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Silas Weir Mitchell collection

MSS.2/0241-04

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the College of Physicians Historical Medical Library. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
College of Physicians Historical Medical Library
Title:
Silas Weir Mitchell collection
Date [inclusive]:
1888-1930
Call Number:
MSS.2/0241-04
Extent:
1.1 Linear feet
Language:
English
PDF Version:

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Biography/History

Silas Weir Mitchell, the son of Dr. John Kearsley and Sarah Matilda Henry Mitchell, was born in Philadelphia in 1829. He entered the University of Pennsylvania in the class of 1848, at the age of 15. By his second year, he was first in his class, but was forced to withdraw the following term to assist his family during the illness of his father. In 1848, he enrolled at Jefferson Medical College (where his father was a faculty member), and obtained his M.D. in 1850. He spent the following year in Paris, where he studied with Claude Bernard and Charles Philippe Robin, before returning to Philadelphia to work in his father’s practice. He published his first scientific paper (on uric acid) in 1852, and was elected to the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia the following year. In 1858, his father died, and Mitchell took over the family medical practice. He continued his scientific investigations and issued several more scientific papers before the Civil War. These included a study of the blood crystals of the sturgeon (1858) and his “Researches upon the Venom of the Rattlesnake” (issued in the Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge, 1860).

During the Civil War, Mitchell served as a surgeon at Turners Lane Hospital in Philadelphia, a 400-bed army facility. This experience allowed him to make an extensive study of nerve wounds and their treatment, and lead to two important monographs of 1864: Gunshot Wounds and Other Injuries of Nerves and Reflex Paralysis (both of which were co-written by fellow army surgeons, G.R. Morehouse and W.W. Keen). By 1865, Mitchell had returned to private practice, where, influenced by his war-time work, he focused on neurological problems. In 1870, he was appointed to the Philadelphia Orthopedic Hospital for Nervous Diseases, where he treated patients and instructed visiting physicians for over four decades. Despite working full-time as a practicing physician, Mitchell found time to make varied and significant scientific investigations. From the end of the Civil War until the first decade of the 20th century, he published over 100 articles and books on neurological subjects, but also made contributions in toxicology, pharmacology, and physiology. Although his scientific papers are far too numerous to list here, one of the most significant was “On a Rare Vaso-motor Neurosis of the Extremities and on the Maladies with Which It May Be Confounded” (1878), in which he was the first to describe erythromelalgia, a neurosis known as “Weir Mitchell’s Disease.”

Beginning with his 1871 book, Wear and Tear, Mitchell began to lay before the medical world his famous “Rest Cure” for nervous maladies, which, in addition to bed rest, prescribed massage, electrotherapy, and dietary changes for the aggrieved. In time, the rest cure was recognized as a valuable therapy by the American medical profession and was hailed by European researchers, Sigmund Freud and Jean Martin Charcot. His other important books to advance the concept of the rest cure were Fat and Blood (1877), Lectures on the Diseases of the Nervous System, Especially in Women (1881), and Clinical Lessons on Nervous Diseases (1897). In addition to his medical practice and scientific research, Mitchell was a professor at the Philadelphia Polyclinic and College for Graduates in Medicine. As a trustee of the University of Pennsylvania, from 1875 until the time of his death, he worked to expand facilities for medical instruction and to establish the school of hygiene. He was a fellow and president of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, a member of the National Academy of Science, and an honorary or corresponding member of a number of foreign medical societies. He received honorary degrees from several prominent institutions, including Harvard, Princeton, Jefferson Medical College, University of Edinburgh, and the University of Bologna. His friends included some of the leading medical minds of the era, including William Osler and W.H. Welch.

While his professional activities would have exhausted the energies of most men, Mitchell was also a prolific author of poetry, stories, and novels. Although his literary works are not often read today, such was his success as an author during his lifetime that his name would be still be remembered today, even if he had never treated a single psychiatric patient or published a single scientific paper. Many of his works met with popular acclaim, and he received critical praise from such leading men of letters as William Dean Howells, George Meredith, James Whitcomb Riley, Oliver Wendell Holmes, John Greenleaf Whittier, and James Russell Lowell.

His first literary appearance in a book came in 1864, with The Children’s Hour, cowritten by Elizabeth Stevenson for the benefit of the Sanitary Commission. Three years later, he published the first book under his own name, another juvenile: The Wonderful Stories of Fuz-Buz the Fly and Mother Grabem the Spider. His first published story, and his first literary work for adults was “The Case of George Dedlow,” printed in the Atlantic Monthly in July, 1866. This fictional account of a Civil War soldier who lost all of his limbs was so realistic that many readers sent donations to the hospital where “George Dedlow” was supposedly being treated. In 1880, Mitchell’s issued his first book-length work of fiction for adults, Hephzibah Guinness (containing the title novelette and two other stories). His first book of poems, The Hill of Stones, was issued in 1883. Two years later, he published his first full-length novel, In War Time. Numerous novels and collections of poetry followed, the most successful and best remembered of which was Hugh Wynne, Free Quaker (1899), a work of historical fiction set during the Revolutionary War. Other works of historical fiction include The Adventures of Francois (the author’s favorite of his own books), Constance Trescot, Westways, and The Red City. Mitchell is also remembered for his character studies, including those to be found in the aptly titled, Characteristics. Of special note was his depiction of women with psychological problems, including Octopia Darnell in Roland Blake and Sybil Maywood in Dr. North and His Friends. The latter character was “probably the first example of dual personality in American literature” (DAB).

Mitchell was married to Mary Middleton Elwyn in 1858. She gave birth to two sons before dying of diphtheria in 1862. In 1875, he remarried, to Mary Cadwalader (d. 1914). With her, he fathered a daughter, Maria Gouverneur Mitchell (b. 1876), who died of diphtheria in 1898.

In addition to works by and about Mitchell, the collection contains a number of items written by or concerning other members of his family, who were themselves noted Philadelphians and may here be introduced.

John Kearsley Mitchell I (1793-1858), father of Silas Weir Mitchell, was also a prominent physician. He was born in Shepherdstown, Virginia (present day West Virginia), and educated in Scotland, where his father, also a doctor, was born. After returning to America, he studied at the University of Pennsylvania, and received his M.D. in 1819. After working for a time in the Far East as a ship’s surgeon, he settled in Philadelphia in 1822 and married Sarah Matilda Henry (b. 1800). He was appointed lecturer at the Philadelphia Medical Institute in 1824, and subsequently became chair of chemistry at the school. In 1833, he became professor of chemistry at the Franklin Institute, where he conducted important researches on carbonic acid. In 1841, he was appointed professor of theory and practice at Jefferson Medical College, and thereafter devoted himself to medical pursuits. In addition to his teaching duties, he was a visiting physician to the Pennsylvania Hospital and city hospitals, and was commended by the city for his labors during the smallpox epidemic of 1825 and the cholera outbreak of 1832. He also published on various medical subjects, and “was the first to describe the spinal arthopathies (1831)…. He left an essay `On the Cryptogamous Origin of Malarious and Epidemical Fevers’ (1849), which was the first brief for the parasitic etiology of the disease on a priori grounds – a vigorous, logical argument which, as pure theory goes, ranks with Henle’s essay on miasms and contagia (1820). A collection of essays, including a paper on animal magnetism, was published in Philadelphia in 1859, by his distinguished son.” –Kelly and Burrage. He was a member of the American Medical Association, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, and the American Philosophical Society. He also served as physician and president of the St. Andrew’s Society of Philadelphia and as grand master of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania.

John Kearsley Mitchell II (1859-1917), the eldest son of Silas Weir Mitchell, followed three generations of family tradition and became a physician. He earned his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1883 and became resident physician at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and at Episcopal Hospital. Later, following his father, he served at the Philadelphia Orthopedic Hospital; first as an assistant to William Osler and subsequently as a visiting surgeon. In 1895, he published an important study, Remote Consequences of Injuries of the Nerves, and Their Treatment, in which he reexamined patients treated by his father. His other works included Self Help for Nervous Women. Familiar Talks on Economy in Nervous Expenditure (1909).

Langdon Elywn Mitchell (1862-1935), the younger son of Silas Weir Mitchell, followed his father’s literary predilections, and became a successful playwright and poet. After studying at the law schools of Harvard and Columbia universities, he practiced for a brief period in Philadelphia. At the same time, his first literary works were brought to the press, beginning with the pseudonymously published, Sylvian and Other Poems (1885). His first play to be performed on the stage, Deborah, made its debut in London in 1892. The following year, he had his second London debut, with In the Season. His breakthrough play, bringing him financial success and critical acclaim, was Becky Sharp. It ran for two years on the New York stage (1899-1900), was revived in 1929, and, in 1935, was the first film to be produced in technicolor. In 1906, Mitchell had two further theatrical hits with The Kreutzer Sonata and The New York Idea. The latter play “is witty and highly civilized and remains the sole American comedy of this period to continue to elicit admiration when read or performed” (ANB). He was also a member of the National Institute of Arts and Letters, a lecturer on poetry at George Washington University, and a Mask & Wig Professor of Playwriting at the University of Pennsylvania.

In 1892, Langdon Mitchell married Marion Lea (1861-1944), a Philadelphia native, who found success as an actress on the London stage. She is best remembered for coproducing and starring in the first English adaptation of Ibsen’s play, Hedda Gabler.

Biography/History

S. Weir Mitchell, physician, novelist, and poet, was born in Philadelphia on 15 February 1829. Mitchell was the son of John Kearsley Mitchell (1798-1858), a physician and lecturer at Jefferson Medical College, and Matilda Henry Mitchell (1800-1872). S. Weir Mitchell entered the University of Pennsylvania at the age of fifteen but withdrew during his senior year when he became ill. In 1848, he enrolled in Jefferson Medical College, and by March 1850, at the age of twenty- one, Mitchell had completed his medical degree.

In the fall of 1850, S. Weir Mitchell departed for Europe with his sister, Elizabeth. Elizabeth stayed with her younger sister in England, and Mitchell settled in Paris to study medicine. During this influential year, Mitchell dined with Sir James Paget and Edward Jenner, studied with Claude Bernard, and purchased his own microscope. After a year in Paris, he travelled with his sister in Italy and Switzerland. At the request of their ailing father, Mitchell and Elizabeth returned home in the fall of 1851.

Upon returning to Philadelphia, Mitchell set up a demanding schedule for himself; he assisted his father during the day and worked in the laboratory in the evenings. It was during this time that Mitchell conducted experiments with snake venom and first became interested in neurology. By 1855, John Kearsley Mitchell had retired, and Mitchell became responsible for the support of his parents and siblings. A few years later, Mitchell started a family of his own. He married Mary Middleton Elwyn in 1858, and the couple had two children, John K. Mitchell (1859-1917) and Langdon Elwyn Mitchell (1862-1935). In 1862, Mitchell's wife died of diphtheria.

During the Civil War years, Mitchell worked as a contract surgeon in Turner's Lane Hospital in Philadelphia, an army hospital for nervous diseases. Turner's Lane was an ideal location for Mitchell to pursue his interest in nerve diseases and wounds of the nerves. Mitchell was joined by William W. Keen and George R. Morehouse in conducting extensive neurological research at the hospital. The three physicians took careful notes, wrote detailed case studies, and published the results of their findings in numerous articles and books, including Reflex Paralysis (1864) and Gunshot Wounds and Other Injuries of Nerves (1864). Their pioneering work was praised for its accuracy, thoroughness, and wealth of statistics. In 1864, having received some degree of notoriety from his work at Turner's Lane, Mitchell resigned as a contract surgeon. Known as an authority on nervous diseases, he soon limited his practice to this specialty. In the early 1870s, Mitchell was appointed to the Philadelphia Orthopaedic Hospital and Infirmary for Nervous Diseases where he continued his neurological research and developed innovative treatments for patients with nervous ailments. During this period, Mitchell discovered a disease called erythromelalgia, or Weir Mitchell's disease. Mitchell also discovered the connection between eyestrain and headaches, and he introduced the "rest cure", a revolutionary method of treatment for patients, especially women, who suffered from hysteria and neurasthenia. Mitchell continued to publish medical works during the 1870s, including Injuries of Nerves and their Consequences (1872), which was still used by the French as late as World War I; Wear and Tear (1873), a book on overwork and mental fatigue written for a general audience; and Fat and Blood (1877), which describes Mitchell's rest cure treatment. In terms of his personal life, Mitchell married Mary Cadwalader in 1875, and his daughter, Maria Gouverneur, was born in 1876.

By 1880, at the age of fifty, Mitchell embarked on a serious literary career. He wrote poetry and several novels, including In War Time (1882), Roland Blake (1886), Hugh Wynne (1896), Dr. North and his Friends (1900), Circumstance (1901), Constance Trescott (1905), and Westways (1913). Having secured his reputation as a "literary physician", Mitchell became a popular figure both at home and abroad; he corresponded regularly with such notable figures as Oliver Wendell Holmes, Andrew Carnegie, William Dean Howells, Sir William Osler, and George Meredith. Mitchell frequently gave speeches before social clubs and professional organizations, and when his busy schedule allowed, he travelled extensively in the United States, Europe, Japan, and Egypt.

S. Weir Mitchell was actively involved in numerous local and national medical societies. He was founder and first president of the American Neurological Society and first president of the Philadelphia Neurological Society. Mitchell also served presidential terms for the Association of American Physicians, the American Association of Physicians and Pathologists, the Congress of American Physicians and Surgeons, and the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. Mitchell's honors and achievements include honorary memberships in the British Medical Association, the American Academy of Medicine, and the Royal Academy of Medicine in Rome. He was awarded honorary degrees from Harvard University, the University of Bologna, the University of Edinburgh, Princeton University, the University of Toronto, Jefferson Medical College, and Johns Hopkins University. In 1906, S. Weir Mitchell received the Franklin Medal.

Scope and Contents

The Silas Weir Mitchell collection contains material related to the personal and professional activities of Philadelphia-area physician and author Silas Weir Mitchell, as well as members of his family. This collection consists of selected manuscripts, photographs, and published material that have been separated from a larger collection by Norman Kane (A.B.A.A., Emeritus), and acquired by the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.

This collection is arranged into five series; “Letters and autographs, 1888-1952, undated,” “Works concerning the Mitchell family, 1858-1914,” “Photographs, undated,” “Book and periodical contributions by members of the Mitchell family, 1839-1840, 1992,” and “Collector’s research and resources, 1914-1992, undated.” In addition to the series-level description found below, detailed descriptions of each item may be found under the relevant entry in the container list. These descriptions provide significant contextual information for each item, and are authored by David J. Eilenberger as part of a pre-acquisition catalogue.

