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Pennell family papers

Register

Ms. Coll. 50

Pennell family papers

Ms. Coll. 50

Pennell family papers

Ms. Coll. 50

Pennell family papers

Ms. Coll. 50

Pennell family papers

Ms. Coll. 50

Pennell family papers

Ms. Coll. 50

Pennell family papers

Ms. Coll. 50

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the University of Pennsylvania. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Pennell Family
Title:
Pennell family papers
Date:
circa 1882-1951
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 50
Extent:
21 boxes (+ 3 map drawers)
Language:
English
Abstract:
The Pennell family papers comprise personal correspondence of both Pennells; drafts and galleys for some of their publications; contracts; royalty statements; trust fund account statements; copies of wills; publicity materials; photographs; newspaper clippings; memorabilia; exhibition catalogs, awards, original sketches, watercolors, and prints by Joseph Pennell; and a few works by other artists.
Cite as:
Pennell family papers, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Williams, Francis Howard, 1844-1922
Title:
Francis Howard Williams papers
Date [inclusive]:
1880-1909
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1193
Extent:
0.2 linear foot (1 box and 1 oversized folder)
Language:
English
Language Note:
Two documents written fully in French and one written partially in French.
Abstract:
Francis Howard Williams (1844-1922) was a Philadelphia literary critic and author whose works were featured in publications such as The Atlantic Monthly,  Harper’s Weekly,  Lippincott’s Magazine, and  The Independent. He was the known friend of several literary greats including Walt Whitman, Louisa May Alcott, and George W. Cable and was part of a large circle of contemporary poets, writers, editors, and publishers of the time period. The collection includes letters to Williams, writings, and ephemera.
Cite as:
Francis Howard Williams papers, 1880-1909, Ms. Coll. 1193, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Repplier, Agnes, 1855-1950
Title:
Agnes Repplier papers
Date:
circa 1870-1960
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 18
Extent:
3.8 linear feet (13 boxes)
Language:
English
Abstract:
Philadelphia-born Agnes Repplier was an essayist and biographer with a writing career that spanned sixty-five years, during which she developed friendships with a number of noted writers, artists, and scholars. The Papers comprise six series: Incoming Correspondence; Outgoing Correspondence; Writings by Agnes Repplier; Biographical Material; Agnes Repplier and Repplier Family Personal Papers; and Memorabilia.
Cite as:
Agnes Repplier papers, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Gág, Wanda , 1893-1946
Title:
Wanda Gág papers
Date [inclusive]:
1892-1968
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 310
Extent:
40 boxes
Language:
English
Abstract:
Personal papers of Wanda Gág, including correspondence to and from Wanda, as well as letters to and from Alma Schmidt Scott, a biographer of Gág, and letters among Gág family members; writings, such as diaries, children’s books, autobiographical works, and juvenilia; notes for talks and for writings; artwork; exhibition catalogs and related publicity material; writings about Gág, including obituaries, biographical pieces, and book reviews; financial records; materials regarding the Estate of Wanda Gág; newspaper clippings; memorabilia; photographs; and examples of Happiwork, a product for children created by Gág.
Cite as:
Wanda Gág papers, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Bradley, Sculley, 1897-
Title:
E. Sculley Bradley papers
Date [bulk]:
1944-1962
Date [inclusive]:
1876-1970
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1083
Extent:
2.5 linear feet (6 boxes)
Language:
English
Abstract:
Edward Sculley Bradley (1897-1987) was a scholar, author, educator, and administrator at the University of Pennsylvania. He was a prolific writer and editor, serving as editor of the General Magazine and History Chronicle, Philadelphia, 1945-1956. He published biographies of literary figures George Henry Boker and Henry Charles Lea, as well as editions of works by Mark Twain, Stephen Crane, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Walt Whitman. Bradley was considered an international expert on Whitman, editing several important editions of the poet's  Leaves of Grass. The Sculley Bradley papers include his personal and professional correspondence dating from 1923 to 1962, material from several literary censorship cases for which he testified, corrected drafts of his manuscripts for the  Comprehensive Reader's Edition,  Norton Critical Edition, and  Variorum edition of  Leaves of Grass, ephemera and graphics associated with Walt Whitman, and a small amount of material on other authors.
Cite as:
E. Sculley Bradley papers, 1876-1970 (bulk: 1944-1962), Ms. Coll. 1083, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Title:
Miscellaneous Manuscripts
Date:
1320-2005
Call Number:
Misc Mss
Extent:
22 boxes
Language:
English
Abstract:
The Miscellaneous Manuscripts collection contains a myriad of materials spanning dates from 1320 to 2005. The materials in this collection can range from a single item in one folder to a brief exchange of correspondence containing several leaves in multiple folders. There are multiple languages including English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish. Examples of items found in this collection are letters, poems, photographs, small diaries, property transactions, legal documents, and historical curiosities. Some of the items relate to larger collections within the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts. Each distinct item has been assigned a title, box number, and folder number. This collection is added to as items are acquired.
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Leland, Charles Godfrey, 1824-1903
Title:
Charles Godfrey Leland letters to George Henry Boker
Date [bulk]:
1869-1870
Date [inclusive]:
1861-1937
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1070
Extent:
0.2 linear feet (1 box)
Language:
English
Abstract:
Charles Godfrey Leland (1824-1903) was a humorist and folklorist from Philadelphia. The collection consists of fourteen illustrated letters written to George Henry Boker which document one year of Leland's trip to Europe from 1869 to 1870; transcriptions of the letters; and an article by donor and scholar Sculley Bradley about the collection.
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Biography/History

The marriage of Joseph Pennell (1857-1926) and Elizabeth Robins Pennell (1855-1936) was one of equals and complements, bringing together two talented individuals with keen minds, ambition, and a love of work. Elizabeth Robins published her first essay, "Mischief in the Middle Ages," in the  Atlantic Monthly in July 1881, and wrote travel books, biographies, a novel, art criticism, and essays up until the time of her death in 1936. Her first book,  Life of Mary Wollstonecraft (Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1884) was published the year she married. Joseph Pennell was an illustrator (as he said,  "a born illustrator" ), an etcher, lithographer, and a writer as well, noted for his ho nesty, invective, and sense of humor. They began their acquaintance in 1881 while collaborating on an article for  The Century Magazine. She was assigned to write the text to accompany some of his etchings of Philadelphia sites; the result was  "A Ramble in Old Philadelphia," published in the March 1882 issue. The collaboration continued throughout their marriage producing over 230 books as author, joint author, and/or illustrator, plus hundreds of essays and articles. See Free Library of Philadelphia.  "Checklist of Books and Contributions to Books by Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell, issued in connection with a Pennell exhibition in the Free Library of Philadelphia, June-August 1945," by Victor Egbert.

In his extremely productive career as an artist Joseph Pennell made over 1800 prints, many as illustrations for magazines and for the books of prominent authors including F. Marion Crawford, Andrew Lang, William Dean Howells, and Henry James.

Both Pennells were natives of Philadelphia. Elizabeth Robins was born to a prosperous banking and finance family. Her grandfather, Thomas Robins, whose family was originally from Virginia and the eastern shore of Maryland, was a trustee of the First Pennsylvania Bank and later president of the Philadelphia Bank at Fourth and Chestnut Streets. Her father, Edward Robins, worked as a broker on the Philadelphia Stock Exchange but lost money following the Civil War, leaving the family with limited resources. Elizabeth's mother died when she was very young, and she and her sister were sent by their father to the convent of the Sacred Heart in Torresdale, just north of Philadelphia. Their life at the school was documented by Elizabeth's classmate Agnes Repplier (1855-1950) in her book In Our Convent Days (1905). Elizabeth also wrote of the experience in  Our Philadelphia (1914). Her father was a convert to Catholicism, and Elizabeth writes of how her convent experience and the class prejudice against Catholics in nineteenth-century Philadelphia made it difficult for her to become a part of Philadelphia society when she left the convent at age seventeen:  "In France, in Louisiana, in Maryland, to be a Catholic was to be at the top of the social scale, approved by society; in Pennsylvania, it was to be at the bottom, despised by society,"  Our Philadelphia, 175).

She went to live in her father's home. By this time he had remarried and she had younger siblings. Elizabeth found inspiration in the work of her uncle, the author Charles Godfrey Leland (1824-1903), who was a stimulating companion, introducing her to other writers, including his friends Walt Whitman (1819-1892) and George H. Boker (1823-1890). Leland took her with him on his visits to gypsy encampments in New Jersey and Pennsylvania for his book The Gypsies. He encouraged her to write and gave her introductions in the offices of Philadelphia's newspapers. Elizabeth needed her own income and was excited by the challenge of work, which transformed her view of her world, up until then limited by what she calls  "the social adventure."

Joseph Pennell was born in Philadelphia at 603 South 9th Street on 4 July 1857 but was raised on Lombard Street by his Quaker parents, Larkin Pennell and Rebecca A. Barton. He attended the Select Boys' School, now Friends Select School. In 1870 the family moved to Germantown, where he attended Germantown Friends Select School. He spent much time drawing, a skill not appreciated in his school, but he did receive some instruction in drawing there from James R. Lambdin. After graduating, he worked in an office of the Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company. His application to the newly opened school of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts was rejected in 1876, and he attended the School of Industrial Arts at night. He was expelled from this school in 1879 (Pennell says for encouraging a mutiny among the students), but recognizing his ability, his professor, Charles M. Burns, gained admittance for Pennell to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where he studied under Thomas Eakins and others. Pennell's talents lay in graphic arts, not in painting, and his abrupt personality contributed to some difficulties he experienced during uneasy years at the Academy. He was determined to work as an artist and opened his own studio (shared with Henry R. Poore) in 1880. Pennell also loved cycling and was captain of the Germantown Bicycle Club. Some of his early commissions as an illustrator were for articles on cycling. From the start he succeeded in landing many commissions for Harper's and  Scribner's (later  The Century Magazine) and then a host of other publications. In 1883 he was sent by  Century to Italy to work on illustrations for a series of articles by William Dean Howells. In his letters to Elizabeth from Florence he used endearments from the gypsy cant they had both picked up while traveling with Charles Godfrey Leland; and Pennell expressed his desire that she join him in Italy.

In the summer of 1884, following their wedding which took place on June 4 in the parlor of Elizabeth's grandfather's house at 1110 Spruce St. in Philadelphia, Life and Letters of Joseph Pennell, v. 1, p. 114.

The Pennells moved to London, remaining there for thirty years. They traveled throughout Europe in the summers by tricycle, by bicycle, and on foot, writing and illustrating a large number of travel books together. Both agreed from the start not to let their marriage interfere with their work. As Elizabeth wrote: "After Canterbury [the publication of their first book, A Canterbury Pilgrimage in 1885] the opportunity came to test the resolution reached before our marriage, not to allow anything to interfere with his drawing and my writing. Should they call us in different directions, each must go his or her way."  Life and Letters of Joseph Pennell, v. 1, p. 123. And while they spent a great deal of time traveling together, Joseph Pennell pursued his work wherever it took him, writing long letters to Elizabeth, who sent him the same. In London they became friends with Robert Louis Stevenson, Andrew Lang, Edmund Gosse, Dr. Frederick James Furnivall, and Walter Crane. Their relationships with William Morris, John Galsworthy, James McNeill Whistler, Henry James, George Bernard Shaw, Aubrey Beardsley, William Heinemann, John Lane, Fisher Unwin, and a number of other writers, artists, and publishers are documented in their books, particularly in Elizabeth Robins Pennell's  Nights: Rome, Venice in the Aesthetic Eighties; London,  Paris in the Fighting Nineties (1916), an account of the lively Thursday night salon they hosted.

In 1887 Joseph Pennell began writing a column of art criticism for the Star in London, a column started by George Bernard Shaw, who had abandoned it to write a column on music. Pennell was outspoken, upsetting both the academy and artists; soon the editor H. W. Massingham engaged Elizabeth R. Pennell to do the work as understudy and thus she began a career writing art criticism.

James McNeill Whistler had a profound influence on Joseph Pennell. They met in London in 1884. When Whistler moved to Paris in 1892, Pennell followed in 1893 and spent a period working with Whistler in his studio. The Adventures of an Illustrator, p. 242.

The Pennells began collecting materials for an authorized biography of Whistler's life, first published in 1908. The biography generated a lawsuit over the issue of whether in fact it had been authorized by Whistler, and whether the Pennells had the right to use the Whistler letters they had collected. The Pennells won the lawsuit but not the rights to publish the letters.

Joseph Pennell's books, particularly the earliest, were written as he dictated them to his wife Elizabeth, Life and Letters of Joseph Pennell , v. 1, pp. 191-192. It was she who polished the writing and went over the proofs with him. They included  Pen Drawing and Pen Draughtsmen (1889),  The Illustration of Books (1895),  The Work of Charles Keene (1897),  Joseph Pennell's Pictures of War Work in America (1918),  Etchers and Etching (1920), and  The Graphic Arts (1920), among others.

After spending part of 1914 in Berlin, Joseph Pennell managed to get to London just as the war was declared. He drew and sketched munitions factories and other war works for the British Government and then was invited to do the same for France. What Pe nnell experienced in France horrified him. As a Quaker, he abhorred the war and the destruction of cities, towns, and ways of life he had known. Through H.-D. Davray he had been given a French government permit to go to Verdun to illustrate the war at the front lines. He traveled there as part of a press corp but could not bear to remain, returned to England, and shortly afterwards to the United States, writing "I had had my sight of War and felt and knew the wreck and ruin of War, the wreck of my life and my home-and that has never left me since."  The Adventures of an Illustrator, pp. 356-357.

The Pennells spent time in Philadelphia but never settled there. Joseph Pennell traveled, lectured, and worked in Washington, D.C., organizing his Whistler collection for the Library of Congress. In 1921 the couple moved to Brooklyn, New York.

Near the end of his life Joseph Pennell recognized that his 40-year career had coincided with "The Golden Age of Illustration" at one of the leading illustrated magazines in the United States,  Century Magazine. The magazine's art editor, A. W. Drake, and editor, R. U. Johnson, remained close friends of the Pennells. In her letters to Emily Robins, Elizabeth describes birthday parties and Christmases at the Johnson's home in New York.

Joseph Pennell worked, teaching students at the Art Students League, up until a week before his death. He contracted influenza which developed into pneumonia and he died at home in the Hotel Margaret in Brooklyn Heights on 23 April 1926. Edward L. Tinker reports that "just before he died he begged to be carried to his window for one last look at the view of Manhattan that he loved and had often sketched and painted. The doctor thought it unwise, but I have always regretted that Mr. Pennell was deprived of this last pleasure." Edward Larocque Tinker,  The Pennells, p. 24

Elizabeth moved into Manhattan in October 1926, to an address at 449 Park Avenue where the Pennells' friends, Edward L. and Frances Tinker lived downstairs. She remained there for the rest of her life, maintaining her friendship with dozens of artists including her husband's students. Always true to her interest in dinners and dining, she entertained at home with her famous “little dinners.” Childe Hassam, Ernest Lawson, and the sculptor John Flanagan were among her guests. She died on Friday, 14 February 1936, at her apartment in New York City.

The Pennell Family Papers at the University of Pennsylvania Library contain scores of tributes to Joseph Pennell written after his death in April 1926. This letter written by artist Gifford Beal and published in the Hartford Courant, 12 June 1926, is also a tribute to Elizabeth R. Pennell and to the Pennells' marriage:

The keynote of his life was service to the cause of art and the clearing out of dark corners where sham and pretense lurked in the guise of beauty. His kindness to those around him in everyday life was unbounded and I will mention but one instance that I know of: At the exhibition of his students' work at the Anderson Galleries, he bought more than half of the exhibit just to encourage them.... But I often think that the greatest things in life spring from that harmony known only to those who have live d lives like Mr. and Mrs. Pennell--a husband and wife equally great in different ways with a mutual love and understanding until the end.

Elizabeth Pennell's life inspired affection and tributes as well. Included in this collection are two letters written by British author Violet Hunt (1862-1942) in 1939. Hunt was suffering from illness and distressed not to hear from her friend Elizabeth, whom she had known for many years in London. After learning of Elizabeth Pennell's death, she wrote to Frances Tinker:

I loved Elizabeth as I am sure I told you. (No harm in telling you again) and I feel as if I should soon join her if [it] were permitted. I loved her.

26 February 1939

Biography/History

Francis Howard Williams was born into a Philadelphia Quaker family on September 2, 1844. He was a Philadelphia literary critic and author whose works were featured in publications such as The Atlantic Monthly,  Harper’s Weekly,  Lippincott’s Magazine, and  The Independent. He was the author of  The Princess Elizabeth: A Lyric Drama (1880),  Theodora: a Christmas Pastoral (1882),  A Reformer in Ruffles: a Comedy in Three Acts (1883),  The Bride of the White House (1886),  Master and Man: a Play in a Prologue and Four Acts (1886),  The Flute Player and Other Poems (1894),  The Burden Bearer: an Epic of Lincoln (1908), and several others.

On May 30, 1865, Williams married Mary Bartholomew Houston in Germantown, Pennsylvania and they had four children: Francis Churchill Williams, Mary De Solms Williams, Joseph John Williams, and Aubrey Howard Williams. Their Germantown home appears to have been a frequent meeting place for Williams and his friends, who included Walt Whitman, Louisa May Alcott, George W. Cable, George Riddle, Edmund Clarence Stedman, and many other poets, writers, editors, and publishers. Williams was a member of the Historical Pageant Committee which helped plan the 225th Anniversary of the founding of Philadelphia. For this 1912 event, Williams wrote some of the dialogue for some of the theatrics performed. He also served as treasurer for the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, as vice-president of the Franklin Inn Club, and a member of the Welcome Society. Williams died on July 1, 1922.

Biography/History

Agnes Repplier was an essayist and biographer who was admired for her common sense, courage, and sense of artistry in crafting an essay. Independent-minded, well-read, and with an incisive sense of humor, she had a writing career that span ned sixty-five years, during which she developed friendships with a number of noted writers, artists, and scholars.

Born in Philadelphia on 1 April 1855, she was the daughter of John George Repplier (of Alsatian descent) and his second wife, Agnes Mathias (of German descent). As a child she had a phenomenal memory and could recite lengthy poems which her mother had taught her viva voce. Her mother also tried to teach her to read— unsuccessfully for years. Agnes taught herself to read at the age of ten and read extensively from that time on. At twelve she was enrolled in Eden Hall, the Convent of the Sacred Heart in Torresdale, north of Philadelphia. The pleasures of her two-year stay are captured in her memoir,  In Our Convent Days (1905), written more than thirty years later and dedicated to he r closest friend there, Elizabeth Robins Pennell. It is not clear why she was asked not to return to Eden Hall after her second year there, except that her willfulness and independent spirit were to blame. She was enrolled in Agnes Irwin's West Penn Square Seminary for Young Ladies. This school required serious scholarship and strict discipline: it was not merely a finishing school. Agnes Irwin recognized Repplier's intelligence and wit, and their relationship later developed into a strong mutual friendship; however, Agnes Repplier completed only three terms at Miss Irwin's school when she was dismissed for rebelling against the headmistress's authority. Miss Irwin maintained contact with Repplier and was ambitious for the success of Repplier's writing career. Agnes Repplier wrote a short biography of Agnes Irwin after Irwin's death in 1914.

At the age of twenty Agnes Repplier began to write and publish stories. When her father lost all his money in an unsuccessful business venture, her mother determined that Agnes's writing would contribute to the family income, as did the teaching job of Agnes's older sister Mary. Repplier began writing essays after meeting Father Isaac Thomas Hecker, the founder of the Paulist order and editor of the Catholic World, where some of her early poems and stories had been publ ished. He advised her that she was not equipped for writing fiction, for she was  "more a reader than an observer" (Stokes, p. 59). Repplier recognized this as one of most valuable pieces of advice that she received in her life, and from then on she cult ivated her particular talent for the short essay.

As a writer and a Catholic, Repplier was at times called upon to write on Catholic subjects. For example, in 1936 she was asked by the Philadelphia Inquirer to write some lines on the death of the pope. Towards the end of her writing career Repplier was asked to write biographies of three Catholic figures, Mère Marie of the Ursulines, Père Marquette, and Junípero Serra. Repplier's biographers have noted how her independence of mind was not in the least compromised by t he conservatism of the Catholic church, but rather strengthened by its intellectual traditions.

The year 1886 marked the point at which Repplier achieved literary success with the publication of her essay, "Children, Past and Present," in  The Atlantic Monthly. Afterwards she published regularly in  The Atlantic Monthly until 1940. She published numerous essays as well in  Life, Appleton's Magazine, The New Republic, McClure's, Harper's Monthly Magazine, Commonweal, America, Century Magazine, and  The Yale Review. She was invited to Boston to meet the literary circle of Lowell and Holmes, the arbiters of literary taste for the country at that time.

Recognition of Repplier's literary accomplishments led to speaking engagements and travel. Agnes Repplier enjoyed the company and conversation of men. She developed close relationships with those she called her "literary friends," among them Dr. S. W eir Mitchell; Horace Howard Furness, Jr.; Harrison S. Morris (later editor of Lippincott's Magazine); author Owen Wister; book collector A. Edward Newton; physician J. William White; and British author, Andrew Lang. Repplier 's friendships with women were warm and long-lasting: among these friends were Cornelia Frothingham; Helen Jastrow; artist Cecilia Beaux; poet Amy Lowell; Mrs. Schuyler Warren, mistress of a literary salon in New York; and Frances Wister, Philadelphia patroness of the arts; and many others.

As soon as proceeds from the sales of her books and essays permitted, Repplier traveled to Europe for extended visits and wrote of her experiences there. She was a founding member of the Cosmopolitan Club in Philadelphia in 1886 and a member of the Acorn Club. She received honorary doctor of letters degrees from the University of Pennsylvania, Temple University, Yale, Princeton, and Columbia.

In later life, Repplier, who never married, lived with and cared for her older sister Mary and brother Louis, who suffered from partial paralysis and poor health. She was close to her niece, Emma Repplier Witmer (wife of the psychologist, Lightner Witmer). Emma Repplier Witmer was the daughter of J. George Repplier, one of two sons of the first marriage of Agnes's father. After her mother's death, Agnes sought out her older brothers and then established a warm relationship with her niece, Emma.

The press visited Agnes Repplier at home in Philadelphia as she passed one milestone birthday after another through her eighties and into her nineties. They always exclaimed over her nimble mind, witty repartee, and fresh views on political situations . She died in Philadelphia at the age of ninety-five.

Her published books include Books and Men (1888);  Points of View (1891);  Essays in Miniature (1892);  Essays in Idleness (1893);  In the Dozy Hours (1894);  Varia (1897);  Philadelphia: The Place and the People (1898);  The Fireside Sphinx (1901);  Compromises (1904);  In Our Convent Days (1905);  A Happy Half Century (1908);  Americans and Others (1912);  The Cat ( 1912);  Counter Currents (1915);  J. William White, M.D.; a Biography (1919);  Points of Friction (1920);  Under Dispute (1924);  Life of Père Marquette (1929);  Mère Marie of the Ursulines (1931);  To Think of Tea (1931);  Times and Tendencies (1931);  Junípero Serra (1933);  Agnes Irwin (1934);  In Pursuit of Laughter (1936); and  Eight Decades (1937).

Biography/History

Artist, illustrator, and writer Wanda Gág was born Wanda Hazel Gag on 11 March 1893 in the town of New Ulm, Minnesota, a German-speaking community of freethinking artisans and farmers. She was the oldest of seven children born to Anton Gag, a painter, photographer, and decorator, and his wife Elisabeth Biebl, also from an artistic family who made their living through cabinet making, photography, and farming. Gág described her parents, Anton and Lissi, as "iconoclasts" who did not practice the Catholicism of their Bohemian ancestors and raised their children in a home where drawing, painting, music, gardening, and sewing were the chief occupations of parents and children. Lissi designed and made her children's stylish clothes, a skill her daughters learned. As an older child Wanda Gág was amazed to discover that there were people who did not know how to draw--she and her brother and sisters were drawing before they entered school.

Wanda Gág's earliest teacher was her father Anton. He painted church interiors and decorated houses as partner in the firm Heller & Gag. On Sundays he painted in his attic studio in their home. One of his paintings of the 1862 Indian Massacre in New Ulm (now referred to as the Dakota conflict of 1862) was exhibited at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893; others are in private collections, museums, and historical societies in Minnesota and elsewhere. Anton Gag was an immigrant, born near Neustadtbei Heide, Bohemia. Lissi Biebl was born in Pennsylvania of Bohemian parents, both families moved to New Ulm around the same time. After moving to New York, Wanda Gág altered the family name by adding an accent to it, because people so often mispronounced her name. Some of Wanda's siblings adopted this change in their name after Gág became well known. (See Gág's note in Growing Pains, hereafter  GP, 471.)

When her father was on his deathbed in May 1908 at the age of 48, he called Wanda to his side and told her "Was der Papa nicht thun konnt' muss die Wanda halt fertig machen" (What Papa couldn't do, Wanda will have to finish). Wanda was fifteen years old, her youngest sister Flavia was one year old, her mother was ill and often unable to do housework and they were left very little beyond their home at 226 Washington Street, New Ulm, and life insurance of $1200 which was made to last over the next six years.

In October of that year, 1908, Wanda began keeping a record of her earnings, expenses, and events of her life in a ledger book that had belonged to her father. This was the start of her habit of keeping diaries, which she continued until her death. With her mother's approval, Wanda decided not to take work as a clerk or housekeeper. Instead she was determined to earn as much as she could by her art work--drawing bookmarks, place cards, and postcards (at 5 cents each) which she sold locally. She illustrated her own stories and poems for submission to the Minneapolis Junior Journal, which paid a dollar for each published work. A year later, she was holding drawing classes in her home to earn money for the family. Wanda also decided that she and her sisters and brother would each finish high school. Her attendance at school was often interrupted by having to tend the baby at home when her mother was sick, and by doing the washing, cleaning, cooking, chopping firewood, and other chores. The story of these years and her earliest studies at art schools in St. Paul and Minneapolis is told in Wanda Gág's book  Growing Pains, comprising excerpts from her diaries and letters from 1908 to 1917 and published in 1940.

