Philadelphia Area Archives Research Portal (PAARP)

Navigation Aids

Philadelphia Area Archives Research Portal (PAARP)
Search Finding Aids
 

Main Content

Marianne Craig Moore papers

M98

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the Bryn Mawr College. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
Bryn Mawr College
Creator:
Moore, Marianne, 1887-1972
Title:
Marianne Craig Moore papers
Date [bulk]:
1905-1972
Date [inclusive]:
1904-1991
Call Number:
M98
Extent:
12 Linear feet
Language:
English
Text: [Box]
1-24
Abstract:
Marianne Craig Moore (1887-1972) was an award-winning modernist poet. She graduated from Bryn Mawr in 1909 with a B.A. in history, economics, and politics. The poet was published for the first time in 1915, and by 1920, her poetry was frequently featured in The Dial, a magazine that served as an outlet for modernist thought and art. From 1925-1929, Moore was editor of The Dial. During the 1930s and 1940s, she published her poetry in books and did freelance writing. The 1950s and 1960s brought Moore fame and recognition: her Collected Poems, published in 1951, won her the Bollingen Prize, the Pulitzer Prize, and the National Book Award. She was also the recipient of The National Medal for Literature, France's Croix de Chevalier, and sixteen honorary degrees. Throughout her life, she participated in many speaking engagements and offered advice to young poets. Moore was also noteworthy for her iconic tricorn hat and her love for baseball and Brooklyn. The Marianne Craig Moore Papers include correspondence, photographs, audio recordings, manuscripts and artwork, news clippings, and ephemera, as well as reflections on the poet and poems written in tribute to her. A subset of the collection, the K. Laurence Stapleton Marianne Moore Papers include Stapleton's correspondence with the poet, materials related to the verse composition course Moore taught at Bryn Mawr, Stapleton's research notes, and manuscript and galley copies of her book, Marianne Moore: The Poet's Advance. Correspondence and documents regarding the management of Marianne Moore's estate, Stapleton's fight to save the Dial Papers, and the establishment of the Marianne Moore Poetry Fund are also in this subset.
Cite as:
Cite as the Marianne Craig Moore papers, Special Collections Department, Bryn Mawr College Library.
PDF Version:

Return to Top »

Biography/History

Marianne Craig Moore was an award-winning modernist poet, writer, and critic known for her precise use of words, unusual style, and speech-like poetic rhythm. Marianne was born in Kirkwood, Missouri on November 15, 1887 to Mary Warner Moore and John Milton Moore. Because Moore’s father suffered a mental breakdown prior to her birth, Marianne never knew him. She grew up in the house of her grandfather, John R. Warner, a Presbyterian minister.

After the death of Reverend Moore in 1894, Mary moved Marianne and her older brother, John, to Allegheny City, Pennsylvania and then to Carlisle, Pennsylvania to be closer to other relatives. Mary, John, and Marianne were extremely close and filled much of their spare time with reading. Mary taught English at the Metzger Institute in Carlisle, where Marianne received her initial education. A single mother, Mary worked so that John could attend college at Yale and Marianne could go to Bryn Mawr.

In 1904 and 1905, Marianne took entrance examinations in preparation for attending Bryn Mawr. She moved into her dormitory in the fall of 1905. Although she had wanted to be an English major, her professors refused to let her, saying that her writing was too obscure and that she consistently violated rules of grammar and language—two qualities that would be hallmarks of her modernist poetry. Despite her disappointment, Marianne continued to read avidly and wrote during her college years. She published short stories and poetry in Bryn Mawr’s Tipyn o’Bob and Lantern. Marianne also had a keen interest in biology but was discouraged from majoring in the subject since her mother thought that biology was no profession for a lady. Animals and nature, however, were never far from her mind or her poetry. In the end, Marianne graduated in the Class of 1909 with a B.A. in history, economics, and politics.