Series I, “Letters and autographs, 1888-1952, undated,” contains written correspondence and other documents authored or received by members of the Mitchell family. The majority of this series consists of letters authored by Silas Weir Mitchell, but includes items authored by Langdon Mitchell and John Kearsley Mitchell, as well as several items sent by individuals outside the family. This series also includes several non-letter items bearing the signatures of Mitchell family members, including a set of four Mahogony Tree menus which also bear the signatures of other notable Philadelphians. This series is arranged alphabetically by author, and further arranged chronologically.

Series II, “Works concerning the Mitchell family, 1858-1914,” contains published or commercially printed works dedicated to, discussing, or featuring the Mitchell family. This series contains a copy of Harper’s Weekly featuring a poem authored by Silas Weir Mitchell, proceedings of a Masonic lodge concerning the death of John K. Mitchell, a copy of the Philadelphia Public Ledger featuring a portrait of S.W. Mitchell, music dedicated to John Kearsley Mitchell, and an advertising broadside featuring S.W. Mitchell’s “Hugh Wynne, Free Quaker.” This series is arranged alphabetically by subject.

Series III, “Photographs, undated,” contains four albums containing multiple photographs. The subjects of these photographs are primarily members of the Mitchell family, their friends, and events of import, and were the property of Silas Weir Mitchell and Marion Lea Mitchell. Though some photographs have been annotated, the collections compiler has also provided item-level description of each photograph. These descriptions can be found under each individual album in the container list below. The albums are arranged numerically according to the numbers assigned to them by the compiler.

Series IV, “Book and periodical contributions by members of the Mitchell family, 1839-1840, 1992,” contains published and printed works authored by members of the Mitchell family. Included in this series are three items; “Oh! Fly to the Prarie” and “The Prarie Lea,” music composed by John Kearsley Mitchell, and a written appreciation of Samuel Lewis, MD, published by the College of Physicians of Philadelphia and including remarks by Silas Weir Mitchell. This series is arranged alphabetically by author.

Series V, “Collector’s research and resources, 1914-1992, undated,” contains resources and materials accumulated by one or more collectors of the Silas Weir Mitchell papers during the process of locating and acquiring manuscript material for the collection. Items in this series include bibliographies, publisher’s catalogs, handwritten notes, correspondence, and material concerning an exhibition of Mitchell’s works at the Free Library of Philadelphia central branch. This series consists of one folder.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

College of Physicians Historical Medical Library,  5/18/11

Finding Aid Author

Compiler: Norman Kane Biographical. Note/Item-level Description: David J. Eilenberger. Finding Aid: Brian Stewart.

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Related Materials

Separated Materials note

Printed volumes acquired as part of the larger collection have been catalogued by the College of Physicians of Philadelphia Library.

Three-dimensional objects acquired as part of the larger collection are managed by the College of Physicians of Philadelphia's Mütter Museum.

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Provenance Note

This collection was compiled by Norman Kane (A.B.A.A Emeritus), and purchased by the College of Physicians of Philadelphia from The Americanist (ABAA). The collection was received on November 5, 2010.

Collection Inventory

Series I.  Letters and autographs, 1888-1952, undated. 28 folders.

Box Folder
Abbot, Marion Wetherill. Letter to Violet Oakley regarding a mural at Pennsylvania Hospital, 1921 March 20. 1 folder.
 

ABBOTT, Marion Wetherill (Mrs. E. Stanley Abbott). AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. Philadelphia, March 20, 1921. Five page letter on leaves measuring approx. 7 x 5”. Mrs. Abbott was the wife of the psychiatrist, E. Stanley Abbott. She here writes to Violet Oakley (1874-1961), the American muralist, illustrator, and stained glass artist. Abbott discusses the donation of an autograph poem by Silas Weir Mitchell to the Insane Department of the Pennsylvania Hospital, and asks Miss Oakley if she would consider executing a mural on the wall where Mitchell’s poem was to hang. In her letter, Abbott copies the full text of the poem, which was dedicated to nurses. She also mentions Dr. Owen Copp, the administrator of the Hospital receiving the donation and a president of the American Psychiatric Association.

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Mahogony Tree menus, signed by S.W. Mitchell and various personages, 1894, 1896, 1897, 1905. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, [Silas] Weir, [et al.]. GROUP OF FOUR nMANUSCRIPT MENUS FOR DINNERS AT THE MAHOGANY TREE CLUB. [Philadelphia], March 6, [18]94; Feb., 1896; April 13, 1897; and Feb. 20, 1905. Each menu is completed in manuscript in an unknown hand on the recto of a partially printed, circular card, with a diameter of approx. 3”. The menus, for what were evidently sumptuous meals, list about seven courses each, together with side dishes and accompanying spirits. Mitchell was an avid diner and his biographer speaks of his “addiction to clubs, especially those centering around good food: the Biological, the Mahogany Tree, the Triplets, the Charaka Club of New York, and the Franklin Inn, which he helped to found.” –Ernest, p. 177. The cards dated 1894 and 1905 are SIGNED BY MITCHELL as well as several of his companions on the versos; the other two cards are signed by various persons not including Mitchell, again on the versos. OTHER SIGNERS include: JOHN SHAW BILLINGS (1838-1913), Mitchell’s life-long friend, who served as the medical director of the Army of the Potomac and then director of the Library of the Surgeon Generals Office, where he developed the collection that formed the core of the National Library of Medicine. In the latter capacity, he also published the Index Catalogue of the library and the Index Medicus, both vital contributions to medical bibliography. He later organized, with the aid of Andrew Carnegie, the New York Public Library system. Billings signs two of the menus. Also, DR. WILLIAM PEPPER (1843-1898), an eminent physician, who served for many years as professor of medicine and provost of the University of Pennsylvania. Pepper signs three of the menus. Also, JOSEPH WHARTON (1826-1909), the Philadelphia industrialist and philanthropist, who founded the Wharton School of Business and co-founded Bethlehem Steel. He was also an organizer, benefactor, and president of Swarthmore College. Also, DR. J[ACOB] M[ENDEZ] DA COSTA (1833-1900), a native of St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, who was raised in Germany and trained as a surgeon at Jefferson Medical College and in Europe. During the Civil War, he served with Mitchell at Turner’s Lane Hospital. After the war, Da Costa taught for many years at the Pennsylvania Hospital and became a professor at Jefferson Medical College. He was also remembered as the author of the landmark Medical Diagnosis (1864), which went through many 19th century editions, and for his description of the anxiety disorder known as Da Costa’s syndrome. Da Costa signs two of the menus. Also, H[ENRY] A[LGERNON] DU PONT (1838-1926), a member of the prominent family of industrialists, a lieutenant colonel in the Union army, railroad director, and U.S. Senator from Delaware (1906-1917). Du Pont signs three of the menus. Also, DR. J. WILLIAM WHITE (1850-1916), who served the University of Pennsylvania as professor of surgery, a member of the board of trustees, and as an influential promoter of athletics. Also, TALCOTT WILLIAMS (1849-1928), journalist, editor of the Philadelphia Press, and the first director of the school of journalism at Columbia University. Williams signs two of the menus. Also, L. CLARKE DAVIS (1834-1904), editor of the Philadelphia Public Ledger and spouse of the author, Rebecca Harding Davis. Davis signs three of the menus. Also, CHARLES C. HARRISON, a provost of the University of Pennsylvania. Also, industrialist, GEORGE FREDERIC BAER, attorney to J.P. Morgan, president of the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad, and president of Franklin and Marshall College. Also, JOHH CADWALADER, likely a relation of Mitchell’s brother-in-law[??] and close friend, John L. Cadwalader (U.S. Congressman, Assistant Secretary of State, and prominent New York attorney). Cadwalader signs all four of the menus. Also, SAMUEL W. PENNYPACKER (1843- 1916), governor of Pennsylvania (1903-1907).

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Meagher, John. Letter to S.W. Mitchell regarding the novel "Hugh Wynne", 1896 November 5. 1 folder.
 

MEAGHER, John. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. Wellsboro, PA, Nov. 5, 1896. Five-page letter on rectos of five leaves, with each leaf measuring 9 x 6”. Very good. A letter to Silas Weir Mitchell, praising his novel, Hugh Wynne, and calling attention to a historical inaccuracy Meagher perceived in the work. Meagher, a Pennsylvania local historian, was the co-author of a History of Butler County, Pennsylvania (1895) and a History of Tioga County, Pennsylvania.

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Meigs, S. Emlin. Letter to S.W. Mitchell, 1902 January 2. 1 folder.
 

[SHERMAN, WILLIAM TECUMSEH]. MEIGS, S[amuel] Emlen. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. [Philadelphia], Jan. 2, 1902. Two-page letter on leaf measuring 8 x 5”, together with an integral leaf containing a two-page copy of a letter by William Tecumseh Sherman accomplished by Meigs. Fine. A letter to Silas Weir Mitchell praising Mitchell’s poem on Washington. In reference to one of the lines in the poem, pertaining to the relationship between military force and the rule of law, Meigs copies the full text of a relevant letter written by Gen. Sherman to Meigs’s brother, Gen. M.C. Meigs. In the upper margin of the first page of the letter appears a note in Mitchell’s hand reading, “Interesting legally.”

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Mitchell, JK. Letter to unnamed recipient regarding BC Cooper, undated. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, J[ohn] K[earsley]. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. [n.p., circa 1840’s or early 1850’s]. One-page letter on leaf measuring 10 x 8”. Moderate damping and wear to lower left corner of sheet, with no impact on legibility; good only. A letter to an unnamed recipient, recommending B.C. Cooper for a customs appointment. Mitchell notes that Cooper is an “undeviating Whig” and that he “is almost starving & his wife & child are actually sufferers.”

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Mitchell, JK. Printed invitation to a dinner, undated. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, J[ohn] K[earsley, et al.]. PRINTED INVITATION, SIGNED IN TYPE BY MITCHELL AND 15 OTHERS. [Philadelphia, n.d.]. Recto only of card measuring approx. 2.5 x 4”. The text reads, in part: “Sir, The dinner to which you are a subscriber, will take place at Mansion House, on Thursday, 4th of April, at 5 o’clock P.M…. Committee of Arrangement.” This copy of the invitation is addressed, in manuscript, to Dr. M.H. Coates. The other signers of the invitation are J. Randolph, Thomas Harris, C.D. Meigs, Robley Dunglison, John Bell, William Rush, R.M. Huston, Francis West, Jr., James A. M’Crea, George Fox, J.B. Biddle, George W. Morris, Robert Morris, T.F. Betton, and J.M. Wallace.

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Mitchell, Langdon. Letter to Arthur Hobson Quinn regarding Mitchell's plays, 1926 December 15. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, Langdon. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. N.Y.C., Dec. 15, 1926. Two-page letter on leaf measuring 10 x 8”. Tiny evidence of damping, affecting several letters of text with no loss of comprehension, some later penciled notations; else near fine. Another letter to Arthur Hobson Quinn. Mitchell discusses the manuscripts and stage productions of several of his plays, including The Adventures of Francois (based on his father’s novel by the same name), The Kreutzer Sonata, The New Marriage, and The New York Idea. He also wishes Quinn “the best of good luck with the History!” He refers to Quinn’s important study, A History of the American Drama (3 vols., 1923-1927).

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Mitchell, Langdon. Letter to Arthur Hobson Quinn regarding a visit to Mr. Quinn, undated. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, Langdon. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. [New York City, n.d.]. One-page letter on leaf of stationery bearing Mitchell’s printed address, measuring 7.25 x 10.5”. Fine. A warm letter to Arthur Hobson Quinn, explaining that circumstances have made it impossible for Mitchell to visit, but that he will do so after the Christmas holiday to “talk over my classes, & the future … [and to ask] a hundred and one questions.” Quinn (1875-1960) was for many years professor of English literature and drama at the University of Pennsylvania, and a noted historian of the American stage.

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Mitchell, S.W.; Dalziel, Jane and Zimmerman, WW. Letters regarding the Infirmary, 1888, 1890 April, 1890 March. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, [Silas] Weir. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. [Sept., 1888]. One-page letter on leaf measuring 7 x 4.5”, with integral blank, together with original mailing envelope. Near fine. A letter to a Mrs. Little of Towanda, PA, informing her that she may forward this letter to “the Infirmary” (ie. the Philadelphia Orthopaedic Hospital and Infirmary for Nervous Diseases), to “receive prompt attention” from the institution. Dr. Mitchell helped organize the Infirmary and, for many years, offered clinical courses at the institution for medical students and hospital staff. Mrs. Little had a child suffering from a nervous malady, as is discussed in the two letters described below. [Together with:] DALZIEL, Jane. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. Philadelphia, March 28, 1890. One-page letter on leaf of stationery issued by the Philadelphia Orthopaedic Hospital and Infirmary for Nervous Diseases, measuring 11 x 8.5”. Near fine. Dalzeil, an administrator at the Infirmary, acknowledges the receipt of Little’s letter and informs her that her child will be admitted as soon as a vacancy occurs. [Together with:] ZIMMERMAN, W.W. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. Philadelphia, April 16, 1890. One-page letter on leaf of stationery issued by the Executive Committee of the Philadelphia Orthopaedic Hospital and Infirmary for Nervous Diseases, measuring 10 x 6”. Fine. Dr. Zimmerman, resident physician at the Infirmary, informs Mrs. Little that a bed is available for her child and that he or she will be treated by Dr. W.W. Keen. William William Keen (1837- 1932) was a prominent physician and long-time colleague and friend of Dr. Mitchell.

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Mitchell, S.W. Letter to Dr. Walter Franklin Atlee, circa 1898. 1 folder.
 

[MITCHELL, Silas] Weir. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. [Philadelphia, circa 1898]. Two-page letter on two integral leaves of black-bordered mourning stationery, with each leaf measuring 4 x 6.25”. Short, clean separation to one fold, not affecting text; one faint stain; very good plus. Mitchell writes to Dr. Walter Franklin Atlee and discusses an unspecified matter of contention. He states, in part: “I did not approve the action which annoyed you & rightly annoyed you, but we are old fellows & many things go awry in this life & one should forget as I often need to do.” Walter Franklin Atlee (1828-1910) was the son of prominent American physician, John Light Atlee, who was one of the founders and a president of the American Medical Association. Walter Atlee received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1850 and thereafter studied and practiced in Europe. In 1856, he returned to America and established a practice in Philadelphia. He contributed numerous articles to the American Journal of the Medical Sciences and edited works by Bernard on blood and Nelaton on surgery

.

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Mitchell, S.W. Note to Dr. Walter Franklin Atlee regarding a meeting with his son, 1902 March 2. 1 folder.
 

[MITCHELL, Silas] Weir. AUTOGRAPH NOTE SIGNED. Philadelphia, March 1, [1902]. Two-page note on leaf of black-bordered mourning stationery bearing Mitchell’s printed address, measuring 3.5 x 4.5”. One central crease, else fine. Mitchell again writes to Dr. William Franklin Atlee, transmitting a letter to Dr. Atlee’s son, Dr. Lewis William Atlee. Mitchell states that he will need to meet the younger Dr. Atlee before nominating him for a fellowship. Like his father and grandfather, Lewis Atlee was a physician. He graduated from Jefferson Medical College and served in the navy before establishing a practice in Philadelphia.