Wanda balanced her sense of obligation to her siblings, who remained close to her throughout her life, and her desire to pursue art. The Wanda Gág Papers at the University of Pennsylvania include a significant amount of family correspondence plus Gág's writings about her family. Her siblings were her sisters Stella Gag Harm (1894-1962); Thusnelda Gag Stewart ( "Tussy,"  "Nelda" ) (1897-1973); Asta Gag Treat (  "Drift" ) (1899-1987); Dehli Gag Janssen (  "Dale,"  "Deli" ) (1900-1958); her brother, Howard Gag (1902-1961); and baby sister Flavia Gág (  "Flops" ) (1907-1978) who also became an author and illustrator of children's books (see Winnan, 78). Her mother's family, the Biebls, whom Wanda called  "Grandma folks," were especially close to her. They included her grandmother; her uncle Joe (  "Josie" ) Biebl; her Aunts Mary and Magdalena (  "Lena" ) Biebl; and her uncle Frank Biebl, a woodcarver, cabinet maker, photographer, and musician.

Wanda had a keen appreciation for music, learned from her family. She played the piano, sang in the Glee Club, arranged the school song in four parts, and was happy when her uncle Frank, who also made musical instruments, came to their house and played his guitar. She played duets at the piano with her friend Alma Schmidt ( "Schmidty," later Alma Schmidt Scott), who maintained a lifelong friendship with the Gág family and wrote a biography of Wanda, published in 1949. They graduated together from high school in New Ulm in 1912.

During the summer she returned to New Ulm and was visited by Charles Weschcke of St. Paul, who had known her father and was interested in Gág's talent. He offered to send her to the St. Paul Institute of Arts and Sciences and to pay her board at t he Y.W.C.A. Her sister Stella was able to teach school that year to support the family and in the fall of 1913 Wanda began classes, preparing for a career in illustration and commercial art.

Wanda received early support from a number of individuals in St. Paul and Minneapolis. Among them was Arthur J. Russell, journalist and editor at the Minneapolis Journal and  Minneapolis Junior Journal, where Wanda had submitted her stories and drawings since she was in her early teens. She wrote to him about her compulsion to draw, which she referred to as  "fierce drawing moods" or  "drawing fits" and her  "myself and many me's" which occupied her thoughts in her diaries:

Myself is the part of me that sees its way out of my "self-to-me" arguments, as for instance the one above about cleverness; and Me is that part that writes things in diaries in angular words, angular phrases and angular thoughts. Like this :-Myself is inside, and  Me is trying to sort of fit around the outside only it can't very well because it's so angular, you see, and can do no more than touch  myself and feel that myself is there.

-- GP, 212-213

Russell gave her books to read and wrote to her for over thirty years encouraging her to pay attention to her unique view of her world and her work:

I am sure your me's will not worry you for you know now they are deciduous, if that is the word, or in other words they are crops of leaves that you are shedding as the seasons go. The real tree of you stands and will stand.

--Russell to Gág, 24 November 1914

Wanda first met Arthur Russell on 28 November 1914. He introduced her to his editor, Herschel V. Jones, who was so excited by her work that Jones offered to pay Wanda's tuition, room, and board at the Minneapolis School of Art on the spot. Wanda considered this and then accepted and moved to Minneapolis in December 1914. She returned home to New Ulm for the Christmas holidays, where Dehli was recovering from a serious illness. Christmas was an important part of Gág's life. In New Ulm the holiday began with St. Nicholas's Day, December 6, but the tree trimming did not take place until December 24, and in the intervening weeks much effort went into making presents for every member of the family. The family practice of writing verses and riddles attached to Christmas gifts persisted throughout their lives and a large number of these have been preserved in Gág's Papers.

After Wanda's return to Minneapolis in January 1915, she frequently mentions one of her classmates, artist Adolf Dehn (spelled Adolphe or Adolph in his letters to Gág). They became close friends, discussing immortality, art, books, and religion, and after a few years, the pros and cons of marriage. Although she greatly enjoyed the company of men, Wanda had always said that art came first in her life, and from her teenage years she thought seriously about remaining single. Dehn's declaration of his love for her in 1916 drove her to think about the question almost constantly.

In January 1917, after she had returned to Minneapolis following the Christmas holidays in New Ulm, she received a message from Stella that she should return home immediately. Her mother had been ill over the holidays. The weather was bitterly cold and Wanda kept the fires and furnace going and tried to keep a normal routine for the youngest children. Two neighbors and the doctor were with Gág at her mother's bedside when she died early in the morning of January 31. Her mother was 48, the same age her father had been when he died almost ten years earlier. After a few months Wanda decided that the best chance of keeping the family together (some local families wanted to adopt the youngest children) and of giving them opportunities for education would be to sell their home in New Ulm and move to Minneapolis. In April of the same year Wanda Gág and Adolf Dehn both received notice that they were among twelve students nationwide who had won scholarships to the Art Students League in New York. Agai n, Herschel V. Jones offered to pay Gág's room and board, this time in New York.

During the summer of 1917, Wanda, her sisters, and Adolf Dehn painted the house in New Ulm to ready it for sale and they sold most of their household goods. By the end of September the house had not sold and through that winter Asta stayed with the youngest children in New Ulm, while Stella and Nelda worked to support them in Minneapolis. Wanda borrowed $150 for the children from Jean Sherwood Rankin for whom she illustrated A Child's Book of Folk-lore: Mechanics of Written English (1917) a guide to assist immigrants in learning the English language. Wanda Gág, Adolf Dehn, and their classmate Arnold Blanch went to New York together at the end of September 1917.

At the Art Students League Gág studied with Frank Vincent DuMond, Kenneth Hayes Miller, and Robert Henri. She took a class in etching from Mahonri Young, while attending lectures and classes with a number of other instructors including John Sloan. She roomed at the Studio Club of the Y.W.C.A. but moved to a room at 859 Lexington Avenue to save money to send home to New Ulm where the children were having a difficult winter. Gág began looking for commercial art jobs to earn extra money.

Gág returned to New Ulm for the summer of 1918, sold their house and moved her family to Minneapolis. Wanda returned to New York with an art school classmate, Lucile Lundquist, who had roomed with Stella in Minneapolis. Although her scholarship had been renewed, Gág was not able to study full time, and spent much effort trying to interest publishers in her work; trying to obtain work making covers for sheet music; and becoming involved in fashion advertising, which she hated. In her diary she describes the celebration at the end of World War I in New York City when the news came of Germany's surrender, with bits of paper falling everywhere from the sky. That November she took a job decorating lampshades for 25 cents an hour for a Danish woman named Mrs. Lund.

Adolf Dehn had been drafted into the Army in June 1918, and served as a conscientious objector in a guard house in Spartanburg, South Carolina. While still in the Army, Adolf was able to visit Wanda in New York in January 1919. She described their meet ing in detail and wrote in her diary, "Adolphe, of course, is not greatly in favor of marriage, neither am I, but being a woman, & being also very fond of children, free love has as many disadvantages as marriage for me" [Diary 35, 1 February 1919]. She often wrote of the disadvantages of being a woman. When Dehn and sculptor and fellow Minnesotan John B. Flannagan wanted to hire on as deck hands on a merchant ship to China, Gág was very upset that Dehn didn't ever consider that it would be impossible for her to take the trip with him because she was a woman [Diary 36, 16 December 1919]. They did plan to travel to Europe together and began saving money for this.

During the period 1920 to 1922 Gág was becoming more successful earning money through commercial art. In her diaries she was preoccupied with her relationship with Adolf, worried about the effects of her unsatisfied desires on her health and about his self-described "promiscuity." She investigated methods of birth control and exchanged information about sex with her roommate Lucile Lundquist, who was involved in a relationship with Arnold Blanch. Dehn and Gág became lovers but con tinued to “torture” (her word) each other and when he persisted with his wish to travel to Europe in October 1921 she did not go with him. At this time Gág was undertaking a business venture called  "Happiwork," a series of activity kits for children. Gág designed and wrote stories for these; her partners were Janet and Ralph Aiken who lived in Connecticut.

Gág still thought about joining Dehn in Europe once Happiwork was established. She wanted to travel to her ancestors' homelands in Austria and Czechoslovakia, in addition to spending time in Paris. But she became involved with Earle Marshall Humphreys, a friend of Adolf Dehn, who had been interred with him as a conscientious objector in South Carolina during the war. Earle Humphreys, a bookseller and writer, was born in Philadelphia and had graduated magna cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania. Meanwhile Dehn wrote to Gág on 24 February 1922 that he had fallen in love with Mura Ziperovitch, a young dancer, but that he wanted Gág to join him soon in Vienna. Gág obtained her passport on 11 March 1922, but never departed for Europe.

Wanda Gág had her first art exhibition at the New York Public Library's East 96th Street Branch from 15 February to 1 April 1923. Her work was well received by fellow artists and she received notices in the press. Among her admirers was Carl Zigrosser, a founder of the Weyhe Gallery in New York, which specialized in prints. Throughout the 1920s Zigrosser encouraged her, wrote to her, sent books to her, and bought all her completed prints for Weyhe so that she would have some money to live on. Zigrosser organized her first exhibition at Weyhe, 1-20 November 1926, which was a critical success.

In 1923 the Happiwork venture failed. Gág did not like the pace of living in New York City year round and prized the times she had been able to spend in the country--at Mohegan Lake, New York in the summer of 1919 and in Connecticut with the Aiken family. Although she had a steady income from commercial art, her real desire was to make art for herself. She made the decision in 1923 to "go native" as she called it, to give up fashion drawing and go to the country to pursue art. She spent the summer and autumn of 1923 and 1924 in the country near Ridgefield, Connecticut and long summers from 1925 through 1930 at a rented farmhouse near Glen Gardner, New Jersey which she called  "Tumble Timbers." Here she was able to plant a garden, to study the growth of nature and forms of the landscape, and to draw and paint every day. Gág sometimes expressed her experiences of the fundamental forces of nature by using musical analogies. In one diary entry she describes the forms of trees and masses of foliage as a symphony, the sound comprised not just of wavelengths, but volume [6 July 1923, Diary 40]. She wrote to Carl Zigrosser about her work and her determination.

...once and for all to get at the bottom of the principle which governs all this [the forms of hills, planes, conflicting fragments, big forms].... My aesthetic existence teems with forms which project themselves tauntingly toward me, recede elu sively from me, bulge, flow - and, worst of all, turn triumphantly over the edge of things, leaving me to wonder what's going on beyond. But of course that's exactly the place where I can't afford to give up...

--Gág to Zigrosser, 10 May 1926

Her companions in the country and during the winter at their apartments in New York City were Earle Humphreys and her sisters and brother. Thusnelda moved to New York in 1922, Asta in 1924, Dehli and Flavia (who had been living with Stella, now married in Minneapolis) in 1926, and Howard in 1927. Nelda, Asta, and Dehli married, but Flavia remained unmarried and spent a number of years living with Gág, as did her brother Howard, who supported himself as a musician at clubs in New York.

Gág was involved in a number of collaborative efforts with artists in New York, including William Gropper, with whom she founded a magazine without an editor entitled Folio in 1924. Carl Zigrosser invited her to parties and exhibition openings, some of which she accepted, but many she turned down, preferring to spend her time working uninterrupted. She did accompany Zigrosser to Lake George, New York for a weekend in August 1928--an invitation from Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O'Keeffe. Stieglitz admired her work and an autobiographical article she had written for  The Nation titled  "These Modern Women: A Hotbed of Feminists" (22 June, 1927) and Gág enjoyed Georgia O'Keeffe's company.

In 1928 Gág became nationally known with the publication of her first illustrated children's book, Millions of Cats. She followed this the next year with another book,  The Funny Thing. Gág had been writing stories for children since her teens and had attempted to publish some of them during the early 1920s in New York. Her meeting with Coward-McCann editor Ernestine Evans at the time of Gág's exhibition at Weyhe Gallery in 1926 led to the publication of  Millions of Cats. The period from 1924 to 1928 had been especially productive for her as an artist. Her innovative lithographs from sandpaper plates and her ink drawings and watercolors on sandpaper were widely acclaimed. Her drawings appeared in  New Masses; her lithograph  Elevated Station was selected as one of the Fifty Prints of the Year (1926) by the American Institute of Graphic Arts, an honor she received during each of the next five years. She exhibited in a number of group exhibitions around the country, and had a second exhibition at the Weyhe Gallery, 19-31 March 1928. The royalties from her children's books gave her a substantial income for the first time in her life and when  "Tumble Timbers," became unavailable for rent in 1931, Gág and Humphreys began looking for a rural property to buy. She wrote to Jean Sherwood Rankin, who was trying to get Gág to collaborate on another book:

I am planning to get myself a little country place somewhere-one where I can stay all the year round. I have quite “gone native” and I like to go in hiding for the purpose of greater freedom and concentration in my work.

--Gág to Rankin, 16 November 1930

They bought a farm of 193 acres in the Musconetcong mountains near Milford, New Jersey in June 1931, and set to work renovating the old farmhouse and planting the garden. The following year, they built a studio on the property for Gág which she named "All Creation," the name later applied to the whole property. This work occupied nearly all of Gág's time (and Humphreys' and Howard Gag's) for the second half of 1931. Gág highly prized her personal freedom and privacy for her own work. She had once written to Zigrosser that:

These are the times-this winter being one of them-when I am so intensely absorbed in my work that a love-affair just cannot hold out against it. Maybe that's cruel, but that's me! Way back in my art school days I used to say, "Art comes first-and men, much as I like them and need them, must come second." I think no one believed me then, but I meant it, and I have practiced it, I think, pretty consistently throughout my life.

--Gág to Zigrosser, 28 January 1929

Humphreys moved to Virginia in 1932 to make time for himself to work on a manuscript for a book, an endeavor in which Gág supported him. He returned in the summer and traveled with Gág to Walden and Concord, Massachusetts. Gág worked on her wood engravings and lithographs during the 1930s, but the number of prints she produced was fewer than in the 1920s. In March of 1932 her friends the artists Howard Norton Cook and his wife Barbara Latham stayed with her at "All Creation" while Howard Cook taught her the techniques of aquatint. Barbara was reading Gág's diaries (and evidently upset by Gág's views on sex and creativity) and Gág wrote of this to Earle:

I think it is this part of it that Barbara [Latham Cook] failed to see. I tried to explain to her that sex to me was not a neurotic desire for many experiences, but that it was like the earth to me-growth, breadth, creation.... I am inclined to think t hat a great personal pleasure is more potent for the purposes of aesthetic re-birth than a trip to another country.

--Gág to Humphreys, 4 April 1932

Gág's circle of friends in the 1930s and 1940s included Hugh Darby and his wife Eleanor Muriel Kapp, Louis and Stella Adamic, Carl Van Doren, Mark and Dorothy Van Doren, Joe Freeman, Mike Gold, and Max Jacobs. Gág also had a close friendship with the writer Lewis Gannett and his wife Ruth Chrisman Gannett. In July 1934 she was invited by the Gannetts to a party for a Russian consul.

As soon as we got there, Ruth introduced me to a man who talked with me off & on for a great part of the evening. When I was about to go home I found out that it had been Morris Ernst. He was very different from what I expected him to be like. Theodore Dreiser was there too. I was introduced to him in passing. If I had known what to say I could easily have gotten into a conversation with him, I think, for he's not aloof.

--Gág to Humphreys, 16 April 1934

Gág was in demand as a lecturer. Her publisher, Coward-McCann, wanted her to produce more children's books and to give some time to promoting them. She was also asked to illustrate books for other authors. She refused most of these requests, but during the Depression, there was little demand for fine art; many of her artist friends were struggling (see, for example, letters from her friend J. J. Lankes) and her ability to earn a living and help support her siblings through the market for children' s literature was important. Between 1930 and 1940 she published seven more books, six for children plus her early diaries, Growing Pains, all for Coward-McCann. These included original stories by Gág and her illustrations and translations of the  Kinder- und Hausmärchen of the Brothers Grimm. Gág had grown up hearing traditional stories and spoke only German until she entered school. She continued to work on her German langauge skills while she was in Minneapolis-St. Paul. She enjoyed the project of working on the Grimms' Fairy Tales, and not coincidently, published her illustrated  Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs during the same year, 1938, that the Walt Disney movie was released.

Gág served on art juries for the New York World's Fair in 1939 and she applied for a Guggenheim Fellowship that year, obtaining letters of reference from Lewis Gannett, Rockwell Kent, Lewis Mumford, and Carl Zigrosser. Zigrosser applied for and received a fellowship in the same year, but in a different category from Gág's application, which was not funded.

In 1940 the Weyhe Gallery mounted a major retrospective of Gág's work, "Wanda Gág: 35 Years of Picture-Making," 21-31 October 1940. On this occasion the gallery published a special  "Gág Number" of  The Checkerboard, which includes a catalog of her works to date. She was also working in oils at this time. In her early career she had little experience with oils because she could afford neither paints nor canvas. The success of the autobiographical  Growing Pains(1940) prompted her to start work on a sequel.

Since 1939 Gág had been suffering from severe dizziness, poor eyesight, ringing in her ears, weight loss, and low energy which kept her from drawing and painting much of the time. She was still able to write, however, and continued her work on various writing projects. She was not able to get a clear diagnosis of her medical problems from the doctors she visited; they blamed her symptoms on menopause, dysentery, thyroid problems, and eventually on allergies. She had expressed concern about her hea lth as early as 1928 in a letter she wrote to Carl Zigrosser:

I'm not feeling at all well, and a certain trouble which I had hoped would decrease, has apparently increased instead. I did not tell you about this, because I do not like to talk about my ailments, and the worse they are, the harder it is to get me to tell about them. It was chiefly about this that I went to the naturopath. He told me it was an enlarged gland in my left breast-resulting probably from a strain. But I was not at all reassured, and now-after having been careful to use my left arm very li ttle-it seems to bother me more than formerly.

--Gág to Zigrosser, 28 May 1928

Zigrosser was alarmed and recommended a doctor, Dr. Burton J. Lee, whom Gág continued to see over the next several years. Stieglitz and Georgia O'Keeffe also recommended O'Keeffe's doctor. Evidently nothing substantive was done for Gág, and she continued to complain of pain in her side in her letters to Zigrosser in 1931 and 1934.

Gág was depressed by her health and by the state of the world at the approach of the second World War. She contributed a drawing to the American League for Peace and Democracy for its 1939 calendar. She was committed to anti-Fascism and to the liberal causes that many of her artist friends espoused. Her contributions consisted of donating her prints for auctions and other fundraisers plus some small cash contributions. She held memberships in the American Artists Congress, the League of American Writers, and the Authors' Guild of the Authors' League of America through which she contributed to the National War Fund during World War II.

Wanda Gág and Earle Humphreys were married at the end of August 1943, affirming their bond of more than twenty years. The church ceremony took place at the Central Baptist Church in New York City, on a rainy August 27, with Gág's brother-in-law Bob Janssen as witness. Robert Janssen, married to Wanda's sister Dehli, was very close to both Earle and Wanda. They married to quell criticism received by Earle at his defense job that he was living with an unmarried woman--criticism motivated by hos tility and distrust of Earle's union organizing activities in the plant. Although she felt all along that theirs had been a true and moral relationship, Wanda was positive about the marriage; she was glad to be able to be open about their relationship, particularly with Earle's family.

Gág's work continued to be exhibited in group shows and traveling exhibitions. In 1944 she was represented in the First Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Drawings at the National Academy of Design and was awarded the Joseph and Elizabeth R. Pennell Purchase Prize by the Library of Congress for her lithograph Barns at Glen Gardner.

By 1945 Wanda Gág was seriously ill, she wrote that she could not walk a block without panting and she frequently ran a fever. When she was hospitalized in February, several pints of fluid were removed from her left lung. X-rays and exploratory su rgery revealed that she was suffering from terminal lung cancer. Her doctors and husband, Earle Humphreys, decided not to inform her of this, the only people who were told were her brother Howard, Robert Janssen, and Carl Zigrosser. Wanda probably suspected the malignancy, she received radiation treatments and Earle determined that he would take care of her and make her as comfortable as possible, taking over all the maintenance of the household and garden so that she could continue to work.

Late in December of 1945, Earle and Wanda left New York City and drove to Florida where they hoped the warmer climate would make Wanda more comfortable. She continued to work on this trip, producing drawings and working on translations for her next col lection of Grimms' tales. Returning to "All Creation," on May 17, Earle and Howard Gag planted the garden. Wanda became critically ill in June and died at Doctor's Hospital in New York City, 27 June 1946 after a few days hospitalization. She was cremated and her ashes scattered at  "All Creation."

Gág's will was dated 13 December 1945. In it she named Humphreys and Zigrosser as co-executors. Earle Humphreys died 16 May 1950 of a heart attack before final settlement of the estate. His co-executor, Robert Janssen then represented the family in the final settlement. In accordance with Earle's instructions, Robert Janssen burned Humphreys' papers, including the manuscripts for his unpublished books. Her family's wish was that Wanda Gág's work be distributed widely and a number of memorial exhibitions of her work were held in New York, Philadelphia, and Minnesota. Few of Wanda's friends or colleagues had known how ill she was and her death at the age of 53 was a shock to the art world.

Biography/History

Edward Sculley Bradley (1897-1987) was a scholar, author, educator, and administrator at the University of Pennsylvania. Born in Philadelphia to Stephen Edward Bradley and Annette Evelyn Palmer, he received a B.A. in 1919, M.A. in 1921, and Ph.D. in 1925, all from the University of Pennsylvania. Bradley began his teaching career at Penn as an instructor of English, from 1919 to 1926. He was assistant professor from 1926 to 1937, associate professor from 1937 to 1940 and professor from 1940 to 1967. He served as vice provost of undergraduate education from 1956 to 1963. Bradley held several visiting professorships: at Duke University during the summers of 1932, 1937, and 1941; at Northwestern University in 1938; and at the University Southern California in 1940. He served as lecturer at the Ogontz School from 1926 to 1932; at Rosemont College from 1930 to 1933; at Upton School Drama in Philadelphia from 1930 to 1934; and at the Bread Loaf School of English at Middlebury College in 1945.

Sculley Bradley was a prolific writer and editor, serving as assistant literature editor of the Philadelphia Record from 1930 to 1931 and editor of the  General Magazine and History Chronicle in Philadelphia from 1945 to 1956. He published biographies of literary figures George Henry Boker and Henry Charles Lea, as well as several editions of the important and popular anthology,  The American Tradition in Literature. He also published editions of works by Mark Twain, Stephen Crane, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Walt Whitman. Bradley was considered an international expert on Whitman, editing several important editions of the poet's  Leaves of Grass, including the 1949 Rinehart edition, the Comprehensive Reader's Edition in 1965, a Norton Critical Edition in 1973 and  A Textual Variorum in 1980. He was also a general editor and contributed to the 14-volume  Collected Writings of Walt Whitman from 1961 to 1984.

While at Penn, Sculley Bradley maintained a long association with many important writers of his day. He was instrumental in the University acquiring numerous important literary collections, including the Walt Whitman collection, the James T. Farrell papers, the William Carlos Williams research collection, the George H. Boker papers, the Henry Charles Lea papers, and the Theodore Dreiser papers. He was a trustee of the Walt Whitman Foundation, and a member of the Franklin Inn Club, the Athenaeum of Philadelphia, Phi Beta Kappa, Delta Sigma Rho, and Alpha Chi Rho. He was a fellow of the Society of American Studies and the American Association of University Professors, and chairman of the American Literature Group of the Modern Language Association from 1937 to 1938. He was a member of the Society of Friends and was a founding member of Chestnut Hill Monthly Meeting, and served on the board of Germantown Friends School and Friends Hospital. He was married to Marguerite C. Bradley and had two daughters, Deborah B. Oberholtzer and Alison B. Wilhelm.

Biography/History

Charles Godfrey Leland (1824-1903) was a humorist and folklorist from Philadelphia. Born August 15, 1824, Leland was the son of Henry and Charlotte Frost Leland in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was educated in private schools, at Princeton University, and in universities in Heidelberg and Munich, and in Paris, where he became involved in the Revolution of 1848. After returning to the United States, he worked briefly in the field of law before moving towards a career in journalism. He wrote for many newspapers and eventually served as editor for the Philadelphia Press. A strong supporter of the Union during the Civil War, Leland enlisted in the Union Army and served at the battle of Gettysburg.

Leland was interested in folklore, folk linguistics, gypsies, fairies, and witches; and he published books and articles on American and European languages and folk traditions. He achieved recognition as the author of the comic Breitmann’s Ballads and  Arcadia, or the Gospel of the Witches, a classic of neo-Paganism.

In 1869, Leland's father died and Leland traveled to Europe, in part to supervise an official English edition of Breitmann’s Ballads in Great Britain where it had become a minor literary sensation. During the years 1869 to 1870, he wrote to his childhood friend, George Henry Boker. He returned to Philadelphia in 1879 and established the Industrial Art School. In 1888, he moved to Italy where he remained until his death on March 20, 1903.

Scope and Contents

The Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell Papers at the University of Pennsylvania are the integration of several gifts and deposits made during the 1950s by Edward Larocque Tinker and Elizabeth Pennell's sister-in-law, Emily Jewell Robins, augmented by a few later donations and purchases. Received separately, the papers are here combined for better access by researchers.

The Pennells bequeathed their collection of Whistleriana to the Library of Congress in 1917 although the papers remained in storage in London until the end of the war. Upon his death in 1926, Joseph Pennell bequeathed his own prints, papers, and estate to the Library of Congress, subject to provision made for Elizabeth's use of the estate until she died. Elizabeth was the manager of the couple's finances and kept the estate intact and growing even through the Depression. Upon her death the couple's papers, including Elizabeth's collection of cookery books and some papers of Charles Godfrey Leland, were transferred to the Library of Congress. Elizabeth left her personal papers and literary rights to her friends Edward L. and Frances Tinker, who donated some of these papers to the University of Pennsylvania in 1951 and later made a donation to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin in 1961.

The papers at the University of Pennsylvania Library comprise personal correspondence of both Pennells, drafts and galleys for some of their publications; contracts; royalty statements; trust fund account statements; copies of wills; publicity materials; photographs; newspaper clippings; memorabilia; exhibition catalogs, awards, original sketches, watercolors, and prints by Joseph Pennell; in addition to a few works by other artists.