After graduation, Marianne and her mother took a trip abroad. Her experiences overseas perceptibly influenced her poetry. Upon returning to the United States, Marianne attempted to have her poetry published. At the same time, she sought a job working for publishers or magazines. Failing on both fronts, she attended the Carlisle Commercial College to learn secretarial skills to become more qualified for work. Marianne got her first position working for Melvil Dewey as his secretary at the Lake Placid Club. She next worked as a teacher at the United States Indian School in Carlisle. While Marianne was teaching, she managed to find time to write. She was professionally published, at last, in 1915.

Marianne and her mother moved to New York City in 1918. With her mother always at her side, she churned out poetry, read voraciously, and interacted with other modernist poets. In 1920, Marianne was published ever more frequently in The Dial, a modernist magazine. Purchased by Scofield Thayer and J. Sibley Watson, Jr. in 1919, The Dial became a popular outlet for modernist thought, literature, and art. The art of Pablo Picasso, Renoir, Vincent Van Gogh, and Edvard Munch, among others, and the poetry of E.E. Cummings, William Carlos Williams, Ezra Pound, and W.B. Yeats, among others, were often featured in the magazine. In 1925, Thayer finally got Moore to agree to become acting editor of The Dial. Soon, she permanently replaced him. Moore was editor until 1929 when the magazine ceased publication. Until her death, Marianne would maintain a close friendship with J. Sibley Watson, Jr. and his wife Hildegarde.

During the 1930s and 1940s, Marianne was an active freelance writer and published books of her poetry. In 1947 she was devastated by the loss of her mother. The 1950s and 1960s brought Moore more fame and recognition. Her Collected Poems, published in 1951, won her the Bollingen Prize, the Pulitzer Prize, and the National Book Award. She was also the recipient of The National Medal for Literature, France’s Croix de Chevalier, and sixteen honorary degrees. Until the onset of her final illness in 1969, Moore traveled, participated in numerous speaking engagements, and graciously offered advice to young writers. She died on February 5, 1972. In addition to being remembered as a groundbreaking poet, Marianne Moore is remembered for her captivating conversations, iconic tricorn cap, advocacy for the conservation of Prospect Park, and love for baseball and Brooklyn.

Bibliography Willis, Patricia C. 1987. Marianne Moore: Vision into Verse. Philadelphia: Rosenbach Museum and Library.

Scope and Contents

The Marianne Craig Moore papers include correspondence, photographs, audio recordings, manuscripts and artwork, news clippings, ephemera, tribute poems to Moore by others, and reflections on Moore's life by those who knew her. Bryn Mawr also has a cloak, tricorn hat, and briefcase which belonged to Moore. Drawings and paintings of Moore as well as artwork by her can be found by searching TriArte.

The K. Laurence Stapleton Marianne Moore Papers, a subset of this collection, include Stapleton's correspondence with the poet, materials relating to the verse composition course Moore taught at Bryn Mawr, Stapleton's research notes, and her manuscript and galley copies of Marianne Moore: The Poet's Advance. Correspondence and other documents relating to the management of Moore's estate, Stapleton's effort to save the Dial Papers, and the establishment of the Marianne Moore Poetry Fund are also part of this subset.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

Bryn Mawr College

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Marianne Hansen, Jennifer Hoit, Melissa Torquato

Revision Description

Reviewed for MARC record. 2014 July 17

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research.

Use Restrictions

The Marianne Craig Moore papers are the physical property of Bryn Mawr College Special Collections. Literary rights, including copyright, belong to the authors or their heirs and assigns.

Custodial History note

Many individuals have contributed materials to the collection of Marianne Craig Moore Papers. Hildegarde and J. Sibley Watson, Jr. contributed photographs, manuscripts, news clippings, audio recordings, a tricorn hat, a long black cape, a briefcase, and an enormous amount of correspondence. Marianne Moore's nieces, Marianne Craig "Bee" Moore II and Sallie Moore, contributed correspondence, photographs, manuscripts, news clippings and student notebooks. K. Laurence Stapleton was responsible for a subset of the collection which includes her own correspondence with the poet, research notes, and manuscript and galley copies of her book Marianne Moore: The Poet's Advance as well as materials related to Moore's verse composition course, the management of the Marianne Moore estate, the establishment of the Marianne Moore Poetry Fund.

