 46

Halacha, 1976-1992, undated.

10 1

Hevrot proposal, 1985-1987.

10 2

Interesting articles, 1994, undated.

10 3

Jewish Family Service award, 1982.

10 4

Learning guides, 1991-1993.

10 5

Lishmah adult education project, undated.

10 6

McKinsey, 2000.

10 7

Minyan M'at, 1994-2001, undated.

10 8

Minyan M'at, 2000.

10 9

Minyan M'at membership lists, 1987-1991.

10 10

Minyan M'at / Morningside Montessori, 1987-2004, undated.

10 11

Minyanim, 1985-1998, undated.

10 12

Minyanim, Bereah, Re'ut, 1975-1989, undated.

10 13

Miscellaneous material (notes and articles), undated.

10 14

Miscellaneous materials related to Ansche Chesed, 1981-1996, undated.

10 15

Mowshowitz Prize, 1999-2000.

10 16

New Minyan proposal, 1998.

10 17

New Minyan proposal drafts, undated.

10 18

New York Havurah, 1975.

10 19

Passover, 1974-1996.

10 20

Pitzele, Peter, artist in residence, 1997.

10 21

Proposed projects never realized, undated.

10 22

Rabbi, contract, 1988-1994.

10 23

Rabbi, ideas, 1991, undated.

10 24

Rabbi, public relations, 1984-2001.

10 25

Sanctuary Minyan, 1998-2000.

10 26

Scripture Windows: Toward a Practice of Bibliodrama, by Peter Pitzele, 1997.

10 27

Sermons by others, 1992-1993, undated.

10 28

Shabbat transliteration, 1997.

10 29

Special, 1983, undated.

10 30

Strassfeld, Michael, at Ansche Chesed, 1983-1984.

10 31

Westside Minyan, 1975-1985, undated.

10 32

Westside Minyan membership lists, 1985-1996.

10 33

B. Society for the Advancement of Judaism.

Box Folder

Adult Bar/t mitzvah, 2006.

10 34

Adult B'nai mitzvah, 2003-2008.

10 35

Adult B'nai mitzvah, texts, 2007-2008.

10 36

Bogrim Family D'var Torah, 2003-2007.

10 37

Bogrim program, new, 2006.

10 38

B'nai mitzvah experience (BME), 2006-2011.

10 39

Cantata revised at Society for the Advancement of Judaism, undated.

10 40

Congregant correspondence [RESTRICTED], 2011.

12 53

Connections programs, originals, 2008-2009.

10 41

Denominations, 2010.

10 42

Emerging scholars, 2001.

10 43

Environment, 2006-2007.

10 44

Environmental, 2014.

10 45

Environmental halacha, 2007.

10 46

Environmental issues, 2014.

11 1

Ethical Dilemmas in the Renewed State of Israel, 2004.

11 2

Family prayerbook for Shabbat, undated.

11 3

Flyers and brochures, 2001-2002, undated.

11 4

Flyers and brochures, 2001-2003, undated.

11 5

Future, 2005-2006.

11 6

Goldberg and sons, "The Will", undated.

11 7

Game, 1985-1986.

11 8

Hebrew school, undated.

11 9

Hebrew school yearbook, 2001-2002.

11 10

Hesed day, 2008.

11 11

Hesed network, 1987-1992, undated.

11 12

High Holiday student prayerbook, undated.

11 13

Hirsh, Richard, 2006-2007.

11 14

iEngage course, 2013.

11 15

Inclusivity, 2002-2007.

11 16

Israel, poetry, undated.

11 17

Israel trip, 2008.

11 18

Israel trip, undated.

11 19

Issues, this year, 2006-2008.

11 20

Jewish Journey project, 2011.

11 21

Kashrut, undated.

11 22

Ketubah, undated.

11 23

Latke and hamantaschen, 2010-2012.

11 24

Leadership development, 2003-2006.

11 25

Letter from congregants [RESTRICTED], 2003.

11 26

Lifnei lomeid, undated.

11 27

Lying, parenting session, 2013.

11 28

Magic-Synaplex, 2005.

11 29

Man and His Needs webcast, 1995.

11 30

Mattisyahu lyrics, 2005.

11 31

Matzah, undated.

11 32

Ma'yan omer, 2005.

11 33

Me'ah, 2004.

11 34

Membership, 2002-2006.

11 35

Minyan manners, undated.

11 36

Moldovan, Alfred, undated.

11 37

Mural article, 2009.

11 38

Mysticism, 1995, undated.

11 39

Ninetieth anniversary, 2011.

11 40

Oral history, 1995-2001.

11 41

Outreach, Jewish Outreach Institute at Society for the Advancement of Judaism, 2009.

11 42

Paper cutouts for Hebrew school, undated.

11 43

Parent discussions, 2009-2010.

11 44

Parenting, Chanukah honoring, undated.

11 45

Passover, song session, Friday night before, 2003.

11 46

Passover / Hametz drive, 1977-2015.

11 47

PJ Library programs, undated.

11 48

Program, 1996-2001.

11 49

Program, 2005.

11 50

Program, 2007-2010.

11 51

Program, 2010-2011.

11 52

Program flyers, 2001-2014.

11 53-54

Program ideas, undated.

11 55

Public relations, 2001.

11 56

Purim, 1984-2001.

11 57

Purim, 1998-2003.

11 58

Purim, 2001-2008.

11 59

Purim, 2011-2013.

11 60

Purim and Torah jokes, 1997-2000.

11 61

Reconstructionism, undated.

11 62

Reconstructionist divorce, 2004.

11 63

Reconstructionist learning day, 2015.

11 64

Retreat, 2003.

11 65

Retreat, 2005.

11 66

Retreat, 2012.

11 67

Retreat, 2014.

11 68

Reznikoff, Charles, undated.

12 1

Ripps, David, 2003-2004.

12 2

Ritual committee, 2007.

12 3

Ritual committee, speech on services, 2006-2012.