There also are some letters and other materials about the Pennells generated by the two donors, who researched and wrote about the Pennells and actively promoted the granting of a posthumous doctorate to Joseph Pennell by the University of Pennsylvania in 1951.

Joseph Pennell's correspondence includes letters from the Art Club of Philadelphia, related to his resignation from that organization in 1918; correspondence with the Art Institute of Chicago where he lectured in 1919 and 1920; letters he wrote to fell ow artist John McLure Hamilton, many concerning work they did for world art expositions including the Louisiana Purchase Exposition at St. Louis in 1904; and letters he wrote to artist C. B. Falls while teaching at the Art Students League in the 1920s (th ese were a donation from Mrs. Falls in 1979). Also included is Pennell's correspondence with the Library of Congress in 1917 regarding his donation of Whistler manuscripts to the Library; correspondence with officials of the British government regarding P ennell's access to military sites in 1916-1917; and correspondence and royalty statements from his publishers.

Elizabeth Robins Pennell's correspondence includes letters from Edmund Gosse (1849-1928) and J. M. Barrie (1860-1937) regarding her war novel The Lovers (1917), plus a number of other letters in response to the novel. A lon g letter from Mary Franklin (Mrs. Daniel) Garber in 1925 discusses the education of women, the difficulties of domestic life, and artistic taste in America. Letters from Howard Coppuck Levis discuss wine and the collecting of cookery books. A number of le tters from Agnes Repplier (1855-1950) attest to the lifelong friendship between the two women. Letters from Dora Esther Yates (b. 1879) relate to the Gypsy Lore Society which Elizabeth R. Pennell served as honorary president in 1931. Correspondence to Edward Larocque Tinker spans the years of their friendship from 1922 to 1935. There is also correspondence with the Pennells' publishers regarding both Joseph and Elizabeth's books.

The bulk of the Elizabeth R. Pennell correspondence, however, comprises her letters to her brother Edward Robins, plus, in particular, her bi-weekly letters to her sister-in-law Emily Jewell Robins which span the years from 1922 to February 1936. In th ese letters Elizabeth discusses artists and the art world in New York and Philadelphia, plus news and gossip from Europe. Artists, art dealers and collectors, and writers mentioned in these letters include Wayman Adams, Clifford Addams, Paul Wayland Bartl ett, Gifford Beal, Irving Clark, Royal Cortissoz, John Flanagan, John Galsworthy, Ellen Glasgow, John McLure Hamilton, Childe Hassam, Arthur Mayger Hind, Violet Hunt, R. U. Johnson, Edward G. Kennedy, Emmet Kennedy, Ernest Lawson, John Frederick Lewis, Belloc Lowndes, Harrison S. Morris, Laurent Oppenheim, Agnes Repplier, R. H. Sauter, John Charles Van Dyke, H. G. Wells, Cadwallader Washburn, H. Devitt Welsh, James McNeill Whistler, Owen Wister, Catharine Morris Wright, and Sydney Longstreth Wright.

Elizabeth Robins Pennell's observations on people she had known well are often humorous, as she wrote to Emily:

Bernard Shaw seems to have a distressing fancy to exhibit his nakedness to the world. It was bad enough when he was young and posed as Rodin's Penseur but in his old age it is simply loathsome. He looks like one of those ho rrible holy men of India who spend most of their lives staring at their navel.

15 September 1928

She remained energetic and interested in world events until the end of her life. Her letters comment on United States politics, the music of Leopold Stokowski, the Catholic church and birth control, and world events, as in this example from a letter written when she was 78 years old:

Dear Emily, Isn't this a beautiful morning? It quite wakes me up, despite the fact that Hitler's last performance seems to bring us all to the verge of chaos. When he spoke over the radio yesterday. It's hard just to hear his voice and judge him by it, meaning to turn him off after a few minutes as I understand so little German nowadays that I felt there was no use to linger longer. But I could not stop listening. I never heard such rage and fury -- “hell, fire and damnation” sort of thing -- in a voice before. It was amazing and horribly alarming. Did you listen in by chance, and if you did, how did it strike you? If he has his way the whole world will be in a war within the next year or so, if not sooner.

15 October 1933

The Papers at the University of Pennsylvania include many of the photographs, proof sheets and some publicity for Joseph Pennell's memoirs, The Adventures of an Illustrator (1925). This was Pennell's last book before his death, although he planned and worked on the  Catalogues of his etchings and lithographs. Of interest to historians of the Society of Friends in Philadelphia are the eight daguerreotypes of Joseph Pennell and his family in Quaker dress, ca. 1860. Some of the images were used to illustrate Joseph Pennell's memoirs.

Also included are approximately 150 works of art by Joseph Pennell, most are etchings and lithographs, with a few sketches and watercolors. Subjects include historic sites and contemporary construction in Philadelphia, New York City, Washington, D.C., and some from Pennell's work in Europe. Portraits of Joseph Pennell include signed etchings by H. Devitt Welsh and Levon West, and reliefs by sculptors John Flanagan and R. Tait McKenzie, plus photographs by a number of noted photographers.

Related collections at the Library of the University of Pennsylvania are the Carl Zigrosser Papers, Ms. Coll. 6, and the Agnes Repplier Papers, Ms. Coll. 18, both of which include Pennell letters. Related collections of Joseph and Elizabeth Pennell let ters in the Philadelphia area may be found at the Free Library of Philadelphia, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Rosenbach Library. Many of these items were microfilmed by the Smithsonian Institution for its Archives of American Art project in 1984-1989 and are cataloged in both WorldCat and Franklin.

Scope and Contents

This collection contains letters written to Williams, writings, and ephemera dating between 1880 and 1909. Eighty-five letters, arranged chronologically, relate to literature, personal matters and friendship, and publishing. Williams' correspondents were contemporary poets, writers, editors, and publishers from the time period. Williams’s most frequent correspondent was Edmund Clarence Stedman, the editor of An American Anthology, 1787-1900, a book of American poetry that included Williams’s "Walt Whitman," "Electra," and "Song" (neither of which are included in this collection). Overall, most of the letter writers, if they are not thanking Williams for sending him copies of his works or criticizing them, are making arrangements about getting together either at his house in Germantown or elsewhere, or philosophizing about their thoughts on poetry, or writing in general. There is also talk about the publishing houses or periodicals and magazines where the writers and poets submitted their works, or their efforts to help each other to get published. Correspondents include Henry Abbey, Thomas Bailey Aldrich, Lane Allen, Mary Anderson, R.M. Bache, J. Baldwin, Edwin N. Benson, W.F. Boothe, George Washington Cable, American novelist Winston Churchill, William Jermyn Conlin, Maurice Francis Egan, James T. Fields, Horace Howard Furness, Margaret T. Langston, Charles Godfrey Leland, Samuel Longfellow, Charles H. Luders, S. Weir Mitchell, William Vaughn Moody, Clara Moore, Charles Leonard Moore, Herbert Moreton, Joseph Pennell, Samuel W. Pennypacker, Agnes Repplier, Allen Thorndike Rice, George Riddle, Kate Douglas Riggs, Charles G. D. Roberts, Frank Dempster Sherman, Otis Skinner, Lloyd P. Smith, Edmund Clarence Stedman, Mary Virginia Terhune, Edith Matilda Thomas, Townsend Ward and Owen Wister. Despite Francis Howard Williams's known personal relationship with Walt Whitman, Whitman is not prevalent in this collection. His name is mentioned in a letter from Horace Howard Furness asking Williams where he might find a copy of the ceremonies of Walt Whitman's funeral and in a letter from Agnes Repplier.

The collection also includes writing by Williams such as poems, prose, and notes from talks he gave to various clubs and organizations. Among these are"De Profundis" (a talk given in Atlantic City in 1893), a ten page typed poem titled "Ave America: an ode," and prose pieces such as "The Clock that Struck Thirteen" and "The Tragic Touch." These are also numerous writings that are untitled which have been grouped together in a single folder.

Researchers will find miscellaneous notes and ephemera including several pages of science notes; an invitation to the Informals club and a newspaper clipping concerning the Informals club from 1896; a Crawford Shoe miniature notebook containing notes about Johannes Kelpius and sketches of the Kelpius Cave; a photograph possibly of Louisa May Alcott; a photograph of a tennis match and a photograph of a man walking towards a hedge, both by a photographer named D. Hinkle; and a copy of "Two Friends and the Inn" by Edwin N. Benson.

Scope and Contents

The two containers of correspondence in the Agnes Repplier Papers consist predominantly of correspondence addressed to Agnes Repplier. There are a number of letters from Shakespearean scholar, Horace Howard Furness, who enjoyed Miss Repplier's company at gatherings at his suburban home. The largest number of letters from a single correspondent are those from the British author, folklorist, and compiler of children's literature, Andrew Lang. Outgoing correspondence from Repplier is filed after the in coming correspondence and consists almost entirely of letters that Agnes Repplier wrote to her friend Helen Godey Wilson (these letters were a gift from Wilson to the University of Pennsylvania) and to her niece, Emma Repplier Witmer. Readers should be a ware that Repplier's letters to Horace Howard Furness are included in the Furness correspondence within the H. H. Furness Memorial Library manuscript collection in Special Collections, Van Pelt Library, University of Pennsylvania. Repplier's letters to A. Edward Newton are at Princeton University. Some of Repplier's correspondence with notable Philadelphians is located in the manuscript collection at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and Repplier's letters to editors of The Atlantic Monthly regarding the publication of her essays and of her books with Houghton Mifflin are in the Houghton Library at Harvard University.

The selection of items of correspondence that were saved appears to have been made by Agnes Repplier's niece, Emma Repplier Witmer, who wrote a memoir of her aunt. Some notations on the envelopes and manuscripts are in Repplier's hand, however, most a re in Emma Witmer's hand. Many of these are letters from well-known literary or political figures, for example, Edith Wharton and Theodore Roosevelt. A number of these letters praise Repplier's work or congratulate her for an achievement or award; in ot her words, the correspondence, with a few exceptions, tends to focus on highlights of her career rather than on her personal life or her works in progress.

The collection includes forty-one manuscripts of essays, speeches, and notes for Repplier's books plus one folder of manuscript fragments. The five Agnes Repplier notebooks in the collection are records of her notes on her reading and accounts of inco me that she received from her work. There is a small selection of published copies of some Repplier essays, followed by articles about Repplier and reviews of her work. The collection includes one book manuscript: Mère Marie of the Ursulines.

Memorabilia includes photographs of Agnes Repplier (with some of her cats), newspaper clippings, and two handmade commonplace books.

Scope and Contents

The Wanda Gág papers at the University of Pennsylvania are the primary repository for information on her personal and family life including, as they do, the nearly complete set of her diaries from 1908-1946. Gág's diaries were important to her. She had a compulsion to write that was as strong as her compulsion to draw. She read from her diaries to her close friends, she recopied long sections of them to use in later writings. In them she wrote about art, her family, her friendships, her lovers, her emotions, her ideals, women's roles in society, her health, marriage, money, education, and her passion for the natural world.

Gág's diaries are the primary source for understanding her creative process, her views on art and the work of her contemporaries. She had developed the habit of analyzing her thoughts, motives, morals, moods, and creativity early in childhood and her writings provide an unusually rich inner portrait of a talented and driven artist who was a perfectionist in her work.

The diaries incidently contain much of interest in regard to women's health, particularly women's reproductive health and treatment from the 1920s to the 1940s. Gág was frank in writing about her use of birth control, her sexual activity, and her suffering during menstruation (she suffered so severely from dysmenorrhea that she had to reschedule all her activities each month). In April and May of 1921, Gág feared that she was pregnant and went to see Margaret H. Sanger, whom she describes in her diary (she wasn't pregnant, but was given a regime to follow to induce her menstruation). There is also material related to the health of her sisters. Dehli suffered from depression and turned to Christian Science when she was eighteen, in part to gai n control over her thoughts. She saw a number of psychiatrists and other specialists after she moved to New York in 1926, with financial assistance from Wanda. Flavia, who became a successful author and illustrator of children's books by following Wanda's lead, also suffered from a number of health problems. The poor nutrition of the Gág family members in their childhood may have been responsible for at least some of their health problems later in life.

Correspondence in the Wanda Gág Papers is focused predominantly on personal and family relationships. Her extensive correspondence with Adolf Dehn, 1915-1943, documents his life in a guardhouse as a conscientious objector in World War I, but is primarily an extension of their conversations on art, love, and marriage. He continued to write to her from Europe in the 1920s and his letters contain information about artists they both knew. Gág's letters to Dehn are preserved in the Adolf and Virginia Dehn Papers and Dehn Family Papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Her correspondence with Earle M. Humphreys spans the years 1931-1943 (from about the time he and Wanda purchased their farm in Milford, New Jersey) and does not date from the earliest years of their relationship. Correspondence with Carl Zigrosser is extensive, dating from 1924 until weeks before Gág's death in 1946. Zigrosser's letters in the Wanda Gág Papers and his own papers, also held by the Universit y of Pennsylvania (Ms. Coll. 6) contain a wealth of information about artists and the art world in the United States and Europe for the first half of the century. The Wanda Gág Papers were donated to the University of Pennsylvania by Zigrosser in 197 2 with the donation of his papers, and include items, in addition to their correspondence, which were gifts from Gág to Zigrosser.

There are significant letters from each of Gág's siblings, and ongoing correspondence in particular with Dehli and with Flavia. Some of the earliest letters from her sisters Thusnelda and Stella to Wanda in New York show their struggles to feed the family and keep them warm in the harsh Minnesota winters after their mother died.

Letters from Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O'Keeffe reflect the high regard they both felt for Gág. Other artists, authors, and activists whose work and/or lives are represented or discussed in the papers include Egmont Arens, George Biddle, Roger N. Baldwin, Arnold Blanch, Lucile Lundquist Blanch, Louise Bogan, Howard Cook, Adolf Dehn, Max Eastman, John B. Flannagan, Lewis Gannett, Ruth Chrisman Gannett, Mike Gold, Harry Gottlieb, Emil Ganso, Horace Gregory, William Gropper, Max Jacobs, Frida Kahl o, Spencer Kellogg, Jr., Rockwell Kent, Julius J. Lankes, Harold Atkins Larrabee, Barbara Latham, Thomas Gaetano Lo Medíco, John Marin, Edith Whittlesey Newton, Anton Refregier, Diego Rivera, Arnold Ronnebeck, Grace Cogswell Root, Hyman J. Warsager, Anthony Velonis, and Art Young, among others.

The Papers include approximately 30 original drawings and watercolors, including a number of erotic drawings and paintings. The primary collection of Gág's prints is at the Philadelphia Museum of Art; representative prints were distributed by Zigrosser and Gág's family to a large number of museums around the world after her death. Exhibition catalogs and lists of Gág's works are not complete in these Papers, although lists of her work were compiled as part of the settlement of Gág's estate (Box 32).

Financial records for Wanda Gág are incomplete, comprising only four items. There are notes recording her earnings from commercial art in 1921-1922; one item is an account book in which she kept a strict record of shared household expenses; one is her bank book for a savings account, which shows a balance of $3000-$6000 during the Depression years; and the last item is a book in which she kept handwritten accounts of royalties from book sales.

These Papers include correspondence and partial records for the Estate of Wanda Gág, 1946-1968. Zigrosser and Earle Humphreys were co-executors of the Estate. Upon Humphreys's death in 1950, his co-executor (Wanda's brother-in-law) Robert Janssen became the family representative for Wanda Gág's estate.

Production materials for Gág's children's books were sold after her death. The primary repository for these is the Children's Literature Research Collection, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Some Gág family correspondence, Wanda Gág photo albums, and papers of Alma Schmidt Scott are also part of that collection. The papers of Alma Scott, including her correspondence and research materials for her biography of Wanda Gág, are located at the Minnesota Historical Society. The Gág and Biebl families donated family papers and artwork to the New Ulm Library in New Ulm, Minnesota.

Scope and Contents

The E. Sculley Bradley papers include his personal and professional correspondence dating from 1923 to 1962, material from several literary censorship cases for which he testified, corrected drafts of his manuscript for the Variorum edition of  Leaves of Grass, ephemera and graphics associated with Walt Whitman, and a small amount of material on other authors.

The correspondence consists of letters to Bradley (and sometimes copies of his replies) from colleagues and noted authors of his day, mostly on the topic of literature. Many of the letters concern the correspondents' publication in the General Magazine and History Chronicle, but also includes invitations to lecture at Penn or participate in conference programs. Researchers will find literary manuscripts included with the correspondence when they exist. Material in this series is filed by correspondent. Occasionally a secretary, wife or daughter would write on behalf of a correspondent; these have been filed under the name of the (usually) better known literary figure. Many of the files contain only a single letter from the correspondent, while others, especially those of James T. Farrell, David McCord, and Peter Viereck, are more extensive. Bradley's correspondence with Farrell spanned 14 years and is the largest single component of this series.

Bradley's association with James T. Farrell began when Bradley testified in support of Farrell's books in a Philadelphia censorship trial in 1948. Through the course of their professional and personal relationship, Bradley took a keen interest in Farrell's writing and published several of his works in the General Magazine and History Chronicle. Farrell often spoke of his money problems leading to his need for giving paid lectures (and which Bradley frequently helped to secure). There was significant discussion of Farrell's literary papers, which he had originally hoped would go to the Newberry Library in Chicago. Farrell decided to give (or sell) them to the University of Pennsylvania, and the correspondence is rich with descriptions of materials periodically arriving at Penn. During this period, Farrell and his second wife Hortense Alden divorced and he reunited with his first wife, Dorothy Butler. Bradley was involved in Farrell's son Kevin's decision to attend Penn, and there was periodic discussion of Kevin's academic progress as well as financial difficulties associated with his tuition.

From 1948 through 1966, Sculley Bradley was involved in a series of literary censorship trials, acting as a witness on the side of the authors, publishers, and/or booksellers. His first case involved the seizure of over 2,000 books confiscated from 50 different bookstores, department stores, and newsstands in Philadelphia, PA in 1948. Among the books seized were Studs Lonigan and  A World I Never Made by James T. Farrell;  Sanctuary and  The Wild Palms by William Faulkner;  God's Little Acre by Erskine Caldwell;  Raintree County by Ross Lockridge, Jr.; and  Never Love a Stranger by Harold Robbins. This case was notable as the first in Pennsylvania to be concerned with current literature in book form. In the following years, other censorship cases arose in Fall River, MA (focusing on the book  Duke, by Hal Ellison), Detroit, MI (  The Devil Rides Out, by John H. Griffin), Youngstown, OH (  Down All Your Streets, by Leonard Bishop), and additional cases brought in Philadelphia, PA as well as several other cities (for  The Tropic of Cancer, by Henry Miller). Bradley also signed on to an  amicus curiae brief prepared by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in defense of Ralph Ginzburg, who published the erotic journal  Eros and other works which were confiscated in the mail in 1962. Some of the cases Bradley was involved in made their way to the United States Supreme Court. In the files for these censorship cases, Bradley collected correspondence concerning his testimony, newspaper and magazine clippings, receipts for his consultative charges, and, in some cases, copies of legal briefs.

The series of Walt Whitman material begins with drafts for the three editions of Leaves of Grass that Sculley Bradley worked on: the  Comprehensive Reader's Edition (1965), the  Norton Critical Edition (1973), and the  Textual Variorum (1980). Drafts for the first two are less complete than for the Variorum and focus mainly on the “Excluded Poems and Passages” section. Drafts for the  Norton Critical Edition are grouped into sets labelled “copy 2” and “copy 3 and 4” following Bradley’s original organization of the papers.

The Variorum edition subseries contains an extensive run of corrected drafts. In 1955, on the 100th anniversary of the first printing of  Leaves of Grass, the  Collected Works of Walt Whitman was announced. It was to be published by New York University Press under the general editorship of Gay Wilson Allen and Sculley Bradley. Preparation of a  Variorum edition of  Leaves, which would collate and trace the six printed editions (and numerous impressions) issued during Whitman's lifetime, was overseen by Bradley and Harold W. Blodgett. Allen and Bradley produced a  Critical Reader's Edition of  Leaves in 1965, but the  Variorum was delayed and was not published until 1980. In the end, Bradley and Blodgett were not able to see it through to completion and the edition was completed by editors William White and Arthur Golden.

The Whitman ephemera assembled by Bradley includes brochures, printed maps, typed inventories and bibliographies, newspaper and magazine clippings (including a copy of Whitman’s “A Backward Glance O'er Travel'd Roads” published in The Critic in 1884), correspondence about Whitman, book reviews and book publication notices, manuscript texts and printed articles of other scholars, cards, invitations, a photostat of Whitman’s manuscript of “Good-Bye my Fancy,” and two Whitman family autographs (envelopes addressed in the hand of Whitman's mother and Whitman himself, respectively). Also included are notes by Bradley on Whitman.

The series of Whitman graphics includes engravings, photographs, and reproductions of paintings of Whitman, buildings associated with Whitman, and monuments to the poet. Also included are some negatives and postcards.

The final series on authors other than Whitman includes works of Ernest Hemingway translated into Japanese, copies of the American Literary Review in Japanese, a collection of American poems in French edited by Jacques Catel, clippings on Robert Frost, and a galley proof of three poems of e.e. cummings, with the poet's own annotations. Also in this file is an inventory of autograph manuscripts once owned by Bradley.

Scope and Contents

In 1869, Charles Godfrey Leland took advantage of a small inheritance to resign his post as editor of the Philadelphia Press and go abroad. His health was poor, and on the verge of a nervous collapse, he set sail in May 1869.

According to Sculley Bradley:

It was only natural that he should correspond with George Henry Boker, who had been his bosom friend from boyhood, and who was now deeply concerned about his health. Boker had been instrumental in securing his appointment as editor of the Press and since Leland’s return to Philadelphia, they had been much together. The depth of their friendship is reflected in the intimacy of these letters, so frankly revealing of the natures of both men. These letters were not available for the use of Leland’s biographer, Mrs. Elizabeth Robins Pennell. They therefore shed new light upon the life and character of Hans Breitmann, who has recently been given increased attention both by critics of American poetry and by those interested in the development of American humor. Since Boker and Leland were intimately acquainted not only with the “Philadelphia Group,” but with most of the literary circle in the East, the references, casual or extended, to other literary men, are to be regarded as authentic and revelatory. There are many such references among these letters. This correspondence also has value as being a typical reaction of a cultivated and highly civilized American of his day to the culture, literature and social life of the European countries which he visited. His attitudes are in strong and interesting contrast to those of  Innocents Abroad. In this and in many other respects, the letters shed light on American social history. They are also of enormous interest in showing, in intimate correspondence, the attitudes and interests of two of the most cultivated Americans of that day. The points of view, the type of humor and the revelation of the personal lives of such men is reflected in a manner sometimes startling and always instructive. Another very interesting aspect of these letters lies in the intimate picture of various members of the London literary circle and literary people on the continent whom Leland met. The illustrations which Leland made for these letters are intrinsically valuable as works of art and derive additional value from Leland’s important connection in the development of the teaching of the arts and crafts in America.

There is, of course, a very interesting revelation of the differences between publishing conditions in America and in England, together with much detail bearing upon Leland’s own poetic work. The correspondence has a homogenous quality as the unified record of a single journey of the author over a period of one year. This journey is recorded as the last episode of Leland’s Memoirs, but the record of the letters is very much more detailed and intimate. (The above taken in its entirety from “Uncollected Letters of Charles Godfrey Leland,” an unpublished article by Sculley Bradley located in folder 5).

The collection consists of fourteen illustrated letters. The illustrations include beautiful and highly illuminated capital D’s in the salutations as well as fourteen sketches in pen and ink, of which a good many show fine color work. The collection also contains a transcription of the letters, probably completed by Sculley Bradley and an article written by Bradley entitled, "Uncollected Letters of Charles Godfrey Leland," which had been submitted for publication sometime before 1937.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  1999

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2016 April 27

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  1992

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  1999

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2015 June 17

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2014

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2015 May 6

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Maggie Kruesi

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Kelin Baldridge

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Margaret Kruesi

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Maggie Kruesi, Christa Stefanski, and Jessica Dodson

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by John Anderies

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Donna Brandolisio

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Clémence Scouten

Sponsor

The processing of the Pennell family papers and the preparation of this register were made possible by a grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

Sponsor

The processing of the Wanda Gág Papers and the preparation of this register were made possible by a grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

The Wanda Gág Papers are available for consultation by researchers in the Reading Room, Rare Book and Manuscript Library at the University of Pennsylvania. Permission to reproduce or publish materials from this collection must be obtained from a curator at the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, from the estate of Wanda Gág and/or from other holders of copyright for these materials.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Edward Larocque Tinker, Emily Jewell Robins, and Mrs. C. B. Falls, 1951-1952, with purchased additions.

Source of Acquisition

Sold by Michael Brown Rare Books, 2016.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Carolyn Ambler Walter and Helen Godey Wilson, 1986

 Mère Marie of the Ursulines, gift of Agnes Repplier

Source of Acquisition

Gift of E. Sculley Bradley.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of E. Sculley Bradley.