Responsible for the materials that supplement the Watsons', Moores', and K. Laurence Stapleton's major contributions are Bryn Mawr College alumnae: Fannie S. Barber Berry (Class of 1909), Helen B. Crane (Class of 1909), Nina Montgomery Dana (Class of 1945), Grace Wooldridge Dewes (Class of 1909), Katherine G. Ecob (Class of 1909), Marjorie Young Gifford (Class of 1909), Blanch Shapiro Grant (Class of 1933), Patsy von Kienbusch Little (Class of 1947), Gertrude M. Macy (Class of 1926), Anna Marcet Haldeman-Julius (Class of 1909), Mary Frank Case Pevear (Class of 1911), Helen Sandison (Class of 1906), Jane Yeatman Savage (Class of 1922), Mrs. Barbara B. Thacher Plimpton (Class of 1965), and Mary K. Woodworth (Class of 1924). Additionally, the Marianne Moore Poetry Fund, Friends of the Bryn Mawr College Library, Mrs. Gilbert Charbonneau, Janice Pries, John Francis Putnam, Lewis Turco, Bernard Waldman, and Michael Watson have contributed important materials.

Return to Top »

Controlled Access Headings

Personal Name(s)
  • Moore, Marianne, 1887-1972
  • Watson, Hildegarde Lasell
  • Watson, James S. (James Sibley), 1894-1982
Subject(s)
  • Bryn Mawr College-- Alumni and alumnae.
  • Dial (Chicago)
  • Moore, Marianne, 1887-1972. Poems
  • Poetry, Modern--20th century.
  • Women poets, American -- 20th century -- Biography

Return to Top »

Collection Inventory

Series I. Correspondence.

Box
1-3
9-15
17
Folder

Outgoing Correspondence.

Box
1
2
17
Folder

to Agnew, Janet (Librarian, Bryn Mawr College).

Box
1
Folder
1
Box Folder
n.y. May 6.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Do not trouble to acknowledge these pictures--but eventually could you have them returned to me?"

1 1
1951 March 27.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I am glad to send you one of my note-books--which Mrs. John Stephan of The Tiger's Eye kindly had protected by a slip-case. The title, "Reading Diary" does not seem to me just right. Excerpts or transcripts seems to me more accurate."

1 1
1952 May 30.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I enclose the list of recommended reading for my 2nd semester seminar [at Bryn Mawr College] in contemporary selected poets contemplated by Miss McBride and Dr. Chew. Certain of the books are so very expensive, I hope they are already in the Library... So far as I know material is not carelessly duplicated in any of the items specified. Please give me advice if improvements occur to you or if certain books should be omitted by reason of expense."

1 1
1952 May 30.
TM, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Typed list of recommended reading for the proposed poetry seminar with notes in pencil in Miss Agnew's handwriting.

1 1
1954 July 9.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I shan't forget the transforming power of your presentment in the rare book room. The rareness is in what you and Bryn Mawr do for me"

1 1
1955 October 13.
TPcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I thank you for writing but you are much too punctilious. If the Sitwell books can be of use, I am glad."

1 1
1956 May 5.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"...The Reverend John D. Sheehan...has completed [a bibliography of MCM's work] and a copy is in Trinity College Library--a bibliography of writings by me, about me, honorary degrees, citations and photostat copies of material.... The orderly presentation of data is out of the ordinary and the thesis is of real interest critically--although I am much, much over-rated."

1 1
1956 September 27.
AL, n.p.

"You must not take time to thank me Miss Agnew" received with MCM's gift copy of Like a Bulwark

1 1
1959 May 25.
ALS, n.p.

"No acknowledgement necessary of these items." Received with MCM's gift copy of Idiosyncrasy & Technique.

1 1
1959 June 3.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"As I have said to Katherine Ecob, I am not only willing but eager to do anything that might benefit Bryn Mawr, but I do not consider it intelligent to crowd already crowded files with what is easier to read in typing or print and you have my permission to discard this pen-version of the piece of which I read several stanzas at the meeting in Goodhart Hall on Sunday."