12 4

Society for the Advancement of Judaism, starting at, 2000-2001.

12 5

Society for the Advancement of Judaism bulletin, 2001-2004.

12 6

Society for the Advancement of Judaism e-bulletin, 2003.

12 7

Society for the Advancement of Judaism history, 2001-2002.

12 8

Society for the Advancement of Judaism history, scavenger hunt, 2002.

12 9

Sadness, anger, illness, 2005-2006.

12 10

Self-learning, undated.

12 11

Shabbat.

12 12

Shabbat Parashat, Genesis handouts, part 1, 2006-2014.

12 13

Shabbat Parashat, Genesis handouts, part 2, 2009-2014.

12 14

Shabbat Parashat, Leviticus handouts, 2011-2015.

12 15

Shabbat Parashot, Numbers/Deuteronomy handouts, 2011-2014.

12 16

Shabbat Parashat, Eco-kosher / $ handouts, 2006-2015.

12 17

Shabbat neighborhood, 2006-2007.

12 18

Shavuot, 2003.

12 19

Shavuot, 2011.

12 20

Shavuot, First fruits, 2003-2004.

12 21

Shavuot, Matan Torah, Triennial cycle, undated.

12 22

Shavuot, teaching, how did you get Torah, 1995.

12 23

Shavuot tikkun, undated.

12 24

Shmita, undated.

12 25

Simhat Torah, etc., undated.

12 26

Simhat Torah Sukkot, 1989-2012.

12 27

Slonimsky, Henry, undated.

12 28

Social justice, 2003-2007.

12 29

Spirituality resources, undated.

12 30

Strassfeld, Michael, 2002-2015.

12 31

Strassfeld, Michael, resume, undated.

12 32

Suicide, undated.

12 33

Sukkot, 2002-2009.

12 34

Synagogue initiative, Reinvisioning the Society for the Advancement of Judaism, 2010-2011.

12 35

Synagogue transformation, 1999-2000.

12 36

Synagogues Reimagined, Tom Brady session at Rabbinical Assembly, 2005.

12 37

Synaplex marketing, 2004.

12 38

Thanksgiving prayers, undated.

12 39

Tisha Be-av, 1984-2002.

12 40

Transgender, 2008.

12 41

Transliteration project, undated.

12 42

Triennial cycle, 1988.

12 43

Tu Bishevat seder, 1995-2004.

12 44

Tu Bishevat seders, 1989-1995.

12 45

Ukraine trip, 2004.

12 46

Ukraine trip, pre-departure information, 2004.

12 47

United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism, expulsion of Society for the Advancement of Judaism, 2009.

12 48

Unveilings, 1998-2001.

12 49

Video courses, 1987.

12 50

Vision (Michael Davidson), 2007.

12 51

War and peace, undated.

12 52

Yom ha-shoah service, undated.

12 54

Zalman / National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership, 2000-2001.

12 55

Series IV. Observances.

A. Parashat Hashavua (Weekly Torah Portions), Special Shabbatot, and Holidays.

Box Folder

Aharei Mot, 1999, 2008.

12 56

Aharei Mot, 2005-1022, undated.

12 57

Beha'alotecha, 1995.

12 58

Beha'alotecha, 2002-2011, undated.

12 59

Behar Behokotai, 2002-2011, undated.

12 60

Bemidbar, 2002-2011, undated.

12 61

Bemidbar (Eldad and Medad), undated.

12 62

Bereshit, 2001-2008, undated.

12 63

Bo, 2002-2009, undated.

12 64

Chukkot, 2004-2012, undated.

13 1

Devarim, 2007-2009, undated.

13 2

Ekev, 2005-2012, undated.

13 3

Emor, 2002-2012, undated.

13 4

Ha'azinu, 2002-2013, undated.

13 5

Ha'azinu, 2014.

13 6

Hanukkah (and Joseph), 1993.

13 7

Hayye Sarah, 2001-2010, undated.

13 8

Kedoshim, 2002-2011, undated.

13 9

Ki Tavo, 2003-2014, undated.

13 10

Ki Tissa, 2000-2011, undated.

13 11

Ki Teitzei, 2003-2014, undated.

13 12

Lech Lecha, 1994.

13 13

Lech Lecha, 2001-2007, undated.

13 14

Lech Lecha, 2006.

13 15

Mattot-Masei, 2002, 2009.

13 16

Metzorah/Hagadol, 2003, 2008.

13 17

Miketz, 1997.

13 18

Miketz, 2001-2007, undated.

13 19

Miketz, 2010.

13 20

Mishpatim, 2001-2009, undated.

13 21

Naso, 2003-2011, undated.

13 22

Nitzavim, 2002-2014, undated.

13 23

Noah, 1997-2008, undated.

13 24

Noah, 2001-2008, undated.

13 25

Noah, 2003.

13 26

Pekudei, 1997.

13 27

Pekudei, 2005-2011, undated.

13 28

Pesach, 2002-2011, undated.

13 29

Pesach, 2007-2015, undated.

13 30

Pesach, 2013-2015.

13 31

Pinchas, 2002-2009.

13 32

Re'eh, 2001-2013, undated.

13 33

Shabat Hanukkah, undated.

13 34

Shavuot, 1998, 2005-2006.

13 35

Shavuot, 2002-2013, undated.

13 36

Shavuot, 2012-2013, undated.

13 37

Shelach Lecha, 2002-2009, undated.

13 38

Shemini, 2002-2008, undated.

13 39

Shemot, 2002-2010, undated.

13 40

Shoftim, 2000.

13 41

Shoftim, 2001-2014, undated.

13 42

Shoftim, undated.

13 43

Shuvah, undated.

13 44

Sukkot, 1996.

13 45

Tazria/Metzora, 2002-2011, undated.

13 46

Tazria, undated.

13 47

Toledot, 2001-2007, undated.

13 48

Tzav, 2000-2011, undated.

13 49

Vaeira, 2000-2011, undated.