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Related Materials

Related Archival Materials note

At University of Pennsylvania:

Charles Godfrey Leland letters to George Henry Boker

Walt Whitman collection

William Carlos Williams research collection

George H. Boker papers

Related Archival Materials note

At Historical Society of Pennsylvania: Charles Godfrey Leland papers

At Princeton University: Charles Godfrey Leland Collection, 1841-1902

At the University of Pennsylvania: George H. Boker papers, 1837-1919, Ms. Coll. 661

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Drawings (visual works)
  • Lithographs
  • Manuscripts, American--19th century
  • Manuscripts, American--20th century
  • Watercolors (paintings)
Subject(s)
  • Art
  • Art, American--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia
  • Artists
  • Authors
  • Illustration of books--United States
  • Women authors

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Memorabilia
  • Notes
  • Poems
  • Speeches
  • Writings (document genre)
Personal Name(s)
  • Stedman, Edmund Clarence, 1833-1908
Subject(s)
  • American literature
  • Authors, American--19th century
  • Authors, American--20th century
  • Criticism, Textual

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Manuscripts, American--20th century
  • Manuscripts, English--19th century
  • Memorabilia
  • Writings (document genre)
Subject(s)
  • Authors
  • Authors, American--20th century
  • Women
  • Women authors

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Diaries
  • Drawings (visual works)
  • Financial records
  • Photographs
  • Prints
  • Watercolors (paintings)
  • Writings (documents)
Subject(s)
  • Art
  • Artists
  • Authors
  • Authors, American--20th century
  • Children's literature
  • Children's literature, American
  • Women
  • Women artists--United States
  • Women authors

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania--Faculty.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Articles
  • Clippings (information artifacts)
  • Correspondence
  • Legal documents
  • Notes
  • Photographs
  • Printed ephemera
Personal Name(s)
  • Farrell, James T. (James Thomas), 1904-1979
  • McCord, David Thompson Watson, 1897-1997
  • Viereck, Peter, 1916-2006
  • Whitman, Walt, 1819-1892
Subject(s)
  • Authors
  • Authors, American--20th century
  • Censorship--United States--20th century
  • Criticism, Textual
  • Literature
  • Literature--Study and teaching
  • Poetry
  • Poets
  • Trials (Obscenity)

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Illuminations (visual works)
  • Sketches
Geographic Name(s)
  • Europe--Description and travel
Personal Name(s)
  • Boker, George H. (George Henry), 1823-1890
Subject(s)
  • Voyages and travels

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Other Finding Aids

For a complete listing of correspondents, do the following title search in Franklin: Pennell Family Papers.

Other Finding Aids

For a complete listing of correspondents, do the following title search in Franklin: Agnes Repplier Papers.

Other Finding Aids

For a complete listing of correspondents, do the following title search in Franklin: Wanda Gág Papers.

Bibliography

Material for this biographical sketch has been drawn from John Lukacs' chapter on Repplier in his Philadelphia Patricians & Philistines, 1900-1950; from Agnes Repplier's autobiographical sketch in her  Eight Decades; from the memoir written by her niece, Emma Repplier Witmer, titled  Agnes Repplier: A Memoir; and from the biography  Agnes Repplier, Lady of Letters (1949) by George Stewart Stokes.

Bibliography

Pennell, Elizabeth. Joseph Pennell: An account by his wife Elizabeth Robins Pennell issued on the occasion of a memorial exhibition of his works. Library of Congress, 1927.

Pennell, Elizabeth. The Life and Letters of Joseph Pennell. 2 vols. London: Ernest Benn, Ltd., 1930.

Pennell, Elizabeth Robins and Pennell, Joseph. Our Philadelphia. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Company, 1914.

Pennell, Joseph. The Adventures of an Illustrator. Boston: Little Brown and Co., 1925.

Tinker, Edward Larocque. The Pennells. Privately printed. New York, 1951.

Wuerth, Louis A. Catalogue of the Etchings of Joseph Pennell, with an introduction by Elizabeth Robins Pennell. Boston: Little Brown and Company, 1928.

Wuerth, Louis A. Catalogue of the Lithographs of Joseph Pennell, with an introduction by Elizabeth Robins Pennell. Boston: Little Brown and Company, 1931.

Bibliography

Gág, Wanda. Growing Pains: Diaries and Drawings for the Years 1908-1917. New York: Coward McCann, 1940; reprint edition, St. Paul: Minnesota Historical Society Press, 1984.

Hoyle, Karen Nelson. Wanda Gág. New York: Twayne Publishers, 1994. Focuses on Gág's work as a writer and illustrator of children's books.

Scott, Alma. Wanda Gág, the Story of an Artist. Minneapolis, Minn.: University of Minnesota Press, 1949. Alma Schmidt Scott was a lifelong friend of Gág and her family. She based this biography on her own cor respondence and Wanda's diaries. Scott worked on this project with Gág in 1944 and 1945, but did not complete the biography until after Gág's death.

Winnan, Ardur H. Wanda Gág: A Catalogue Raisonné of the Prints. Washington, D. C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1992. This includes the most complete listing of Gág's exhibitions and publications; disc ussion of her printmaking techniques; a useful chronology of her life (which does, however, contain a few inaccuracies); excerpts from Gág's later diaries; a biographical sketch and information about her family members.

Books written / translated and illustrated by Wanda Gág

Batiking at Home. 1926. New York: Crowell Publishing.

Millions of Cats. 1928. New York: Coward-McCann.

The Funny Thing. 1929. New York: Coward-McCann.

Snippy and Snappy. 1931. New York: Coward-McCann.

Wanda Gág's Story Book [  Millions of Cats, The Funny Thing, and  Snippy and Snappy in one volume]. 1932. New York: Coward-McCann.

The ABC Bunny. 1933. New York: Coward-McCann.

Gone is Gone. 1935. New York: Coward-McCann.

Tales from Grimm. 1936. New York: Coward-McCann.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. 1938. New York: Coward-McCann.

Growing Pains. 1940. New York: Coward-McCann.

Nothing at All. 1941. New York: Coward-McCann.

Three Gay Tales from Grimm. 1943. New York: Coward-McCann.

More Tales from Grimm. 1947. New York: Coward-McCann.

Collection Inventory

I.  Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell Correspondence. 5 boxes.

Series Description

Correspondence is arranged alphabetically by correspondent, then chronologically within each folder. Outgoing and incoming letters are interfiled. The correspondence series for both Joseph and Elizabeth Pennell includes royalty statements of income fro m their books, filed under the name of the publisher. The container list provides only a brief description of the contents for the correspondence series; individual cataloging records for all correspondents have been entered into OCLC and Franklin. For a listing of the correspondents in WorldCat or Franklin, do the following title search: Pennell Family Papers.

A.  Joseph Pennell correspondence. 46 folders.

Description

Comprises 45 correspondents in 46 folders; outgoing letters from Joseph Pennell include letters to artists C. B. Falls and John McLure Hamilton, and to his brother-in-law Edward Robins.

Box Folder

Correspondents A-W.

1 1-46

B.  Elizabeth Robins Pennell correspondence. 105 folders.

Description

Comprises 59 correspondents in 105 folders, much is business correspondence with publishers, the bulk is personal correspondence to Elizabeth's sister-in-law, Emily Jewell Robins, and to her friend Edward Larocque Tinker.

Box Folder

Correspondents A-Z.

1-5 47-151

II.  Joseph Pennell Writings and Artwork. 5 boxes (+ oversize).

A.  Writings, lecture notes, publications, and publicity.

Description & Arrangement

Arranged alphabetically by title of publication, where possible. Pennell's lecture notes for the Scammon lectures at the Art Institute of Chicago are filed under their publication title, The Graphic Arts. Includes publicity materials for Pennell's books and for his lectures and promotion of J. M. Whistler's reputation.

Box Folder

Adventures of an Illustrator, specimen pages. One set autographed by Joseph Pennell, the second set with color, 1925.

6 152

Adventures of an Illustrator, title page and frontispiece (portrait of J. Pennell by William Strang (1859-1921), in color). Proof for invitation to the private view for  Adventures of an Illustrator at the Anderson Galleries, 4 December 1925.

6 153

Adventures of an Illustrator, chapter 3, “Friends School in Germantown,” reprinted in the  Germantown Crier, vol. 2, no 4, pp. 20-23.ttitle>, (December 1950).

6 154

Glory of New York, forthcoming publication notice, William Edwin Rudge, Society of Illustrators notice re Pennell's Pen Drawing and Pen Draughtsmen, ca. 1926 and 1932. 2 items.

6 155

The Graphic Arts, modern men and modern methods. Scammon Lectures for the Art Institute of Chicago. Holograph lecture notes and copy, [Published in 1921 by the University of Chica go Press]., circa 1918-1920.

6 156-158

"The Lost Art of American Illustration" , holograph. 33 leaves.

6 159

"The Lost Art of American Illustration," typescript, 2 copies, 1 copy with ms. corrections by Joseph Pennell. 28 leaves.

6 160

Ms. descriptions of lithographs [?]. Descriptions or annotations for a number of J. Pennell's lithographs, possibly intended for, but not published in the Catalogue of the Lithographs of Joseph Pennell. 16 leaves.

6 161
Publicity. 2 items (3 leaves).
Contents

* Publicity for International Memorial to James McNeill Whistler, sponsored by the International Society of Sculptors, Painters, & Gravers, London, ms. note to A. A. Pope from Joseph Pennell requesting a contribution to the memorial sculpted by Auguste Rodin, 1907

* Publicity for Joseph Pennell's lecture on  "James McNeill Whistler, His Art and Life" sponsored by the Author's League Fund, New York, for 31 March 1922

6 162

B.  Prints, sketches, graphic design, and related artwork.

Description & Arrangement

Arranged chronologically, with reference to Louis A. Wuerth, Catalogue of the Etchings of Joseph Pennell. Approximately 22 of the 150 Pennell prints and sketches are filed in Box 6, the remainder are in Oversize Drawers 65, 66 and 51. Related artwork includes proof sheets of Joseph Pennell artwork published in both Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell's books.

Box Folder
"Views on the old Germantown Road," etchings by Joseph Pennell for article by Townsend Ward for  Journal of the Pennsylvania Historical Society, Vol. 5, 1880-1881. 11 items.
Contents

* The Fox Chase Inn, 1880 (Wuerth 9)

* The Old Stone Bridge at Nicetown, 1880 (Wuerth 11)

* Fair Hill Mansion, 1880 (Wuerth 12)

* Wakefield Fisher's Lane, 1880 (Wuerth 14)

* Roberts Mill, 1880 (2 proofs, marked No. 2) (Wuerth 15)

* Little Wakefield, 1880 (Wuerth 16)

* Germantown Academy, 1880 (Wuerth 23)

* Wister's House, on the Main St. opp. Queen, 1881 (Wuerth 24)

* Stenton. From the South West, 1881 (Wuerth 25)

* Wakefield Mills, 1881 (Wuerth 26)

6 163
Etchings of Philadelphia sites by Joseph Pennell, 1879-1920. 7 items.
Contents

* "Fort Wilson," S. W. Cor of 3rd and Walnut St. Phila. 1879 (Wuerth 8)

* Plynlimmon Court, Philadelphia, 1880 (Wuerth 13)

* Black Horse Inn Yard, 352-354 N. 3nd St., 1880 (Wuerth 22)

* Independence Square, Philadelphia, 1920 (Wuerth 767) 4 proofs

6 164
Series of postcards of the Rouen Cathedral, lithographed, 1 missing according to note by Elizabeth Pennell in folder. Some previous water damage to postcards, circa 1907. 11 items.
Contents

* Facade. The West Front

* Veille Rouen. An Old Street

* La Nef. The Nave, from Choir

* Transept. Transept du Nord

* Portail des Libraires. Screen Before the North Transept

* Rouen, St. Maclou, Stairs to Organ. Escalier de l'Orgue

* Rouen, St. Maclou, Spire of the Church. La Fleche

* Portail de la Calende. Doorway to the South Transept

* Tour de Beurre. Butter Tower

* Rue de la Grosse Horloge. Street of the Great Clock

* Les Tombeau. Tombs in Lady Chapel

6 165
Sketches for Liberty and Victory Loans, circa 1918. 6 items.
Contents

* Sketches for Liberty Loan Posters. 2 items, 1 pencil sketch, 1 pen & ink, "What Your Liberty Bonds Buy," pamphlet ill. By J. Pennell, undated

*  "I Am New York and This Is My Creed," by Bruce Barton, pamphlet published by Bankers Trust Company for the Victory Loan, cover illustration [Statue of Liberty] by J. Pennell, circa 1918, 4 items

6 166

Printed prospectus for "Walt Whitman" An Essay by Gabriel Sarrazin, translated by Harrison S. Morris, and to include an etching of Whitman's home by J. Pennell, 1919. 1 item (1 leaf).

6 167

Page proofs for The Gardens of Aphrodite by Edgar Saltus (1855-1921). Privately printed for the Pennell Club, Philadelphia, With layout corrections marked by J. Pennell on title page and 3 -5, 1920. 1 item (5 leaves).

6 168

Joseph Pennell in Etching by H. Devitt Welsh (Horace Devitt Welsh, b. 1888). Signed by Welsh, number 7/50, 1923.

6 169

Landscapes by Joseph Pennell, ink wash sketches, undated. 2 items.

6 170

Page proofs of J. Pennell's artwork for publication, including pastels and watercolors in color, undated. 1 item (16 leaves).

6 171

Page proofs of J. Pennell's lithograph, Searchlights Behind St. Paul's (Wuerth L398), 1914. 6 copies (6 leaves).

6 172

Page proofs of illustrations for The Life and Letters of Joseph Pennell, with captions in the hand of the author, Elizabeth Pennell, circa 1929. 1 item (39 leaves).

6 173-174

III.  Elizabeth Robins Pennell Writings. 3.5 boxes.

A.  Writings.

Description & Arrangement

Arranged chronologically, Elizabeth R. Pennell's writings in these papers are focused almost exclusively on the life and work of her husband, the exception is her article on William Ernest Henley.

Box Folder

Biographical sketch of Joseph Pennell. "Mr. Joseph Pennell is the well-known American artist..." holograph, circa 1922. 1 item (6 leaves).

6 175
"Joseph Pennell" : Introduction for Memorial Exhibition of Joseph Pennell's work at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, held 9 Nov. 1926-27 Jan. 1927.
Contents

* Typescript with corrections signed by ERP, 24 August 1926. 1 item, 23 leaves

* Typed and annotated copy of exhibition checklist sent by ERP to E. L. Tinker, 9 August 1926 1 item, 5 leaves

6 176
Introduction to The Glory of New York, Sept. 1926. 1 item (17 leaves).
Description

Typescript with corrections signed by ERP

6 177

Notes regarding Joseph Pennell's will, circa 1926. 1 item (7 leaves).

6 178
Introduction to Catalogue of the Lithographs of Joseph Pennell by Louis A. Wuerth, August 1930. 1 item (24 leaves).
Description

Typescript with corrections, inscribed "For Edward L. Tinker from Elizabeth Robins Pennell," corrected

6 179
"William Ernest Henley: Lover of the Art of Bookmaking," for the  Colophon , January 1931. 3 items (30 leaves).
Description

Typescript, corrected, signed and Galley and page proofs

6 180

Sample binding. A Guide for the Greedy.

6 181

Sample binding. The Life and Letters of Joseph Pennell.

6 182

B.  Galleys.

Description

With corrections by Elizabeth Robins Pennell, these are galleys for her introductions to catalogs of Joseph Pennell's works by Louis A. Wuerth, and her biography of Joseph Pennell.

Box Folder
Introduction to Catalogue of the Etchings of Joseph Pennell by Louis A. Wuerth, 1928.
Description

Marked galleys.

7 183
Introduction to Catalogue of the Lithographs of Joseph Pennell by Louis A. Wuerth, 1931.
Description

Marked galleys.

7 184-186
The Life and Letters of Joseph Pennell Galleys, 12 July 1929.
Description

Duplicate proofs.

8 187-191
The Life and Letters of Joseph Pennell Galleys, 23 August - 13 September 1929.
Description

Author's proofs.

9 192-197

IV.  Pennell Financial and Legal Papers. 1 box.

Series Description

Arranged chronologically within each subseries, the financial and legal papers of both Pennells are filed together here.

A.  Contracts.

Description

Comprises 17 drafts and contracts with publishers.

Box Folder
Agreements. Macmillan Company and Joseph Pennell, 1904-1925. 5 items.
Contents

* History of American Etching, Engraving and Illustration (never published), 1904

*  Etching, 1919

*  Pen Drawing and Pen Draughtsmen (revision), 1920

*  Etchers and Etching (revision), 1924

*  Etchers and Etching (agreement re royalties), 1925

10 198
Agreements. J. B. Lippincott Company and Joseph Pennell, 1912-1918. 3 items.
Contents

* Joseph Pennell's Pictures of the Panama Canal (signed by J. Pennell), 1912

*  Pictures of War Work in America (2 copies), 1917

*  Joseph Pennell's Fourth Liberty Loan Poster(2 copies), 1918.

10 199
Agreements. J. B. Lippincott Company and Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell, 1912-1920. 3 items.
Contents

* Our Philadelphia, 1912

*  Whistler Journal, 1919, 1920

10 200
Agreements. J. B. Lippincott Company and Elizabeth Robins Pennell, 1915-1929. 3 items.
Contents

* Nights, 1915

*  Joseph Pennell's Pictures of Philadelphia, 1926

*  Whistler the Friend, 1929

10 201
Agreement. Art Institute of Chicago and Joseph Pennell, 1920. 2 items.
Contents

The Graphic Arts (draft of agreement and copy signed by J. Pennell)

10 202
Agreement. Little, Brown, and Company and Joseph Pennell, 1924. 1 item.
Contents

"Reminiscences" ,  The Adventures of an Illustrator (signed by J. Pennell)

10 203

B.  Accounts.

Description

Comprises statements of investments in stocks, bonds, and real estate managed by the Provident Trust Company of Philadelphia for both Pennells.

Box Folder

Provident Life and Trust Company of Philadelphia. Statement of Account, Joseph Pennell., April 1921 - July 1935.

10 204-206

Provident Trust Company of Philadelphia. Statement of Account, Elizabeth R. Pennell, January 1928 - June 1935.

10 207

C.  Wills and estates.

Description

Original will made by Joseph Pennell, with many revisions. There is no complete copy of Elizabeth Robins Pennell's will.

Box Folder

Joseph Pennell will. Original, drafts, codicils, and revisions, 1892-1924.

10 208-215

Re Estate of Joseph Pennell. Transfer tax form for the state of New York, 1926.

10 216

Re Estate of Joseph Pennell. Inventory and appraisal [of artwork and materials on hand] by Louis Wuerth and Edward L. Tinker, 3 August 1926.

10 217
Philadelphia County Orphans' Court. Re Estate of Ambrose White, 4 April 1929.
Description

Final account of Howard W. Page, substituted trustee of Alexander Henry White. Elizabeth R. Pennell was a great granddaughter of Ambrose White and a beneficiary of the estate.

10 218

Elizabeth Robins Pennell will. Drafts, codicils, unsigned, 1927-1933.

10 219-220

Elizabeth Robins Pennell will. Probate notice, carbon copy, 1936.

10 221

D.  Family documents and memorabilia.

Description

A few items, including Joseph Pennell's passport for 1915-1917, these range in date from 1830 to the 1930s. See also Oversize, Drawer 51.

Box Folder

Philadelphia. Receipt for water rent from Joseph Pennell, 3 December 1830.

10 222

U.S. passport for Joseph Pennell, 1915-1917.

10 223

Elizabeth R. Pennell. Membership cards in N.Y. City clubs, undated. 5 items.

10 224

V.  Newspaper Clippings. 1 box.

Series Description

The bulk of the newspaper clippings are obituaries and appreciations of Joseph Pennell's life and work, written just after his death. There are a few reviews of the works of both Pennells, but very few items about Elizabeth Robins Pennell.

Please note, most of the clippings are extremely brittle.

Box Folder

Work by and about the Pennells, 1881-1924.

11 225

Joseph Pennell, obituaries, tributes, and articles concerning his will and bequest to the Library of Congress, April-July 1926.

11 226-232

Joseph Pennell exhibitions, 1923-1926.

11 233

Pennell's students and friends, 1926.

11 234

Reviews of Joseph Pennell books, circa 1917-1934.

11 235

Reviews of Elizabeth R. Pennell books and articles, circa 1917-1930.

11 236

About James McNeill Whistler, circa 1926-1936.

11 237

About other artists and writers, circa 1926-1938.

11 238

Elizabeth R. & Joseph Pennell bequest to Library of Congress, 1936.

11 239

Joseph Pennell, posthumous honorary degree, 1951.

11 240

VI.  Edward Larocque Tinker, Frances Tinker, and Emily Jewell Robins collections. 1 box.

A.  Correspondence about Joseph and Elizabeth R. Pennell.

Description & Arrangement

Arranged alphabetically by correspondent, this series comprises 23 correspondents in 23 folders, a few are addressed to Frances Tinker, E. L. Tinker's wife, and one folder is addressed to Emily Jewell Robins. The bulk is correspondence of E. L. Tinker, in some cases acting on behalf of Elizabeth Robins Pennell, particularly in regard to her husband's bequest to the Library of Congress. This correspondence is cataloged in RLIN and may be searched in the Eureka database. Not cataloged are two folders of letters written to E. L. Tinker and to Emily Jewell Robins thanking them for copies of Tinker's memoir of the couple, The Pennells (1951).

Box Folder

Correspondence A-W.

12 241-263

Letters to E. L. Tinker re receipt of his essay,  The Pennells, 1951. 39 items.

12 264

Letters to Emily Jewell Robins acknowledging receipt of Tinker's essay The Pennells , 1951. 19 items.

12 265

B.  Writings and research about the Pennells.

Description

Comprises 5 folders of Edward Larocque Tinker's writings about the Pennells, and his work preparing an exhibition about the Pennells for the Grolier Club in 1935.

Box Folder

Typescript copy of a review, "Pennell's Sketches, the Verhaeren of the pencil" , in  La Voz de Guipuzcoa, 9 August 1918.

12 266

Mr. Pennell's description & sketch of how Whistler developed the butterfly signature from his initials J. M. W., 30 March 1924. 1 item (1 leaf).

12 267
"Joseph Pennell's gift to the nation" by E. L. Tinker Press release, holograph and corrected typescript,, 1927. 18 leaves.
Contents

12 267

"The Graphic and Literary Work of Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell" Ts. description of exhibition at the Grolier Club, 18 April-9 May 1935.

12 268
Privately printed essay The Pennells, 1951. 2 items (copies).
Description

Proof sheets of illustrations for this work.

12 269

"The wonder of work" by E. L. Tinker, in  Think 17, no. 9, pp. 18-19, 36, September 1951.

12 270

C.  Research and lists.

Description

Comprises 3 folders of lists, including lists of Pennell artwork and articles for the serials Harper's, Portfolio, The Magazine of Art, Art Journal, The Studio, and  The Century Magazine . Also includes an exhibition list of Joseph Pennell work exhibited at the Royal Society of Painters-Etchers in 1885-1887.

Box Folder

List of works exhibited by Joseph Pennell at the Royal Society of Painter-Etchers, London, 1885-1887.

12 271

Lists of articles in serials by or about the Pennells, 1883-1927.

12 272

List of Elizabeth Pennell's publishers.

12 273

VII.  Photographs. 2 boxes.

A.  Joseph Pennell family photographs.

Description

Daguerreotypes of Joseph Pennell as a child, his father, mother[?], aunt[?] and unidentified children.

Box

Joseph Pennell as a child, circa 1860.

13

Joseph Pennell as a child. Photograph by Root Gallery, Philadelphia, circa 1860.

13

Larkin Pennell, (1819-1890), father of Joseph Pennell. Photograph by McClees and Germon, Philadelphia.

13

Unidentified woman.

13

Unidentified young woman, in leather case, 24 December 1850.

13

Unidentified mother and child.

13

Young boy.

13

Young boy with two siblings.

13

B.  Photographic portraits of the Pennells.

Box Folder

Photograph of Charles Godfrey Leland, Elizabeth Robins, and Joseph Pennell, undated, circa 1883 .

14 274
Photograph of young Elizabeth Robins Pennell, circa 1896.
Description

Inscribed on reverse, "With love and best wishes for you both from Elizabeth," Christmas, Photograph copied by Fred Hollyer, 9 Pembroke Sqr. Kensington W [London].

14 275
Photograph of Joseph Pennell in his studio, undated. 2 items (copies).
Description

One copy is inscribed "Joseph Pennell in his studio which was a real studio. To Mrs. Tinker. Joseph Pennell."

14 276

Photograph of Joseph Pennell by Ellis, circa 1925.

14 277

Photograph of relief portrait of Elizabeth Robins Pennell by John Flanagan, 1934. 2 prints plus 1 negative.

14 278

C.  Photographs of illustrations for Joseph Pennell's memoirs, Adventures of an Illustrator (1925).

Box Folder
Photographs of images of Joseph and Elizabeth Pennell and the J. Pennell family, circa 1860 and 1885.
Contents

* Larkin Pennell

* J. Pennell, circa 1860

* Portrait of J. Pennell in his studio by John McLure Hamilton

* Drawings of J. Pennell by J. M. Whistler

* Elizabeth Pennell drawn by J. Pennell in 1885

* Unidentified portrait of J. Pennell

14 279
Photographs of artists, writers, and public figures.
Contents

* Portraits of George Washington Cable

* Timothy Cole

* William Dean Howells

* Busts of R. W. Gilder and George Bernard Shaw

* Photograph of George Bernard Shaw with the bust of him by Auguste Rodin

* Photos of two unidentified portraits

14 280

Photoprints of documents and J. Pennell drawings.

14 281

Glass dry plate photograph of relief portrait of Joseph Pennell by John Flanagan, 1919.

14 282
Photograph of J. Pennell lithograph The Cut Toward Culebra , 1912. 4 items (3 photoprints, 1 metal photographic plate).
Description

Gaillard Cut, Panama Canal.

14 283

VIII.  Joseph Pennell Awards and Exhibitions. 2 boxes.

A.  Awards. 1 box.

Description & Arrangement

Listed by name of the institution or exposition and arranged chronologically, these 20 medals awarded to Joseph Pennell during his career document the international reputation he achieved and his contributions to many world expositions of art near the turn of the century. They contain examples of some of the fine work of noted sculptors and medalists through 1922.

Box
Art Club of Philadelphia, 1892.
Description

Architectural exhibition, Medal in case. Sculptor: E. A. Stewardson.

15
World's Columbian Exposition (Chicago, Ill.), 1893.
Description

Award medal and aluminum case made by Scovill Manufacturing Company, Waterbury, Conn. Sculptors: C. E. Barber and Augustus Saint-Gaudens.

15
Exposition universelle internationale de (Paris, France), 1900.
Description

Bronze medal in case. Sculptor: J. C. Chaplain.

15
Internationale Kunstausstellung zu Dresden (Dresden, Germany), 1901.
Description

Bronze, in case, sculptor unidentified.

15
Pan-American Exposition (Buffalo, N.Y.), 1901.
Description

Bronze medal in case. Sculptor: Hermon MacNeil.

15

Louisiana Purchase Exposition (Saint Louis, Mo.), 1904. 3 items.

15
Bronze medal in case.
Description

Grand prize. Sculptor: A. A. Weinman.