1 1
1959 November 4.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I do like to feel that my donations are not a problem--a book shelf superfluity. But emancipate yourself, stately Miss Agnew, from any formality of acknowledgement when I give the Library anything."

1 1
1963 March 7.
TPcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I have just written an explicit letter to Mr. Baum...asking if the work done can be paid for promptly or if I am needed to help pay for it rather than have the Library embarrassed--shall let you know the result."

1 1
1963 March 11.
260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"So philosophic and gracious you are! The ambition of these literary delinquents is surpassed by their inconsiderateness." Enclosed letter from S. V. Baum apologizing for paying his photostat fees late.

1 1

to Berry, Fannie S. Barber (Class of 1909).

Donor

Fannie S. Barber (Class of 1909)

Box
1
Folder
2
Box Folder
1951 November 11.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"...your global view of the world is literally that. When I consider the perennial penny before my eye that obscures the sun, I marvel at my talent for being an earthworm."

1 2
1953 August 31.
ALS, 153 Summit Avenue, Brookline, MA

"My summers are like those of an insect--one continent, one meadow... You say volumes on a post-card. I say nothing on foolscap."

1 2
1955 May 8.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Dear Fan, am not too scared to face the beagles of 1909, but I just can't make it; am a kind of Nellie Bly."

1 2
1956 August 26.
TPcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Am a fool about 'the [Republican] Party,' that is to say Ike. I think he is a marvel, for goodness, charm, grasp of world matters and plain hard work."

1 2
1957 January 15.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"My fascinating mail concerning the Berry-Barber Library, makes me so glad I insist on trying to be an author."

1 2
1958 November 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I never received a card that fascinated me more... Those masks with eye-holes for the elephants and the throng restrained by police in Stetson hats and bare legs--the mahouts on the elephants serenely passive, with royal attendants in long 'drapes' and blinding sun beating down on the multitude..."

1 2
1960 June 7.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"It is dear of you to say these things...I am, I confess, tongue-tied by you Fannie. And contemplating you and Frances, the obvious fulfillment of Miss Thomas's dream, while I stagger amid the neversay- dies, I can't half breathe--the disparity is so great!"

1 2
1961 April 15.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Those ties of nearness at St. Luke's Place when I was apprehensive that Mother could not recover, and your sacrifices to sustain me...your instructing me about the manipulation of sheets; your visiting us here and accounts of your summers, bringing grapefruit...--all is alive in my consciousness--And College! integral with my existence."

1 2
1966 September 19.
ALS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"I think fondly of your visits to 260 Cumberland Street. The neighborhood got to be a strain and 35 is no strain; though dusty. Do be near me before long and come in. Please do."

1 2
1967 November 14.
ALS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"My birthday is quite a puzzle to me but neighbors have celebrated with presents, so feel exonerated."

1 2
1968 June 20.
APcS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"What excitement to see you in that anomalous crowd--Dear Fannie! I've been futilely phoning you--now driven to the pen! Blessings on you Valiant Fannie."

1 2
1968 November 18.
APcS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"However advanced a Mrs. Rip van Winkle I become please find me in my wayward haunts... Phoenixes forever? Do let us be."

1 2
1968 November 18.
APcS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"I am so grateful for that word or two under the roses, love that has grown stronger over more than 60 years."

1 2
1968 December 14.
TLS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"Am so glad that Sallie and Warner could say some words of thanks to you. I have plenty of room for congratulations, Mary, from you and Fannie. You break a record every time."

1 2
n.d. "Sunday".
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I attained some 'class' by virtue of my friends--you and Helen.... It stabilizes me some, to think of you and Mary. Always chic--mentally and sartorially. And that dear Helen--our impresario, and so quiet..."

1 2
n.d.
APcS, n.p.

"No ordinary rabbit (cottontail)--an angel with long soft ears visited me today, no regulation trespasser, an Easter friend to lift my spirits and bring me a pussy-willow twig or 20"

1 2

to Biba, Carol (Publicity Director, Bryn Mawr College).