13 50

Vaetchanan, 2005-2011, undated.

13 51

Va-Yakhel, 2000-2007, undated.

13 52

Va-Yera, 1997.

13 53

Va-Yera, 1998.

13 54

Va-Yera, 2001-2006, undated.

13 55

Va-Yera, 2004-2008, undated.

13 56

Vayeshev, 2001-2009, undated.

13 57

Vayeshev, 2006.

13 58

Vayetze, 2001-2008, undated.

13 59

Va-Yikra (Toronto), 1991.

13 60

Va-Yikra (Baltimore), 1999.

13 61

Va-Yikra, 2001-2009, undated.

13 62

Vayishlach, 1995, 2003, undated.

13 63

Vayishlach, 2001-2010, undated.

13 64

B. High Holidays services.

Box Folder

Rosh Hashanah, 1988.

13 65

High Holidays, 1989.

13 66

High Holidays, 1990.

13 67

Rosh Hashanah sermon, 1990.

13 68

Rosh Hashanah, 1991.

13 69-70

Kol Nidre (Rabbi vision), 1991.

13 71

Rosh Hashanah, 1992.

13 72

High Holidays sermons, 1992-2002, undated.

13 73

Rosh Hashanah (Hassidic Teshuvah), 1993.

13 74

Yom Kippur (Kol Nidre) (critique of Hassidic vision), 1993.

13 75

Yom Kuppur, 1993.

13 76

Rosh Hashanah, 1994.

13 77

Rosh Hashanah (d'var Torah: Command Change), 1994.

13 78

Yom Kippur (d'var Torah: Vision of Ansche Chesed), 1994.

13 79

Rosh Hashanah speech (Learning), 1995.

13 80

Kol Nidre (Words: America, Israel), 1995.

13 81

Rosh Hashanah (d'var Torah: My Theology), 1996.

13 82

Yom Kippur (d'var Torah: Spirituality), 1996.

13 83

Rosh Hashanah, first day, 1997.

13 84

Yom Kippur (d'var Torah: How do we measure the year?), 1997.

14 1

Rosh Hashanah (d'var Torah: Messianism), 1998.

14 2

Yom Kippur, 1998.

14 3

Yom Kippur (Zidonot - Shegagot / Forgiveness), 1998.

14 4

High Holidays (speech not given), 1999.

14 5

Rosh Hashanah (My vision for a new Judaism), 1999.

14 6

Yom Kippur (Suffering), 1999.

14 7

Rosh Hashanah, 2000.

14 8

Yom Kippur (dvar Torah), 2000.

14 9

Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, 2001.

14 10

Rosh Hashanah, 2001.

14 11

Elul (Preparing for High Holidays, Friday night in August), 2002.

14 12

Rosh Hashanah, 2002.

14 13

Rosh Hashanah, first day ("Plan B"); second day prayer, 2002.

14 14

Yom Kippur, 2002.

14 15-16

Kol Nidre (Israel), 2002.

14 17

High Holidays (Jewtocracy, Akedah, The meaning of it all), 2003.

14 18

Rosh Hashanah, 2003.

14 19

Rosh Hashanah (Jewtocracy), 2003.

14 20

Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur readings (master copy), 2003.

14 21

Yom Kippur, 2003.

14 22

Yom Kippur (God / holiness), 2003.

14 23

High Holidays, 2004.

14 24-25

Rosh Hashanah, 2004.

14 26

Yom Kippur, 2004.

14 27

High Holidays booklets, 2004-2014.

14 28

High Holidays, 2005.

14 29

Rosh Hashanah, first day, 2005.

14 30

Rosh Hashanah, first night (ma'ariv), 2005.

14 31

Rosh Hashanah, second day, 2005.

14 32

Yom Kippur, 2005.

14 33

High Holidays, 2006.

14 34-35

High Holidays (Family Service), 2006.

14 36

High Holidays, general, 2006.

14 37

Rosh Hashanah, first day, 2006.

14 38

Rosh Hashanah (ma'ariv), 2006.

14 39

Rosh Hashanah, second day, 2006.

14 40-41

Yom Yippur, 2006.

14 42

High Holidays, 2007.

14 43

Rosh Hashanah (Religion), 2007.

14 44

Rosh Hashanah, first day, 2007.

14 45

Rosh Hashanah, first night (ma'ariv), 2007.

14 46

Rosh Hashanah, second day, 2007.

14 47-48

Yom Kippur, 2007.

14 49

Kol Nidre, 2007.

14 50

High Holidays, 2008.

14 51-52

Rosh Hashanah, 2008.

14 53

Rosh Hashanah, first day, 2008.

14 54-55

Rosh Hashanah (ma'ariv), 2008.

14 56

Rosh Hashanah, second day, 2008.

14 57

Yom Kippur, 2008.

14 58

Kol Nidre (Prayer, Intermarriage, Max), 2008.

14 59

Kol Nidre (Talk for family service), 2008.

14 60

Selichot, 2009-2013.

14 61

High Holidays, 2009.

14 62

Rosh Hashanah, 2009.

14 63

Rosh Hashanah, first day and ma'ariv, 2009.

14 64

Rosh Hashanah, second day, 2009.

14 65

Yom Kippur, 2009.

14 66

Yom Kippur (Prayer), 2009.

14 67

Yom Kippur (Prayer, family service version), 2009.

14 68

Kol Nidre, 2009.

14 69

Readings and announcements, 2009.

14 70

Additional readings, 2009.

14 71

Rejected readings, 2009.

14 72

Rosh Hashanah (Rethinking Synagogue), 2010.

14 73

Rosh Hashanah, first day, 2010.

14 74

Rosh Hashanah (ma'ariv) (Who is a Jew - Chelmsford), 2010.

14 75

Rosh Hashanah, second day, 2010.

14 76

Yom Kippur, 2010.

14 77

Kol Nidre, 2010.

14 78

High Holidays, 2011.

14 79-80

High Holidays, Psalm booklet, 2011.