15
Bronze medal in case.
Description

Gold medal. Sculptor: A. A. Weinman.

15
Bronze medal in case.
Description

Commemorative medal. Sculptor: A. A. Weinman.

15
Exposition internationale des beaux arts (Liege, Belgium), 1905.
Description

Medal in case (medal preserved with varnish?). Sculptor: G. Devreese.

15
Exposition internationale de Milan, 1906.
Description

Presented by the British Commission.

15
Bronze medal in case.
Description

Sculptors: Ciannino and S. Johnson.

15

Exposicion Internacional de Barcelona, 1907.

15
Bronze medal in case.
Description

Sculptor: E. Arnau.

15
Exposition universelle et internationale (Brussels, Belgium), 1910.
Description

Cast aluminum (?) medal in box. Sculptor: G. Devreese.

15
Exposicion Internacional de Bellas Artes: Centenario de Chile, 1910.
Description

Medal in leather case. Sculptors: F. Thauby and Lortscher.

15

Royal Society of Arts (Great Britain).

15

"For his paper on the pictorial possibilities of work, 1912-1913" .

15

Silver medal in case. Sculptor: B. M.

15

Anglo-German Exhibition (London, England), 1913.

15

Bronze medal in case. Elkington & Co.

15

Panama-Pacific International Exposition (San Francisco), 1915. 3 items.

15

In commemoration. Large medal in case. Shreve & Co.

15

Commemorative medal. Small medal in case.

15
Souvenir de la Republica Argentina.
Description

Small silver medal in box.

15

Woodrow Wilson Medal, 1917.

15
Bronze medal in case.
Description

Sculptor: Pierre Gregoire.

15

Academie royale des sciences, lettres et beaux-arts de Belgique, 1922.

15
Bronze medal in box.
Description

Sculptor: Victor Rousseau.

15

B.  Exhibition catalogs. 1 box.

Description & Arrangement

Listed by name of the sponsoring institution or gallery, arranged chronologically.

1.  Works by Joseph Pennell.

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically.

Box Folder
Frederick Keppel & Co., New York, N.Y., 1906. 1 item.
Description

"Mr. Pennell's Etching of London" by Walter Conrad Arensberg reprinted, by permission, from  The Evening Post, To which is appended  "Mr. Pennell as a printer" by Frederick Keppel written on the occasion of an exhibition of Mr. Pennell's new etchings of London. Illustrated. The De Vinne Press.

16 284

Grolier Club, New York, N.Y. Catalogue of Etchings by Joseph Pennell, 6-21 November 1908. 1 item.

16 284
Cartwright Hall, Bradford (Bradford, England), 1913. 1 item.
Description

Catalog of an exhibition of lithographs and etchings by Joseph Pennell of the wonder of work with an introduction and notes by the artist. Illustrated.

16 285
National Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C., 1- 24 November 1917. 1 item.
Description

Catalogue of an exhibition of lithographs of war work in Great Britain and the United States by Joseph Pennell.

16 286
Rosenbach Galleries, Philadelphia, Pa., undated and 1918. 4 items.
Description

Catalog of an exhibition of original drawings and lithographs of war work in America made by permission of the United States government and exhibited by consent of the War and Navy Departments by Joseph Pennell with an introduction and notes by the artist. Number One. 2 copies. Number Two. 2 copies.

16 287
Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 14 January - 18 February 1918. 1 item.
Description

Joseph Pennell lithographs of war work in England and America.

16 288
Frederick Keppel & Co., New York, N.Y., 1918-1919. 1 item.
Description

Catalogue of an exhibition of etchings by Joseph Pennell of railroad activities done during the years by permission of the United States Railroad Administration and other various subjects.

16 289
Anderson Galleries, New York, N.Y., 4-20 December 1925. 1 item.
Description

The Adventures of an Illustrator by Joseph Pennell. The making of the book.... Illustrated, printed by William Edwin Rudge.

16 290
Memorial Hall, Philadelphia, Pa., 1-31 October 1926. 1 item.
Description

Memorial exhibition of the works of the late Joseph Pennell held under the auspices of the Philadelphia Print Club and the Pennsylvania Museum, in Memorial Hall, Fairmount Park Philadelphia. Catalogue of etching s, lithographs, water colors, drawings and books. Illustrated, bound. Printed by J. B. Lippincott Company.

16 291
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., 9 November 1926 - 2 January 1927. 4 items.
Description

Joseph Pennell, an account by his wife Elizabeth Robins Pennell issued on the occasion of a memorial exhibition of his works. Illustrated. 2 copies, one marked 1st ed., the other marked 2nd ed. [in pencil], plus 2 copies inscribed by Elizabeth R. Pennell to Frances Tinker and to Edward Larocque Tinker.

16 292
Frederick Keppel & Co., New York, N.Y., 23 November - 31 December, 1926.
Description

Catalogue of an exhibition of etchings by Joseph Pennell, introduction by David Keppel.

16 293
American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York, N.Y., 1 March - 1 April 1927.
Description

A catalogue of a memorial exhibition of the works of Joseph Pennell (kindly lent by Mr. John F. Braun of Philadelphia). Introduction by John C. Van Dyke. (Academy publication no. 56). 2 copies, 1 inscribed by Elizabeth R. Pennell to Edward Larocque Tinker.

16 294
American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York, N.Y., 1927.
Description

Commemorative tributes to Cable by Robert Underwood Johnson; Sargent by Edwin Howland Blashfield; Pennell by John Charles Van Dyke. (Academy publication no. 57). 2 copies, 1 inscribed by Elizabeth R. Pennell to Frances Tinker.

16 294
Library of Congress, Washington, D. C., 1927. 4 items.
Description

Joseph Pennell Memorial Exhibition Catalogue. Foreword by Herbert Putnam, Illustrated with portrait of Pennell. 2 copies. Joseph Pennell, an account by his wife Elizabeth Robins Pennell issued on the occasion of a memorial exhibition of his works. Illustrated. 2 copies.

16 295
Victoria and Albert Museum. South Kensington, London, England, 14 May - 22 June 1929. 1 item.
Description

Exhibition of contemporary American prints. Illustrated. Press of Byron S. Adams, Washington, D.C. Ten of the 432 works exhibited were by Joseph Pennell.

16 296
Frederick Keppel & Co., New York, N.Y., 29 October - 23 November, 1929. 1 item.
Description

Lithographs by Raffet, Delacroix, Ingres, Daumier, Corot, Whistler, Fantin, Degas, Redon, Lautrec, Matisse, Bellows, and others. Introduction by Gordon K. Allison. Four of the 104 works exhibited were by Joseph Pennell.

16 297
Frederick Keppel & Co., New York, N.Y., April 1931. 1 item.
Description

Etchings by Joseph Pennell, with an introduction by Elizabeth Robins Pennell. Illustrated.

16 297

2.  Works by other artists.

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically.

Box Folder
Rosenbach Galleries, Philadelphia, Pa., 6-20 November 1911. 1 item.
Description

Portraits of James McNeill Whistler and landscapes by Walter Greaves. Illustrated.

16 298
Library of Congress, Washington, D. C., 1921.
Description

The Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell Collection of Whistleriana, shown in the division of prints, Library of Congress. Illustrated with portrait of J. M. Whistler. 2 copies.

16 299
American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York, N.Y., 21 April - 21 October, 1927. 1 item.
Description

A Catalogue of the works of Childe Hassam. Foreword with letters from John Gellatly and Joseph Pennell to Hassam. Illustrated. (Academy publi cation no. 58).

16 300
M. Knoedler & Co., New York, N.Y., 16 October - 17 November 1934. 1 item.
Description

A Whistler Centenary (etchings and dry-points). Introduction by Howard Mansfield.

16 301

IX.  Relief portraits of Joseph Pennell. 3 boxes.

Box

Plaster, 24 × 31 cm. Sculptor: R. Tait McKenzie.

17

Sculptor: John Flanagan, 1919. 4 items.

17

Bronze, 26 cm. diameter.

17

Bronze, 12 cm. diameter, mounted on wood.

17

Bronze, 12 cm. diameter.

17
Plaster, 12 cm. diameter.
Note

For photographs of John Flanagan's portraits, see Folders 278, 282 and Oversize Drawer 51.

17

Plaster, unsigned, ca. 31 cm. diameter.

18

X.  Memorabilia. 2 boxes.

A.  Printer's cuts for illustrations for E. L. Tinker's The Pennells , 1951.

Box

Printer's cuts. 8 items.

19

B.  Joseph Pennell's toolbox and easel.

Box

Wooden toolbox (broken).

20

Engraver's and lithographer's tools. 17 items.

20
Oversize

Joseph Pennell's easel.

--

XI.  Oversize. Prints, drawings and watercolors by Joseph Pennell.

Series Description

Arranged chronologically, identified by titles and numbers used in Louis A. Wuerth's Catalogue of the Etchings of Joseph Pennell (1928) and  Catalogue of the Lithographs of Joseph Pennell (1931). With oversize photographs of Elizabeth and Joseph Pennell and a few items of oversize memorabilia.

A.  Joseph Pennell etchings.

Description

Title, date and number from Louis A. Wuerth, Catalogue of the Etchings of Joseph Pennell.

Drawer

Bridge at Harrisburg, (Wuerth 40), 1882.

65

San Georgio, Venice, (Wuerth 71), 1883.

65

Le Puy, third plate (Wuerth 208), 1894.

65

Thames Below the Bridges, Night, (Wuerth 217), 1894.

65

St. John's Gate, Clerkenwell, (Wuerth 273), 1903.

65

Rainy Night, Charing Cross Shops, (Wuerth 274), 1903.

65

Windsor from Eton, (Wuerth 282), 1903.

65

Doorway - Henry VII's Chapel, (Wuerth 310), 1904.

65

Sunlight Soap, (Wuerth 385), 1905.

65

Cowley Street, Westminster, (Wuerth 437), 1906.

65

Rouen, from Bon Secours, (Wuerth 464), 1907.

65

Grosse Horloge, Rouen, (Wuerth 466), 1907.

65

The West Front, Rouen Cathedral, (Wuerth 470), 1907.

65

Among the Skyscrapers, (Wuerth 494), 1908.

65

Palisades and Palaces, (Wuerth 496), 1908.

65

Wren's City, (Wuerth 504), 1909.

65

Edgar Thomson Works, Bessemer, (Wuerth 517), 1909.

65

On the Way to Bessemer, (Wuerth 520), 1909.

65

Coal Wharves, Staten Island, No. II, (Wuerth 538), 1909.

65

Low Moor, Bradford, (Wuerth 554), 1909.

65

The Grip, Serang, (Wuerth 609), 1910.

65

St. Peter's from the Pincian Gardens, Rome, (Wuerth 624), 1911.

65

Sacramento Street. The Way Up to the Fairmount, San Francisco, (Wuerth 633), 1912.

65

The Falls, Yosemite Valley, (Wuerth 649), 1912.

65

New York from Governor's Island, (Wuerth 668), 1915.

65

The Bridge at Hell Gate, (Wuerth 670), 1915.

65

Sunset from Williamsburg Bridge, (Wuerth 674), 1915.

65

The Woolworth Building, (Wuerth 675), 1915.

65

The Ferry House, The Cortlandt Street Ferry from the Jersey City Side, (Wuerth 676), 1919.

65

St. Paul's, New York, (Wuerth 678), 1915.

65

The Approach to the Grand Central, New York, (Wuerth 692), 1919.

65

The Clock, Grand Central, New York (Wuerth 695), 1919.

65

Pennsylvania Station, New York, (Wuerth 699), 1919.

65

Within the Ferry, Cortlandt Street, New York, (Wuerth 700), 1919.

65

The Trains that Come, and the Trains that Go. Pennsylvania Railroad, Philadelphia, (Wuerth 712), 1919.

65

The Commuters. Pennsylvania Station, Philadelphia, (Wuerth 718), 1919.

65

The Castle State in Schuylkill, (Wuerth 736), 1919.

65

The State in Schuylkill, (Wuerth 737), 1919.

65

Stock Exchange, Philadelphia, (Wuerth 741), 1920.

65

Christ Church, Philadelphia, (Wuerth 752), 1920.

65

Polo Grounds, New York, (Wuerth 768), 1921.

65

Excavations, 42nd Street and Park Avenue, New York, (Wuerth 769), 1921.

65

Not Naples, But New York, (Wuerth 776), 1921.

65

Archway, Municipal Building, (Wuerth 778), 1921.

65

The Woolworth, Through the Arch, (Wuerth 785), 1921.

65

The Elevated, (Wuerth 789), 1921.

65

Brooklyn Bridge at Night, (Wuerth 790), 1922.

65

Trinity Churchyard, (Wuerth 792), 1921.

65

Snow, from Brooklyn Heights, (Wuerth 796), 1921.

65

New Fish Market, (Wuerth 797), 1921.

65

The White Way, (Wuerth 798), 1928.

65

The Cliffs, Night, (Wuerth 799), 1922.

65

New York Stock Exchange, (Wuerth 802), 1923.

65

Madison Avenue, (Wuerth 811), 1923.

65

The Times Annex, From 40th Street, (Wuerth 812), 1923.

65

Rebuilding Broadway, Standard Oil Building, (Wuerth 814), 1923.

65

Standard Oil Building, (Wuerth 817), 1923.

65

The Nave, Washington Cathedral, (Wuerth 819), 1923.

65

The Foundations at the Cathedral, Saks Building, (Wuerth 820), 1923.

65

Washington Cathedral, From the Park, (Wuerth 822), 1923.

65

The Telephone and Telegraph Foundation, (Wuerth 827), 1924.

65

Hotel Margaret, Brooklyn, (Wuerth 830), 1924.

65

The Docks, from Columbia Heights, (Wuerth 831), 1924.

65

Montague Terrace, Children Skating (Wuerth 832), 1924.

65

New York, from Grace Court, (Wuerth 836), 1924.

65

The Deserted Ferry, (Wuerth 838), 1924.

65

Pierrepont Place, Montague Terrace, (Wuerth 839), 1924.

65

Willow Street, Brooklyn, (Wuerth 840), 1924.

65

From Clark Street to Wall Street, (Wuerth 842), 1924.

65

Grace Church and Court, (Wuerth 843), 1924.

65

The Tunnel, Montague Terrace, (Wuerth 845), 1924.

65

Fall River Boats Going Out, (Wuerth 846), 1924.

65

Front Street, Brooklyn, (Wuerth 848), 1924.

65

Walt Whitman's House, Camden, New Jersey, (Wuerth 851), 1924.

65

United Fruit Boat, (Wuerth 852), 1925.

65

Caissons on Vesey Street, (Wuerth 854), 1924.

65

B.  Joseph Pennell lithographs.

Description

Title, date and number from Louis A. Wuerth, Catalogue of the Etchings of Joseph Pennell.

Drawer

Apartments of Washington Irving, In the Alhambra, (Wuerth L11), 1896.

66

Lions of the Mosque, (Wuerth L23), 1896.

66

The Garden of the Generalife, (Wuerth L37), 1896.

66

The Shop of the Little Cat, (Wuerth L39), 1896.

66

The Little Inn, (Wuerth L42), 1896.

66

Posada de las Tabladas, (Wuerth L48), 1896.

66

Pots and Pans, (Wuerth L51), 1896.

65

The Rocky Valley, Tintagel, (Wuerth L88), 1897.

66

Lynmouth, from Lynton, (Wuerth L90), 1897.

66

Looking Towards Westward Ho, (Wuerth L102), 1897.

66

Norwinston Church, (Wuerth L105), 1897.

66

Restormel Castle, (Wuerth L115), 1897.

66

Slaughter Bridge, (Wuerth L117), 1897.

66

High Street, Totnes, (Wuerth L119), 1897.

66

Earl's Court Exhibition, (Wuerth L142), 1900.

66

The Inauguration Steps, (Wuerth L265), 1912.

66

Early Morning in the Capitol Grounds, (Wuerth L266), 1912.

66

From the Library Steps, (Wuerth L267), 1912.

66

The Dome of the Capitol, (Wuerth L268), 1912.

66

The House, or The Facade, (Wuerth L269), 1912.

66

The Steps up to the Capitol, (Wuerth L270), 1912.

66

The Way up to the Capitol, (Wuerth L271), 1912.

66

The Avenue, (Wuerth L272), 1912.

66

Broad Street Station, Philadelphia, (Wuerth L273), 1912.

66

The City Hall and Bridge Across Market Street, (Wuerth L275), 1912.

66

City Hall Square and Wanamaker Building, (Wuerth L276), 1912.

66

Down Sansom Street from Eighth Street, (Wuerth L278), 1912.

66

Girard Street, (Wuerth L279), 1912.

66

The Tunnel in the Park, (Wuerth L280), 1912.

66

Old Fairmount Water Works and Basin, (Wuerth L283), 1912.

66

Independence Square and the State House, (Wuerth L288), 1912.

66

Liberty Bell, (Wuerth L292), 1912.

66

The Elevated, at Market Street Wharf, (Wuerth L293), 1912.

66

Philadelphia, from Belmont, (Wuerth L294), 1912.

66

Upsala, Germantown, (Wuerth L295), 1912.

66

Morris House, Germantown, (Wuerth L296), 1912.

66

Cliveden, The Chew House, (Wuerth L297), 1912.

66

Book Room, at Dr. Wister's, (Wuerth L298), 1912.

66

Doorway, Wyck, (Wuerth L299), 1912.

66

Main Street, Germantown, (Wuerth L300), 1912.

66

The Hall, at Cliveden, (Wuerth L301), 1912.

66

Hallway, at Dr. Wister's, (Wuerth L302), 1912.

66

Drawing Room, at Cliveden, (Wuerth L303), 1912.

66

Upper Room, Stenton, (Wuerth L304), 1912.

66

The Hall, Stenton, (Wuerth L305), 1912.

66

The Dining Room, Stenton, (Wuerth L306), 1912.

66

Bed Room, Stenton, (Wuerth L307), 1912.

66

Hallway to Bed Room, Stenton, (Wuerth L308), 1912.

66

The Garden Front, Stenton, (Wuerth L309), 1912.

66

Skyscrapers, from the Gladstone, (Wuerth L312), 1912.

66

C.  Sketches and water colors by Joseph Pennell.

Drawer

"Billy" Deck Hand Roustabout on the Mark Twain, monochrome, [engraved for illustration in  Adventures of an Illustrator], 1882.

51

Old Villa on Bayou, wash drawing for The Creoles of Louisianaby G. W. Cable [engraving used as illustration in  Adventures of an Illustrator], 1882.

51

Skye (Sketch of a peasant's cottage) ink wash drawing, circa 1888.

51

Study for "Tower of St. Ouen, Rouen," charcoal, 1907.

51

Brooklyn Bridge, water color, circa 1919.

51

D.  Oversize photographs and artwork by other artists, for other photographs see Boxes 13 and 14.

Drawer

Joseph Pennell. Photograph by Pirie MacDonald (1867-1942). New York, N.Y., undated. 1 item.

51

Joseph Pennell. Photograph by Arnold Genthe (1869-1942). New York, N.Y., undated. 1 item.

51
Joseph Pennell by Ellis, Philadelphia, Pa., undated. 5 items.
Description

2 copies of one print are inscribed "To Frances Tinker from Elizabeth Robins Pennell."

51

Elizabeth Robins Pennell by Frederick Gutekunst (1831-1917), Gutekunst Studio, Philadelphia, Pa., undated. 1 item.

51

Elizabeth Robins Pennell by Kaiden Studios, New York, N.Y., undated [192-]. 3 items (3 photoprints of portrait in 2 sizes).

51

Photograph of relief portrait of Joseph Pennell by John Flanagan (1865-1952), 1919.

51

Photograph of relief portrait of Joseph Pennell by Adam Pietz, (mounted on board), 1920.

51
Portrait of Joseph Pennell, etching by Levon West (1900-1968), signed and numbered 6/45.
Description

Inscribed "To Edward Larocque Tinker with Christmas Greetings from Elizabeth Robins Pennell, Christmas, 1929."

51
Reproductions of caricatures of Joseph Pennell. 4 items.
Description

3 items inscribed to the Tinkers from ERP.

51

E.  Memorabilia.

Drawer
Susquehannah (Ship), 23 August 1845. 1 item (1 leaf).
Description

Presidential order for safe passage for the Ship Susquehannah of Philadelphia, master and commander Albert Farley [?], signed by President James K. Polk and by James Buchanan, Secretary of State of Pennsylvania, H. & A. Cope & Co. written on verso. Parchment, with 2 engravings at the top, one of a sailing ship, the other of a harbor with lighthouse in the foreground; with presidential seal. This item apparently belo nged to the Pennell family, perhaps to one of Joseph Pennell's relatives in West Chester, Pa.? [see S. Pennell in Correspondence Folder 34] or to Joseph Pennell's father, Larkin Pennell, who worked for the Philadelphia shipping firm of H.& A. Cope & Co.

51

Poster for Memorial Exhibition of the artwork of Joseph Pennell held at Memorial Hall, Philadelphia, 1926. 1 item (5 copies).

51

Collection Inventory

I. Letters to Williams.

Box Folder

From Thomas Bailey Aldrich, Mary Anderson, R.M. Bache, J. Baldwin, George W. Cable, William Jermyn Conlin (as William J. Florence), James T. Field, Charles Godfrey Leland, Clara Moore, Herbert Moreton, Joseph Pennell, Allen Thorndike Rice, George Riddle, Lloyd P. Smith, Edmund C. Stedman, and Townsend Ward, 1880-1885.

1 1

From Thomas Bailey Aldrich, Edwin N. Benson, W.F. Boothe, William Jermyn Conlin (as William J. Florence), Charles H. Luders, Edmund C. Stedman, and Mary Virginia Terhune, 1886-1889.

1 2

From Henry Abbey, Thomas Bailey Aldrich, Maurice Francis Egan, Horace Howard Furness, Charles H. Luders, Margaret T. Langston, Charles Godfrey Leland, Charles Leonard Moore, Agnes Repplier, Charles G.D. Roberts, Frank Dempster Sherman, Edmund C. Stedman, and Edith Matilda Thomas, 1890-1895.

1 3

From Henry Abbey, James Lane Allen, Winston Churchill, William Vaughn Moody, Samuel W. Pennypacker, and Kate Douglas Riggs, 1903-1909.

1 4

From Horace Howard Furness, Samuel Longfellow, S. Weir Mitchell, Joseph Pennell, Agnes Repplier, Otis Skinner, Edmund C. Stedman, and Owen Wister, circa 1880-1909.

1 5

II. Writings.

Box Folder

20th Anniversary Service and Art Club of Germantown, address by Williams, undated.

1 7

"A Field of Corn," poem, undated.

1 7

"A Midnight Phantasy," poem, undated.

1 7

"And He Never Knew," prose, undated.

1 7

"A Wild Lecture," prose, possibly an address, undated.

1 7

"Art," poem, undated.

1 7
Box Folder

"Ave America: An Ode," poem (typescript and published piece), undated.

1

1

7

Box Folder

"Biographia Literaria America: Being Extracts from a Cyclopedia published Anno Domini 4000," humorous piece, undated.

1 7

"Christmas Meeting at Yellow Wing Club," address, undated.

1 7

"Clock that Struck Thirteen," prose, undated.

1 7

"De Profundis," address at Atlantic City, 1893 July.

1 7

Johannes Kelpius, prose pieces, undated.

1 7

"Quote Hymn I," prose, undated.

1 7

"To Beauty: An Ode," poem, undated.

1 7

"The Tragic Touch," prose, undated.

1 7

"Two Roses," poem, undated.

1 7

"Wanderers," poem, undated.

1 7

"Willie," poem, undated.

1 7

Manuscripts, untitled, circa 1880-1909.

1 8

III. Notes and ephemera.

Box Folder

Family signatures and a photograph of an unknown woman (possibly Louisa May Alcott), undated.

1 6

The Informals Club, invitation and newspaper clipping, undated.

1 6

Invitation to the funeral of Edmund Milne, 1822 February 5.

1 6

Johannes Kelpius, notes and drawings of his cave in notebook, undated.

1 6

John Burroughs, naturalist, calling card, undated.

1 6

Photographs of a tennis match by D. Hinkle, photographer, undated.

1 6

Science notes, undated.

1 6

Writings by others, including Edwin N. Benson and Harrison S. Morris, undated.

1 6

Collection Inventory

I.  Incoming correspondence, 1886-1958. 2 boxes.

Series Description

Incoming and outgoing correspondence is not interfiled; the outgoing correspondence follows the incoming. Correspondence is arranged alphabetically by correspondent and then chronologically within each correspondent's file.

Box Folder

The Atlantic Monthly, 1913-1934. 6 items (6 leaves).

1 1-2

Beaux, Cecilia, 1934. 3 items (6 leaves).

1 3

Beveridge, Albert Jeremiah, 1922. 1 item (2 leaves).

1 4

Black, Matthew Wilson, 1958. 1 item (1 leaf).

1 5

Brearley School, 1914. 1 item (2 leaves).

1 6

Burlingame, Edward L., 1921. 1 item (2 leaves).

1 7

Charlotte Cushman Club, undated. 1 item (1 leaf).

1 8

De Schweinitz, G. E., 1919. 1 item (2 leaves).

1 9

Eyre, Wilson, undated. 1 item (1 leaf).

1 10

Forum, 1927. 1 item (3 leaves).

1 11

Fraley, Joseph, 1919. 1 item (2 leaves).

1 12

Fuller, Henry Blake, 1892-1917. 6 items (10 leaves).

1 13

Furness, Horace Howard, 1890-1912, undated. 39 items (78 items).

1 14-18

Furness, William Henry, 1892. 1 item (1 leaf).

1 19

Furness, William Henry III, 1912-1913. 2 items (4 leaves).

1 20

Gimbel, Richard, 1938. 2 items (3 leaves).

1 21

Glasgow, Ellen Anderson G., 1924-1925. 2 items (4 leaves).

1 22

Gosse, Edmund, 1893-1924. 3 items (5 leaves).

1 23

Hadley, Arthur Twining, 1916. 1 item (2 leaves).

1 24

Hale, Richard Walden, 1927-1934. 2 items (3 leaves).

1 25

Henderson, Victor, 1936. 1 item (1 leaf).

1 26

Hillyer, Robert, 1936. 1 item (1 leaf).