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Mitchell, S.W. Letter to Dr. Walter Franklin Atlee regarding missing a meeting with Atlee's son, 1902 March. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, [Silas] Weir. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. Philadelphia, [circa March, 1902]. Two-page letter on two integral leaves of stationery bearing Mitchell’s printed address and black mourning borders, with each leaf measuring 8 x 5”. Short, clean separation to two folds, not affecting text, else fine. Mitchell again writes to Dr. Walter Franklin Atlee and apologizes for not being able to see his son, Dr. Lewis William Atlee, when he called at his office. Mitchell blames his failing hearing for the mishap, stating that he did not hear his secretary when she announced the younger Dr. Atlee’s arrival, and promises to write him. [See the following entry for the promised letter].

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Mitchell, S.W. Letter to Dr. Lewis William Atlee regarding a missed meeting, 1902 March 6. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, S[ilas] Weir. MANUSCRIPT LETTER SIGNED. [Philadelphia], March 6, 1902. Three-page letter on two integral leaves of black-bordered mourning stationery, with each leaf measuring 8 x 4.75”. Near fine. The letter is written in a secretarial hand and boldly signed by Dr. Mitchell at the end. The recipient is Dr. Lewis William Atlee and the circumstance of Mitchell’s communication is described in the preceding entry. Mitchell here apologizes for missing Dr. Atlee when he called, and states that he would like to meet him personally before nominating him for a fellowship.

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Mitchell, S.W. Letter to Dr. Lewis William Atlee, 1902 March (April?) 14. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, [Silas] Weir. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. [Philadelphia, March or April] 14, [1902]. Two-page letter on two integral leaves of black-bordered mourning stationery, with each leaf measuring 8 x 5”. Minor toning, tiny corner crease; very good plus. Another letter to Dr. Lewis William Atlee. Mitchell begins, “Dear Doctor, Thanks for your timely protest as to Laparotomies.” He continues to ask Dr. Atlee who he would like to have sign his application for fellowship.

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Mitchell, S.W. Letter to Dr. Lewis William Atlee regarding recommendation for fellowship, 1902 March 26. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, [Silas] Weir. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. Philadelphia, March 26, [1902]. Two-page letter on two integral leaves of stationery bearing Mitchell’s printed address and black mourning borders, with each leaf measuring 8 x 5”. Light soil to one page, else fine. Another letter to Dr. Lewis William Atlee. Mitchell regretfully informs him that neither he nor Dr. Evans will be able to sign the nomination recommending him for a fellowship, stating that they, “being censors, & therefore members of the Council,” cannot legally sign. Mitchell suggests that Dr. Atlee instead ask Dr. Wharton to nominate him and states that he will write Dr. Wharton on his behalf.

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Mitchell, S.W. Letter to Dr. Walter Franklin Atlee regarding "The Youth of Washington", 1904 May 4. 1 folder.
 

[MITCHELL, Silas] Weir. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. Philadelphia, May 4, 1904. Three-page letter on two integral leaves of stationery bearing Mitchell’s printed address, with each leaf measuring 8 x 5”. Mitchell writes to Dr. Walter Franklin Atlee. He discusses his recently published book, The Youth of Washington (Century, 1904) and states, in part: “If herein I have set G.W. on his living legs – no more to be a lay figure – I shall have attained my end. Some time I must point out what in the text is G.W.’s own – ie. most of page 1[?]. The letters are mostly fictitious – guess which. It was great fun – ah, but he was a great, silent, shy, misunderstood man.”

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Mitchell, S.W. Letter to Dr. Lawrence Webster Fox regarding "A Practical Treatise on Ophthalmology", 1909 November 13. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, S[ilas] Weir. TYPED LETTER SIGNED. Philadelphia, Nov. 13, 1909. One-page letter on leaf of stationery bearing Mitchell’s printed address, measuring 8 x 5”. Mounted on sheet of larger size, else very good plus with some faint soiling. Mitchell writes to Dr. Lawrence Webster Fox, thanking him for a copy of his recently published book, A Practical Treatise on Ophthalmology (1909). Mitchell states, in part: “Perhaps I am better fitted to understand it than most physicians not in your line of practice. I am glad to see so much on the ocular conditions of hysteria. But far more than the book, I thank you for the kind words of your little note.” Lawrence Webster Fox (1853-1931), a native of Hummelstown, Pennsylvania, received his M.D. from Jefferson Medical College and thereafter studied at various institutions in Europe. In 1882, he became ophthalmologist at Jefferson Medical College and, the following year, began serving as ophthalmic surgeon at Germantown Hospital. In 1893, he was appointed professor of ophthalmology at the Medico-Chirurgical College in Philadelphia and later served in the same capacity at the medical school of the University of Pennsylvania. He is also remembered for curing trachoma among the Blackfeet Indians, who made him an honorary member of the tribe.

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Mitchell, S.W. Letter to a chaplain, 1910 October 18. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, [Silas] Weir. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. [Philadelphia?], Oct. 18, 1910. One-page letter on sheet measuring 6.75 x 4.5”, with integral blank. Minor soil; very good plus. A brief letter addressed, “Dear Chaplain.” Mitchell mentions an engagement (“Macalester, Thurs.”) and sends the regards of his wife.

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Mitchell, S.W. Autographed sentiment, undated. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, [Silas] Weir. AUTOGRAPH SENTIMENT SIGNED. [n.p., n.d.]. The inscription, “Yrs. Truly, Weir Mitchell,” appears on a card measuring 3 x 3.75”. Mounting remnants on verso, else fine.

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Mitchell, S.W. Clipped signature and printed portrait, undated. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, [Silas] Weir. CLIPPED SIGNATURE. [n.p.], Jan. 26., [year not stated]. Signature on sheet measuring 2.75 x 4.25”, evidently clipped from letter with closing (“Yrs Truly”) retained. Light soil; very good. Laid together with printed portrait of Mitchell.

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Mitchell, S.W. Letter to George Frederick Baer, undated. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, [Silas] Weir. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. Philadelphia, May 19, [year not stated]. Two-page letter on two integral leaves of stationery bearing Mitchell’s printed address, with each leaf measuring 8 x 5”. Some minor soiling; very good plus. A letter to George Frederick Baer (1842-1914), thanking him for “a memorable day.”

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Mitchell, S.W. Letter to unknown female recipient, undated. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, [Silas] Weir. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. Bar Harbor, ME, Sept. 26, [year not stated]. Three-page letter on two integral leaves, with each leaf measuring 6.75 x 4.5”. Near fine. Mitchell writes to an unnamed female recipient in response to her letter. The letter reads as follows: “Dear Madam, You would be very welcome to verse of mine if I had ever written anything in the interest of children except unpleasant prescriptions. I am unfortunately not in any such relation to M.M. Charcot & Pasteur as would enable me to take with either the liberty of making the request you desire me to make. Yrs truly, Weir Mitchell.”

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Mitchell, S.W. Letter to William Farrar Smith, undated. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, [Silas] Weir. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED. [Grand Cascapedia, Quebec, n.d.]. Four-page letter on Cascapedia Club stationery, consisting of two integral leaves with each leaf measuring 7 x 4.25”. According to a penciled note in an unidentified hand, on the final page, the recipient of this letter was William Farrar Smith (1824-1903), a major general of volunteers in the Civil War, and later a civil engineer and a New York police commissioner. In his letter, Mitchell discusses a proof for one of his books or magazine articles in Smith’s possession. Apologizing for his tremulous hand, he writes, “My ink is mud, my pen a stick! I hope it can be read.” [Actually, Mitchell’s tremor is less evident here than in his later correspondence, and the letter is easily legible].

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Mitchell, S.W. Letters to Mr. Bourne, undated. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, [Silas] Weir. GROUP OF THREE AUTOGRAPH LETTERS SIGNED. Grand Cascapedia, Quebec, [one letter dated July 4, no year stated, the others undated]. One one-page letter and two twopage letters all on Cascapedia Club stationery, each consisting of two integral leaves, with each leaf measuring 7 x 4.5”. Fine. Mitchell writes to a Mr. Bourne about salmon fishing on the Cascapedia River and Bourne’s anticipated arrival. In one letter, Mitchell also mentions the departure of Lord Grey. He presumably refers to Albert Henry George Grey, the 4th Earl Grey, who served as Governor General of Canada (1904-1911).

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Mitchell, S.W. Note to "Miss Susan", undated. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, [Silas] Weir. AUTOGRAPH NOTE SIGNED. Philadelphia, [n.d.]. One page letter on leaf of stationery bearing Mitchell’s printed address, measuring 4.5 x 4.5”. Small tape repairs to verso with no impact on text; mounting remnants on verso; else near fine. A note of transmittal for an unspecified enclosure, address to a Miss Susan.

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National Academy of Science, facsimile of signature book, 1952 April 7. 1 folder.
 

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. A FACSIMILE OF THE ORIGINAL SIGNATURE BOOK. [Cover title]. [Washington, D.C., 1952]. First edition. Printed letter by the president of the Academy, explaining the history of the signature book, laid-in Original printed wraps. Approx. 11 x 9”. [7] pages of facsimiles. Very good. Silas Weir Mitchell is one of the signers.

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Reath, Theodore W. Letter to Mrs. Kenneth Day regarding S.W. Mitchell, 1946. 1 folder.
 

REATH, Thomas W. CARBON TYPESCRIPT LETTER, SIGNED IN TYPE. [Philadelphia, circa 1946]. Three page letter on rectos of three leaves, with each leaf measuring 11 x 8.5”, in original mailing envelope addressed to Mrs. Kenneth Day (S. Weir Mitchell’s granddaughter), dated 1946. Reath relates a story told to him by Silas Weir Mitchell in Bermuda, in 1912. Mitchell reputedly described an encounter between his father, John Kearsley Mitchell, and the great actor, Junius Booth, in which the elder Mitchell confronted a drunken Booth on behalf of the mayor of Philadelphia. Booth was apparently disturbing the peace. The confrontation supposedly ended in a brawl, with both Mitchell and Booth tumbling down a flight of stairs.

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Sherman, FD. Letter to "J.B.G", 1893. 1 folder.
 

S[HERMAN], F[rank] D[empster]. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED (with Initials). [n.p.], Jan. 17, 1893. One-page letter on leaf measuring 8 x 5”. Two pinholes, else fine. A letter to a “J.B.G.” enclosing a review [not present] and the following: AUTOGRAPH LETTER, IN VERSE, SIGNED (as “Franciseus Dempsterius S.”). [n.p.], Jan. 16, 1893. One-page letter on leaf.

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Series II.  Works concerning the Mitchell family, 1858-1914. 5 folders.

Box Folder
Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, death of John K. Mitchell, 1858. 1 folder.
 

[FREEMASONS]. PROCEEDINGS OF THE R.W. GRAND LODGE OF PENNSYLVANIA, AT A SPECIAL COMMUNICATION, HELD AT THE MASONIC HALL, CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA, APRIL 13TH, 1858 … ON THE OCCASION OF THE DEATH OF THE R.W. GRAND MASTER, JOHN K. MITCHELL, M.D. Philadelphia: King & Baird, 1858. First edition. Original self wraps. 8.5 x 5.5”. 8pp. Removed with several tiny holes to spine from former binding, else fine and bright. Rare; OCLC locates only four copies.

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Public Ledger, pictoral section, 1914 January 18. 1 folder.
 

PUBLIC LEDGER. PICTORIAL SECTION. Philadelphia, Jan. 18, 1914. Original self-wraps. 16 x 11”. [16]pp. Faint crease and small area of toning with slight impact on image of Mitchell; tear to gutter; good plus. Front wrap bears a large photographic portrait of Mitchell, published as a memorial soon after his death.

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Sheet music, "Rocked in the Cradle of the Deep", dedicated to John Kearsley Mitchell by J.P. Knight, 1853. 1 folder.
 

WILLARD, Mrs. And KNIGHT, J.P. ROCKED IN THE CRADLE OF THE DEEP. WORDS BY MRS. WILLARD. MUSIC COMPOSED AND DEDICATED TO DR. MITCHELL BY J.P. KNIGHT. [Cover title]. Boston: Oliver Diston, 1853. Sheet music. Original printed wraps neatly backed in cloth. Very good. Dedicated to John Kearsley Mitchell (I).

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The Century For November, chromolithograph advertising broadside, 1896. 1 folder.
 

[CENTURY COMPANY]. HAMBIDGE, Jay, [illustrator]. THE CENTURY FOR NOVEMBER. LARGE CHROMOLITHOGRAPH ADVERTISING BROADSIDE FOR CENTURY ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE. N.Y.: G.H. Buek & Co., Lith[ographers], 1896. Broadside measuring 17.5 x 21”. The text continues: “Beginning the New Volume. A Great Article on Elections. Opening Chapters of the New Serials: “CAMPAIGING WITH GRANT,” Personal Recollections by Gen Horace Porter. “HUGH WYNNE FREE QUAKER,” A Novel of the Revolution by Dr. S. Weir Mitchell. Richly Illustrated Articles, Short Stories, Etc., Etc. Published by The Century Co.” The large color illustration dominating the broadside (measuring approx. 13 x 20”) is a reproduction of a painting by JAY HAMBIDGE (1867-1924), a noted American artist, illustrator, and art theorist. It appeared in the November, 1896 Century Illustrated Magazine with an article describing the 1896 election in New York City and bore the caption: “Campaign Parade at Night.” It depicts a large procession in New York City, illuminated by the gaslights and sparkling flares carried by the marchers. The broadside is professionally backed with a sheet of the same size. It exhibits a horizontal and a vertical crease, three marginal chips, not affecting text or image, several short tears with no loss, and some marginal soiling, but is still bright, attractive, and worthy of display. Both Hugh Wynne and Campaigning for Grant were issued in book form by Century in 1897. RARE; OCLC finds no copies.

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Harper's Weekly, poem "A Prayer" by S.W. Mitchell, 1898 August 13. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, S[ilas] Weir. “A Prayer.” A poem. Vol. 42, No. 2173, Aug. 13, 1898. Original self-wraps. Short tear to head of spine, else near fine. Mitchell’s poem appears in an inset box in the “Diary of the [Spanish American] War.”

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Series III.  Photographs, undated. 14 folders.

Box Item
Photograph album I, undated. 76 photographs.
 

