Franklin: Record - Reginald Augustus Warren diaries, 1844-1845.

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Reginald Augustus Warren diaries, 1844-1845.

Author/Creator:
Warren, Reginald Augustus, 1820-1911.
Publication:
1844-1845.
Format/Description:
Manuscript
4 volumes.
Subjects:
English diaries -- Specimens -- 19th century.
English diaries -- Male authors -- 19th century.
Nile River -- Description and travel -- 19th century.
Nile River Valley -- Description and travel -- 19th century.
Italy -- Description and travel -- 19th century.
France -- Description and travel -- 19th century.
Jerusalem -- Description and travel -- 19th century.
Syros Island (Greece) -- Description and travel -- 19th century.
Birds.
Form/Genre:
Diaries.
Drawings (visual works)
Watercolors (paintings)
Sketches.
Manuscripts, English -- 19th century.
Language:
In English with some French, and one leaf with the Arabic alphabet.
Biography/History:
Born in St. Georges, Middlesex, England in 1820. Warren was admitted as a solicitor in 1843, with an office located on 99 Great Russell Street, London. Warren began buying farms, buildings, and land in East Preston, Sussex, England and became a squire. In 1850 he married Anne Eliza Olliver, born in 1830. By 1861 the Warren's had six children.
Summary:
Comprises four volumes with the earliest entry on 9 November 1844. These volumes were written during Warren's six-month journey from England, through Europe, to Alexandria, then to Cairo, a voyage up the Nile River and back, concluding with a trip to Jerusalem by caravan. Leaving from London Warren records major sights on his journey through France and Italy where he stops in Lyon, Avignon, Marseilles, Naples, Capri, and Venice. On 3 December 1844, he lands on the Greek island of Syros where he boards a steamer ship to Alexandria, Egypt. Warren identifies the group he is traveling with and refers to them throughout his journey. Departing from Alexandria Warren writes "our party consisted of Lord Elphinstone, Mr. Hardinge, Mr. MacPhearson (his physician), his wife and daughter, the two Lewises, and Cooke, and myself." Warren tours the city of Alexandria noting the obelisk and the city's appearance. From Alexandria the party arrives in Cairo where they go on an expedition by donkey to the pyramids. Warren gives a detailed description of the pyramids, the sphinx, and the people they encounter on the journey. They travel the Nile River stopping at several temples, small and large. At one stop Warren records being bullied by natives. By January 1845 Warren is at Aboo Simbel to see the Colossi ruins, where he makes a sketch of the facade. Warren also mentions the vivid colors of the A'mada Temple. He describes Karnak and Luxor. In February 1845, at Thebes, the group rides donkeys to the tombs of the kings. By 20 February 1845 the traveling party is back in Cairo packing for their trip to Jerusalem. Warren describes the the trip by camel and the caravan. He makes a sketch of their circular-shaped camp. They reach Gaza by 8 March 1845. In mid-March they arrive in Bethlehem and then journey to Jerusalem. The four volumes that record the journey are written almost simultaneously. Warren's first entry, is in a maroon tooled-leather volume. This volume contains drawings, sketches, and detailed descriptions of the journey on the Nile River. In this volume is a watercolor self-portrait of Warren standing and sketches of fellow travelers J. E. Cooke and John Lewis, native peoples, landscapes, and ships. Also, the first leaf in the volume has the Arabic alphabet with notes on letter placement. Another volume is labeled "Cairo to Jerusalem." This is an oblong volume with marbled paper covers, written in pencil, with rough sketches of the journey to Jerusalem and departure. The next volume is title on the cover "1845 Daily Remembrancer," a commercially printed daily calendar where Warren also records a large portion of the journey. There are also notes for the rest of the year. Warren makes daily notations in this calendar after his arrival back in England in May 1845. Here we learn snippets of his home life in England including meetings and his plans to draw a map of Fieldplace. The last volume of the group is a small almost square black tooled-leather volume with gilt-edged pages. The leaves in the volume are blue and white. The first several leaves have lists of birds in columns labeled Bewick and Buffon in English and French. The column titles refer to Thomas Bewick and George Louis Leclerc Buffon, who published volumes on the history of birds. This volume is chiefly drawings, watercolors and sketches from the European portion of the voyage. There are drawings of people, Venice, Trieste, and Greece. In all of the volumes Warren records, almost daily the types of birds he sees and also hunts while at sea and on land. Although Warren makes so many notations about birds there are no drawings of them.
Local notes:
Acquired for the Penn Libraries with assistance from the Martin and Margy Meyerson Endowment Fund for Special Collections.
Provenance:
Sold by Samuel Gedge Ltd. (Mundesley, England), cat. 12 (2012-2013), no. 127.
Contributor:
Martin and Margy Meyerson Endowment Fund for Special Collections.
Web link:
The Martin and Margy Meyerson Endowment Fund for Special Collections Home Page
The Martin and Margy Meyerson Endowment Fund for Special Collections Home Page  Bookplate