1 27

Houghton Mifflin Company, 1935. 1 item (1 leaf).

1 28

Housman, Laurence, 1938. 1 item (1 leaf).

1 29

Irwin, Agnes, 1886-1894. 7 items (14 leaves).

1 30

Keen, William W., 1919. 1 item (2 leaves).

1 31

Lacey, Louise E., 1927. 1 item (2 leaves).

1 32

Lang, Andrew, 1891-1912, undated. 84 items (197 leaves).

1 & 2 33-45

Library Company of Philadelphia, 1934. 1 item (1 leaf).

2 46

Life, 1912. 1 item (2 leaves).

2 47

Marquette University, 1950. 1 item (2 leaves).

2 48

Mitchell, S. Weir, 1894-1908. 2 items (5 leaves).

2 49

More, Paul Elmer, 1917. 1 item (2 leaves).

2 50

Morris, Harrison S., 1902. 1 item (2 leaves).

2 51

Nathan, Robert, 1935. 1 item (2 leaves).

2 52

Pennell, Elizabeth Robins, 1926-1934. 2 items (5 leaves).

2 53

Perry, Bliss, 1905. 1 item (2 leaves).

2 54

Princeton University, 1935. 3 items (6 leaves).

2 55

Quiney, L. P., 1898. 1 item (2 leaves).

2 56

Roosevelt, Theodore, 1918. 2 items (3 leaves).

2 57

Saintsbury, George, 1889. 1 item (2 leaves).

2 58

Scudder, Vida Dutton, 1927. 1 item (2 leaves).

2 59

Senni, Mary, 1945. 1 item (3 leaves).

2 60

Tingle, Jedediah, 1923. 1 item (3 leaves).

2 61

U.S. General Accounting Office, 1927. 1 item (2 leaves).

2 62

University of Pennsylvania, 1931. 1 item (1 leaf).

2 63

Wharton, Edith, 1915. 1 item (1 leaf).

2 64

White, J. William, 1908. 1 item (2 leaves).

2 65

Williams, Wayland Wells, 1925. 1 item (2 leaves).

2 66

Wilson, Francis, 1935. 1 item (3 leaves).

2 67

Wilson, Helen Godey, 1929. 1 item (2 leaves).

2 68

Wister, Owen, 1919-1931, undated. 5 items (9 leaves).

2 69

Witmer, Emma Repplier, 1921. 1 item (2 leaves).

2 70

Wylie, Elinor, 1928. 1 item (2 leaves).

2 71

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II.  Outgoing correspondence, 1908-1938. 12 folders.

Series Description

Correspondence is arranged alphabetically by correspondent and then chronologically within each correspondent file.

Box Folder

Barratt, Morris S., 1913. 1 item (2 leaves).

2 72

Talbot, Francis X., 1925-1928. 6 items (9 leaves).

2 73

von Moschzisker, Mrs., undated. 1 item (1 leaf).

2 74

Wilson, Helen Godey, 1928-1931, undated. 21 items (40 leaves).

2 75-77

Witmer, Emma Repplier, 1908-1938, undated. 36 items (79 leaves).

2 78-83

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III.  Writings by Agnes Repplier. 2 boxes.

Series Description

The first portion of these are manuscripts of Repplier's speeches and essays. These are filed alphabetically by title; some titles used are notated at the beginning of each manuscript in Emma Repplier Witmer's hand—they may not be the titles under which the essays were eventually published. Following the alphabetically ordered files are three file folders containing fragments of manuscripts or manuscripts that could not be identified.

Writings by Agnes Repplier housed in Series VII consist of published articles and essays in alphabetical order by title. Box No. 6 contains paperback copies of two of Agnes Repplier's books; Box No . 7 contains five notebooks by Agnes Repplier dated from 1897 to 1939. The latter include notes that she made from her extensive reading, and two of the notebooks list income she received from the publication of her writings.

In addition, there is one book manuscript housed in Box 13: Mère Marie of the Ursulines.

Box Folder

"Actor and Audience" . 1 item (56 leaves).

3 84
"Aut Caesar, Aut Nihil" . 1 item (30 leaves).
Description

Essay on women's rights & progress

3 85

"Bewilderment" . 1 item (4 leaves).

3 86

"The Brothers Housman" . 1 item (32 leaves).

3 86

"Contemporary Club Talk" . 1 item (16 leaves).

3 87

"Disillusionment" . 1 item (55 leaves).

3 88
"Donna Borghese" . 1 item (17 leaves).
Description

Introduction

3 89

"Dr. Furness" . 1 item (18 leaves).

3 90

"Edith Wharton" . 1 item (18 leaves).

3 91

"Episodes-Crime" . 1 item (12 leaves).

3 92

"Failure of Success" . 1 item (81 leaves).

3 93

"Francis A. Lewis, A Citizen" . 1 item (9 leaves).

3 94

"George Washington" . 1 item (12 leaves).

3 95

"Introducing M. Claudel" . 1 item (15 leaves).

3 96

"Introducing Maurois" . 1 item (10 leaves).

3 97
"Ireland" . 1 item (10 leaves).
Description

Address at the Contemporary Club

3 98

"M. Maurois" . 1 item (6 leaves).

3 99

"Marianus" . 1 item (40 leaves).

3 100

"Mark Twain" . 1 item (16 leaves).

3 101
"Mrs. Cornelius Stevenson" . 1 item (17 leaves).
Description

Dedication

3 102

"The Pedestrian" . 1 item (22 leaves).

3 103

"Philadelphia Libraries" . 1 item (22 leaves).

3 104

"Plea for the Classics" . 1 item (16 leaves).

3 105

"Pleas for the Republican Party and Coolidge" . 1 item (32 leaves).

3 106

"The Pleasure of Possession" . 1 item (32 leaves).

3 107

"Prohibition" . 1 item (16 leaves).

3 108

"The Pursuit of Laughter" . 1 item (166 leaves).

3 109

"Reading and Writing" . 1 item (19 leaves).

3 110

"Reading Books" . 1 item (38 leaves).

3 111

"Research" . 1 item (32 leaves).

3 112
"Retirement of Sothern and Marlowe" . 1 item (23 leaves).
Description

Theater

3 113

"Sentimental America" . 1 item (102 leaves).

3 114
"Serbo-Croatian Minister" . 1 item (15 leaves).
Description

Introduction

3 115

"Sin" . 1 item (20 leaves).

3 116

"Speech in Honor of Gusserand" . 1 item (20 leaves).

4 117

"Survivals" . 1 item (100 leaves).

4 118

"The Town and the Suburbs" . 1 item (51 leaves).

4 119

"Transportation" . 1 item (19 leaves).

4 120

"What Claim Had I" . 1 item (15 leaves).

4 121

Notes on Byron. 1 item (37 leaves).

4 122

Notes on Horace. 1 item (67 leaves).

4 123

Notes on Mère Marie. 1 item (139 leaves).

4 124

manuscript fragments. 1 item (165 leaves).

4 125-127
"Contributions to periodicals" , 1904-1925, 1947. 1 item (47 leaves).
Description

List

4 128
Titles of published articles by Agnes Repplier, undated. 1 item (4 leaves).
Description

List

4 129

"American Magazines,"  The Yale Review, undated. 1 item (7 leaves).

4 130

"As We Were,"  The Atlantic Monthly, undated. 1 item (4 leaves).

4 131

"The Brothers Housman,"  The Atlantic Monthly, undated. 1 item (4 leaves).

4 132

"Children and Their Educators,"  Appleton's Magazine, undated. 1 item (4 leaves).

4 133

"Education" , undated. 1 item (5 leaves).

4 134

"Glory of Pennsylvania" , circa 1920. 1 item (1 leaf).

4 135

"Horace Howard Furness" , 1912. 1 item (1 leaf).

4 136

"Keep on Worrying!"  The Independent, 1922. 1 item (1 leaf).

4 137

"Marius the Epicurian" , 1886. 1 item (5 leaves).

4 138

"The Novel Reader,"  America, 1926. 1 item (2 leaves).

4 139

"Our Overrated Great-Grandmothers,"  Harper's Monthly Magazine, undated. 1 item (6 leaves).

4 140

"The Privilege of Being Murdered" , undated. 1 item (1 leaf).

4 141

"Selling a House" , 1877. 1 item (1 leaf).

4 142

"Sweet are the Uses of Publicity,"  The Century Magazine, undated. 1 item (5 leaves).

4 143

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IV.  Biographical material, 1926-1951. 14 folders.

Series Description

This series consists of publications about Agnes Repplier—her life and work—and includes book reviews. (End of Box 4.)

Box Folder

Adams, Mildred, "Agnes Repplier, Essayist" , 1926. 1 item (1 leaf).

4 144
Brady, Charles A., "Agnes Repplier: tea table autocrat" , 1951.
Description

Journal article

4 145

Chase, Mary Ellen, "The Dean of American Essayists" , 1933. 1 item (1 leaf).

4 146

Curti, Merle, quotation from "The Growth of American thought" , undated. 1 item (1 leaf).

4 147

"Fairbairn, Don, Agnes Repplier...She's 89..." , 1944. 1 item (1 leaf).

4 148

Gilkyson, Phoebe H., "Miss Repplier's Luminous Life of Agnes Irwin" , undated. 1 item (1 leaf).

4 149

N.Y. Herald Tribune, book review of  Junípero Serra, 1933. 1 item (6 leaves).

4 150

McKee, Rose, "Agnes Repplier, 84..." , 1941. 1 item (1 leaf).

4 151

Morris, Harrison S., "Franciscan Monk Hero...," book review of  Junípero Serra, undated. 1 item (2 leaves).

4 152

Philadelphia Record,  "Home Town Honors...After 50 Years" , 1938. 1 item (1 leaf).

4 153

Shuler, Evelyn, "Agnes Repplier, 83 Today..." , 1941. 1 item (1 leaf).

4 154

Taussig, Ellen, "Essayist Agnes Repplier is 90..." , undated. 1 item (3 leaves).

4 155

Who's Who in the East  " Repplier, Agnes" , undated. 1 item (2 leaves).

4 156

Miscellaneous clippings re: Agnes Repplier. 40 items (43 leaves).

4 157

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V.  Agnes Repplier personal papers, Repplier family papers, 1869-1971. 1 box.

Series Description

The first two files in Box 5 contain Agnes Repplier's personal papers, including her will, and a file of clippings. This is followed by the papers of Emma Repplier Witmer, including correspondence, stories, and poems composed by ERW; clippings; and a diary relating details of Emma's medical condition. There are three files of correspondence dated 1869, 1870, and 1873-1874 written by Emma's father, J. George Repplier (who was Agnes Repplier's half-brother) to his fiancée and later his wife, Fannie Levy Repplier. Fannie Levy lived in Savannah, Georgia, while George Repplier worked in New York and Boston—the correspondence is of interest to those exploring the connection between families in the south and families in Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, and Boston just after the Civil War.

Related papers are housed in Series VII boxes 8 and 9.

Box Folder

Agnes Repplier personal papers (will, etc.), 1879-1952. 4 items (10 leaves).

5 158

Agnes Repplier clippings. 34 leaves.

5 159

Emma Repplier Witmer, incoming correspondence, 1957-1971, undated. 6 items (8 leaves plus 1 pamphlet).

5 160

Emma Repplier Witmer re: Agnes Repplier, undated. 3 items (12 leaves).

5 161
Emma Repplier Witmer, "The Amorous Nurse" , undated. 1 item (3 leaves).
Description

Story

5 162
Emma Repplier Witmer, "Gift Horses" , undated. 1 item (3 leaves).
Description

Story

5 163
Emma Repplier Witmer, "The Kingfisher" , undated. 1 item (3 leaves).
Description

Poem

5 164
Emma Repplier Witmer, "Mrs. Publicover" , undated. 1 item (7 leaves).
Description

Story

5 165
Emma Repplier Witmer, "The Wise Cow" , undated. 1 item (8 leaves).
Description

Story

5 166

Emma Repplier Witmer, unidentified poems, undated. 2 items (2 leaves).

5 167

Emma Repplier Witmer, personal documents, 1929. 1 item (2 leaves).

5 168

Emma Repplier Witmer, notes, clippings, diary, undated. 17 items (50 leaves).

5 169

J. George Repplier, correspondence, 1869-1874, undated. 62 items (94 leaves).

5 170-172

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VI.  Memorabilia, 1909-1948. 2 folders.

Series Description

The material in Box No. 5 includes clippings and keepsakes of both Agnes and Emma Repplier.

Additional memorabilia are housed in Series VII Boxes 10, 11 and 12. Box No. 10 contains photographs of Agnes Repplier and two handpainted books which were gifts to her. Box No. 11 contains Agnes Repplier's leather notebook covers. Box No. 12 (oversize) contains photographs of Agnes Repplier and an etching of her made in 1922 by Ada C. Williamson.

Box Folder

Clippings, photographs, etc., 1909-1934. 8 items (8 leaves plus 3 photographs).

5 173

Clippings, gifts to Agnes Repplier, pamphlets, 1924-1948, undated. 25 items (38 leaves plus 4 pamphlets).

5 174

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VII.  Items housed in boxes of varied sizes, 1897-1960s. 8 boxes.

Box Folder
Books by Agnes Repplier, Junípero Serra and  Père Marquette. 2 items.
Description

Armed Services edition, condensed for wartime reading

6-8 175-182

Agnes Repplier notebooks, and recipe book "Cooking notes" , 1897, 1927-1935, 1935-1939, undated. 5 items.

6-8 175-182
Emma Repplier Witmer notebooks, circa 1950-1960s, undated. 6 items.
Note

Some individual leaves of notes in Agnes Repplier's hand are stuck in the pages of these notebooks.

6-8, 8-11 175-182
Repplier family diaries and notebooks. 5 items.
Contents

8-11
Agnes Repplier memorabilia. 10 items.
Contents

* 5 photographs of Agnes Reppliers

* 2 handmade, handpainted books of verse and drawings

* 3 pamphlets printed privately by A. Edward Newton—  "The Christmas Spirit," 1930

*  "Reflections on the Character of Madame Thrale Piozzi" , 1921

*  "John Mytton," 1924

8-11 182-189
Agnes Repplier memorabilia. 3 items.
Description

Leather notebook covers belonging to Agnes Repplier

8-11 182-189
Agnes Repplier memorabilia. 14 items (oversize).
Contents

* 11 photographs of Agnes Repplier and of her cats

* Etching of Agnes Repplier by Ada C. Williamson titled  "Agnes Repplier 1922" (there are two original etchings and a proof of the destroyed plate)

12

Mère Marie of the Ursulines.

13

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Collection Inventory

I.  Correspondence, 1905-1961. 12 boxes.

Series Description

Arranged alphabetically and then chronologically within folders, outgoing and incoming correspondence is interfiled. Undated correspondence was sometimes dated retrospectively by Wanda Gág or by Earle Humphreys whose notes and dates are found thro ughout the Papers. Readers should be aware that Gág was not careful about dates and attempts by later individuals to date materials in this collection are tentative.

Correspondence between Wanda Gág and her siblings is found in Boxes 3-5; family correspondence among her siblings is in the final correspondence subseries in Box 14. Carl Zigrosser's correspondence in reference to the estate of Wanda Gág is in Box 30.

A.  Letters to and from Wanda Gág, 1905-1946.

Description

The bulk of this correspondence is from Adolf Dehn, Earle M. Humphreys, Alma Scott, Carl Zigrosser, and members of Gág's family, including her siblings and aunt Lena Biebl. There is a small selection of letters from important artists and correspon dence with a number of organizations which Gág supported with small donations during the 1930s and early 1940s.

Box Folder

Adamic, Stella -- Dehn, Adolf, 1915-1916.

1 1-46

Dehn, Adolf, 1917-1943, undated.

2 47-67

Deml, Clara -- Gág, Dehli, 1915-1942.

3 68-97

Gág, Dehli -- Gág, Howard, 1916-1945.

4 98-120

Gág, Howard -- Howland, Garth, 1943-1945.

5 121-153

Humphreys, Earle Marshall, 1930-1940.

6 154-173

Humphreys, Earle Marshall -- Janssen, Robert, 1931-1943.

7 174-193

Janssen, Robert -- Moore, Anne Carroll, 1937-1945.

8 194-228

National Bureau for Blind Artists -- Scott, Alma, 1911-1935.

9 229-268

Scott, Alma, Stieglitz, Alfred, 1936-1945.

10 269-296

Tiala, Viola -- Zigrosser, Carl, 1924-1933.

11 297-326

Zigrosser, Carl, 1934-1944.

12 327-344

Zigrosser, Carl -- Unidentified, 1945-1946, undated.

13 345-348

B.  Letters to and from Alma Schmidt Scott, 1912-1961.

Description

Comprises Alma Scott's correspondence with individuals other than Wanda Gág. Most of this correspondence was generated while Scott was working on her biography of Gág, ca. 1942-1949; but it also includes Scott's early correspondence with Gág's sisters, especially from Flavia and Stella, dating from 1912. Correspondence with Gág's family members continues after Wanda's death in 1946. Scott filed typewritten notes and attached photographs to this correspondence for her biography.

Box Folder

Coward-McCann, Inc. -- Gág, Stella, 1912-1945.

13 349-365

Gág, Stella -- Weschcke, Charles, 1946-1961, undated.

14 366-374

C.  Family correspondence, circa 1927-1946.

Description

Correspondence among family members, not including Wanda Gág. Includes some items of correspondence between Gág's family, Earle M. Humphreys and Carl Zigrosser. Also included is correspondence between Humphreys and Zigrosser from 1932-1946. The continuation of their correspondence to 1950, which refers to the estate of Wanda Gág, is in Box 30.

At various times Wanda Gág shared her country homes with her sisters Flavia and Dehli, with her brother Howard, and with Earle M. Humphreys. Her other sisters and brothers-in-law visited and vacationed at her home, as did Carl Zigrosser. This network of close relationships is reflected in correspondence among various family members and friends.

Box Folder

Biebl, Magdalena to Dehli Gág and Alma Scott.

14 375

Biehn, Marcus to Earle M. Humphreys.

14 376

Gág, Asta to Dehli Gág.

14 377

Gág Asta to Flavia Gág.

14 378

Gág, Asta to Howard Gág.

14 379

Gág, Dehli to Flavia Gág.

14 380

Gág, Dehli to Jack Grass.

14 381

Gág, Dehli to Earle M. Humphreys.

14 382

Gág, Dehli from Robert Janssen.

14 383

Gág, Dehli to Carl Zigrosser.

14 384

Gág, Flavia to Howard Gág with appended note from Humphreys to Howard Gág.

14 385

Gág, Flavia and Stella Gág.

14 386

Gág, Flavia and Thusnelda Gág.

14 387

Gág, Flavia and Earle M. Humphreys.

14 388

Gág, Flavia and Robert Janssen.

14 389

Gág, Flavia and Carl Zigrosser includes typescript story by Flavia Gág "The Self-Maid Man" .

14 390

Gág, Howard and Stella Gág, includes drawings made by Stella's child Gary Harm.

14 391

Gág, Howard and Thusnelda Gág.

14 392

Gág, Howard to Earle M. Humphreys.

14 393

Gág, Howard and Robert Janssen.

14 394

Gág, Stella to Thusnelda Gág.

14 395

Humphreys, Earle M. and Robert Janssen.

14 396
Humphreys, Earle M. and Carl Zigrosser.
Description

Includes 2 photographs of Humphreys taken by Robert Janssen.

14 397

Humphreys, Earle Marshall. Condolences sent to Humphreys at Wanda Gág's death, 1946.

14 398-399

Janssen, Robert to Zigrosser, Carl.

14 400

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II.  Writings and ideas for publication, 1905-1945. 3 boxes.

Series Description

Includes nearly all of Gág's writings found in her papers at the University of Pennsylvania, with the exception of her diaries and a few notes she prepared for lectures and radio talks. From the time of her childhood, Gág wrote with the idea of publishing her writings; after her father died in 1908, publishing became a necessity. Although these writings have been organized in a series separate from her artwork, readers should be aware that there was no clear division between ideas for art and ideas for writing in Gág's work. These notes, notebooks, and sketch books include drawings, sketches, and stories throughout. The series V. Artwork comprises completed drawings and prints, but also includes some notes and text for stories.

A.  Published writings and artwork, 1923-1940.

Description & Arrangement

Includes Gág's pamphlet, "Batiking at Home" and her article for  The Nation,  "A Hotbed of Feminists," plus copies of serials where her prints were published, which are arranged chronologically. In addition, a few of these published prints are in Oversize, box 40.

Box Folder

The Guild Pioneer, vol. 1 no.5 (May 1923). Prints by Wanda Gág.

14 401

Batiking at Home: A handbook for beginners, published by  Woman's Home Companion, 1926.

14 402

"These Modern Women: A Hotbed of Feminists,"  The Nation, 22 June 1927 .

14 403

Book Dial, vol. 5, no. 5 (Late Fall, 1928). Prints by Wanda Gág.

14 404

"A Scene From the Scandals,"  Theatre Guild Magazine. December 1928. Print by Wanda Gág.

14 405

"There is a Green Hill Far Away."  The American Sketch. January 1929. Print by Wanda Gág.

14 406

Wings: The Literary Guild Magazine, vol. 12, no. 7 (July 1938). Illustrations by Wanda Gág.

14 407

Growing Pains. Illustrated order form, 1940.

14 408

B.  Early writings, circa 1905-1920.

Description & Arrangement

Comprises notebooks in which Gág copied andrecopied stories she had written for submission to periodicals, primarily the Minneapolis Junior Journal. Also includes two sketch books, containing more writing than sketches, which she kept during her student days in art school in Minneapolis and New York, and which were not included in her series of diaries. Arranged chronologically, titles of stories and poems are listed when possible. Edythe Vernon Younge was a pen name of Wanda Gág.

Box Folder
Early Writings, circa 1905-1906. 1 item (notebook).
Contents

* "Jocko"

*  "Goldenrod and Sylvia"

*  "To the Rescue"

*  "Violet! Our May Queen"

*  "Arizona and Co."

15 409
Early Writings, circa 1905-1906. 1 item (notebook, ill. with watercolor).
Contents

* "An Afternoon Trip"

*  "Doll Reggy and I"

*  "Ronnie's Trouble"

*  "Emerald Woods"

15 410
Early Writings, circa 1905-1906. 2 items (8 leaves).
Contents

* "Sally's Thoughts About Gardening"

*  "The Story of a Trip"

* Ideas for stories

15 411
Early Writings, circa 1906-1907. 1 item (pocket notebook, ill).
Contents

* "A Little Mother's Cares"

*  "The Return"

*  "Lady Tulip Bulbs Visit"

*  "A Spring Sketch"

*  "Jocko, the Paper Parcel" [fragment]

*  "Vela's Glen"

*  "Sally's Thoughts About Gardening"

*  "Sally Has the Earache"

*  "Bobby's Black-and-Tan" [play]

*  "A Noise You Dislike. Why?"

*  "Hyacinthe's Garden"

*  "Two Little Innocent Thieves"

*  "Jane's Revenge"

*  "The Spring Garden"

15 412

Early Writings, "Jane's Revenge" and an early attempt at dialog, circa 1906-1907. 2 items (12 leaves).

15 413
Early Writings, circa 1906-1907. 1 item (notebook).
Contents

Notebook with "I Am It" printed on front cover, ill. with pencil drawings, watercolor and illustrations cut out from magazines (fragile):

* "Ruth and her Dress"

*  "Thanksgiving Day"

*  "The Jolly Four"

*  "Mr. Bluebird's Misfortune"

*  "Child's Alphabet"

*  "The Great Resolve"

*  "Hyacinthe Abroad"

*  "The Prize Garden"

*  "How the Easter Rabbit Was Hatched"

*  "Easter Bonnets"

* Lists of names for girls, boys, twins, last names and names of palaces

15 414

Early Writings, 1908. 2 leaves.

15 415
Early Writings, poems, 1910-1913. 5 items (9 leaves).
Contents

* "Her Twisted Way"

*  "Would You?"

*  "A Little-Girl Adventure"

*  "Indian Summer"

*  "The Walra"

*  "To L-"

15 416
Early Writings, poems and songs, 1910-1913. 1 item (pocket notebook).
Contents

* "Just Dreams"

*  "Wanderer's Abschied" (in German)

*  "The Tables Turned"

*  "Who Is He? Can You Guess?"

*  "A Difference"

*  "The Snowstorm"

*  "Mother Goose's Party"

*  "The Coming of Spring"

*  "Easter Verse"

*  "Nonsense Verse"

*  "Great Grandmama's Chest"

*  "The Wind"

*  "Dedication to Mr. R. Graves"

*  "The Day is Done"

*  "Dedication to Miss Gould"

*  "Grandmother's Farm"

*  "Letter Limerick"

*  "The Garden of Dreams"

*  "Thanksgiving at Grandma's"

*  "Out of the Harbor, into the Sea"

*  "Indian Summer"

*  "Tragedy"

*  "Parody"

*  "A Thought"

*  "The Christmas Spirit"

*  "A Dream"

*  "The Walra"

*  "To L-"

*  "A Message"

15 417
Early Writings, 1914-1915. 12 leaves.
Contents

* "A Rainy-Day Thought"

*  "An Artist's Thought"

*  "The First of May"

*  "The Garden of the Great Unknown"

*  "A Twentieth Century Wail"

* Poems

*  "Personal Discoveries," writings about problems in drawing

15 418
Sketch book and commonplace book, circa 1914-1915. 1 item (notebook).
Description

Poetry, ideas for stories, sketches, meditations, reflections on books read while in art school; pencil sketches of people, self-portraits, watercolor ideas for Christmas cards, and fashion sketches.

15 419
Notes and reflections, 1914-1917. 30 leaves.
Description

Reflections on art, pencil sketches, diary entries, poems. Leaves are from notebooks, some fragments.

15 420
Commonplace book and reflections, 1915-1918. 1 item (notebook).
Description

Reflections on art theory, readings. Lists of art lectures, plays, music, excursions experienced in New York City, Lists of books in her library, a few diary entries, very few sketches, printed poems tipped in. 1 notebook, cloth binding, a number of pages torn out.