ALBUM (I). OWNED BY SILAS WEIR MITCHELL AND BEARING HIS NUMEROUS AUTOGRAPH IDENTIFICATION INSCRIPTIONS. The following 76 photographs appear in an album issued by J.B. Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia, bound in the original tan morocco, handsomely decorated in gilt and brown, with functional metal clasps. Front board detached, else very good. Photographs are in very good or better condition, unless when otherwise indicated below. The contents are as follows:

[Page 1]. [HENRY, Alexander]. CDV. Back-mark: M.P. Simons, 1320 Chestnut St., Phila. Moderate stains and foxing; good plus. Subject identified by inscription in album. Head shot of Henry, here seen as an elderly man, in left profile. This albumen photograph evidently reproduces a daguerreotype or perhaps a painting. Alexander Henry (1766-1847), the maternal grandfather of Silas Weir Mitchell, was a wealthy Philadelphia merchant and philanthropist, who served as first president of the American Sunday School Union and as a director of the Bank of the United States. His grandson, Alexander Henry (1823-1883), served as mayor of Philadelphia during 1858-1866. The photographer, Montgomery P. Simons (b. 1816 or 1817, d. 1877) was active as a daguerreotypist in Philadelphia by 1848 and established a photographic studio at 1320 Chestnut Street by 1862. The present carte de visite was likely issued sometime between that year and the end of the 1860’s.

[Page 2]. [MITCHELL, Silas Weir]. CDV. Backmark: J.E. McClees, 910 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Some light soiling, but very good. Head-shot portrait of Mitchell as a young man. Inscription in album reads: “S.W.M.”

[Page 3]. [MITCHELL, John Kearsley (II)]. CDV. Back-mark: : J.E. McClees, 910 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Head-shot portrait of Silas Weir Mitchell’s son as a young child. Subject identified based on inscription in album.

[MITCHELL, Langdon Elwyn]. CDV. Back-mark: E. Woodward, No. 1 cor[ner] Church and Gay Sts., West Chester. Card trimmed a bit unevenly, else near fine. Full-length portrait of Langdon Mitchell, seated, as an infant in his Christening gown. Subject identified based on inscription in album.

[Page 4]. [WHARTON, Henry]. CDV. Back-mark: J.D. Fowler & Co., opposite U.S. Naval Academy, Newport, RI. Small corner chip to photograph, in no way affecting image of Wharton, else better than very good. Subject identified based on inscription in album. Full-length portrait of Wharton, standing. Henry Wharton (1827-1880) was a long-time friend of Silas Weir Mitchell. He was the son of Thomas Isaac Wharton and, like his father, a prominent Philadelphia attorney.

[Page 5]. FISH, G[eorge]G. CDV. Back-mark: New York Photographic Co., 453 Broadway, New York. Near fine. Reproduction of an 1863 painting signed by Fish, depicting a witch on a broomstick carrying two small children.

[Page 6]. [CONOVER, Thomas Anderson]. CDV. [Circa 1862-1864]. Back-mark: Wenderoth & Taylor, 912-914 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Very good plus. Subject identified based on inscription in album. Head-shot portrait of Commodore Conover, perhaps in his naval uniform. Thomas Anderson Conover (1794-1864) was a career naval officer from New Jersey. He fought in the War of 1812 and subsequently served in the Mediterranean squadron and elsewhere. In 1857-1858, he commanded the African squadron on the flagship Constitution. When the rank of commodore was created in July, 1862, he was appointed to the rank and placed on the retired list.

[Page 7]. [HENRY, Mrs. S.?]. CDV. Back-mark: F. Gutekunst, 712 Arch St., Philadelphia. Near fine. Subject identified by inscription in album. Half-bust portrait of a woman, presumably a relation of Silas Weir Mitchell on his mother’s side.

[MTICHELL, Edward Donaldson]. HANDCOLORED CDV. [Circa 1862-1864]. Back-mark: M.P. Simons, 1320 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Some light foxing with negligible impact on image of Mitchell, still bright and about very good. Inscription in album reads: “Cadet Ed’d D. Mitchell.” Edward Donaldson “Ned” Mitchell (1843-1864) was Silas Weir Mitchell’s youngest brother. During the Civil War, he served as a medical cadet at Douglas Hospital in Washington. There, in 1862, he contracted diphtheria and the disease claimed his life two years later.

[Page 8]. CDV depicting an unidentified woman. Back-mark: Wenderoth & Taylor, 912-914 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.

MITCHELL, Langdon [Elwyn]. CDV. Back-mark: F. Gutekunst, 704 & 706 Arch St., Philadelphia. Near fine. Subject identified by penciled inscription on verso. Depicts Langdon Mitchell as a young boy, in a full-length portrait, seated, wearing a dress.

[Page 9]. [MITCHELL, Langdon Elwyn]. CDV. Near fine. Subject identified by inscription in album. Full-length portrait of Langdon Mitchell as a young boy, seated, wearing a dress or skirt, and holding a hoop.

CDV depicting an unidentified woman. Back-mark: F. Gutekunst, 704 & 706 Arch St., Philada.

[Page 10]. [MITCHELL?]. CDV. Back-mark: Wenderoth, Taylor, & Brown, 912-914 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Several tiny spots to photograph, still very good. Depicts a man half-bust, in left profile. He is probably a member of the Mitchell family.

CDV depicting unidentified woman. Hand-tinted adding color to cheeks and eyes. Backmark: Alex. Gardner, photographer to the Army of the Potomac, 511 Seventh Street and 332 Pennsylvania Av., published by Philip & Solomons, Washington, D.C.

[Page 11]. CLARK, Thomas M., Rev. CDV SIGNED AND INSCRIBED. 1862. Inscription on verso reads: “Mrs. J.K. Mitchell with the grateful regards of Thomas M. Clark.” Front-mark: McAllister & Brother, 728 Chestnut Street [holder of copyright]; Gutekunst, photographist. Back-mark: F. Gutekunst, 706 Arch Street, Philadelphia. Subject’s name printed at base of recto of card together with copyright notice. Photograph toned and faded, but image still suitable for purposes of identification. Thomas March Clark (1812-1903), a native of Newburyport, Massachusetts, preached in various locales, including Philadelphia, before becoming the Episcopal bishop of Rhode Island in 1854. In 1899, he became bishop of the Episcopal Church in America. He was the author of several books and numerous orations.

CDV of an unidentified young man. Back-mark: Frank Rowell, 25 Westminster Street, Prov[idence], RI.

[Page 12]. [MCBIRNEY?, Mary]. CDV. Subject identified by inscription in album. Minor wear, but very good. Full-length portrait of woman, standing.

[COOPER, Charles De Kay, Rev.]. CDV. Back-mark: M.P. Simons, 1320 Chestnut St., Philada. Near fine. Subject identified by inscription in album. Half-bust portrait. Rev. Charles De Kay Cooper (1813-1902), a native of Albany, was an Episcopal minister who came to Philadelphia by the 1860’s. In 1868, he was the co-founder (with Philips Brooks) of the Church of the Holy Apostles, where he preached for many years.

[Page 13]. [MUTTER, Mrs. Thomas Dent]. CDV. Back-mark: W.F. Burrows, 158 Main St., Middletown, CT. Near fine. Subject identified by inscription in album. Threequarters length portrait of Mrs. Muller, seated.

[MUTTER, Thomas Dent]. CDV. [Circa late 1850’s]. Original albumen photograph measuring 3.25 x 2.5”, trimmed to oval as issued, and mounted on plain card. Half-bust portrait. Subject identified by inscription in album, reading “Dr. Mutter,” and by comparison with published photographs and portraits. Heavy marginal soiling to card, not affecting photograph. Small crease affecting approx. top ¼” of photograph, but with no impact on image of Mutter. The photograph itself otherwise in fine condition. Thomas Dent Mutter (1811-1859) was a prominent Philadelphia physician and the original benefactor of the Mutter Museum in that city. A native of Richmond, Virginia, he obtained his M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania in 1831and afterwards studied medicine in Paris. From 1841 to 1856, he was professor of surgery at Jefferson Medical College. Soon before his death at the age of 48, he donated his extensive collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, plus a trove of prints, photographs, portraits and ephemera of American medical men, to the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. This gift formed the core collection of the Mutter Museum, which was named in his honor and remains a landmark institution of medical history. A handsome portrait of this noted Philadelphian.

[Page 14]. CDV depicting unidentified infant. Back-mark: Wenderoth, Taylor & Brown, 912-914 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.

[Page 15]. CDV depicting young girl. Back-mark: Bell, 1200 Chestnut St., Philada. Subject identified as “Mary” in album

CDV depicting unidentified woman with waist-length black hair. Back-mark: Wenderoth, Taylor, & Brown, 912-914 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.

[Page 16]. CDV depicting young girl. Back-mark: Rockwood & Co., 639 Broadway, New York. Inscription in album reads: “Potter.”

[MITCHELL, Langdon Elwyn?]. CDV. Back-mark: O.H. Willard’s, 1206 Chestnut St., Phila. Near fine. Full-length portrait of a young boy, seated, wearing a dress. The subject is probably Langdon Mitchell.

[Page 17]. CDV depicting young girl. Back-mark: Rockwood, 839 Broadway, NY. Inscription in album reads: “Potter.” Subject is the same as the girl in item above.

CDV depicting young boy in dress. Back-mark: Rockwood, 839 Broadway, NY. Inscription in album reads: “Potter.”

[Page 18]. CDV reproducing a painting titled, “All Quiet on the Potomac.” There was a the famous Civil War song with the same title. Back-mark: E. & H.T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York.

[No photographs inserted on p. 19].

[Page 20]. [HENRYSON, Alexander]. CDV. Back-mark: M.P. Simons, 1320 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Very good. Depicts a young man in a head-shot portrait. Subject identified based on inscription in album.

[Page 21]. CDV depicting young girl. Front-mark: Whipple, 297 Washington St., Boston. Inscription in album reads: “Schlesinger.”

ANDREWS, [?]. CDV. Very good. Full-length portrait of a man, standing. Subject identified by penciled inscription on recto of card.

[Page 22]. [HENRY, Theodora]. CDV. Front-mark: D. Hinkle, Germantown. Near fine. Hand-tinted (adding color to cheeks). Head-shot portrait of Henry. Subject identified by inscription in album. She was presumably a relation of Silas Weir Mitchell on his mother’s side of the family.

[HENRY, ?]. CDV. Back-mark: F. Gutekunst, 704 & 706 Arch St., Philadelphia. Headshot portrait of a woman. There is a strong family resemblance (perhaps sororal) between the subject and Theodora Henry (see preceding entry).

[Page 23]. CDV depicting unidentified woman. Back-mark: W. Schaus, 749 Broadway, New York.

CDV reproducing painting of cats, titled on verso: “The Question Settled.” Inscription on verso reads: “J.K. Mitchell May 5, ’68. Good boy.”

[Page 24]. CDV depicting unidentified boy. Back-mark: F. Gutekunst, 704 & 706 Arch St., Philadelphia.

CDV depicting young girl. Faint penciled inscription on verso reads: “Lizzie.” Inscription in album, maybe erroneous, reads: “Andrews.” [The subject is perhaps Elizabeth Kearsley Mitchell, d. 1928, daughter of Nathaniel Chapman Mitchell and niece of S. Weir Mitchell.

[No photographs inserted on p. 25].

[Page 26]. CDV depicting young girl. Back-mark: Henry Ulke, 278 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. Subject appears to be same girl as in preceding entry.

[Page 27]. KING, Harry. CDV. Back-mark: John A. Whipple, 297 Washington Street, Boston. Small marginal stain, in no way affecting image of King, else near fine. Fulllength portrait of male toddler in dress. Inscription on verso reads: “Harry King, Aug. 14th, ’68. Aged 19 mos.”

M[ITCHELL], J[ohn] K[earsley (II)]. CDV. [Circa 1865]. Back-mark: F. Gutekunst, 704 & 706 Arch St., Philadelphia. Very good plus. Hand-tinted (adding color to cheeks). Full-length portrait of Mitchell as a boy, standing, dressed in plus fours. Identified by inscription on verso.

[Page 28]. CDV reproducing unsigned, untitled painting of a cat.

[Page 29]. MINTOT, [Louisa?]. CDV. Front-mark: Whipple, 297 Washington St., Boston. Very good plus. Full-length portrait of a girl, seated. Inscription on verso reads: “Mintot.” There was a Louisa Mintot who corresponded with Silas Weir Mitchell during the last years of his life (see Burr, pp. 349-352) and who took summer vacations in Bar Harbor.

[Page 30]. [MITCHELL, John Kearsley (II)]. CDV. [Circa 1865]. Back-mark: J.E. McClees, 910 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Full-length portrait of Mitchell as a boy, standing. This photograph is nearly contemporary (perhaps a year or two later) with the CDV on p. 27.

[Page 31]. ROBINSON, “Missi.” CDV. Back-mark: Rockwood, 839 Broadway, NY. Very good plus. Inscription on verso reads: “`Missi.’ Mrs. Robinson.” Full-length portrait of a girl, seated. Inscription in album, probably erroneous, reads: “Douglas Robinson.” While it is possible that Mrs. Robinson refers to herself, rather than the subject of the photograph as “Missi,” and that the subject of the photograph is indeed Douglas Robinson, the appearance of the subject’s hair and hat, both of which bear bows, strongly suggest that the subject is a girl.

CDV depicting infant. Hand-colored. Back-mark: Gihon & Rixon, 1024 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Inscription in album reads: “Maural[?]”

[Page 32]. CDV depicting two unidentified children. Back-mark: Wm. H. Rhoads, 1814 Frankford Road, Philadelphia.

CDV depicting male infant. 1865. Back-mark: Edward R. Morgan, 1109 Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia. Very good plus. Full-length portrait of an apparently male infant in Christening gown. Inscription on verso reads: “Thompson, April, 1865.”

[No photographs inserted on p. 33].

[Page 34]. CDV depicting young girl. Back-mark: John L. Gihon, 1024 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Inscription in album reads: “Wilson.”

[Page 35]. [MITCHELL, Edward Donaldson]. CDV. Circa 186_? Back-mark: M.P. Simons, 1320 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Slight crease, with negligible impact on image of Mitchell, else very good. [Another example of the same image described above with more biographical information in the item above].

CDV depicting woman. Back-mark: Black & Case, successors to J.W. Black, 163 & 173 Wash. St., Boston and So. Turo St. opp. Naval Academy, Newport, RI. Inscription in album reads: “Guillon.” The subject was perhaps the wife of Philadelphia attorney, Constant Guillon (d. 1872).

[Page 36]. TAPPAN, Winthrop. CDV. Back-mark: Wm. Pierce, Brunswick, ME. Near fine. Half-bust portrait of Tappan. Identification based on penciled inscription on photograph.

CDV depicting unidentified woman. Circa 1860’s. Back-mark: S.A. Cohner, 62 O’Reilly, Habana. Samuel Alexander Cohner, who previously worked at McClees Studio in Washington, was an American photographer in Havana. He was killed in Jan., 1869, during an attack on a café by Cuban rebels.