Box
1
Folder
3
Box Folder
1953 June 9.
TL, n.p.

Biba discusses print copies of pictures MCM has requested.

1 3
1956 November 10.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"You are most encouraging, Miss Biba, to notice my Dodgers. They now include a citation for Gil Hodges, Carl Farillo, and Jake Pitter!"

1 3

to Borie, Mrs.

Box
1
Folder
4
Box Folder
1956 March 20.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I cannot yet approximate the number of words I shall be submitting and am beset by simultaneous tasks, that I cannot defer. Please know that my sense of the urgency of presenting something promptly is extreme."

1 4

to Brackett, Miss.

Box
1
Folder
5
Box Folder
1958 December 26.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Thank you for your kind question. I dare not offer new work, having signed an agreement to offer what I write to one magazine..."

1 5

to Browne, France (Class of 1909).

Donor

Mrs. Gilbert Charbonneau (of West Southport, Maine)

Box
1
Folder
25
Box Folder
1963 February.
ALS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I must have taken all the pictures and all the films--"

1 25

to Browne, Mary L.

Donor

Mrs. Gilbert Charbonneau (of West Southport, Maine)

Box
1
Folder
26
Box Folder
1956 April 10.
ALS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"...Am very sorry you caught cold on the pier in that blizzard-so did I..."

1 26
1956 April 29.
ALS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"The pictures! They bring back happy days-"

1 26
1956 May 4.
ALS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I can't take my eyes off the pictures-(Color pictures!)"

1 26
1958 December 2.
ALS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"...I haven't liked the trudging and patience that Aunts F & N have had to muster these past months but they are doing better they say."

1 26
1959 January 22.
ALS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"...Sister, I am being punished for 5 or more months (before I can be a very friendly alligator); a kind of stroke--interfering with the muscles of my throat."

1 26
1959 February 12.
ALS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Sister! It is no problem. I will be your Valentine!"

1 26
1962 April 9.
ALS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Mundane Marianne does love embossed hearts and for-get-me-nots."

1 26
1962 August 22.
APcS (copy), Rome

"Dear Sister, Why are you not with me?"

1 26
1962 October 22.
ALS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I thank you for Mrs. Holland's letter; and the picture is beautiful,-the sea, wonderfully accurate."

1 26
1962 December 27.
ALS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"The Nutshell Library has hypnotised me so that I refuse to read any book or books but Alligators all around."

1 26
1963 July 24.
ALS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To Frances, Norvelle, and Mary Browne "I am abounding in health since my visit, impervious to any annoyance-"

1 26
1963 October 6.
ALS/TLS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Description of the Indian Harbor House.

1 26
1963 December 5.
ALS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"The donkey's sides should not advertise anything but perseverance. True.

1 26
1964 February 14.
ALS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Don't I know? See you later Alligator! I hope, Sister B., that I shall."

1 26
1966 February 11.
TLS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I am charmed with the Persians."

1 26
1966 March 3.
APcS (copy), Captiva Island, Florida

"Our photographer on a tour of Spain, France, and Italy where the lizards are green as well as grey."

1 26
1966 July 12.
APcS, 35 West Ninth Street, New York City

"Thank you Sister, Should return you anything, write of telephone 4753201. Would not be so brief but crazy-busy."

1 26
1967 February 14.
ALS (copy), 35 West 9th Street, New York City

"I'm reviving from 4 weeks and more, of bronchitis and dentistry."

1 26
n.y. September 26.
APc (copy), 35 West Ninth Street, New York City

"Summer 1966"

1 26

to Chew, Samuel C. (Professor of English, Bryn Mawr College).

Box
1
Folder
6
Box Folder
1951 December 24.
Donor

Mary Woodworth (Class of 1924)

Acquisition Date

Acquired on 17 December 1979

TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Since you feel it could be of use to you to have me conduct such a course or 'seminar' as we have considered, I shall do my very best to make what is offered, valuable."

1 6

to Ciardi, John.