14 81

Rosh Hashanah (90th anniversary), 2011.

14 82

Rosh Hashanah, first day, 2011.

14 83

Rosh Hashanah (ma'ariv), 2011.

14 84

Rosh Hashanah, second day, 2011.

14 85

Yom Kippur, 2011.

14 86

Yom Kippur (Family service: Gratitude), 2011.

14 87

Kol Nidre (Gratitude), 2011.

14 88

High Holidays, 2012.

14 89

Rosh Hashanah (Fiddler on the Roof, and Jewish future), 2012.

14 90

Rosh Hashanah, first day, 2012.

14 91

Rosh Hashanah (ma'ariv), 2012.

14 92

Rosh Hashanah, second day, 2012.

15 1

Yom Kippur, 2012.

15 2

Yom Kippur (Family service), 2012.

15 3

Kol Nidre, 2012.

15 4

Neilha / Minha, 2012.

15 5

High Holidays, general, 2013.

15 6

Rosh Hashanah (Community), 2013.

15 7

Rosh Hashanah, first day, 2013.

15 8

Rosh Hashanah (ma'ariv), 2013.

15 9

Rosh Hashanah, second day, 2013.

15 10

Yom Kippur, 2013.

15 11

Kol Nidre, 2013.

15 12

Family service, 2013.

15 13

High Holidays, 2013-2014.

15 14

High Holidays, 2014.

15 15-16

Rosh Hashanah (Black and white fire), 2014.

15 17

Rosh Hashanah, first day, 2014.

15 18

Rosh Hashanah, first night, 2014.

15 19

Rosh Hashanah, second day, 2014.

15 20

Yom Kippur, 2014.

15 21

Kol Nidre (Change), 2014.

15 22

Do over, undated.

15 23

The Eternal Light radio scripts, undated.

15 24

General readings ("look at next year"), undated.

15 25

Hanna and Sam, undated.

15 26

High Holidays, undated.

15 27-28

High Holidays (Family service), undated.

15 29

High Holidays ("not used"), undated.

15 30

Mahzor for Rosh Hashanah, Yom, Kippur (The SAJ Family service), undated.

15 31

Martyrology (F. Kohn) (not used), undated.

15 32

Possible readings, undated.

15 33

Readings, undated.

15 34

Readings for High Holidays, undated.

15 35

Readings "for next year", undated.

15 36

Rosh Hashanah, undated.

15 37

Rosh Hashanah (ma'ariv), undated.

15 38

Rosh Hashanah (version two), undated.

15 39

Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, undated.

15 40

Three speakers, undated.

15 41

C. Prayer / Life cycle ceremonies.

Box Folder

Articles about prayer and services, 1993, 2000.

15 42

Ashrei, 2004.

15 43

Avodah, prayer, 1998-2008, undated.

15 44

Birth ceremonies, 1976-1998, undated.

15 45

Birth ceremonies, 1988-2006, undated.

15 46

Blessing the Birth of a Daughter: Jewish Naming Ceremonies for Girls, by Reifman and Nashim, 1978.

15 47

Bogrim readings, 2008-2013, undated.

15 48

B'nai Mitzvah booklets, 1974, 1995.

15 49

Chochmat Ha-Lev liturgy, 1996.

15 50

Congregation Sha'ar Zahav readings, undated.

15 51

Death, 2001.

15 52

Hiroshima service, 1999.

15 53

Jewish Women's Resource Center Birth ceremonies guide, 1985.

15 54

Ketubbot (marriage contracts), undated.

15 55

Leading service, 1993, 1997, undated.

15 56

Liturgical change in the time of violence, Dorshei Derekh, Germantown, Pennsylvania, 1994.

15 57

Liturgy, 1989-2000, undated.

15 58

New liturgy, 1999, undated.

15 59

Opening Kavanah following unidentified earthquake, undated.

15 60

Piyyut, 2012.

15 61

Prayer, 1969, undated.

15 62

Prayer, 1987-2005, undated.

15 63

Prayer, 1991, 2004, undated.

15 64

Prayer, 1993, undated.

15 65

Prayer, 2009.

15 66

Prayer at Society for the Advancement of Judaism, 2003, undated.

15 67

Prayer scores by Robert Agus, 1974.

15 68

Prayer sermons, 2009-2010, undated.

15 69

Prayer session for David Teutsch, Montclair, 2007.

15 70

Rabbis for Human Rights ritual, 2006.

16 1

Reconstructing Prayer article, 2006.

16 2

Rolando Matalon, Piyyut, 2007.

16 3

Services, 1972-1975, undated.

16 4

Services, 1989-1995, undated.

16 5

Services after September 11, 2001, 2001.

16 6

Services and speech, Boston weekend, 1998.

16 7

Services, Berkeley weekend, 1998.

16 8

Services, reconstructing prayer, 2003, undated.

16 9

Shomrei Shalom service, undated.

16 10

Siddur review, 2007-2009.

16 11

Terumah service, Weiss's Farm, undated.

16 12

Wedding booklets, 1983-2011, undated.

16 13

Wedding speeches, undated.

16 14

Weddings, undated.

16 15

Yom Tov Sheni, undated.

16 16

D. Healing services and resourcees.

Box Folder

Healing service, January, 1996-2001.

16 17

Healing service, February, 1996-2005.

16 18

Healing service, March, 1996-2003.

16 19

Healing service, April, 1996-2005.

16 20

Healing service, May, 1996-2004.

16 21

Healing service, June, 1996-2004.

16 22

Healing service, September, 1996-2005.

16 23

Healing service, October, 1996-2003.

16 24

Healing service, November, 1996-2005.

16 25

Healing service, December, 1996-2007.

16 26

Healing services, 1996-2001.

16 27

Healing service (articles), 1996-2000.

16 28

Healing service (D. Friedman), 1992-2001, undated.

16 29

Healing service, first and preludes and others, 1995-1998, undated.

16 30

Healing service, Kavanot, 1996-2004, undated.