[Page 37]. ODENHEIMER, Minnie B. CDV SIGNED. 1866. Back-mark: R.M. Tudor, 336 South Fourth Street, Philada. Near fine. Hand-tinted (adding color to cheeks and lips) and hand-painted (depicting top of subject’s dress). Head-shot. Odenheimer signs and dates her name on the verso of the card.

[ELWYN, ?]. CDV. Back-mark: Wenderoth, Taylor & Brown, 912-914 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Very good. Depicts an infant. Inscription in album reads: “Elwyn.” The subject is probably one of the five children of Rev. Alfred Langdon Elwyn born between 1865 and 1871. Alfred Elwyn was Silas Weir Mitchell’s brother-in-law by his first wife, Mary Middleton Elwyn.

[No photographs inserted on p. 38].

[Page 39]. CDV depicting unidentified man. Back-mark: William Shew, 423 Montgomery Street, San Francisco.

[Page 40]. CDV depicting young girl. Back-mark: F. Gutekunst, 704 & 706 Arch St., Philadelphia, removed to 712 Arch St. Inscription in album reads: “Peale.”

SMITH, R. CDV. Back-mark: F. Gutekunst, 704 & 706 Arch St., Philadelphia. Very good plus. Head-shot portrait of a young boy. Identification based on inscription on verso of card.

[No photographs inserted on p. 41].

[Page 42]. CDV reproducing G. Douglas Brewerton’s painting of the bombardment of “Sumter, April 13, 1861.” 1864. Back-mark: A.A. Turner, 765 Broadway, New York. Very good plus.

CDV depicting girl. 1871. Back-mark: Reichman & Siebert, 459 & 461 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. Subject bears a resemblance to the second Henry girl depicted on p. 22. [Lengthy inscription on verso, largely unintelligible to us].

[Page 43]. [PACKARD, John Hooker]. CDV. Back-mark: Henry A. Smith, 928 Girard Avenue, Philad’a. Near fine. Half-bust portrait. Subject identified by inscription in album. John Hooker Packard (1832-1907) was a prominent Philadelphia physician and the illustrator of The Children’s Hour, Silas Weir Mitchell’s first book. Packard earned his M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania, studied briefly in Europe, and then worked in various Philadelphia institutions. Like Mitchell, he also served in Union hospitals during the Civil War. Packard was a leader in the early use of anesthesia in this country and one of the original members of the American Surgical Association. He published several medical works, including a Manual of Minor Surgery (1863) and a Handbook of Operative Surgery (1870). He was the father of Francis Randolph Packard (1870-1950), a noted medical historian.

LEAMING, [?]. CDV. 1869. Photographer’s autograph inscription on verso reads: “R.W.L. Photo., June, 1869.” Near fine. Full-bust portrait of a woman, seated. Inscription at base of recto of card reads: “Leaming.”

[Page 44]. POLLARD, [?]. CDV. Back-mark: Wenderoth, Taylor & Brown, 912-914 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Very good plus. Head-shot portrait of a woman. Inscription at base of recto of card, in pencil, reads: “Miss Pollard.”

CDV depicting unidentified woman. Back-mark: Cremer & Dillon, 18 South Eighth Street, Philadelphia.

[Page 45]. CDV depicting unidentified woman. Back-mark: Wenderoth, Taylor & Brown, 912-914, Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.

LEAMING, [?]. CDV. 1869. Photographer’s autograph inscription on verso reads: “R.W.L. Photo., June, 1869.” Near fine. Full-bust portrait of a woman, seated. Inscription at base of recto of card reads: “Leaming.” This is either the same woman depicted in the item above, in a different dress, pose, and hairstyle, or her sister.

[Page 46]. [MITCHELL, Nathaniel Chapman]. CDV. Back-mark: Wenderoth, Taylor & Brown, 912-914 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Tiny stain to photograph, not affecting image of Mitchell, else very good plus. Half-bust portrait of one of Silas Weir Mitchell’s younger brothers. Identification based on inscription in album. Nathaniel Chapman Mitchell (1840-1900) came of age as an Union officer in the Civil War. He served as a private and lieutenant in the 15th Illinois Cavalry, before being made major of the 4th U.S. Colored Cavalry in April, 1864. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in the regiment in April, 1865. He engaged in business after the war, and secured several patents for the cleaning and processing of rubber.

TINTYPE CDV depicting unidentified woman. Embossed front-mark reads: “Potters Patent March 7, 1865.”

[Page 47]. [MUTTER, Thomas Dent]. CDV, being a photograph of an earlier photograph.

[TOWNSEND, ?]. CDV. Back-mark: E. Woodward, No. 1, cor. Church & Gay Sts., West Chester. Head-shot portrait of a woman. Inscription in album reads: “Miss Townsend.”

[Page 48]. BUTLER, [Frances] “Fannie” [sic]. CDV. [Circa 1860’s]. Embossed front-mark: Rintoul & Rockwood. Slight marginal soil, still very good plus. Full-length portrait of Miss Butler, standing. Inscription on verso reads: “Miss Fannie Butler, Phil’a.” Frances Ann “Fanny” Butler (1838-1910) was the daughter of the famous actress and memoirist, Fanny Kemble (1809-1893). Silas Weir Mitchell was a friend of Mrs. Kemble and traveled by horseback to visit her when she was residing at York Farm, near Philadelphia. This was during the period after her famous divorce from her slave-owning husband, Pierce Butler. Mitchell also became closely acquainted with Mrs. Kemble’s other daughter, Sarah Butler Wister [see entry #121 for a book inscribed to Wister and more information on this relationship]. Fanny Butler was raised mostly by her father and, unlike her mother and sister, was favorably impressed with Southern institutions. After the Civil War, she moved to Georgia and resided on her father’s plantation. In 1871, she married Rev. James Wentworth Leigh, a British clergyman who had been a defender of slavery. Her memoir of her Georgia experiences, Ten Years on a Georgia Plantation Since the War, 1866-1876 (1883), contradicted the negative assessment of Southern race relations put forth in her mother’s more famous book, Journal of a Residence on a Georgia Plantation, 1838-1839 (1863).

[MITCHELL, Robert Walsh]. CDV. [Circa 1860’s]. Front-mark: Osler, 1924 Chestnut Street, Phila. Minor wear to card, else near fine. Identification based on inscription in album, reading: “Captain Robert Walsh Mitchell.” Half-bust portrait of one of Silas Weir Mitchell’s younger brothers as an adult, in civilian clothes. Walsh Mitchell (1836-1872) served the Union as a captain in the 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry. Weir Mitchell remembered his brother as a “strong-willed, unruly, excitable person … [who] was – even as a lad, conspicuous for courage – a lover of danger” –qtd. in Burr, p. 34. As a result, Walsh became involved in a number of entanglements and scandals throughout his life, which are described only in the vaguest terms by Weir Mitchell’s biographers. In the late 1850’s, he traveled to Panama, worked on a railroad, and reputedly fought in a duel. After serving in the Civil War, he again wandered, traveling to Alaska, and perhaps other places, before arriving in St. Kitts in the Caribbean. In 1866, Weir Mitchell complained of “Walsh’s deeps of moral degradation” (ibid, p. 148) and, in 1871, noted that he expended $720 to help his brother out of some difficulty. By that time his brother’s health was failing, and when Walsh last wrote to Weir from Saint Kitts, he was being treated by a doctor for a “severe hemorrhage” (ibid). The cause of this hemorrhage, like much of Walsh’s life, remains unknown, but it claimed his life. He died on Saint Kitts on April 10, 1872 at the age of 36 or 37. [See item #366 below for the first of several photographs documenting his untimely demise]. Despite Walsh’s failings,Weir Mitchell honored his brother’s memory, displaying Walsh’s sword from the Civil War above his hearth and recounting his war-time gallantry to friends and family.

[Page 49]. SCHURZ, Carl Lincoln. CDV. 1871. Backmark: Bogardus, 1153 Broadway, New York. Very good. Half-bust portrait of Schurz as infant. Identification based on presentation inscription by family member on verso. Carl Lincoln Schurz was the first-born son of Carl Schurz (1829-1906), a German exile of the 1848 revolutions, Union general, U.S. Senator, U.S. Secretary of the Interior, and journalist. The younger Schurz became a prominent attorney in New York. The presentation inscription reads: “To my dear Mama Mitchie, from sister. Carl Lincoln Schurz, 4 months old. Remember the days on Bishopthorpe, Aug., 28, 1871.”

[TENNYSON, Alfred]. CDV reproducing a painting of Tennyson. Back-mark: Gihon & Rixon, 1024 Chestnut St., Philadelphia.

[Page 50]. [HENRY, Ely]. CDV. Back-mark: D. Hinkle, 4741 Main St., Germantown. Near fine. Halfbust portrait. Inscription in album reads: “Aunt Ely Henry.” The subject was evidently a relation of Silas Weir Mitchell on his mother’s side of the family.

CDV depicting “Silver Cascade [a waterfall], near St. Anthony.” Back-mark: Whitney, St. Paul, MN.

2 1
Photograph album II, Mitchell family album, undated. 13 photographs.
 

ALBUM (II). MITCHELL FAMILY ALBUM. The following 13 photographs appear in an album issued by E. Anthony, 501 Broadway, NY, bound in the original black morocco, decorated in blind, with one of the two original metal clasps present. Slightly worn, but very good. Photographs in very good or better condition, except when otherwise indicated below. The individual photographs are as follows:

[Page 1]. [MITCHELL, John Kearsley?]. CDV. [Circa 1850’s]. Back-mark: J.E. McClees, 910 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Faint soiling or foxing, still very good. Half-bust portrait of a man presumed to be John Kearsley Mitchell, father of Silas Weir Mitchell, based on comparison with an engraving included in the collection.

[Page 2]. [MITCHELL, Sarah Matilda Henry?]. CDV. Back-mark: M.P. Simons, 1320 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Lightly foxed, but about very good. Depicts a woman wearing a bonnet, half-bust, in left profile. Given the placement of the photograph in the album, we suspect that the subject is Sarah Matilda Henry Mitchell (d. 1872), mother of Silas Weir Mitchell, however this is merely conjecture. The only other image of Mrs. Mitchell we could locate was an earlier, painted portrait reproduced in Burr’s Weir Mitchell: His Life and Letters (opposite p. 30). Although the appearance of the subject of this photograph is not dissimilar to that of the painted portrait of Mrs. Mitchell, the difference of her pose in the painting, as compared with the photograph, makes positive identification on this basis impossible.

[No photographs inserted on pp. 3-4 of album].

[Page 5]. MITCHELL, E[dward] D[onaldson]. CDV. Circa 1861-1862. Back-mark: M.P. Simons, 1320 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Faint foxing, still very good. Half-bust portrait of Mitchell in his cadet’s uniform. Identification based on contemporary inscription on verso reading: “E.D. Mitchell, medical cadet.”

[No photographs inserted on pp. 6-9 of album].

[Page 10]. [MITCHELL, Silas Weir]. CDV INSCRIBED. Circa early 1860’s. Back-mark: Rintoul & Rockwood, 839 Broadway, NY. Moderately foxed; good plus. Three-quarters length portrait of Mitchell, seated. Penciled inscription on verso reads: “For Major Mitchell.” This CDV was evidently presented by Mitchell to his brother, Nathaniel Chapman Mitchell (1840-1900), who came of age as an Union officer in the Civil War. He served as a private and lieutenant in the 15th Illinois Cavalry, before being made major of the 4th U.S. Colored Cavalry in April, 1864. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel in the regiment in April, 1865. He engaged in business after the war, and secured several patents for the cleaning and processing of rubber.

[Page 11]. [MITCHELL, Mary Middleton Elwyn?]. CDV. Circa 1860. Front-mark (embossed on photograph): Germon, 702 Chest. St., Phila. William Lafayette Germon was operating at this address by 1859. Very good plus. Hand-tinted (adding color to cheeks). Full-length portrait of a woman presumed to be Mary Middleton Elwyn Mitchell (d. 1862), Silas Weir Mitchell’s first wife, based on comparison with a photograph of her reproduced in Burr (opposite p. 120).

[No photographs inserted on pp. 12-14].

[Page 15]. [NEILSON,] Lucy [Brooke]. CDV. Back-mark: J.H. Bostwick, Bristol, PA. Very good. Hand-tinted (adding color to cheeks). Head-shot portrait of Silas Weir Mitchell’s niece as a girl. She was the daughter of Mitchell’s sister Sarah (b. 1831), who married William Neilson in 1848. Lucy Neilson and her husband, Richard S. Edwards, were the parents of Richard Stanislaus Edwards (1885-1959), an admiral in the U.S. Navy.

[No photographs inserted on pp. 16-17].

[Page 18]. “Em.” CDV. 1869. Back-mark: D. Hinkle, 4739 Main St., Germantown. Light soil, still about very good. Hand-tinted (adding color to cheeks). Head-shot portrait of a girl, who is identified only by a contemporary inscription on verso reading: “Em. Sep., 1869.”

[Page 19]. [MITCHELL, Elizabeth Kearsley?] “Lizzie.” Back-mark: D. Hinkle, 4739 Main St., Germantown. Very good. Hand-tinted (adding color to cheeks). Head-shot portrait of a girl. Contemporary inscription on the verso reads, “Lizzie.” The subject is most likely Silas Weir Mitchell’s niece, Elizabeth Kearsley Mitchell (d. 1928). She was the daughter of Mitchell’s brother, Nathaniel Chapman and his wife, nee Margaret Yeates Brinton.

[No photograph inserted on p. 20].

[Page 21]. WEST[?], Maggie. CDV. Back-mark: Wenderoth, Taylor & Brown, 912- 914 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Faint stain, still about very good. Hand-tinted (adding color to lips and cheeks). Half-bust portrait of a woman, identified by contemporary inscription on verso.

[No photographs inserted on pp. 22-23].

[Page 24]. DA CAMARA, Dr. CDV. 1872. Small tears and creases to one margin of photograph, in no way affecting image, else better than very good. Half-bust portrait. Inscription on verso reads: “Dr. Da Camara, Surgeon Dentist, St. Kitts, July, 1872.” Dr. Da Camara was most likely the doctor who treated Robert Walsh Mitchell, Silas Weir Mitchell’s brother, who died on Saint Kitts, in the West Indies, on April 10, 1872. [See item #352 above for biographical information on Walsh]. The date on this photograph (three months after Walsh’s death) and the presence of two other CDV’s from St. Kitts in the collection (see next two items), suggests the possibility that Weir Mitchell traveled to the island, perhaps to visit his brother’s grave and to meet the people who were acquainted with him in the last months of his life. None of Weir Mitchell’s biographers note such a trip, however Walsh was a notorious figure in his family and it appears that little record exists of his colorful life. One biographer (Earnest) misidentifies his place of death as Alaska. Although we have been able to learn little of the subject of this and the following two cartes de visite, they provide rare documentation of Walsh’s activities on Saint Kitts.