Box
1
Folder
7
Box Folder
1950 March 15.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I...thank you for being so fearless and idealistic as to think about a Collected Poems for me; but my Macmillan contract requires that any two books of verse I may next have for publication, be submitted to the Company."

1 7
1950 March 20.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"It seems to me one should be loyal to the publisher who first hazarded its substance and reputation for one...but I do not intend to beg! This perhaps would mean that I would need a home, but as just said, please don't count on it."

1 7
1950 April 7.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I do endorse your project, and upon receiving your list, felt a strong impulse to come to your support...but, Mr. Ciardi, I cannot at present be a subscriber.... I contribute (in a sense) to the basic therapies: cancer research, leprosy, blindness, but should like to be on some sort of payroll [rather than the beneficiary of grants] before I appear to be in any sense a sponsor or subscriber."

1 7
1952 November 17.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore, having received of Elizabeth Bartlett a book of poems which she thought publishable, forwards them to Ciardi for his perusal.

1 7
1952 December 13.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore regrets that Ciardi has had to turn down the poems by Elizabeth Bartlett and comments on poems by Ciardi, which he has sent her.

1 7
1953 January 31.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I thank you for sending me your Cantos I-V of the Inferno. I am very, very interested in translation; (I know something of its desperations) and like the firmness of [your translated lines.]"

1 7
1955 August 12.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Ciardi has requested a submission from Moore for his New World Writing and Moore replies that she has a piece that would be appropriate, but has submitted it elsewhere. She promises it to Ciardi if the other publication rejects it.

1 7
1955 September 24.
TPcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"No answer from Botteghe Oscure about my tribute to Escudero, so abandon me. I am very disappointed."

1 7

to Cornell, Katherine.

Donor

Gertrude M. Macy (Class of 1926)

Date of Acquisition

April 1980

Box
1
Folder
8
Box Folder
1958 December 5.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"After you had appeared and disappeared at the Katzenback's and I discovered that Mr. McClintock had been ill--that privacy should have been obligatory as we swarmed upon you both in your helplessness- -strangers without a vestige of an excuse to invade your retreat--an unmanageable herd.... I, well--my feelings? Despair engulfed me, that it could be one's fate to harm the very prototype of charity, of sensibility, of goodness! I never can recover from that."

1 8

to Dewes, Grace Wooldridge (Class of 1909).

Donor

Grace Wooldridge Dewes (Class of 1909)

Box
1
Folder
9
Box Folder
1957 February 27.
ALS, Waterloo House, Bermuda

Moore declines to participate in the way requested in a Bryn Mawr Reunion. She suggests others who "would do the thing well."

1 9

to Ecob, Katharine G. (Class of 1909).

Donor

Katharine G. Ecob (Class of 1909)

Box
1
Folder
10
Box Folder
1955 June 22.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"September is my favorite time of year and what a joy that select reunion would be... But, Scrap, I defeat my best good by crowding everything into the good parts of the year and have no hope of realizing this delectable vacation."

1 10
1964 October 25.
APcS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

Moore thanks Ecob for sending her a copy of the Saturday Review with a front cover photo of her.

1 10

to Ferris, Frances C. (Class of 1909).

Box
1
Folder
11
Box Folder
1959 July 7.
Donor

Frances C. Ferris (Class of 1909)

ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I am more thankful than I can say that I was at Reunion. I thought that we were an encouraging sight; what is more, such reciprocity and affection as was shown by all, did me ever so much good. And the usefulness of nearly all members made me proud of Bryn Mawr and give me incentive to do all I can for the College." Folder also contains the letter that accompanied the donation of this letter.

1 11

to Finch, Miss (Edith?).

Box
1
Folder
12
Box Folder
1936 May 7.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"That Miss Donnelly will not be giving lectures at Bryn Mawr, makes me very sad. I want her to have quiet hours and beauty of leisure and often have thought with anxiety of her too abundant giving; her unmeasured generosity in connection with her English lectures; but involuntarily feel the more that her retirement is not to be permitted."

1 12

to Ford, George.