15 421
Early Writings, circa 1919-1920, undated. 4 items (12 leaves).
Contents

* "Growing Pains"

*  "Interlude"

* Poems

*  "The Middle West Far East Colony," typescript story

* Untitled story  "One winter day two little children..."

15 422
Early Writings, undated. 13 leaves.
Contents

* "My Schoolhouse"

*  "Not a Poem"

*  "I Was Made For You"

*  "A Midsummer Night's Dream"

*  "The Love of an Adolescent"

15 423

C.  Children's literature, circa 1920-1945, undated.

Description

Notes on ideas for children's stories, some published, but most unpublished. The production materials for Gág's published children's books were sold after her death and are located in other repositories, primarily the University of Minnesota.

1.  Original stories.

Description

Includes some children's stories Gág worked on with Ruth Chrisman Gannett, which Gág attributes to Gannett, and stories by Gág.

Box Folder
Stories, 1930-1931.
Contents

Stories by Ruth Gannett:

*  "The Kitten Story"

*  "The Fuzzy Dog Story"

*  "Sleeping Away"

*  "Snowing"

*  "The Bird Story"

15 424

"Millions of Cats" puppet play, typescript,  "Millienen von Katzen," translation by Gág into German, and notes about cats, undated.

15 425
Stories, 1935 and undated.
Contents

* "Ivory Soap Stories"

*  "The Cry-Away Bird" [published in  Delineator, May 1935

*  "Round-Eyes and Roley-Eyes"

*  "The Lonely Mountains"

*  "The Pink Puppy and His Trees" (typescript, manuscript, and 5 colored pencil drawings by Gág) * Typescripts with ms. corrections

15 426
Stories.
Contents

* "Shoes"

*  "Invention"

*  "Bobo"

*  "Ooza"

15 427

"Stories, ideas & notes, expressions" , circa 1930-1941. 1 item (notebook, ill).

15 428

2.  Translations from Fairy Tales by the Brothers Grimm.

Description

Gág made her own translations from German of the Kinder- und Hausmärchen of the Brothers Grimm. Includes notes Gág took on other writers' translations of Grimms' Fairy Tales, and her research materials on the stories.

Box Folder

"The Griffon,"  "Poor and the Rich,"  "Cobbler and Elves,"  "Golden Goose,"  "Die Rübe,"  "Three Men in the Woods,"  "The Juniper Tree" and more. 2 items (notebooks).

15 429

"The Old One in the Wood" notebook;  "Red Riding Hood" and manuscript notes for Grimms' tales.

15 430

"Reynard the Fox" research notes. 1 item (notebook).

15 431

3.  Proposed "Baby's Bookshelf," Collection of stories and verse for young children, circa 1942-1944.

Description

Ideas, including original verse, for an illustrated series for young children.

Box Folder
Stories and poetry for proposed "Baby's Bookshelf" . 2 items (notebooks).
Contents

* "My Gardens"

*  "Birds in the Branches"

*  "The Bumble Bee"

*  "The Kitten Story"

*  "The Bird Story"

*  "Birds and Bunnies"

*  "The Garden"

*  "Shoes"

*  "Roosterkin and Henniken and Home Sweet Home"

*  "Three Little Duckies"

*  "Hide and Seek"

*  "Two Little Fingers"

*  "A Very Little Flea"

*  "Barbara"

* Other fragments and ideas

16 432
Stories and poetry for proposed "Baby's Bookshelf" .
Contents

* "Hide and Seek"

*  "Two Little Fingers"

*  "A Very Little Flea"

*  "Birds in the Branches"

*  "The Moon"

*  "Three Little Children" *  "Of Olden Days and Fairy Ways"

* Notes and drafts for unidentified children's stories

16 433

D.  Autobiographical writings, 1918-1945, undated.

1.  Proposed "Childhood Reminiscences" .

Description

Stories told from the point of view of a young child, based on Gág's experiences growing up in New Ulm, Minnesota. Includes Gág's research on her family history, and a number of Gág's recollections copied in multiple versions. One notebook from this series and three typed stories were gifts to Zigrosser and are located with correspondence in Folders 342 (notebook) and 344 (typescript).

Box Folder
Reminiscences, 1942. 1 item (notebook).
Contents

* "The Dentist Story"

*  "Wanda and God"

*  "Pre-school"

*  "Papa's Schulzeugnis"

16 434
Reminiscences, 1942. 1 item (notebook).
Contents

* "Meditation"

*  "Books"

*  "Etiquette books"

*  "School" (2nd - 8th grades)

*  "Worries"

*  "Odds and Ends"

*  "Abstract Experiences" (  "Rhythm,"  "Fairies,"  "Abstract Forms,"  "Accordion Pleats,"  "Art,"  "Sex" )

16 435
Reminiscences, 1942. 1 item (notebook).
Contents

* "Outline"

*  "Grown-ups"

*  "The Park Concert"

*  "Primavera"

*  "Story Behind the Picture"

16 436
Reminiscences, 1944. 1 item (notebook + 18 leaves).
Contents

* "I'm Two"

* Notes on children including her niece Barbara Jean Treat

16 437
Reminiscences, 1945, undated. 2 items (notebooks).
Contents

* "All Christmas"

*  "Christmas Story"

16 438
Reminiscences, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Contents

* "Grandma's - general" (descriptions of family members, neighbors and friends,  "Klaus Contingent,"  "Papa,"  "Mama" )

* Family Origins

*  "School"

*  "Going down the Rellrote Tracks"

*  "Paper Dolls at Grandma's"

* Biographical information on family and more

16 439
Reminiscences, undated. 2 items (notebooks).
Contents

* "Meditation"

16 440
Reminiscences, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Contents

* Layout of New Ulm * Family origins

*  "Fate?"

*  "Early Ideas, Superstitions, etc."

*  "Technique or Plan"

*  "Papa's Schulzeugnis"

*  "My First Home..."

*  "Prememory Items"

*  "Kindergarten"

*  "Primary School"

*  "Pre-school Memories"

*  "Our Home"

*  "First Grade"

*  "Early Drawing"

*  "What Home Meant to Me"

*  "Grown-up World and I"

*  "Wanda and God"

16 441
Reminiscences, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Contents

* "Wanda and God"

*  "Meditation"

*  "Primavera"

*  "The Park Concert"

16 442
Reminiscences, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Contents

* Playing Dentist

*  "Grab Bag"

*  "Christmas"

*  "Dolls"

*  "Puppet Show"

*  "Playing"

*  "Clothing"

*  "Food"

*  "The First Show I Went to Alone"

*  "Weseparately" (descriptions of siblings Stella, Thusnelda, Asta, Dehli, Howard and Flavia)

*  "Vacation Days"

*  "Sand Stones"

*  "Playmates"

*  "Wash Day"

16 443
Reminiscences, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Contents

* Scenes from the House of Gág

* The Gág Saga

*  "Art"

*  "Technique"

*  "Books"

*  "Clothing"

*  "Christmas"

*  "Eating"

*  "Feminism"

*  "Friends"

*  "The Grown-up World and I"

*  "Our Home"

*  "Infantile Doings and Sayings"

*  "Klaus Contingent"

* Descriptions of Biebl relatives

*  "Grandma's"

*  "Neighbors"

*  "Obsessions, Superstitions and Queer Ideas"

*  "Odds and Ends"

*  "Playing"

*  "Papa"

*  "School"

*  "This and That"

*  "We-separately"

*  "General Plan for book"

16 444
Reminiscences, undated. 2 items (notebooks).
Contents

* "Of Pennies and Pencils" (description of family and New Ulm)

* "First Memories, My Place in My Young World" (house in New Ulm)

16 445
Reminiscences, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Contents

* "About Fairies"

*  "The Dentist Story"

*  "About Teachers"

*  "Going down the Rellrote Tracks"

*  "Paper Dolls at Grandma's"

16 446
Reminiscences, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Contents

* "The Dentist Story"

*  "Going to the Barbershop"

16 447
Reminiscences, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Contents

* "Her First Show"

*  "Down at Grandma's"

*  "Her First Show Alone"

*  "A Summer's Day"

16 448
Reminiscences, undated. 2 items (notebooks).
Contents

* "General Play"

*  "Dolls"

*  "The Sand Stone"

16 449
Reminiscences, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Contents

* "Kindergarten"

*  "Papa's Death"

*  "Our Block"

*  "Hermanje"

*  "The Rhythm Beat"

*  "Primary School"

*  "Accordion Pleats"

*  "Burying Children"

*  "Visit for Aunt Mary"

*  "Aunt Lena"

*  "Del-Floofy"

*  "Rhythm"

*  "Ruby"

*  "Mirror"

*  "Pins"

*  "Holzegens"

*  "Accordion Pleats"

*  "Papa and Mama"

*  "Decoration Day"

17 450

Early history of New Ulm and family origins, undated. 1 item (notebook).

17 451
Reminiscences, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Contents

* "Rell Rote Tracks"

*  "Paper Dolls"

*  "Going to the Butcher Shop"

*  "Wanda and God"

*  "Meditation"

17 452
Notes, undated. 1 item (notebook + 31 leaves).
Contents

* Home

* Pre-school memories

*  "Primavera"

*  "In the one-roomed school house"

*  "Books"

*  "House and Yard"

*  "Meditation"

*  "Duplicates of Childhood Reminiscences"

17 453
Reminiscences, undated. 42 leaves.
Contents

* "Tussy Sick"

*  "Measles"

*  "1901-1902" ”-Grandma's

*  "Down at Grandma's"

*  "A day at Grandma's"

*  "Paper Dolls"

*  "The Barbershop"

*  "Show Alone"

*  "Wash Day"

*  "Snow"

17 454
Notes for proposed "Childhood Reminiscences" , undated. 38 leaves.
17 455

3.  Proposed sequel to Growing Pains .

Description and Arrangment

Gág planned to publish additional excerpts from her diaries and letters from 1918 on, and for this she recopied portions of her diaries and correspondence with Adolf Dehn. This sequel was never completed. Arranged chronologically, the letters were later numbered by Wanda in reference to this project.

Box Folder
Notes re: proposed sequel to Growing Pains, undated. 58 leaves.
Description

Lists of letters between Wanda Gág and Adolf Dehn, recopied letters and diary excerpts re: Adolf Dehn, 1920-1922 and more.

17 459
Recopied letters, book 3, 5½, undated. 1 item.
Description

Letters between Wanda Gág and Adolf Dehn and two poems dated 21 July 1918-27 April 1919.

17 460
Recopied letters, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Description

Letters between Wanda Gág and Adolf Dehn dated 14 October 1918 - 21 July 1919.

17 461
Recopied letters and diary entries, book 6, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Description

Letters between Wanda Gág and Adolf Dehn dated 20 December 1918 - 29 April 1919.

17 462
Recopied letters and diary entries, book 6 ½, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Description

Letters between Wanda Gág and Adolf Dehn dated 16 May 1919 - 8 June 1919.

17 463
Recopied letters and diary entries, book 7, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Description

Letters between Wanda Gág and Adolf Dehn dated 25 June 1919 - 7 September 1919.

17 464
Recopied diary entries, book 8, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Description

Diary entries dated 25 July 1919 - 22 May 1920.

17 465
Recopied diary entries, book 9, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Description

Diary entries dated 22 May 1920 - 23 March 1921.

17 466
Recopied diary entries, book 10, undated. 1 item (notebook).
Description

Diary entries dated 30 March 1921 - 5 October 1921.

17 467
Recopied letters, undated . 1 item (notebook).
Description

Letters between Wanda Gág and Adolf Dehn dated 16 October 1921 - 28 December 1921.

17 468
Recopied letters, undated. 56 leaves.
Description

Letters between Wanda Gág and her siblings Asta, Dehli, Flavia, Howard and Thusnelda, and her friends Alma Schmidt Scott and Boris dated 16 January 1920 - 29 September 1921.

17 469

Notes for proposed "Childhood Reminiscences" , undated. 64 leaves.

17 456

2.  Growing Pains .

Description

Materials from Gág's diaries and letters from 1908-1917 used or recopied for inclusion in Gág's book, published in 1940. Typed transcripts of these diaries were prepared for the book and have been filed with the original diaries. Gág's handwriting is sometimes difficult to read, and the transcripts, typed by Flavia Gág, make the diaries more accessible.

Box Folder

Notes on Growing Pains,  "My Early Letters to Alma Schmidt" , undated. 2 items (notebooks).

17 457

Miscellaneous notes on Growing Pains.

17 458

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III.  Diaries, 1908-1946. 9 boxes.

A.  Diaries, 1908-1945.

Description & Arrangement

Gág referred to these as her "Diaries Proper," and distinguished them from Day Diaries and other notebooks in which she wrote. The diaries were transcribed for Wanda Gág's book  Growing Pains, published in 1940. The diaries were typed, for the most part, by Flavia Gág; typed transcripts are filed with the originals, and are arranged chronologically, numbered by Gág. Diaries numbered 1, 6, 12, 21, and 29 are missing and were not part of the papers when they were transferred to the University of Pennsylvania.

Box Folder

Diary 2, 12 October 1908 - February 1909.

18 470

Transcript of Diary 2, undated.

18 471

Diary 3, 8 April 1909 - 26 September 1909.

18 472

Transcript of Diary 3, undated.

18 473

Diary 4, 25 September 1909 - 16 January 1910.

18 474

Transcript of Diary 4, undated.

18 475

Diary 5, 27 December 1909 - 28 February 1910.

18 476

Transcript of Diary 5, undated.

18 477

Diary 7, 1 March 1910 - 11 July 1910.

18 478

Diary 7B, 19 March 1910 - 15 June 1910.

18 479

Transcript of Diary 7B, undated.

18 480

Diary 8, 12 July 1910 - 21 August 1910.

18 481

Transcript of Diary 8, undated.

18 482

Diary 9, 29 August 1910 - 28 October 1910.

18 483

Transcript of Diary 9, Diary entries, undated.

18 484

Diary 10, 28 October 1910 - 21 January 1911.

18 485

Transcript of Diary 10, undated.

18 486

Diary 11, 23 January 1911 - 14 May 1911.

18 487

Transcript of Diary 11, undated.

18 488

Diary 13, 1 July 1911 - October 1911.

19 489

Transcript of Diary 13, undated.

19 490

Diary 14, 25 December 1911 - 28 April 1913.

19 491

Transcript of Diary 14, undated.

19 492

Diary 15, 5 May 1913 - 8 August 1913.

19 493

Transcript of Diary 15, undated.

19 494

Diary 16, 13 August 1913 - 22 September 1913.

19 495

Transcript of Diary 16, undated.

19 496

Diary 17, 27 September 1913 - 17 January 1914.

19 497

Transcript of Diary 17, undated.

19 498

Diary 18, 8 January 1914 - 20 February 1914.

19 499

Transcript of Diary 18, undated.

19 500

Diary 19, 1 March 1914 - 5 April 1914.

19 501

Transcript of Diary 19, undated.

19 502

Diary 20, April 1914 - 6 May 1914.

19 503

Transcript of Diary 20, undated.

19 504

Diary 22, 25 May 1914 - 15 August 1914.

20 505

Transcript of Diary 22, undated.

20 506-508

Diary 23, 17 August 1914 - 2 October 1914.

20 509

Transcript of Diary 23, undated.

20 510-511

Diary 23A, 6 October 1914 - 26 November 1914.

20 512

Transcript of Diary 23A, undated.

20 513-514

Diary 24, 27 November 1914 - 15 December 1914.

20 515

Diary 25, 18 December 1914 - 9 February 1915.

21 516

Diary 26, 15 February 1915 - 14 April 1915.

21 517

Diary 27, 14 April 1915 - 25 May 1915.

21 518

Diary 28, 25 May 1915 - 7 September 1915.

21 519

Diary 30, 18 February 1916 - 4 October 1916.

21 520

Diary 31, 14 October 1916 - 31 July 1917.

21 521

Diary 32, August 1917 - 30 November 1917.

22 522

Diary 33, 30 November 1917 - 10 June 1918.

22 523

Diary 34, 28 June 1918 - 29 October 1918.

22 524

Diary 35, 1 November 1918 - 25 June 1919.

22 525

Diary 36, February 1919 - February 1920.

22 526

Diary 36B, February 1920 - 23 March 1921.

22 527

Diary 37, 30 March 1921 - 7 November 1921.

22 528

Diary 38, 9 November 1921 - 2 May 1922.

22 529

Diary 39, 3 May 1922 - 22 January 1923.

23 530

Diary 40, 22 March 1922 - 2 December 1922.

23 531

Diary 41, 29 January 1924 - 13 April 1925.

23 532

Diary 42, 25 April 1925 - 18 January 1928.

23 533

Diary 43, 18 January 1928 - 13 February 1928.

23 534

Diary 44, 14 February 1928 - 16 March 1929.

23 535

Diary 45, 17 March 1929 - 23 April 1929.

23 536

Diary 46, 2 May 1929 - 10 July 1929.

24 537

Diary 47, 10 July 1929 - 4 March 1930.

24 538

Diary 48, 6 March 1930 - 12 June 1930.

24 539

Diary 49, 20 June 1930 - 30 January 1931.

24 540

Diary 50, 30 January 1931 - 23 June 1931.

24 541

Diary 51, 10 March 1932 - 28 December 1932.

24 542

Diary 52, 28 December 1932 - 25 May 1933.

24 543

Diary 53, 3 June 1933 - 10 June 1933.

24 544

Diary 54, 10 June 1933 - 17 July 1933.

24 545

Diary 55, 17 July 1933 - 17 September 1933.

25 546

Diary 56, 17 September 1933 - 10 December 1933.

25 547

Diary 57, 10 December 1933 - 13 May 1935.

25 548

Diary 58, 14 March 1938 - 17 February 1942.

25 549

Diary 59, 17 March 1942 - 14 February 1945.

25 550

B.  Day diaries, 1929-1946.

Description

Gág referred to these as her "Diary Annex" as differentiated from the  "Diaries Proper." For the most part they contain brief annotations about activities, although in some cases they include full diary entries. Included here are notebooks and day diaries kept by Wanda during her final illness.

Box Folder

1929-1932. 4 items (notebooks).

25 551

Day Diaries, 1933-1935. 3 items (notebooks).

25 552

Recopied Day Diaries for 1929-1935, undated. 1 item (notebook).

25 553

Day Diaries, 1936-1937. 2 items (notebooks).

25 554

Recopied Day Diaries for 1936-1937, undated. 1 item (notebook).

25 555

Day Diaries, 1940-1941. 2 items (notebooks + 10 leaves).

26 556

Day Diaries, 1942-1943. 2 items (notebooks).

26 557

Day Diaries, 1944-1945. 2 items (notebooks).

26 558

Recopied Day Diaries for 1944 - April 1945. 1 item (notebook).

26 559

Hospital Diary, 18 February 1945 - 5 April 1945. 1 item (notebook + 12 leaves).

26 560

Recopied Hospital Diary for 11 March 1945 - 19 June 1945. 1 item (notebook).

26 561

Trip to Florida Travelog, 1946. 2 items (notebooks).

26 562

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IV.  Lecture notes; notes on writing; radio talks and readings; miscellaneous and unidentified notes. 6 folders.

Box Folder

Lecture notes, "The artist and the child," for the Child Study Association, typescript with ms. corrections, undated. 3 leaves.

27 563

Lecture notes on art and life with reference to Gág's print Grandma's Parlor , undated. 1 item (notebook).

27 563

Notes for "Author! Author!" notes and partial story for appearance on  "Author! Author!" canceled due to illness, circa 1945, undated. 13 leaves.

27 564
Notes on writing, including grammar, word choice, etc. 2 items (notebooks).
Contents

* "My first radio effort June 1941" * Radio notes and ideas

27 565
Notes on art, marriage, undated. 12 leaves.
Contents

* "After our secret marriage..."

* Lecture notes on art by Robert Henri, with explanation of  "Diary Annex" on cubism, god, grownups

*  "Spaziergang" [three artists taking a stroll]

27 566

Chronological life history/autobiography by Gág from with related notes, 1912-1944. 9 leaves.

27 567

Unidentified notes.

27 568

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V.  Artwork, 1915-1948, undated. 1.5 boxes (+ oversize).

Series Description

Includes published and unpublished drawings, prints, and Christmas cards. There are a number of erotic and humorous drawings, watercolors, and booklets; presumably most of these were gifts from Wanda Gág to Carl Zigrosser.

A.  Drawings, watercolors and prints, 1915-1944, undated.

Description & Arrangement

Includes published and unpublished drawings and prints; Christmas cards; sexually humorous booklets, drawings, and paintings; and rough sketches. A number of these were gifts to Carl Zigrosser. Arranged chronologically, titles in quotation marks are taken from the item if titled, and from Winnan, if untitled. See also 5 items in Oversize, Box 40.

Box Folder

Self-portrait, pastel, 1915. 1 item.

27 569

Untitled pencil sketches, 1921-1922. 3 items.

27 570
Drawings, watercolors and prints, 1924-1927. 3 items.
Contents

* Untitled pen, brush and ink related to Chidlow Tree, [Connecticut], 1924

* Untitled nude, pencil, 1926-1927, gift to Carl Zigrosser, 1940

* Tumble Timbers, linoleum cut, 1927

27 571
Christmas Eve II , 1927. 10 items.
Description

Lithograph, with message "Greetings from the House of Weyhe 1927."

27 572
Drawings, watercolors and prints, 1928. 2 items.
Contents

* Siesta, soft ground etching, gift to Carl Zigrosser

*  A Morning in January, pen and ink, gift to Carl Zigrosser

27 573

The Cobbler's Shop, first print, not successful, 1931.

27 574

Adam and Eve, ink and pencil. Gift to Carl Zigrosser, 1923-1932. 1 item (booklet + 2 leaves).

27 575
Urformen der Natur, 1934. 1 item (booklet + 8 leaves).
Description

Watercolors, miniatures, some are detached from pages.

27 576
Christmas Cards, 1935.
Description

Christmas Tumble Timbers, Christmas Eve, Fireplace, Franklin Stove, Lantern and Fireplace. 5 cards with prints by Gág, published by the American Artists Group.

27 577
Self-Caricature (Self Portrait) , 1940.
Description

Print from 1937 drawing, used for announcement for Wanda Gág retrospective exhibition at the Wehye Gallery.

27 578
Landscapes, 1944, undated. 2 items.
Contents

* Untitled landscape, pencil

* Color reproduction of  The Red Barn, watercolor

27 579

A Sinthesis of the More Exotic Vices, watercolor, undated. 1 item (8 leaves).

27 580
Six Little Gems of Modern Art with appreciations by Professor Ernest De Fender, undated. 26 leaves.
Contents

* Crescendo

*  Love's Young Dream

*  Nude with Egg-Beater

*  Interlewd

*  Ob Scene in Central Park

*  The Fountain of Youth

* Preliminary drawings for each

27 581
Drawings, watercolors and prints, undated. 3 items.
Contents

* The Tree of Knowledge, pen and ink

* Untitled [man and tree], pencil

* Untitled [man and tree], pencil

27 582

Love Among the Acrobats , sketches, pen and ink and pencil, circa 1934. 3 leaves.

27 583

Untitled female nude, pen, brush and ink, undated. 1 item.

27 584

Untitled (2 reclining figures), drawing on sandpaper, undated. 1 item.

27 585

Untitled, watercolor on sandpaper, undated. 2 items.

27 586

Untitled sketches, notes, poems, captions for drawings, undated. 16 leaves.

27 587

B.  Drawings and prints for children's books, projects for children, circa 1921-1942, undated.

Description

Artwork for children's books and a booklet created for Gág's niece, Barbara Jean Treat. Some of these items were gifts to Carl Zigrosser, laid into copies of Gág's books.

Box Folder

Early drawings, pencil, undated. 3 items.

28 588
Text for Happiwork Story Boxes, typescript, circa 1921-1923, undated.
Note

See Boxes 36-39.

28 589
Cats, 1928-1929. 4 items.
Contents

* Cat on Chair (Cat in Kitchen), wood engraving, sixth state, 1928. 1 item

*  Cats at the Window, wood engraving, 1929 2 copies

* From  Millions of Cats, two cards with prints from the book, promotion by Coward-McCann. 2 items

28 590
Tales From Grimm, 1936-1938. 3 items.
Contents

* Spindle, Shuttle, and Needle, preliminary pen and ink drawing for  Tales From Grimm. Gift to Carl Zigrosser, 1936. 1 item

* Six Servants, preliminary pen and ink drawing for  Tales From Grimm. Gift to Carl Zigrosser, 1936. 1 item

*  Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, preliminary pen and ink drawing, 1938. 1 item

28 591

Nothing at All, 2 original drawings, signed. Gift to Carl Zigrosser, 1941.

28 592
Drawings and ideas for children's books. 4 items.
Contents

* Fanny and Bobo, pencil sketch, undated

*  The Wimble Wamble of Jimble Jamble, colored pencil, undated

*  Tin-canary, pen and ink, undated

* Untitled watercolor (Girl sleeping, stockings on bed posts),undated

28 593

A Bedtime Story for Barbara Jean , circa 1941-1942. 1 item (booklet + 2 leaves).

28 594
Miscellaneous sketches for children, undated. 14 leaves.
Contents

* Kangarooster

*  Hippopotamustard

* Sketches of cats, dogs, tiger, penguin, squirrel, elves, pencil

28 595

C.  Family drawing and word games, circa 1944-1945.

Description

These drawings, made during family get togethers, include some completed and signed sketches by Wanda and Flavia Gág, Howard Cook, and Barbara Latham Cook, plus four-part people drawn by these and other family members who were Wanda's guests at "All Creation."

Box Folder
Drawing and word games, 1932. 16 items.
Description

By Howard Cook, Barbara Latham Cook, Flavia Gág, and Wanda Gág, pencil, most signed and dated by the artists.

28 596
Drawing and word games, circa 1944-1945.
Description

Includes sisters Stella, Dehli, Flavia, Bob Janssen, Earle Humphreys, Howard, Alma Scott and her daughters, Jane and Patsy.

28 597
Drawing and word games, undated.
Description

Includes Carl Zigrosser drawings, Gág notes on games and family rhymes. See also folder 689 for Christmas rhymes exchanged among family members.

28 598

Drawing games, four-part people, undated. 35 leaves.

28 599

Drawing games, four-part people, undated. 40 leaves.