[Page 25]. JORDAN, Archie. CDV SIGNED AND INSCRIBED. Inscription on verso reads: “Faithfully yrs, Archie Jordan.” Circa 1872. Front-mark: E.L. Edwards, [St. Kitts]. Near fine. Half-bust portrait of a man. Jordan’s biography is unknown to us, but he was probably acquainted with Walsh and/or Weir Mitchell (see preceding entry).

[Page 26]. PIGUENIT. CDV. 1872. Front-mark: E.L. Edwards, [St. Kitts]. Very good. Inscription on verso reads: “Piguenit, St. Kitts, 1872.” Half-bust portrait of a man. The subject’s biography is unknown to us, however he was probably acquainted with Walsh and/or Weir Mitchell (see preceding two entries).

[Pasted to rear endpaper]. [MITCHELL, ?] ORIGINAL ALBUMEN PHOTOGRAPH, measuring 1.5 x 1”. Tiny half-bust portrait of a man wearing a suit (civilian). Inscription on the endpaper reads: “21 privates, 2 officers,” evidently in reference to a Civil War unit. The subject is perhaps Nathaniel Chapman Mitchell or Robert Walsh Mitchell, two brothers of Silas Weir Mitchell who fought in the Civil War, although the man mostly closely resembles another brother, Edward Donaldson Mitchell, who served as a medical cadet during the war.

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Photograph album III, undated. 11 folders.
 

ALBUM (III). OWNED BY MARION LEA MITCHELL AND SIGNED BY HER. The following 124 photographs (in 117 entries) appear in an album issued by G.R. & Co., circa 1875, in the original dark green morocco over beveled boards (11.5 x 8.75”). Signed by Marion Lea [Mitchell] on the verso of the front free endpaper and dated by her, London, 1875. Spine perished, boards detached, some stains to leaves (affecting photographs only when indicated below); thus album itself in poor condition. Photographs are in very good or better condition, except when otherwise indicated below. The individual photographs are as follows:

[Page 1]. [LEA, Susannah Massey]. CDV. Ownership inscription signed by Marion Lea on the verso. Some faint soiling to photograph, still about very good. A head-shot, in profile, of Susannah Massey Lea, the mother of Marion Lea. The subject is identified based on comparison with a labeled photograph on p. [13] of this album.

CDV depicting unidentified man. Back-mark: J.W. Black, 173 Washington St., Boston.

CDV depicting unidentified man. Back-mark: Taylor & Brown, 912-914 Chestnut St., Philadelphia.

[MERRITT, Anna Lea] “Nany.” CDV SIGNED AND INSCRIBED. Inscription on verso reads: “From Nany to dear little May [ie. Marion Lea].” Front-mark and back-mark: Robert Eich, Dresden. Very good plus. Depicts Merritt three-quarters length, in right profile, with her back turned to the photographer. Anna Lee Merritt (1844-1930) was a native of Philadelphia and the sister of Marion Lea. She moved to London in 1871 and there found success as a painter, etcher, muralist, and author. In 1877, she married her art teacher and mentor, Henry Merritt, who died three months after the wedding. Anna Lea Merritt was best known as a portrait artist, whose famous subjects included James Russell Lowell, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Henry James. Her 1889 painting, Love Locked Out, was the first work by a woman purchased by the Tate Gallery. She also exhibited at the Royal Academy, the Paris Salon, and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and her works were featured at the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia (1876), the Exposition Universelle in Paris (1889), and the World’s Columbian Exhibition in Chicago (1893).

[Page 2]. MERRITT, Henry. CDV SIGNED AND INSCRIBED. Inscription on verso reads: “May Lea, from Henry Merritt, 25 Dec., 1874.” Back-mark: L. Galdesi, London. Front-mark with photographer’s name. Depicts Merritt seated, full bust. Photograph damped and faded with some detriment to Merritt’s visage; fair only. Merritt was an art teacher and critic in London. In 1877, he married Philadelphia-born painter Anna Lea, sister of Marion Lea, but died several months after the wedding. 375) [MERRITT, Anna Lea]. CDV. Photograph trimmed to oval. Back-mark: Lombardi & Co., 13 Pall Mall East, London; 113 Kings Road, Brighton. Front-mark with photographer’s name and cities of operation. Half-bust portrait of Merritt. Inscription in the album reads: “Anna Lea Merritt as a widow.” Bright and near fine. (See description of Merritt’s CDV on page [1] of this album for biographical information).

CDV depicting unidentified woman. Back-mark: L. Suscipj, Rome.

WEREFKINN [?], Arcadic [?]. CDV SIGNED. Inscription on verso reads: “Arcadic [?] Werefkinn [?], 1879. Back-mark: L. Subercaze, Pau. Full-length studio portrait of man, standing.

[Page 3]. [MITCHELL, Silas Weir]. CDV. [Circa 1855-60]. Back-mark: F. Gutekunst, 712 Arch Street, Philadelphia. Half-bust portrait of Mitchell. Inscription in album reads, “S. Weir Mitchell about 1855-60. Some minor foxing, still very good or better.

CDV depicting unidentified man. Inscription on verso reads: “L___ [illegible], at Nice, Jan., 1863.” Back-mark: Pierre Petit, Paris. Front-mark with photographer’s name.

CDV depicting unidentified woman with child. Back-mark: Edw. L. Allen & Frank Rowell, Winter St., Boston.

CDV depicting unidentified man. Front-mark and back-mark: Jesse A. Graves, Delaware Water Gap, PA

.

[Page 4]. CDV depicting unidentified man. Front-mark: Gillman & Co., Oxford.

[DAY], Frank Miles. Original photograph measuring 3.5 x 2.5”. [1927]. Subject identified by inscription in album reading: “Frank Miles, Day II in Rome, 1927.” Portrait of Langdon Mitchell’s grandson as a young boy. Frank Miles Day was the son of Kenneth MacKensie Day and Langdon Mitchell’s daughter, nee Helen Mary Langdon Mitchell.

CDV depicting unidentified woman. Front-mark and back-mark: London Stereoscopic Company, 110 & 108 Regent St.

[Page 5]. [MITCHELL, Langdon Elwyn]. CDV. Inscription on verso reads: “With the child’s love, 1884.” Back-mark: F. Gutekunst, 712 Arch St., Philadelphia. Small pinhole, not affecting image of Mitchell, else very good. Depicts Mitchell as a young boy, wearing a dress, in a full-length portrait, seated. He is identified by an inscription in the album and by comparison with a similar, labeled photograph in the collection.

Original photograph measuring 3 x 2” depicting unidentified woman, child, and dog.

LOW, Pearl. CDV SIGNED AND INSCRIBED. Inscription on verso reads: “To dear Aunt May [Lea], from Pearl Low. Laken, Oct. 20, 1888.” Back-mark: Hinkle, 1673 Main St., Germantown, PA. The subject was perhaps a daughter of Marion Lea’s sister, Bertha, and her husband, Charles Allard Low. Slight soil at base of card with negligible impact on image; else near fine.

CDV depicting unidentified man. Back-mark: Taylor & Brown, 912-914 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. [Same image as another CDV in the album, on first page].

[Page 6]. COOPER, Rona. CDV SIGNED AND INSCRIBED. Inscription on verso reads: “Rona Cooper, 1875. To May Lea.” Back-mark: W. Cronenberg, Darmstadt, [etc.]. Front-mark with photographer’s name. Slightly faded and moderately foxed; good only.

[MITCHELL, Langdon Elwyn?]. CDV. Back-mark: F. Gutekunst, 712 Arch St., Philadelphia. Very good plus. Half-bust portrait of a teenage male, presumably Langdon Mitchell (see another, labeled print of this same photograph on p. [35] below).

[MITCHELL, Marion Lea]. CDV. [Circa 1870]. Back-mark: Wenderoth, Taylor & Brown, 912-914 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Near fine. Subject identified based on comparison with labeled photographs of Lea in the collection. Full-length portrait of Lea as a child, standing, in theatrical dress.

[MITCHELL, Marion Lea]. CDV. [Circa 1870]. Same back-mark as preceding entry. Near fine. Subject identified based on comparison with labeled photographs of Lea in the collection. Full-length portrait of Lea as child, standing, in theatrical dress [different costume than preceding entry, but with same backdrop and props].

[Page 7]. SALVINI, Tommaso. CABINENT CARD SIGNED AND INSCRIBED. Inscription on recto of card below photograph reads: “To Miss Marion Lea, Tommaso Salvini, 9 February, 1889.” Back-mark: C.F. Conly, 465 Washington St., Boston. Card roughly trimmed at top and bottom, with loss to front-mark, but with negligible loss to photograph; else very good plus. Tommaso Salvini (1829-1915) was a noted tragedian, who performed in American and England as well as his native Italy. He is here depicted in a full-bust portrait, seated.

[Page 8]. WATTS, G[eorge] F[rederic]. CABINET CARD SIGNED[?]. [Circa 1900]. Matte photograph. Watts’s name is written on the photograph in pen, most likely in his own hand, however we have not been able to authenticate the signature. Back-mark: Fred. Hollyer, 9 Pembroke Sqr., Kensington, [London]. Card trimmed with slight impact on back-mark, but with no loss to photograph; very good. Watts (1817-1904) was a celebrated English painter associated with the pre-Raphaelite and Symbolist movements. He is here depicted full-bust, seated, in right profile.

[Page 9]. RUSKIN, John. CDV SIGNED. [Circa 1866]. Ruskin signs the recto of the card below his photograph. Front-mark and back-mark: Elliott & Fry, 55 Baker Street, London. Card trimmed (a bit roughly) at head and with moderate stain at head, both flaws affecting margin of photograph with no impact on image of Ruskin; else good plus with a few tiny spots affecting image. Penciled inscription on verso reads: “Friend of Marion Lea before her marriage to Langdon Mitchell.” John Ruskin (1819-1900), the famous Victorian critic, artist, and poet, sat for Elliott and Fry on a number of occasions. The present photograph is perhaps the earliest image of Ruskin made by this prestigious studio. He is here depicted in a half-bust portrait. This CDV is dated based on an engraving of the photograph, which appears in Spielman’s biography of John Ruskin (1900, p. 91).

[Page 10]. IBSEN, Henrik. CABINET CARD SIGNED AND INSCRIBED. 1891. Presentation inscription signed by Ibsen, in Norwegian, to Marion Lea, dated April 29, 1891, Munich, on the verso. The inscription mentions ‘Thea Elvsted,” Lea’s role in the London debut of Ibsen’s play, Hedda Gabler, on April 20, 1891. This was the first English language production of the play as well as the British premier. (The world debut was in Munich, in January of the same year). In addition to playing in Hedda Gabler, Lea co-managed the play with her co-star, friend, and fellow American, Elizabeth Robins. The women also helped revise the English translation of the script, by Edmund Gosse, in secret collaboration with William Archer. [Gosse’s publisher, Heinemann, held the rights to the play in England, and Archer had harshly criticized the translation in print. See John, Elizabeth Robins: A Staging Life, pp. 54-55]. The play was staged at the Vaudeville Theatre, where it succeeded well enough as a matinee to be moved to the evening bill. Upon hearing of the success of the production, Ibsen wrote to William Archer and enclosed two photographs, one being the present cabinet card for Lea as well as another for Robins. His letter, bearing the same date as this cabinet card, states: “It is a great pleasure to me to be allowed to send my photograph, through you, to the two excellent actresses. The inscription I have, as you see, written in Norwegian; will you be so kind as to write the English below it?” [Archer evidently declined to do as instructed, perhaps giving Lea a verbal or other written translation instead. An inscription appears below Ibsen’s on the card, but it was obviously written at a later date and almost certainly not by Archer. It is written in pencil with the last few words in ink, and gives biographical information on Lea.] Front-mark: J.C. Schaarwachter, Berlin. Light wear to base of card with slight impact on photographer’s mark, a few light scratches to image; good plus. A superb and well-documented presentation photograph.

[Page 11]. CDV depicting unidentified child. Trimmed at base with loss of front-mark.

[MITCHELL, Langdon Elwyn]. CDV. [Circa 1880’s]. Back-mark: Hinkle, 4673 Main Street, Germantown. Light foxing with minimal impact on image of Mitchell; crack to lower left corner, not affecting image; good plus. Half-bust portrait of Mitchell in early adulthood. He is identified in a penciled inscription in the album.

[MITCHELL, Weir?]. CDV. [Circa early 1890’s]. Card trimmed to oval and back-mark lost, else very good. Penciled inscription in album reads: “`Uncle’ Weir I think, H.D.” The supposed subject is Weir Mitchell (b. 1892), the first child of Langdon Mitchell and Marion Lea. The inscription was written by Helena Mary Langdon Mitchell Day, another child of Langdon and Marion, who writes her full name on page [27] of this album. The photograph is a head-shot portrait of an infant.

[Page 12]. M[ITCHELL], J[ohn] K[earsley]. CDV. 1880. Back-mark: Broadbent and Phillips, 1206 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Inscription on verso reads: “J.K.M. Cambridge, May 8, 1880.” Some light soil not affecting image of Mitchell; about very good. Depicts John Kearsley Mitchell II, son of Silas Weir Mitchell, in a full-bust portrait.

Original tin-type photograph measuring 3.25 x 2.5” depicting two identified men wearing mosquito masks, sitting by the side of a lake or river.

[LEA, Susanna Massey]. CDV. [Circa 1870]. Back-mark: Wenderoth, Taylor & Brown, 912-914 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Fine. Lea is identified based on a labeled photograph of her on p. [13] of this album. She is here depicted in a head-shot portrait. Susanna Massey Lea (1822- 1903) was the mother of Marion Lea.

[Page 13]. [LOW, Bertha Lea]. CDV depicting a marble bust by Pierce Francis Connelly. Backmark: L. Powers, Florence. Very good. Inscription in album reads: “Marble bust of Bertha Lea who became Mrs. Lowe … ” Berthea Lea Low (b. 1848) was a member of the Philadelphia Lea family and an artist.

[MITCHELL], Marion Lea. CDV SIGNED[?]. [Circa 1870’s]. Back-mark: Cha’s Gillman, Oxford. Very faint soil to photograph, minor rubbing to edges of card; very good. Head-shot portrait of Lea. Her name is written in a contemporary hand at the base of the photograph. It is presumably her autograph however we have not been able to find another example of her signature for authentication.

[MITCHELL, Marion Lea, et al.]. ORIGINAL TIN-TYPE PHOTOGRAPH. Circa 1870’s. Photograph measuring 3.75 x 2.5”. Lightly worn, still very good. A group portrait of five girls, including Marion Lea, who is depicted half-bust, seated.