16 31

An Academic Exploration of Sources of Healing Within Judaism conference, 1995.

16 32

Healing conference, National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership, 1996.

16 33

Jewish Healing Center, 1991-1992, undated.

16 34

Jewish Healing Center, 1994-1995, undated.

16 35

Religion and Cancer II: Using Our Traditions conference, 1992.

16 36

Twelve Steps, Jewish sources, undated.

16 37

The Outstretched Arm, newsletter, the National Center for Jewish Healing, 1995.

16 38

Series V. Teaching.

Box Folder

Aravot, Ansche Chesed retreat, 1995.

16 39

Being a Mensch, Society for the Advancement of Judaism, Spring 2002.

16 40

Beginning Judaism class, Fall 1991.

16 41

Beginning Judaism curricula, 1985-1989, undated.

16 42

Course outlines, undated.

16 43

Derekh Torah class, 2010-2011.

16 44

Derekh Torah II class, 1991-1992.

17 1

Ecology, undated.

17 2

Ecology class, undated.

17 3-4

Environmental class, undated.

17 5

Evil Inclination, Havurah Institute, undated.

17 6

Halacha course taught at Lishmah, undated.

17 7

Har Ke-Giget, undated.

17 8

Hasidic Spirituality, Metivta class, Summer 2000.

17 9

Hasidism, undated.

17 10-11

Hasidism at Malcor, undated.

17 12

Hasidism at Society for the Advancement of Judaism, undated.

17 13

Hasidism class, Kallah, 1997.

17 14

Hasidism in Teshuvah, Selichot, 1995.

17 15

Hasidism, National Havurah Conference, undated.

17 16

Hasidism, Wexner, 1997.

17 17

Haver I, 1993.

17 18-20

Haver II, 1994.

17 21-22

Haver III, 1996.

17 23-25

Haver IV, undated.

17 26

Havurah Ideology, undated.

17 27

Havurah Ideology, National Havurah Conference class, 1990.

17 28

Holiness class, National Havurah Conference Institute, 1997.

17 29

Inner Growth class, undated.

17 30

Inner Growth 2, undated.

17 31

Jeremy Merrim group teaching, undated.

17 32

Jewish History course II, 2003-2004.

17 33

Jewish History survey, 2002-2003.

17 34

Jews in America class, undated.

17 35

Lishmah class, 2003.

17 36

Liturgy class, 2008.

17 37

Liturgy class, 2010.

17 38-39

Liturgy course, National Havurah Conference Institute, undated.

17 40

Lunchtime study class, undated.

18 1

A Map of Time, Spring 1992.

18 2

MM Shabbat Shuvah, Hasidic Teshuvah, 1996.

18 3

Mysticism class, undated.

18 4

Name and namelessness in Exodus, 1998.

18 5

Non-Jews class, undated.

18 6

Non-Jews, National Havurah Conference, class texts, undated.

18 7

Omer class, 2001.

18 8

Pesah Law class, undated.

18 9

Pluralism class, Ansche Chesed retreat, 1990.

18 10

Psalms class, undated.

18 11

Purim teaching, undated.

18 12

Shavuot Tikkun, 2007.

18 13

Spirituality Hevra, undated.

18 14

Spirituality in the Everyday Life, Jewish Community Center class, 1999.

18 15

Spirituality of Everyday, Jewish Community Center, Spring 2003.

18 16

Stories of Sages, Early Rabbinic Authority, Global Learning day, 2010.

18 17

Stories / Rabbis, Fall 2011.

18 18

Structure of Prayer class, undated.

18 19

Talmud text sampler, 2012.

18 20

Theology class, Spring 2004.

18 21

Tselem Elokim, Ansche Chesed retreat, 1996.

18 22

West Side Campaign Against Hunger teaching, 2011, undated.

18 23

Young Professional Sukkah, Rabbi Nahman, undated.

18 24

Series VI. Works by Michael Strassfeld.

Conditions Governing Access note

One file in this series is restricted due to personally identifiable information: Box 19, Folder 4. Researchers interested in viewing restricted files in this collection should email the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rarebooks, and Manuscripts for permission.

A. Speeches and eulogies.

Box Folder

Ansche Chesed annual meeting speech, 1998-1999.

18 25

Athena and Jeremy's wedding, undated.

18 26

Avodah Award speech, undated.

18 27

Bet am Shalom, 2012.

18 28

Capital campaign speech.

18 29

Chairlift dedication, undated.

18 30

Chelmsford Press conference, undated.

18 31

Dedication, 2004.

18 32

Eighth Day Pesach, crossing of the sea, 1995.

18 33

F.D.R. and the Jews, 2014.

18 34

Future of Havurot speech, undated.

18 35

G.A. speech, New York, 1993.

18 36

G.A. speech, Boston, 1995.

18 37

Gay marriage / homosexuality, d'var Torah, 2004, undated.

18 38

Gay Pride Shabbat, Congregation Beit Simchat Torah, 1998.

18 39

God in History in the Haggadah for Jewish Community Center panel, 1993-1997.

18 40

Golden Calf / Why I believe, undated.

18 41

Hatan Torah speech, undated.

18 42

Havdelah speech, Institute, 1990.

18 43

Honey from the rock, Kavanah, undated.

18 44

Hospitality, Lester Shriver, 2001, undated.

18 45

Idolatry, undated.

18 46

Installation at Society for the Advancement of Judaism, 2002.

18 47

Intermarriage speech and conference, and Hebrew Union College lecture, 1991-1993.

18 48

Israel, undated.

18 49

Jewish Reconstructionist Federation conference (Philadelphia) and Plenary (Boston), 2006, 2008.

18 50

Judaism as a revolutionary tradition, 2008.

18 51

Judaism as revolutionary Pesah, 1998.

18 52

Leadership, Kotzker amd Moses, Leading Day, 1993.

18 53

Lectures given, undated.

18 54

Looking to year 2000 at Ansche Chesed, 1993.