Box
17
Folder
2
Box Folder
1961 November 28.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"...We have never had a visitor about whom there has been such unanimous praise afterwards." Letter from Ford to Hildegarde Watson accompanies this copy.

17 2

to Geist, Sarah (Reference Librarian, Bryn Mawr College).

Box
1
Folder
13
Box Folder
1951 June 15.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Miss Agnew devoted such care to me and interest, that certainly the bestowal has been not mine, but Bryn Mawr's to me. Indeed I must come back presently and thank you face to face."

1 13
Gerould Prize Correspondence. This file contains 3 letters by Marianne Moore and 5 others regarding the Katherine Fullerton Gerould Memorial Prize. The Gerould Poetry Prize was first given in 1947.
Donor

Bryn Mawr Alumnae Association

Immediate Source of Acquisition note

3 Letters by Marianne Moore and 5 others related to the Gerould Poetry Prize first given in 1947. From the Alumnae Association file of Katherine Fullerton Gerould. Given to Canaday Library by the Alumnae Association on 2 December 1975. (Signed Caroline Rittenhouse)

1 14
Box Folder
1946 November 15 (to MCM from Miss Hitchcock, Executive Secretary of Bryn Mawr College).
TL, n.p.

"The Executive Board has instructed me to ask you to do us the honor of accepting a one-year term as an alumna member of the Committee to judge the material submitted by the undergraduates. The other two who are being invited are Cornelia Otis Skinner and Fredrick Thon who is giving a course in playwriting."

1 14
1946 November 27 (to Miss Hitchcock from MCM).
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I shall be glad to serve on the committee which will judge material for the Katherine Fullerton Gerould Memorial Prize if I may submit my decision in writing--accompanied by comments if desirable."

1 14
1947 January 15 (to MCM from Miss Hitchcock).
TL, n.p.

"At last we have completed the Katherine Fullerton Gerould Prize Committee to our great satisfaction. When I submitted your letter with its provisional acceptance to the Executive Board at a recent meeting, they felt that they would be glad to have you on any terms and grateful to you for your willingness to serve."

1 14
1947 January 17 (to Miss Hitchcock from MCM).
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"If the entries could be accompanied by specific instructions regarding the number of choices and the forwarding of the work to the colleague who should have it next, I shall be prompt and careful in transmitting work and opinion; and I hope, not too utilitarian."

1 14
1947 February 20 (to Mrs. Carol from Eleanor F. Rambo).
ALS, 120 County Line Road, Bryn Mawr

"Before this date I certainly should have sent you a note to say that I am considerably flattered in being appointed to serve as the first chairman of the committee to read entries for the Katherine Fullerton Gerould Prize. If you will understand that my silence has been due not to lack of interest in this committee's work, but to meditation on how to proceed."

1 14
1947 May 16 (to MCM from Miss Hitchcock).
TL, n.p.

"Ever since May 8th I have been planning to write to you - one more letter on the subject of the Gerould Prize because I thought you would be interested in the Undergraduates' reaction. Miss McBride made quite a feature of the announcement on May Day morning and wild applause greeted the name of the winner.

1 14
1947 May 21 (to Miss Hitchcock from MCM).
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Your word of the Prize and the applause which greeted President McBride's announcement of Margaret Rudd as recipient, is of intense interest to me. I received...a very fine letter from Margaret Rudd, saying she had been discouraged about her writing and that this interest in her work had come just at the right time."

1 14
n.d. (from Eleanor F. Rambo, not addressed to anyone).
TLS, n.p.

Letter summarizes the formation of the Gerould Prize Committee, the helpful role the Alumnae Office played in managing students' submissions, the reasons senior Margaret Rudd won the prize in 1947, and Rambo's desire to have Marianne Moore serve on the committee in the future.

to Grant, Blanche Shapiro (Class of 1933).

Donor

Blanche Shapiro Grant (Class of 1933), via Eva Levin Milbouer (Class of 1933)

Box
17
Folder
3
Box Folder
1959 November 5.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM sends her regrets that she cannot come to alumnae night to do a reading.

17 3

to Haldeman-Julius, Anna Marcet (Class of 1909).