LEA, Susanna Massey. CDV. [Circa 1869]. Front-mark: Levitsky, 22 Rue de Choiseul, [Paris]. Light soil, minor crack affecting card, but not photograph; very good. Early inscription on recto of card below photograph reads: “Mother Susanna Massey Lea, about 1869.” Lea is depicted in a head-shot portrait.

NAPOLEON [III]. CDV. [Circa 1871]. Back-mark: London Stereoscopic & Photographic Co., 110 & 108 Regent St. and 54 Cheapside. Front-mark: photographer’s name only. Napoleon III’s signature also appears in print on the recto of the card. Near fine. Inscription on verso states that this CDV was purchased as a gift for Marianne “May” Lea on June 23, 1871 (her birthday) by her father. Depicts Napoleon III in a halfbust portrait, taken near the end of his life (d. 1872).

[MITCHELL, Langdon Elwyn]. CDV, crudely trimmed to oval and hand-colored. Backmark: J.E. McClees, 910 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Depicts Mitchell as a young boy, wearing a dress, in a full-length portrait, seated.

Original photograph depicting unidentified woman. Photograph mounted on plain card and trimmed to 3.75 x 2.5”.

[Page 15]. [LEA, Marion]. CDV. [Circa 1866]. Back-mark: Wenderoth, Taylor & Brown, 912-914 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. A few tiny spots to photograph, still very good. Hand-tinted (giving color to lips and cheeks). Lea is here depicted in a full-length portrait, leaning against a pillar (studio prop).

[LEA, Julia]. CDV. [Circa 1860]. Back-mark: F. Guterkunst, 704 & 706 Arch St., Philadelphia. Very slight marginal soil, but better than very good. Hand-tinted (giving color to lips and cheeks) and hand-colored (color applied to subject’s dress). Full-length portrait of Lea, standing against a studio railing. She is identified based on an inscription in the album, which explains that she had “`hip disease’ ie. tuberculosis of the hipbone.” The inscription further states that she was crippled by the disease, but survived into her eighties. In the present photograph, Julia exhibits a thinness in her face and arms that can perhaps be attributed to her illness.

[MITCHELL, Marion Lea and unidentified woman]. CDV. [Circa 1880’s]. Back-mark: Hinkle, 4673 Main Street, Germantown, PA. Face of woman posed with Lea has been crossed over in ink, tiny nick to card not affecting photograph, else near fine. Lea, here a young woman, is depicted three-quarters length, standing, in profile, with her back turned towards the photographer.

[LEA, Marion?]. CDV. [Circa early 1870’s]. Back-mark: Taylor & Brown, 912-914, Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Minor soiling, corners trimmed, but very good. Hand-tinted (giving color to cheeks). Head-shot portrait of Lea as a child. Inscription on the verso consists of a quote by Celeste D. Massey. [Perhaps Celeste De Longpre Massey, a noted pianist].

[Page 16]. MARSHALL, George. CDV. Front-mark and back-mark: Lock & Whitfield, 178 Regent Street, London and 109 King’s Road, Brighton. Very good. Subject is identified by contemporary inscription on verso. Depicts a young man, full-bust, seated, in profile.

MARSHALL, Briant. CDV. Front-mark: Surrey Photo. Co., 32 High St., Guilford. Very good. Subject is identified by contemporary inscription on verso. Portrait of male in his teens, depicted full-length, standing.

MARSHALL, Murray Wyatt. CDV. 1870. Front-mark: Surrey Photo. Co., 32 High St., Guilford. Faint marginal soil, but very good. Subject is identified and photograph dated by early inscription on verso. Marshall is depicted in a half-bust portrait. Marshall (1852-1930), a native of Godalming, Surrey, England, was a timber merchant, ship owner, and captain of the Godlaming fire company. He was also a champion rugby player at Wellington College and a life-long supporter of cricket in Surrey.

MARSHALL, [?]. CDV. Inscription on verso reads: “For Connie E. Marshall – L. Marshall.” Back-mark: Hills & Saunders, 36 Porchester Terrace, London. Front-mark of photographer’s name and address. Near fine. Three-quarters length portrait of a woman. 418) MARSHALL, [?]. CDV. Front-mark: Surrey Photo. Co., 32 High St., Guildford. Depicts the same woman as in the preceding entry, this time seated on the floor, fulllength. [Inserted in the album behind the CDV described in the preceding entry].

[Page 17]. MARSHALL, L.H. CDV. Front-mark and back-mark: Jul. Giere, Hanover. Photograph trimmed to oval, as issued. Very good plus. Subject identified by contemporary inscription on verso. Half-bust portrait of a man in his teens or early twenties.

MARSHALL, Murray [Wyatt] and C.P.[?] Marshall. CDV. Back-mark: G.A. Flower, 258 Westminster Bridge Road, [London]. Some marginal soiling; about very good. Portrait of two men, one full-length seated on a studio fence, the other full-bust, standing behind fence.

MARSHALL, Via. CDV. Back-mark: C.H. Hawkins, 32 & 36 Preston Street, Brighton. Front-mark of photographer’s name and town of business. Very good. Subject identified by contemporary inscription on verso. Three-quarter length portrait of a woman, standing behind a studio fence.

MARSHALL, C.E. CDV. Back-mark: C.H. Hawkins, 32 & 38 Preston Street, Brighton. Front-mark of photographer’s name and town of business. Very good. Subject identified by contemporary inscription on verso. Three-quarter length portrait of a woman, standing behind a studio fence.

[Page 18]. [GAMMELL, Susanne Valentine Mitchell]. CDV. [Circa 1896]. Some light foxing, not affecting image; very good. Subject identified by penciled inscription in album. Susanne Valentine Mitchell Gammell (b. 1896) was the second child of Langdon and Marion Lea Mitchell. She married William Gammell, Jr., in 1925. She is here depicted as an infant, in a head-shot portrait.

[MITCHELL, Langdon Elwyn?]. CDV. Back-mark: Gutekunst, 712 Arch Street, Philadelphia. Very good. Depicts a boy, most likely Langdon Mitchell, in a half-bust portrait.

[MITCHELL, Langdon Elwyn]. CDV. [Circa 1864]. Back-mark: J.E. McClees, 910 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Very good. Depicts Mitchell as a young boy, wearing a dress, in a full-length portrait, seated [same image as p. 14]. Inscription on recto of card reads: “The author of Debora[h].” Inscription in album reads: “Langdon E. Mitchell, 1864 or 5.”

[GAMMELL, Susanne Valentine Mitchell?]. Front-mark: T.W. Taylor, West Chester, PA. Card very slightly trimmed with no appreciable loss, else fine. Penciled inscription in the album reads: “Valentine again, I think.” The girl is perhaps two years older than the infant portrayed in the other CDV identified as Susanne Valentine Mitchell on this same page.

[Page 19]. CABINET CARD depicting unidentified man. Inscription on verso reads: “For dear little `May.’ Dec. 10th, 1874.” Back-mark: Sarony’s, 680 Broadway, NY.

[Page 20]. CABINET CARD depicting unidentified man. Front-mark: Balch, 493 Washington Street, Boston. The subject is perhaps Winthrop Tappan (compare with __ below).

[Page 21]. [MITCHELL, Weir]. CABINET CARD. Circa 1900. Penciled inscription in album reads: “`Uncle’ Weir Mitchell, I think, H.D.” The subject is Weir Mitchell (b. 1892), the first child of Langdon Mitchell and Marion Lea. The inscription was presumably written by Helena Mary Langdon Mitchell Day, another child of Langdon and Marion, or one of her descendents. The photograph is a full-length portrait of Mitchell, at approximately 8 years of age. The identification is supported by the strong resemblance of the subject to the labeled photographs of Weir Mitchell on page [25] of this album.

[Page 22]. TOLAND, Edward Dale. CABINET CARD. 1886. Early inscription on photograph reads: “Edward Dale Toland, Jr. 6 months old, from his Mom.” Back-mark: D. Hinkle, 4673 Main Street, Germantown, PA. Light stain to photograph, not affecting image of subjects; good plus. Hand-tinted (adding color to cheeks). Half-bust portrait of Toland as an infant together with his mother. Edward Dale Toland (1886-1964) wrote anaccount of his service in World War I, The Aftermath of Battle: With the Red Cross in France (1916).

[Page 23]. [LEA, Julia?]. CDV. Back-mark: Wenderoth, Taylor & Brown, 912-914 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Very good plus. Inscription on verso indicates subject is 10 years old. Half-bust portrait of a girl. Her visage is similar to the girl depicted in the labeled CDV of Julia Lea on page [15] of this album.

CABINET CARD depicting three unidentified boys. Back-mark: J.W. Black, 173 Washington St., Boston.

[LEA, Gertrude?]. CDV. Back-mark: Guidi, Via Alfreri No. 8, Firenze [Florence]. Front-mark of photographer’s name. Near fine. Inscription in album reads: “Gertrude Lea probably, later m[arrie]d Wm. Fearing of N.Y.C.” The imputed subject is Gertrude Lea (b. 1851), an elder sister of Marion Lea who married William Henry Fearing in 1874. Photograph is a half-bust portrait of a young woman.

TROTH[?], Bertie. CDV. Tintype photograph. Back-mark: Lothrop’s Photograph and Ferrotype Gallery, 43 North Eighth Street, Philadelphia. Some scratches to photograph, with minimal impact on image of subject’s face; good. Hand-tinted (adding color to cheeks). Early inscription on verso reads: “Bertie Troth[?] given to May Lea, December 1872, I think.” Half-bust portrait of a young boy.

[Page 24]. CDV depicting unidentified woman. Back-mark: Croft, 3 Union Street, Torquay. Frontmark of photographer’s name and city of operation.

[MITCHELL, Langdon Elwyn]. CDV. Circa 1880’s. Back-mark: Hinkle, 4673 Main Street, Germantown, PA. Some very faint soiling, still very good. Half-bust portrait of Mitchell. He is identified in a penciled inscription in the album. This CDV was evidently made from the same sitting as the CDV on page [11] of this album. He is here depicted in the same clothing as the other CDV, in a slightly different pose.

[GAMMELL, Susanne Valentine Mitchell?]. CDV. Back-mark: Phillips’ Photographers, 1206 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Fine. Penciled inscription in album reads: “Sissie.” Full-length portrait of a young girl, apparently the same child as depicted in following entry.

[GAMMELL, Susanne Valentine Mitchell?]. CDV. Slightly trimmed, perhaps with loss of front-mark. Penciled inscription in album reads: “Sissie.” Full-length portrait of young girl. (Same image as fourth item on p. 18.)

[Page 25]. [MITCHELL], Weir. GROUP OF FOUR CARTES-DE-VISITE INSCRIBED BY MARION LEA. 1897. Each card is inscribed by Marion Lea on the verso, “Weir, Bar Harbor, August, 1897,” and signed by her with initials. All of the cards are slightly trimmed, perhaps with loss of front-marks, but otherwise very good plus. Four different images of Weir Mitchell (b. 1892) as a boy. He was the son of Langdon and Marion Lea Mitchell.

[Page 26]. [ROBINSON, Natalie?]. TWO CARTES-DE-VISITE. Each CDV bears the back-mark: H.C. Phillips, 1206 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Some soiling, good only. Inscription in album reads: “Natalie Robinson (Mrs. Harry Boyer), I think.” Two headshot photographs of the same woman, one a portrait, the other in left profile.

[MITCHELL, Langdon Elwyn]. ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH. [Circa 1920’s]. Photograph measures 4.5 x 2.5”. Cropped, with loss to inscription on verso. Remainder of inscription reads: “Rissenwald[?], Sept. 22.” Full-length portrait of Mitchell seated on stairs leading to porch of building, with several unidentified man sitting behind him on the stairs.

[MITCHELL, Marion Lea]. CDV. [Circa 1880’s]. Back-mark: Taylor & Brown, 912- 914 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Very good plus. Depicts Marion Lea as a young woman, half-bust, in profile.

[Page 27]. [MITCHELL], Marion Lea. CABINET CARD. [Circa 1880’s]. Frontmark and back-mark: London Stereoscopic Co., 106 & 108 Regent St. Minor soil to card, not affecting photograph, else near fine. A full-length portrait of Lea as a young woman, seated on a couch. Inscription in album reads: “Marion Lea in costume, one of her Ibsen parts I think. (Helena Mary Langdon Mitchell Day).” The author of the inscription was the third child of Langdon and Marion Lea Mitchell.

[Page 28]. [MITCHELL, Marion Lea]. CABINET CARD. [Circa 1880’s]. Front-mark and back-mark: W. Curtis Taylor, 914 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. A few minor traces ofsoil, but very good or better. Hand-tinted (adding color to lips and cheeks). A head-shot portrait of Marion Lea as a young woman. The initials “M.L.” appear on the verso, perhaps in Lea’s own hand. Another example of this same cabinet card is inserted at the same place in the album, however the card is trimmed close to the photograph with loss of the front-mark.

[Page 29]. CABINENT CARD depicting unidentified man. Back-mark: Barraud, 263 Oxford Street, London and 92 Bold Street, Liverpool.

[Page 30]. [LEA, Julia?]. CABINET CARD. Back-mark: Gutekunst, 712 Arch St., Philadelphia. Corners trimmed, some soiling not affecting image; about very good. Inscription in album reads: “I think this is Julia Lea, aged about 20.” The subject is a young woman depicted half-bust in left profile.

[Page 31]. CDV depicting unidentified woman and two girls. Back-mark: Georges Sommer, Naples. Subjects of this and the following CDV are perhaps members of the Marshall family.

CDV depicting two unidentified girls and two boys. Back-mark: Phillip Graff, Berlin. [Inserted in album behind CDV described in preceding entry].

MARSHALL, Walker Douglas. CDV. 1875. Manuscript back-mark: Edwin D. Smith, 69 East St., Brighton. Very good. Subject identified and photograph dated based on contemporary inscription on verso. Full-length portrait of a boy.

[DAY, Helena Mary Langdon Mitchell and Miles Day]. ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH. [Circa 1924]. Photograph measuring 2.5 x 3.5”. Very good. Inscription in album by Helena Day reads: “Helena Mitchell Day holding Miles on the terrace wall at Hickory Hill, perhaps 1924.” Miles is here seen as a toddler.

[LEA?, “Sissie”]. ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH. Photograph measuring 5 x 2.5”. Cropped to fit album, light stains, good only. Inscription in album reads “Sissie (in her late teens?)” The subject is probably a sister of Marion Lea. See page [24] of this album for two photographs of her as a child.

[Page 32]. [MITCHELL, Langdon Elwyn]. ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH. [Circa 1920]. Photograph measuring 3.5 x 2.5”. Fine. Full-length portrait of Mitchell, seated together with an unidentified man. Penciled inscription in album reads: “Langdon Mitchell about 1913 to 1922.”