18 55

Mel Gibson and wigs, 2004.

18 56

Millennium party speech, 2000.

18 57

Muslim speech, 2010.

18 58

New York Board of Rabbis, 2000.

18 59

Prayer / Kavanah, 1996.

18 60

Reconstructionist Rabbinical College graduation speech, 2002.

18 61-62

Redemption and Rosh Hashanah, undated.

18 63

Re-envisioning the Synagogue, 2006.

18 64

Reflections on Rodney King, 1992.

18 65

Regional Jewish Reconstructionist Federation God talk, 2005.

18 66

Response to Egon Mayer, Reconstructionist Rabbinicaal Association, Chicago, 1993.

18 67

Shavuot, intermarriage speech, 1992.

18 68

Shofetim, idolatry, Institute, 1994.

18 69

Society for the Advancement of Judaism acceptance speech, undated.

18 70

Teaching instead of d'vrie Torah, 1996.

18 71

Theology paper ("mine at RCC"), undated.

18 72

Tikkun Conference speech, critique of Havurah movement, 1994.

18 73

White fire on black fire (Non-Jews), undated.

18 74

Zionism, undated.

18 75-76

Funeral speeches, undated.

18 77-78

Funerals, undated.

18 79

B. The Jewish Catalog.

Box Folder

The Jewish Catalog, 1971-1973, undated.

18 80

The Jewish Whole Earth Catalogue: Theory and Development, thesis by George Savran and Richard Siegel, 1972.

18 81

The Jewish Catalog, 1972-1973, undated.

19 1

The Jewish Catalog, volume 3, 1972-1981, undated.

19 2

The Jewish Catalog, articles in the  New York Times and  Boston Globe, 1973-1974.

19 3

The Jewish Catalog royalty statements [RESTRICTED], 1973-2010, undated.

19 4

The Jewish Catalog reviews, 1973-2013, undated.

19 5

Letters from Anthony Waskow regarding the Catalog Two, 1974-1975.

19 6

The Third Jewish Catalog, 1974-1981, undated.

19 7

"Catalog: Mazal Tov? by Sharon and Michael Strassfeld," in Moment Magazine, 1975.

19 8

"The Eternal Light: A Conversation with Sharon Strassfeld", 1975.

19 9

The Jewish Catalog: A Shabbaton in Chapel Hill, N.C., 1975.

19 10

Correspondence with Mae Rockland regarding the Jewish Yellowpages, 1975.

19 11

The Second Jewish Catalog, 1975-1976, undated.

19 12

The Jewish Catalog: A Three Year Curriculum, 1976.

19 13

Public relations for the Second and  Third Jewish Catalogs, 1978-1981, undated.

19 14

" The Third Jewish Catalog, Introduction by Sharon and Michael Strassfeld," in  Present Tense, 1980.

19 15

"The 613th Volume of the Jewish Catalog," in Sh'ma, 1981.

19 16

Jewish Publication Society, 1991-1996, undated.

19 17

Illustrations by Stuart Copans, undated.

19 18

The Jewish Catalog manuscript, undated.

19 19-22

Proposal for a Jewish Catalog Institute, undated.

19 23

C. Other writings.

Box Folder

"America is a Field of Dreams," in We Remember...9/11: An Evening of Reflection and Hope.

19 24

"An Appropriate Ceremony for Daughters," with Sharon Strassfeld, in Sh'ma: A Journal of Jewish Responsibility 14, no. 264 (December 23, 1983).

19 25

Articles by Sharon Strassfeld, 1984-1989.

19 26

"Awakening to the Day," in Tikkun: A Bi-Monthly Jewish Critique of Politics, Culture & Society 18, no. 2 (March/April 2003).

19 27

A Book of Life, 2002-2006, undated.

19 28

"Ceremonial Welcome for a Newborn Jewish Daughter," in Lilith (Winter 1976-1977).

19 29

Current Tikkun article, undated.

19 30

Field of Dreams, 2001, undated.

19 31

First writing essay on Pesach, undated.

19 32

Hadassah, undated.

19 33

Haggadah, historical section, undated.

19 34

Haggadah material, undated.

19 35-36

Haggadah material, undated.

20 1

Haggadah notes, 1976-1981, undated.

20 2

Haggadah outline, undated.

20 3

Israel prayer, undated.

20 4

The Jewish Holidays, 1981-1985, undated.

20 5

The Jewish Holidays, reviews, 1981-1985, undated.

20 6

Journeys: A Spiritual Guide to Everyday Life proposal, undated.

20 7

Leyl She'Eylot: A Night of Questions; Haggadah Shel Pesah (Working draft), undated.

20 8

Making Midrash, 1976, undated.

20 9

Midrash, 1978-1980, undated.

20 10

Midrash Anthology proposal, undated.

20 11

Miscellaneous articles, undated.

20 12

Miscellaneous writings, undated.

20 13-14

Miscellaneous writings and projects, undated.

20 15

Music collection, undated.

20 16

Music collections / Niggunim, 1980-2003, undated.

20 17

A Night of Questions: A Passover Haggadah, 1999-2000, undated.

20 18

"Reconstructing Prayer," in The Reconstructionist: A Journal of Contemporary Jewish Thought & Practice 71, no. 1 (Fall 2006).

20 19

Re-ordering the Seder, undated.

20 20

Review of "A Passover Haggadah", undated.

20 21

Seder Avodah L'Yom Ha-Shoa: Service for Holocaust Memorial Day, undated.

20 22

Seder Avodah L'Yom Ha-Shoa: Service for Holocaust Memorial Day, 1997, undated.

20 23

Shabbat Haggadah proposal, 1979.

20 24

"Shedding light on human rights," Hanukah, undated.

20 25

The Shrink Calendar proposal, undated.

20 26

Songs to Open the Heart, recording, 2002-2004, undated.

20 27

"Too Many for a Minyan," in Response: A Contemporary Jewish Review no. 38 (Winter 1979-80).