28 600

D.  Exhibition catalogs, announcements, and reviews, 1926-1948.

Description & Arrangement

Arranged chronologically, it contains catalogs for Gág's exhibitions and press reviews of her exhibitions. Not complete. Information on posthumous exhibitions is in Carl Zigrosser's correspondence, Box 30.

Box Folder
"Watercolors, Drawings and Lithographs by Wanda Gág." The Weyhe Gallery, 3-20 November 1926. 3 items.
Contents

* Catalog, introduction by Rockwell Kent. catalog. 1 item

* Exhibition announcement. typescript. 1 leaf

* Review,  New York Evening Post, 13 November 1926. 1 leaf

28 601
"Watercolors, Drawings and Prints by Wanda Gág." The Weyhe Gallery, 19-31 March 1928. 3 items.
Contents

* Exhibition announcement

*  The Spinning Wheel, wood engraving, 3 copies

* Exhibition announcement, typescript, 2 leaves

28 602
"Watercolors, Drawings and Prints by Wanda Gág." The Weyhe Gallery, 13 January - 1 February 1930.
Contents

* Exhibition announcement. 2 copies

*  "Gág Number."  The Checkerboard, published on occasion by the Weyhe Gallery, January 1930, includes chronological list of prints. 3 copies, signed by the artist, one with notations by Carl Zigrosser

28 603

Rīgas Grafiķu Biedrības. Joint exhibition. Exhibition catalog, 3-24 April 1932. 1 item.

28 604

"Wanda Gág: 35 Years of Picture-Making," retrospective show at the Weyhe Gallery, Exhibition announcement, proof, 21-31 October 1940. 1 item.

28 604

"Art Sale and Auction to Aid the Defense in the Oklahoma Book Trials," Puma Gallery [New York City], Announcement for joint exhibition and sale, 3-7 December 1941. 1 item.

28 604
Wanda Gág Memorial Exhibition. Philadelphia Museum of Art, 16 October - 24 November 1946. 3 items.
Contents

* Wanda Gág Memorial Exhibition. Philadelphia Museum of Art. 16 October - 24 November 1946. Press releases. 2 items, 3 leaves

* Review,  Philadelphia Inquirer, Oct. 27, 1946 1 item, 2 leaves

28 605

Wanda Gág Memorial Exhibition. New York Public Library. Announcement; introduction by Anne Carroll Moore, 23 June-1 November 1947. 1 item (1 leaf).

28 605

Wanda Gág Memorial Exhibition. Alfalfa Hill Barn, Milford, New Jersey. 4-6 September 1948. Newspaper announcement, 20 August 1948. 1 item (2 leaves).

28 605

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VI.  Writings about Wanda Gág: Biographical articles, obituaries, and book reviews arranged chronologically, 1927-1996. 1 1/2 box.

A.  Biographical articles and obituaries, 1927-1996.

Description & Arrangement

Arranged chronologically and includes a few items added to the collection since it was acquired by the University of Pennsylvania.

Box Folder

Mannes, Marya. "Wanda Gág: Individualist."  Creative Art. Published article and typescript, December 1927.

28 606

Herendeen, Anne. "Wanda Gág: The True Story of a Dynamic Young Artist Who Won't Be Organized."  The Century Magazine. offprint, with Carl Zigrosser's notes on cover, August 1928.

28 607

Foster, Helen Herbert. "Seven Little Gágs Grown Up."  Eagle (Brooklyn, N.Y.)., 11 November 1928. 1 item (1 leaf).

28 608

"New Ulm's Cinderella finds Art's Golden Slipper in New York."  Minneapolis Journal Magazine, circa 1928.

28 609

"Wanda Gág - Graver and Illustrator."  The Index of Twentieth Century Artists, vol. 3, no. 7, and Supplement, April 1936. 10 leaves.

28 610

Obituaries, Delaware Valley News, New York Herald Tribune, New York Sun, New York Times, Publisher's Weekly, Hunterdon County Democrat , June-July 1946. 8 items.

28 611
Obituaries, 1946. 2 items.
Contents

* "Wanda Gág."  Four Star Final

* Evans, Ernestine.  "Wanda Gág."  Four Star Journal - Juvenile supplement.

28 612
"In Tribute to Wanda Gág."  Horn Book Magazine , May-June 1947. 1 volume (21 leaves).
Description

Includes articles by Alma Schmidt Scott, Carl Zigrosser, Ernestine Evans, Rose Dobbs, Lynd Ward, and Earle Marshall Humphreys. Typescript for Zigrosser's essay, "Wanda Gág: Artist." 2 copies. List of captions for Gág prints were written by Carl Zigrosser, with additional notes.

28 613

Bixler, Bernice. "A Memorial to Wanda Gág, an Artist-Author."  Delaware Valley News, 20 February 1948.

28 614

Beavin, Helen. Biographical information compiled from published sources, University of Wisconsin Library School, Copy of typescript, June 1960.

28 615

Hoyle, Karen Nelson. "A Children's Classic: Millions of Cats," in  Manuscripts, 31, no. 4, offprint, Fall 1979.

28 616

Hanson, Doug. "Wanda Gág" and  "An Interview with Ardur Winnan," in  The Window, vol. 2, no. pp. 4-13, 6 January 1995.

28 617

"Wanda Gág House."  New Ulm Visitor's Guide , published by  The Journal , New Ulm, Minn., 1996. 1 volume.

28 618

"Wanda Gág," for  National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, typescript, circa 1947.

28 619

Zigrosser, Carl. "Wanda Gág," Biographical essay and bibliography, typescript and ms., circa 1955. 26 leaves.

28 620

B.  Book reviews, including unpublished reviews of Growing Pains, 1928-1947.

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically.

Box Folder

Reviews and promotion for Millions of Cats and  The Funny Thing , 1928-1929.

29 621

Unidentified reader's response to typescripts of the diaries for Growing Pains, 1935.

29 622

Kenton, Edna. "Report on Anonymous Diary." Re:  Growing Pains, circa 1940.

29 623

Zigrosser, Carl. Foreword to Growing Pains, circa 1940.

29 624

Berryman, Florence S. "New Books on Art."  The Magazine of Art. Review of  Growing Pains, 1940.

29 625

Zigrosser, Carl. Foreword and notes for More Tales From Grimm, circa 1947.

29 626

Becker, May Lamberton. Review of More Tales From Grimm. New York Herald Tribune, 16 November 1947.

29 627

E.L.B. Review of More Tales From Grimm. New York Times , 16 November 1947.

29 628

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VII.  Wanda Gág financial records. Account books, royalties, lists, 1920-1942, undated.

Series Description

Bank book, notes, and notebooks in which Gág kept financial records.

Box Folder

Accounts regarding employment, 1920-1921. .

29 629
Account books, 1924-1942.
Description

Household expense accounts, Bowery Savings Bank account, Royalty statements and Christmas lists.

29 630

Address lists, mostly for publishers, undated.

29 631

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VIII.  Wanda Gág estate, 1945-1968. 2 boxes.

Series Description

In her will, Wanda Gág named her husband, Earle M. Humphreys and her friend Carl Zigrosser as co-executors of her estate. Humphreys took responsibility for financial matters and inventory and organization of her personal papers. Zigrosser took responsibility for her prints, overseeing the donation of Gág prints to major museums and locating prints which were in the stock of art dealers around the country. The estate was not completely settled at the time of Humphreys' death in May 1950. He appointed his brother, Warren Humphreys and brother-in-law Robert Janssen to be his co-executors. By agreement with Gág's siblings, Janssen became their representative in regard to the estate.

A.  Zigrosser correspondence, 1946-1968.

Description

Includes Zigrosser's correspondence with Earle M. Humphreys from 1947-1950 and Zigrosser's correspondence with Robert Janssen. Also included is correspondence regarding shows in which Gág's work was shown and correspondence concerning the distribution of her prints to museum collections.

Box Folder

Correspondence: A-W, 1946-1968.

30 632-676

Museums, Responses to Zigrosser's query re museum holdings of Gág prints and paintings, 1950.

30 677

B.  Legal documents, lists of assets, executors' accounts, notes, 1945-1958.

Box Folder
Wanda Gág will, draft, carbon copy, 1945-1958.
Contents

* Note of explanation to family

* Agreement re estate between Robert Janssen, Warren Humphreys and heirs, 23 December 1950, carbon copy

* Agreement re Wanda Gág diaries, 5 February 1958

31 678

Note of explanation to family.

31 678

Agreement re estate between Robert Janssen, Warren Humphreys and heirs, carbon copy, 23 December 1950.

31 678

Agreement re Wanda Gág diaries, 5 February 1958. .

31 678

Lists of prints and catalogues, Written by Earle Marshall Humphreys, Robert Janssen, and Carl Zigrosser, 1949-1951, undated.

31 679

Lists of prints and catalogues, Written by Earle Marshall Humphreys, Robert Janssen, and Carl Zigrosser, undated.

31 680

Carl Zigrosser notes, accounts.

31 681

Earle Humphreys' accounts for expenditures, 1946-1949.

31 682

Earle M. Humphreys' notes and envelopes.

31 683

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IX.  Newspaper clippings. 2 folders.

Series Description

These appear to be clippings Gág collected. Most refer to the process of writing autobiography.

Box Folder

Clippings, 1908-1949.

32 684

Clippings, undated.

32 685

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X.  Memorabilia, 1857-1948, undated. 5 folders.

Series Description

A few family items from New Ulm, Wanda Gág's membership cards, Christmas gift tags and verses, miscellaneous.

Box Folder

Strong Vocational Interest Blank (Stanford University Press) completed by Gág, 1948.

32 686

Wanda Gág membership cards, bookplate Anton Gag business card, circa 1938-1946.

32 687
Map to "All Creation" , 1857, undated.
Contents

* Sketch of house plan and exterior

*  New York Times

* Classified ad

* Mura Dehn concert announcement

* Items related to family history:  "Schulzeugnis," date of settlement at New Ulm

* Inventory for Biebl family paintings and items donated to New Ulm Library and Museum

See also blueprints for New Jersey house by Herbert Treat in Oversize, Box 40

32 688

Christmas gift notes, rhymes and riddles, by Gág family members and friends.

32 689
Earle Marshall Humphreys and Gág.
Contents

* 8 keys

* Cover to Wanda Gág's photo album. Dismantled. Photos are in archival album, Vol. 33

32 690

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XI.  Happiwork, circa 1921-1923. 4 boxes.

Series Descripton

From 1921-1923 Gág was engaged in a commercial venture to design and produce these play and activity sets for children. Several of the sets have been used and the boxes (with a color design by Gág on the cover) are generally in poor condition.

Box
Happiwork Story Boxes "Four Little Happy Workers;" Happiday Valentine Package; Crinoline Girl Place Cards, P.F. Volland, Co., Chicago.
Description

Original packaging damaged.

36
Happivillage.
Description

2 sets, 1 has been used and is missing the village plan. Original packaging damaged.

37
Happiwork Packages.
Contents

* Krinkle Chains

* Foldabout Papers

* Threadabout Papers

38

Happiwork Home Play Assortment (Cut-Ups, Weavings and Foldabout Papers); Happiwork Story Boxes "Little Black Sambo;" and Coloring / Clay Modeling Cards. 3 items.

39

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XII.  Photographs, 1892-1946. 3 volumes.

Series Description

Comprises a disassembled photograph album that belonged to Gág which includes photographs of her parents and some childhood photos. The second volume contains photographs of Gág, her family and friends, most taken by Robert Janssen and by Carl Zigrosser, arranged chronologically. The third volume comprises photographs of Gág's prints, drawings, and watercolors.

Volume

Wanda Gág photograph album, in original order, 1892-1933.

33
Photographs of Wanda Gág, family and friends, 1926-1946.
Description

Most photographs were taken by Robert Janssen and by Carl Zigrosser. Some of Janssen's photographs are described in his letters to Alma Scott (Folder 371). The first two numbers (in pencil, on reverse) on Janssen's prints indicate the year in which the photograph was taken. The album contains 204 black-and-whie prints plus 128 negatives.

34
Photographs of Gág artwork, 1923-1945.
Note

See also 1 photograph in Oversize, Box 40.

35

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XIII.  Oversize artwork, photographs, clippings, blueprints, 1924-1937, undated. 1 box.

Series Description

Original artwork, clippings, a photograph, and blueprints for Milford, N.J. house.

Box

Pencil sketch on tracing paper, undated.

40

Male nude, pencil on paper, undated.

40

Reclining figures, pencil on paper, undated.

40

Ephesian Diana , watercolor, undated.

40

Lantern and Fireplace , wood engraving, 1931-1932.

40

Photograph of Chidlow Tree , 1924.

40

Waves, illustrating poem by Thomas Hickey, printed in  The Fight, p. 44, 1936.

40

Nativity, drawing printed in  New York Herald Tribune - Books , 1936.

40

After a Visit from Franco, lithograph printed in  The Fight. p. 44, 1937.

40

Blueprints for house in Milford, N.J., by Herbert R. Treat, 1933.

40

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Collection Inventory

Series I. Correspondence.

Box Folder

Anderson, Maxwell, 1938-1950.

1 1

Arvin, Newton, 1937.

1 2

Behrman, S.N., 1935.

1 3

Blanc, Victor H., 1957.

1 4

Bok, Curtis, 1955.

1 5

Bowen, Catherine Drinker, 1951-1952.

1 6

Brooks, Van Wyck, 1935.

1 7

Cabel, Jean, undated.

1 8

Canby, Henry S., 1936-1948.

1 9

Conner, Frederick, 1951.

1 10

Copland, Aaron, 1957.

1 11

DeVoto, Bernard, 1935-1937, undated.

1 12

Dos Passos, John, 1954.

1 13

Douglas, Paul H., 1952-1954.

1 14

Douglas, William O., 1954.

1 15

Dreiser, Mrs. Theodore, 1951.

1 16

Du Barry, William H., 1953.

1 17

Farrell, James T., 1948.

1 18

Farrell, James T., 1949.

1 19

Farrell, James T., 1950.

1 20

Farrell, James T., 1951.

1 21

Farrell, James T., 1952.

1 22

Farrell, James T., 1953.

1 23

Farrell, James T., 1954.

1 24

Farrell, James T., 1955.

1 25

Farrell, James T., 1956.

1 26

Farrell, James T., 1957.

1 27

Farrell, James T., 1958.

1 28

Farrell, James T., 1959.

1 29

Farrell, James T., 1960.

1 30

Farrell, James T., 1961.

1 31

Farrell, James T., 1962.

1 32

Farrell, James T.: Writings and reviews, 1933-1957, undated.

1 33

Feinberg, Charles E., 1958.

1 34

Fine, John S., 1951.

1 35

Finletter, Thomas K., 1951.

1 36

Flaccus, Kimball, 1951.

1 37

Flavin, Martin, 1935.

1 38

Harrison, Earl G., 1953.

1 39

Heatter, Gabriel, 1942.

1 40

Helton, Roy, 1951-1952.

1 41

Hemphill, Alexander, 1957.

1 42

Hergesheimer, Joseph and Dorothy, 1951-1958, undated.

1 43

Hibben, John G., 1925.

1 44

Holm, John Cecil, 1947-1951.

1 45

Jeffers, Robinson, 1932.

1 46

Jones, Howard Mumford, 1954.

1 47

Kefauver, Estes, 1951.

1 48

Kern, Richard, 1953.

1 49

La Farge, Christopher, 1947.

1 50

Lippmann, Walter, 1949.

1 51

MacKenna, Kenneth, 1939.

1 52

MacLeish, Archibald, 1961-1962.

1 53

Masters, Ellen (Mrs. Edgar Lee), undated.

1 54

McCord, David, 1951-1956, undated.

2 1

Menkin, H.L., 1951.

2 2

Mumford, Lewis, 1951-1954.

2 3

Murray, James F., Jr., 1952.

2 4

Oakley, Thornton, 1952.

2 5

Quo Tai-chi, 1946.

2 6

Pennell, Elizabeth Robins, 1923.

2 7

Pepper, George Wharton, 1924, 1952.

2 8

Rhoads, Jonathan and Teresa, 1959.

2 9

Schelling, Felix E., 1935-1945.

2 10

Singer, Edgar A., Jr., 1942.

2 11

Skinner, Cornelia Otis, 1927, 1943.

2 12

Smythe, Daniel, 1957-1962.

2 13

Spaeth, J. Duncan, 1951.

2 14

Sprague, Harriet (Mrs. Frank J.), 1940.

2 15

Stassen, Harold E., 1949, 1951.

2 16

Stewart, George R., 1941.

2 17

Taylor, Maria (Mrs. Bayard), 1923, 1925.

2 18

Thurber, James, 1954.

2 19

Traubue, Anne, 1952.

2 20

Viereck, Peter, 1950-1952, undated.

2 21

Weygandt, Cornelius, 1940.

2 22

Williams, Stanley T., 1952, undated.

2 23

Wright, Frank Lloyd, 1955.

2 24

Young, Stark, 1956.

2 25

Unidentified correspondants, 1935, 1952, undated.

2 26

Series II. Censorship cases.

Box Folder

"General file" on censorship, 1948-1965.

2 27

Censorship case emanating from Philadelphia, PA, leading to Commonwealth of Pennsylvania v. Gordon et al., Court of Quarter Sessions, Philadelphia County (June Sessions 1948), 1948-1953.

2 28

Censorship case emanating from Fall River, MA, leading to Commonwealth of Massachusetts v. American News Company, Inc., United States Supreme Court (1955), 1951-1955.

2 29

Censorship case emanating from Detroit, MI, leading to Alfred E. Butler v. State of Michigan, United States Supreme Court (1955), 1953-1955.

2 30

Censorship case emanating from Youngstown, OH, leading to The New American Library of World Literature, Inc. v. Edward J. Allen, Jr., United States District Court for the Northern District of Ohio, Eastern Division (1953), 1953-1954.

2 31

Censorship case emanating from Philadelphia, PA, leading to Commonwealth v. Robin and  Commonwealth v. Grove Press, Inc., Supreme Court of Pennsylvania (1966); and censorship case emanating from Bergan County, NJ, leading to  Grove Press, Inc. v. Guy W. Calissi, et al., United States District Court for the District of New Jersey (1962), 1961-1966.

2 32

Censorship case emanating from Philadelphia, PA, leading to Ginzburg v. United States, United States Supreme Court (1966), 1963-1966.

2 33

Series III. Whitman material.

a. Leaves of Grass: Comprehensive Reader's Edition.

Box Folder

Contents and Preface, and memos, 1963.

5 1

Introduction, 1964, undated.

5 2

Prefatory Letter, undated.

5 3

"A Backward Glance O'er Travel'd Roads", undated.

5 4

Prefaces, undated.

5 5

b. Leaves of Grass: Norton Critical Edition.

Box Folder

Contents, undated.

5 6

Excluded Poems and Passages - Contents ["copy 2"], undated.

5 7

Excluded Poems and Passages - Notes on Text ["copy 2"], undated.

5 8

Excluded Poems and Passages - Poems and footnotes ["copy 2"], undated.

5 9

Excluded Poems and Passages - Passages and footnotes ["copy 2"], undated.

5 10

Excluded Poems and Passages - Analysis of poems excluded ["copy 2"], undated.

5 11

Excluded Poems and Passages - "New series" poems checklist ["copy 2"], undated.

5 12

Excluded Poems and Passages - Contents ["copy 3 and 4"], undated.

5 13

Excluded Poems and Passages - Notes on Text ["copy 3 and 4"], undated.

5 14

Excluded Poems and Passages - Poems and footnotes ["copy 3 and 4"], undated.

5 15-16

Excluded Poems and Passages - Passages and footnotes ["copy 3 and 4"], undated.

5 17

Excluded Poems and Passages - Excluded poems checklist ["copy 3 and 4"], undated.

5 18

Whitman on His Art, undated.

5 19

A Whitman Manuscript, undated.

5 20

Criticism, undated.

5

6

21-22

1-3

Bibliography, undated.

6 4

Miscellaneous notes, undated.

6 5

Correspondence included with drafts, 1959-1973.

6 6

c. A Textual Variorum of Leaves of Grass.

Box Folder

A Textual Variorum of Leaves of Grass, manuscript, undated.

4 1-46

d. Ephemera.

Box Folder

Bibliographies, 1947-1966.

3 1

Book publication notices, 1959-1966, undated.

3 2

Cards, invitations, and bookplates, 1916-1960, undated.

3 3

Catalogs, 1934-1949.

6 7-8

Correspondence concerning Whitman (to or from Bradley), 1944-1966.

3 4

Magazine articles, 1884-1968 (Bulk, 1944-1968) .

3

6

5

9

Maps, undated.

3 6

Newspaper clippings, 1944-1970.

3 7

Newspaper reprints, 1964-1968.

3 8

Notes of Sculley Bradley, undated.

3 9

Off-prints and complete journal issues, 1907-1967, undated.

3

6

10

10-11

Photostat of Good-bye my Fancy manuscript, undated.

6 12

Printed programs and brochures for Whitman related events, 1931-1970, undated.

3

6

11

13

Whitman family autographs, 1876, undated.

3 12

e. Graphics.

Box Folder

Engravings of Whitman, undated.

3 13

Mickle St. House, Camden, NJ, 1940.

3 14

Monuments to Whitman, 1959, 1961.

3 15

New Castle, DE, undated.

3 16

Photographs of Whitman, undated.

3 17

Postcards, 1936, undated.

3 18

Reeder Photographs, 1936-1937.

3 19

Reproductions of Whitman, 1909, 1958, undated.

3 20

Schoolhouse, Long Island, NY, 1932.

3 21

Timber Creek, NJ, undated.

3 22

Series IV. Non-Whitman material.

Box Folder

Publications, clippings, autograph inventory on authors other than Whitman, including Jacques Catel, e.e. cummings, Robert Frost, and Ernest Hemingway, 1953-1961, undated.

3 23

Collection Inventory

Box Folder

Account of payments to "le capitaine de Lornay", 1490. 1 item (1 leaf).

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Some heads to be considered on for secureing our trade, dureing the time of our warr against Ffrance, circa 1695. 1 item (1 leaf).

Zero 2

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Sermon, May 16, 1747. 1 item (6 leaves).

Zero 3

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Observations on the Connecticut claims to lands in the districts of Pennsylvania purchase, circa 1754-1799. 1 item (1 leaf).

Zero 4

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Some notes and remarks of an Indian warrior at Lancaster, 1762. 1 item (1 leaf).

Zero 5

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Letter written in London dated 23 February 1815 to an unidentified correspondent concerning the anticipated visit of a "Mr. Anderson", 1815. 1 item (1 leaf).

Zero 6

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Memos of dates [etc.], visit to Nantucket, diary, 1844. 1 item (1 book).

Zero 7

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The ash and the white oak, lyrics, circa 1840-1844. 1 item (1 leaf).

Zero 8

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Letter to an uncle for Latin practice, after 1831. 1 item (1 leaf).

Zero 9

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Poems in French with one in Italian, circa 1700-1799. 12 items (13 leaves).

Zero 10

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French book trade ephemera, 1789-1850. 11 items (11 leaves).

Zero 11

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Lettre à un membre du Parlement, contenant un projet pour dresser un bill pour revoir, corriger, ou rejetter certains statuts hors d'usage, qu'on appelle communement les X commandements, 1738. 1 items (8 leaves).

Zero 12

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Legal document written in France in the 16th century, circa 1500-1599. 1 item (1 leaf).

Zero 13

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Pastedown notes from an unknown late-medieval or early-Renaissance volume, approximately 1100-1400. 1 item (1 leaf).

Zero 14

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Recipes laid in an English cookbook (Ms. Codex 1038), circa 1793. 2 items (9 leaves).

Zero 15

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Notes on letters of Benjamin Franklin, approximately 1900-1960. 1 item (1 leaf).

Zero 16

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Manresa legal documents, 1320-1321. 1 item (12 leaves).

Zero 17

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Latin satirical poem, circa 1700-1799. 1 item (10 leaves).

Zero 18

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Notes in German by an unidentified author, originally accompanying, and evidently making direct reference to a codex in Latin of a text by Hermann von Kerssenbroch entitled Furoris Anabaptistici Monasterium inclytam Westphaliae metropolim evertentis historica narratio (Ms. Codex 1208), circa 1700-1799. 1 item (2 leaves).

Zero 19

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Legal opinion, dated 15/25 April 1589, concerning canon and imperial law on the subject of concubinary relationships of clergy members, 1589. 1 item (2 leaves).

Zero 20

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Histoire prodigieuse et espouvantable de plus de deux cens 50 sorciers et sorcierès . . . (manuscript copy of a short work that was printed in 1649 in Paris), 1901. 1 item (10 leaves).

Zero 21

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Note on land transaction, circa 1500-1599. 1 item (1 leaf).

Zero 22

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Two epigrams, circa 1800-1899. 1 item (1 leaf).

Zero 23

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Explanatory booklet for the oversize diagram portraying the financial history of the Storati brothers, circa 1571. 1 item (16 leaves).

Zero 24

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Tax table for seasonal workers, Rome, circa 1500-1599. 1 item (1 leaf).

Zero 25

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Letter concerning abbey business, 1703. 1 item (4 leaves).

Zero 26

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Marriage document, Piacenza, Italy, 1531. 1 item (4 leaves).

Zero 27

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Property transaction, circa 1600-1650. 1 item (24 leaves).

Zero 28

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Italian horoscopes, after 1597. 1 item (2 bifolia).

Zero 29

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Nota di regali fatti a n[ost]ro s[ignore] Papa Innocenzo XII nel viaggio di Civitavecchia, 1696. 1 item (1 leaf).

Zero 30

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Draft for a daily news sheet, 1703. 1 item (1 leaf).

Zero 31

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Abbott, Jacob (1803-1879) letter to Benjamin Bartis Comegys, 1855. 1 item (1 leaf).

1 1

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Adams, John Quincy (1767-1848) Poems, 1842. 1 item (1 leaf).

1 2

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Adlum, John (1759-1836) letter concerning a Philadelphia Chestnut tree, 1832. 1 item (2 leaves).

1 3

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Adrain, Robert letter to Nicholas Biddle, 1828. 1 item (1 leaf).

1 4

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Ahmed I, Sultan of the Turks (1590-1617) letter, 1617. 1 item (3 leaves).

1