TWO CARTES-DE-VISITE depicting an unidentified boy. Back-mark on both: L. Haase & Co., Berlin and Breslau.

[Page 33]. APPIA, S. CDV SIGNED AND INSCRIBED. Inscription on verso reads: “Souvenir d’Amitie. S. Appia a Miss May Lea, 22 April, ’76.” 1876. Front-mark and back-mark: E. Albert, 68 Westbourne Grove, London.

CDV depicting unidentified girl. Front-mark and back-mark: Graf, Berlin.

CDV depicting unidentified young girl. Back-mark: Hanns Hanfstaehgl, Dresden.

[Page 34]. CDV depicting unidentified woman and two children. Back-mark: Hinkle, 4673 Main Street, Germantown, PA.

CDV depicting unidentified man. Inscription on photograph reads: “For my friend, Marion. August 13, ’86.” Back-mark: H.C. Phillips, 1206 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.

ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH depicting two identified children. Photograph measuring 1.5 x 1.5”.

ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH depicting an infant. Photograph measuring 4.5 x 2.5”.

[Page 35]. [MITCHELL, Langdon Elwyn?]. CDV. Front-mark and back-mark: A. Duval, Tours. Light scratches to photograph; good plus. Depicts a young man, presumably Langdon Mitchell (see following entry), half bust, in left-profile.

[MITCHELL, Langdon Elwyn?]. CDV. 1878. Back-mark: F. Gutekunst, 712 Arch Street, Philadelphia. Light soiling, minor crease to upper corner of photograph; good. Inscription on verso reads: “Belonging to Marion Lea. A photograph of Alfred Langdon Elwyn Mitchell, Xmas ’78.” The subject is almost certainly Langdon Elwyn Mitchell. The author of the inscription evidently conflated Mitchell’s name with that of his relation by marriage, Alfred Langdon Elwyn. This is another print of the same photograph as appears on p. [6] of this album. The subject is the same as in the CDV described in the preceding entry and both photographs were evidently made during the same sitting. 463) CDV depicting unidentified child. Photograph damped and faded. Back-mark: Kilburn, 222 Regent Street, [London].

[Page 36]. CDV depicting unidentified child. Back-mark: 1415 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.

HOLLINGSWORTH, [?]. CABINET CARD SIGNED, trimmed to 4 x 2.5”. Circa 1880. Back-mark: Broadbent & Taylor, 914 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Card trimmed as noted, not affecting image of subject, but with loss of subject’s first name in his signature on the verso. Moderate stains.

[No photographs on page 37].

[Page 38]. [MITCHELL, Langdon Elwyn]. ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH. Circa 1920’s. Hand-stamp of photograph developer on verso: Mack Photo Service, Sante Fe, N.M. Photograph trimmed to 5.5 x 2.5”. Near fine. Full-length portrait of Mitchell, standing, eating a slice of watermelon.

[MITCHELL, Langdon Elwyn]. TWO ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHS. Circa 1910’s to 1920’s. Each photograph measures 1.5 x 2” and is mounted on a card measuring 2.5 x 3.5”. One card stained; one photograph faded; else very good.

[Page 39]. MERRITT, Anna Lea “Nany.” CABINET CARD SIGNED AND INSCRIBED. Inscription on verso reads: “To Maydo [ie. Marion Lea] for being a very good girl – with exceptions. From her loving sister Nany. Very truly yours, Anna Lea Merritt. Feb. 3, 1882.” Circa 1882. Photograph a bit faded and marginally toned, still about very good. Inscription in album reads: “Yes, she was the ugly duckling in a family all more or less beautiful. She loved beauty so for its own sake that this caused her some anguish, but her loving heart, sweet temper, resolution, sense of humour, & artistic talent made her a wonderful person & the only one of all those (2 parents, 6 daughters who grew up) with a really stable nervous system.” (See description of Merritt’s CDV on page [1] of this album for biographical information).

[Page 40]. Photograph of a photograph. Caption in album reads: “Robt. V., Emmor K., George V., & Susannah V. Massey (later Mrs. Joseph Lea).” 470) [Page 41]. Photograph of a photograph. Inscription on verso [by Helena Mary Langdon Mitchell Day] reads: “This is G.V.M. II, Susanna Valentine Massey’s (=Mrs. Jos. Lea, Mim’s mother) mother, namely my great-grandmother (maternal-maternal-maternal) whose maiden name was Kimber. Who is the good looking man?” A later inscription answers the question: “It is her husband, Robert V. Massey, and she is Anna (Kimber) Massey.”

[Page 42]. CABINET CARD depicting unidentified woman and her infant. Card trimmed with loss to inscription on verso, a presentation inscription to Marion Lea.

[Page 43]. CDV depicting unidentified man. Front-mark and back-mark: J. Huff, Bad-Homsburg.

CDV depicting unidentified woman. Photographer’s marks same as preceding entry.

[Page 44]. OBLINSKY, Marie. CDV. Back-mark: Hanns Hanfstaengl, Dresden. Some soil to photograph, not affecting image of Oblinsky; good plus. Early inscription on verso reads: “Marie Oblinsky. A young girl at Edliner’s school at Dresden.” She is here depicted half-bust, in profile.

ORIGINAL TINTYPE PHOTOGRAPH depicting unidentified woman (perhaps Marie Oblinsky).

[MITCHELL, Marion Lea and Mary McMurtrie]. CDV INSCRIBED. Inscription on photograph, evidently in Marion Lea’s hand, reads: “Goodbye. 1887. Wishing you a Quick Return.” Circa 1887. Back-mark: Hinkle, 4673, Main Street, Germantown, PA.” Very good. Head-shot portrait of the two women. McMurtrie is identified based on comparison with another example of this CDV in the collection, there labeled in the album.

[No photographs inserted on p. 45]

[Page 46]. CABINET CARD[?], trimmed to CDV size, depicting unidentified infant. Presentation inscription on verso partly obliterated by cropping, remainder reading: “Charles Fearing.” Back-mark: Hargrave & Gubelman, 38 & 40 West 23rd St., New York.

CDV depicting unidentified boy. Trimmed. Back-mark: W.G.C. Kimball, 15 Norman St., Concord, N.H.

CDV depicting unidentified girl. Trimmed. Back-mark: Morse, 417 Montgomery Street, San Francisco.

[Page 47]. CDV depicting unidentified girl. Trimmed. Back-mark: Morse, 417 Montgomery Street, San Francisco.

CDV depicting unidentified woman. Trimmed.

Original photograph depicting unidentified infant. Roughly trimmed.

[Page 48]. [DAY, Miles?]. ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH. Photograph measuring 3 x 2”. Inscription in album reads: “Miles Day, I think. H.D.” Depicts an toddler.

CDV trimmed or CABINET CARD trimmed to CDV size, depicting unidentified woman Back-mark: Julius Ludovic, 889 Broadway, NY.

CABINET CARD trimmed to CDV size depicting unidentified woman. Inscription on verso partly obliterated by cropping, indicates this was presented to A.L. [Anna Lea].

CABINET CARD[?] trimmed to CDV size depicting unidentified woman. Back-mark: Julius Ludovic, 889 Broadway, New York.

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Photograph album IV, undated. 1 folder.
 

ALBUM (IV). OWNED BY MARION LEA MITCHELL. The following 43 photographs consist mostly of images of Philadelphia-born actress, Marion Lea, later wife of Langdon Elwyn Mitchell. Most of the photographs predate her marriage. A number are signed and/or inscribed by her, and it is very likely that she owned and compiled it. It is bound in the original late 19th century red leather over beveled boards measuring 8.5 x 6” with functional metal clasp. (Some rubbing to binding, cracks to a few leaves as a result of rough removal of photographs from mounts, still very good and sound). All photographs are in very good or better condition, except when otherwise indicated below. The individual photographs are as follows:

[Page 1]. [MITCHELL, Marion Lea]. CABINET CARD. 1891. Back-mark: London Stereoscopic Co., 54 Cheapside and 106 & 108 Regent St. Base of card trimmed with loss of front-mark, else near fine. Three-quarters length portrait of Marion Lea in the role of Thea Elvsted, from Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler, seated, in a long white dress. Her role and the date of the photograph are identified by an early inscription on the verso.

[Page 2]. [MITCHELL, Marion Lea and unidentified actor]. CABINET CARD. 1891. Light marginal foxing; very good. Marion Lea is again depicted in the role of Thea Elvsted, full-length, standing, in profile, alongside an actor. She is here depicted in a black dress. The role and date of the photograph are again derived from an early inscription on the verso.

[Page 3]. [MITCHELL, Marion Lea]. CABINET CARD. Circa 1880’s. Back-mark: London Stereoscopic Co., 54 Cheapside [remainder of address covered by contemporary news clipping]. Base of card trimmed with loss of front-mark. Lightly foxed; good plus. Full-length portrait of Marion Lea in the role of Smike (from Nicholas Nickleby), seated on stairs. Her role is identified by the aforementioned news clipping.

[Page 4]. [MITCHELL, Marion Lea]. CABINET CARD. 1891. Light foxing; good plus. Depicts Lea in the role of Thea Elvsted, full-length, in profile, standing with another actress. The role and date of the photograph are derived from an early inscription on the verso.

[Page 5]. [MITCHELL, Marion Lea]. CABINET CARD. Matte photograph. 1882. Back-mark: Fred. Hollyer, 9 Pembroke Sq., Kensington, [London]. Base of card trimmed with some loss to back-mark, else very good plus. Date from early inscription on verso.

[Page 6]. [MITCHELL, Marion Lea]. CABINET CARD. Circa 1888. Frontmark and back-mark: W & D. Downey, 57 & 61 Ebury St., London. Later hand stamp on verso: Charles L. Ritzmann, Importer, 943 Broadway and 171 ½ Fifth Ave., New York. Three-quarters length portrait of Lea in theatrical dress, leaning on a pillar. Early inscription on verso reads: “Small part in a play in which Wilson Barrett starred. London, 1888?”

[Page 7]. [MITCHELL, Marion Lea, C.L., and N.C.R.]. ORIGINAL TINTYPE PHOTOGRAPH. [1881]. Photograph measuring 4 x 2.25”. Hand-tinted (adding color to cheeks). Some very faint scuffs, still very good or better. Depicts Marion Lea in a half-bust portrait together with two other women. They are identified with the initials, C.L. and N.C.R., in an inscription in the album.

[Page 8]. [MITCHELL, Marion Lea]. CABINET CARD[?] trimmed to CDV size. Hand-tinted (adding color to cheeks and red-cross armband). Very good. Depicts Marion Lea in the role of the nurse, Merry Merrick, from Wilkie Collins’s New Magdalen. She is here portrayed standing, three quarters length with stage props.

[MITCHELL, Marion Lea and N.C.R.]. ORIGINAL TINTYPE PHOTOGRAPH. Photograph measuring 3.75 x 2.5”. Hand-tinted (adding color to cheeks). Very good. Full-length portrait of Marion Lea, seated, together with a woman identified by an inscription in the album as “N.C.R.”

[Page 9]. [MITCHELL, Marion Lea]. CABINET CARD. 1891. Small corner chip and stain to card, not affecting photograph; based of card trimmed; else very good. Depicts Marion Lea in the title role of Langdon Mitchell’s play, Deborah, standing, threequarters length, in right profile. Role and date of photograph from early inscription on verso.

[Page 10]. [MITCHELL], Marion Lea. CABINET CARD SIGNED. Lea boldly signs her name at the base of the photograph. 1888. Back-mark: Vernon[?] Kaye, 4 Onslow Place, South Kensington, [London]. Very good. Depicts Marion Lea three-quarters length, in right profile, seated. Her name appears at the base of the photograph, perhaps in her own hand. Dated from early inscription on verso, reading: “The Monk’s Room, Oct. 2, 1888,” referring to the play by John Lart.

[Page 11]. [MITCHELL, Marion Lea]. CABINET CARD. 1885. Back-mark: Gillman & Co., Oxford. Base of card trimmed with loss of front-mark, else very good with some very mild foxing. Depicts Marion Lea in the role Julia, from Sheridan’s The Rivals. Role and date of photograph from early inscription at base of photograph.[No photograph inserted on p. 12].

[Page 13]. [MITCHELL, Marion Lea]. CDV SIGNED AND INSCRIBED. Inscription at base of photograph reads: “For Fickle[?] Philip, with Auntie Maydo’s love.” Frontmark: Chas. Gillman, 107 St. Aldate’s, Oxford. Back-mark of photographer’s name and city of operation. Near fine. Head-shot portrait of Lea.

[MITCHELL, Marion Lea and Mary McMurtrie]. CDV. Back-mark: Hinkle, 4673 Main Street, Philadelphia. Faint foxing and toning, still about very good. Head-shot portrait of Marion Lea and Mary McMurtrie, the latter identified based on inscription in album. See item #476 above for another example of this CDV.

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Series IV.  Book and periodical contributions by members of the Mitchell family, 1839-1840, 1992. 3 folders.

Box Folder
College of Physicians, an appreciation of Samuel Lewis, M.D., 1992. 1 folder.
 

[MITCHELL, Silas Weir, et al.] SAMUEL LEWIS, M.D. (1813-1890). AN APPRECIATION. [Cover title.] Philadelphia: College of Physicians, 1992. First separate edition, being an offprint from the Transactions of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, with a new introduction. #73 of 100 copies. Original printed wraps. 8.5 x 5.5”. [16] pages. Fine. Contains remarks by Mitchell and others.

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Mitchell, John Kearsley. "Oh! Fly to the Prairie", 1839. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, John K[earsley]. OH! FLY TO THE PRAIRIE. A SONG. DEDICATED TO GEORGE P. MORRIS, ESQ. WRITTEN BY JOHN K. MITCHELL, M.D. MUSIC COMPOSED BY JOSEPH PHILIP KNIGHT. [Cover title]. Philadelphia: Geo. W. Hewitt & Co., 1839. First edition. Sheet music. Original printed wraps, neatly removed from later binding. Moderate damping and foxing; good plus.

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Mitchell, John Kearsley. "The Prairie Lea", 1840. 1 folder.
 

MITCHELL, J[ohn] K[earsley]. THE PRAIRIE LEA. A SONG. THE POETRY BY DR. J.K. MITCHELL, THE MUSIC COMPOSED & DEDICATED TO DR. C.H. STEDMAN, BY JOSEPH PHILIP KNIGHT. [Cover title]. Boston: Oakes & Swan, printed by Sharp & Michelin, 1840. First edition. Sheet music. Original pictorial wraps, bearing a large (4.5 x 6”) engraving by E. Champney on the front wrap. 12.75 x 9.25”. 6pp. Spine neatly backed in cloth, early music store stamp at base of front wrap, light to moderate damping; good plus.

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Series V.  Collector's research and resources, 1914-1992, undated. 1 folder.

Box Folder

Collector's research and resources, 1914-1992, undated. 1 folder.

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