20 28

"Towards a Creative Diaspora," in Response: A Contemporary Jewish Review no. 39 (Summer 1980).

20 29

Towards a Torah of Zion, 1993, undated.

20 30

Twenty Years in the Havurah Movement, 1989.

20 31

Who Knows One? Darfur rally, 2006.

20 32

Women and time-bound Mitzvah, undated.

20 33

Writings / articles published, 1980-1995.

20 34

Series VII. Books and other publications from the Library of Michael Strassfeld.

A. Works by Michael Strassfeld.

Box Item

Fishman, Chalres Adés, ed., Blood to remember: American poets on the Holocaust, Revised second edition (St. Louis, Mo.: Time Being Books), Includes poem by Michael Strassfeld, "Who knows one?" (pp. 433-434), 2007.

21 1

Strassfeld, Michael, A book of life: embracing Judaism as a spiritual practice [hardcover] (New York: Schocken Books), 2002.

21 2

Strassfeld, Michael, A book of life: embracing Judaism as a spiritual practice [paperback] (Woodstock, Vt.: Jewish Lights Publishing), 2006.

21 3

Diamond, Gail, Four lessons exploring A Night of Questions: a Passover Haggadah, edited by Rabbi Joy Levitt and Rabbi Michael Strassfeld (Elkins Park, Pa.: Reconstructionist Press), 2000.

23 5

Chwast, Seymour, Had gadya: a Passover song, Afterword by Rabbi Michael Strassfeld (Brookfield, Conn.: Roaring Brook Press), 2005.

21 4

Siegel, Richard, Michael Strassfeld and Sharon Strassfeld, eds., The Jewish catalog: a do-it-yourself kit, First edition (Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society of America), Inscribed: "With all our love, Sharon and Michael", 1973.

21 5

Strassfeld, Sharon, and Michael Strassfeld, eds., The second Jewish catalog: sources and resources: with the Jewish yellow pages, First edition (Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society of America), 1976.

21 6

Strassfeld, Sharon, and Michael Strassfeld, eds., The third Jewish catalog: creating community (Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society of America), 1980.

21 7

Strassfeld, Michael, and Richard Siegel, The Jewish calendar 5736, 1975-76 (New York: Universe Books), 2 copies, 1975.

22 1

Strassfeld, Michael, and Richard Siegel, The Jewish calendar 5737, 1976-77 (New York: Universe Books), 1976.

22 2

Strassfeld, Michael, and Richard Siegel, The Jewish calendar 5738, 1977-78 (New York: Universe Books), 2 copies; copy 1 includes annotations (appointments) in Strassfeld's hand, 1977.

22 3

Strassfeld, Michael, and Richard Siegel, The Jewish calendar 5740, 1979-80 (New York: Universe Books), 1979.

22 4

Siegel, Richard, Michael Strassfeld and Jane Siegel, The Jewish calendar 5741, 1980-81 (New York: Universe Books), 1980.

22 5

Strassfeld, Michael, and Richard Siegel, The Jewish calendar 5742, 1981-82 (New York: Universe Books), 2 copies, 1981.

22 6

Siegel, Richard, and Michael Strassfeld, The Jewish calendar 5743, 1982-83 (New York: Universe Books), 1982.

22 7

Strassfeld, Michael, and Richard Siegel, The Jewish calendar 5744, 1983-84 (New York: Universe Books), Includes annotations (appointments) in Strassfeld's hand, 1984.

22 8

Siegel, Richard, and Michael Strassfeld, The Jewish calendar 5745, 1984-85 (New York: Universe Books), 1984.

22 9

Strassfeld, Michael, and Richard Siegel, The Jewish calendar 5746, 1985-1986: special issue: Jewish women (New York: Universe Books), 1985.

22 10

Strassfeld, Michael, with Vicki Brower, The Jewish calendar 5747, 1986-1987: the Synagogue (New York: Universe Books), 1986.

22 11

Strassfeld, Michael, and Vicki Brower, The Jewish calendar 5748, 1987-1988 (New York: Universe Books), Includes annotations (appointments) in Strassfeld's hand and stapled receipts, 1987.

22 12

Strassfeld, Michael, and Vicki Brower, The Jewish calendar 5749, 1988-1989 (New York: Universe Books), 1988.

22 13

Strassfeld, Michael, The Jewish calendar 5750, 1989-1990 (New York: Universe Books), 1989.

22 14

Strassfeld, Sharon and Michael, The Jewish calendar 5751, 1990-1991 (New York: Universe Books), 2 copies, 1990.

22 15

Strassfeld, Sharon and Michael, The Jewish calendar 5752, 1991-1992 (New York: Universe Books), Includes annotations (appointments) in Strassfeld's hand, 1991.

22 16

Strassfeld, Sharon and Michael, The Jewish calendar 5753, 1992-1993 (New York: Universe Books), 2 copies; copy 1 includes annotations (appointments) in Strassfeld's hand, 1992.

22 17

Strassfeld, Sharon and Michael, The Jewish calendar 5754, 1993-1994 (New York: Universe Books), 2 copies; copy 1 includes annotations (appointments) in Strassfeld's hand, 1993.

22 18

Strassfeld, Sharon and Michael, The Jewish calendar 5755, 1994-1995 (New York: Universe Books), 2 copies; copy 1 includes annotations (appointments) in Strassfeld's hand, 1994.

22 19

Strassfeld, Sharon and Michael, The Jewish calendar 5756, 1995-1996 (New York: Universe Books), 1995.

22 20

Strassfeld, Michael, The Jewish holidays: a guide and commentary (New York: Harper & Row Publishers), uncorrected proof, 1985.

21 8

Strassfeld, Michael, The Jewish holidays: a guide and commentary [hard cover], first edition (New York: Harper & Row Publishers), Inscribed: "Rubin Meyer Strassfeld"; and "To Mommy & Toddy, who taught me all I know about the holidays, Michael Strassfeld", 1985.

21 9

Strassfeld, Michael, The Jewish holidays: a guide and commentary [paperback] (New York: Harper & Row Publishers), 1985.

21 10

Strassfeld, Michael, The Jewish holidays: a guide and commentary [paperback] (New York: Quill), 2001.

21 11

Levitt, Joy, and Michael Strassfeld, eds., A night of questions: a Passover Haggadah (Wyncote, Pa.: Reconstructionist Press), 2013.

21 12

Strassfeld, Michael, ed., A Passover Haggadah ([New York]: Rabbinical Assembly), 2 copies, 1979.

21 13-14

Strassfeld, Michael, A Shabbat Haggadah: for celebration and study (New York: Institute of Human Relations Press), 2 copies, 1981.

21 15-16

B. Comparative religion.

Box Item

Herberg, Will, Protestant, Catholic, Jew: an essay in American religious sociology (Garden City, N.Y.: Anchor Books), 1960.

30 23

James, William, The varieties of religious experience: a study in human nature (New York: New American Library), 1958.

30 27

Weiss-Rosmarin, Trude, Judaism and Christianity: the differences, Seventh printing (New York: Jonathan David Publishers), Inscribed in Hebrew, 1972.

23 4

C. The Holocaust.

Box Item

Arendt, Hannah, Eichmann in Jerusalem: a report on the banality of evil (New York: Viking Press), 1963.

25 9

Frank, Anne, Anne Frank: the diary of a young girl (New York: Washington Square Press), 1972.

30 24

Frank, Jacob, Sayings of Yacov Frank, Translated by Harris Lenowitz (Berkeley, Calif.: Tree), 1978.

23 7

Frankl, Viktor E., Man's search for meaning: an introduction to logotherapy (New York: Pocket Books), 1963.

30 32

Roskies, David, Night words: a midrash on the Holocaust (Washington, D.C.: B'nai B'rith Hillell Foundations), 1971.

23 10

Roskies, David, Night words: a midrash on the Holocaust (Boston: N.E. Free Jewish Press), undated.

24 2

Roskies, David, Night words: a midrash on the Holocaust, Fourth revised edition (New York: CLAL - National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership), 1998.

24 2

Schwarz-Bart, Andre´, The last of the just, translated from the French by Stephen Becker (New York: Atheneum Publishers), 1960.

25 11

Wiesel, Elie, Night (New York: Hill and Wang), 1960.

28 8

D. Jewish counterculture.

Box Folder

American Jewish World Service, The crisis of HIV/AIDS in Africa: a Jewish response (New York: American Jewish World Service), undated.

23 6

Aquarian Minyan, Makhzor for the high holy days (Berkeley, Calif.: Aquarian Minyan), laid in: additional leafs numbered 81, 86, 87, undated.

24 10

Axelrad, Albert S., Call to conscience: Jews, Judaism, and conscientious objection (Hoboken, N.J.: KTAV Publishing House), 1986.

29 17

Barth, Samuel, and Dick Codor, All you want to know about Sabbath services: a guide for the perplexed (West Orange, N.J.: Behrman House), 1995.

23 10

Bush, Lawrence, and Jeffrey Dekro, Jews, money and social responsibility: developing a "Torah of money" for contemporary life (Philadelphia: Shefa Fund), laid in: Letter to Michael and Sharon Strassfeld from Jeffrey Dekro, 1993.

30 3

Carol Ochs, The waters of healing: Psalm 42 and related texts, Monograph series, No. 4 ([New York]: National Center for Jewish Healing), 1997.

23 8

Cowan, Paul, An orphan in history: retrieving a Jewish legacy, Bantam edition (Toronto: Bantam Books), 1983.

30 29

Cowan, Paul, with Rachel Cowan, Mixed blessings: overcoming the stumbling blocks in an interfaith marriage (New York: Penguin Books), 1987.

30 16

Decter, Moshe, ed., Redemption! Jewish freedom letters from Russia ([New York]: American Jewish Conference on Soviet Jewry), undated.

23 9

Dorff, Elliot N., "You shall strengthen them": a rabbinic letter on the poor ([New York]: Rabbinical Assembly), 3 copies, 1999.

23 13

Frishman, Elyse D., ed., Haneirot halalu: These lights are holy: a home celebration of Chanuka (New York: Central Conference of American Rabbis), 1989.

29 30

Goldberg, Hillel, Musar anthology (Hyde Park, Mass.: Harwich Lithograph), Inscribed on cover: "Havurah Copy", 1972.

24 2

Green, Arthur, Restoring the Aleph: Judaism for the contemporary seeker, CIJE Essay series (New York: Council for Initiatives in Jewish Education), Inscribed: "Joy -- Enjoy! Art", 1996.

23 10

Israel, Richard J., Jewish identity games: a how to do it book (Washington, D.C.: B'nai B'rith Hillell Foundations), 1978.

24 3

Kalechofsky, Roberta, ed., Haggadah for the liberated lamb (Marblehead, Mass.: Micah Publications), 1988.

29 23

Kehilla Community Synagogue, Shabbat morning Suddur (Berkeley, Calif.: Kehilla Community Synagogue), undated.

24 10

Koltun, Elizabeth, The Jewish woman: new perspectives (New York: Schocken Books), 1976.

27 6

Koltun, Elizabeth, The Jewish woman: new perspectives, Third printing (New York: Schocken Books), Inscribed: "L. Friedlander"; annotations, 1978.

28 16

Lerner, Michael, Jewish renewal: a path to healing and transformation (New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons), Inscribed: "To Sharon, A pillar of strength and insight, personal & communal -- thanks for all you've done to help me and all you've done to help our people. Love, Michael Lerner, Oct, 94", 1994.

25 2

Lubet, Steven, et al., eds., Chutzpah: a Jewish liberation anthology (San Francisco: New Glide Publications), 1977.

23 14

Morris, Tamra L., Freedom Haggadah for Soviet Jewry (Washington, D.C.: CLAL - National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership), 1987.

23 10