Donor

Anna Marcet Haldeman-Julius (Class of 1909)

Box
1
Folder
27-28
Box Folder
1908 January 26.
ALS, Pembroke East, Bryn Mawr

"...Just at present I am a prey to the ills of the flesh and to contending factions of despair, but I keep things to myself--my work is not up to scratch..."

1 27
1908 February 7.
ALS, Pembroke East, Bryn Mawr

"...I heard a wonder of a lecture last night on 'the aesthetic experience'--It said that aestheticism was to be separated from real living--that we must not get the disassociated habit of thought or we become inefficient, unhappy and often unkind--the lady said, what ailed Henry James was his aestheticism unconsciously carried to excess--His 'later' people were all standing off 'experiencing' and observing."

1 27
1908 February 9.
ALS, Pembroke East, Bryn Mawr

"The amount of plain simple, monotonous living one has to do, in travelling the highroad to fortune, is revolting. I try jollying people up, and reading things I like, and working like a dog for a while and then there's a sticking point--what is the use? If ever I find out, I shall feel that I have attained Heaven."

1 27
1908 February 11.
ALS, Pembroke East, Bryn Mawr

"I never condescend to feel sorry for myself--It's not sporting--and heavens! Whatever I am I must be a sport....She...led evening meeting, Sunday, on contentment--said women were said to suffer from a subtle discontent which men did not--was all wrong--we could train ourselves..."

1 27
1908 February 13.
AMS, Pembroke East, Bryn Mawr

Moore copied out a portion of Ivanhoe as a valentine to Haldeman.

1 27
1908 February 18.
ALS, Pembroke East, Bryn Mawr

"…My 'passion for the phrase' will be the death of me-But there's no use talking, every goat should be allowed a chance to play with its shadow-at least a little-in the wild oat stage-To be specific, my story. It is quite popular with a few, Louise and Georgina Biddle and Martha. I didn't give it to them-It seems Louise got it from Martha-I had to change the name to "The Boy and the Egotist." I wanted to call it 'The Rostrum, a Heap of Flints' but didn't. It may not be coming out-I can't find out, if it doesn't I still shall send it to you…"

1 27
1908 February 25.
ALS, Pembroke East, Bryn Mawr

MCM tells Haldeman about criticism she has received from a friend named as "Margaret M." regarding her short story "Pym" which had just been published in the January 1908 issue of Tipyn O'Bob. The story concerns a literary youth's ambition to become a writer and his vacillations between the artistic life and the practical expectations of an uncle. Moore writes, "She tells me… the 'struggle' is almost too obvious-to try something out in the field of observation but not to me as an individual, so vital-(as Pym)" The letter also contains Moore's handwritten text of "The Sentimentalist," the poem published in Tipyn O'Bob in April 1908 and a reference to her poem "To Come After a Sonnet" about which the poet writes, "[It is] a very awkward sketch 'tis true. But since it is a sketch of you, I like it here and there-do you?"

1 27
1908 February 28.
ALS, Pembroke East, Bryn Mawr

Moore offers Haldeman words of comfort, "The pressure upon you is constant and I do not wonder that you come to ask yourself if dreams good and bad are not the whole stuff hope is made of--I know the feeling" and discusses at length Henry James's niece Peggy, who has come to Bryn Mawr.

1 28
1908 February 29.
ALS, Pembroke East, Bryn Mawr

"Dear Marcet, You don't know how glad I am that you like my 'poetry.' I shall send you what I have of it-knowing that you really do not think it trash does me more good than anything I know-For I know as well as anyone that my productions are not powerful-It is really a terrible feeling, the feeling that you know how to say it and have nothing to say-The rhythm of a poem that is, is suggested by the mood (in my case) before the words. (…)"

1 28
1908 March 15.
ALS, Pembroke East, Bryn Mawr

"…I shall send you my story "The Boy and the Churl" though I feel no excitement about-stories done, are like trees which you paused to gaze at and admired extravagantly, but which have grown dead, characterless and uninteresting as you look back on them-I don't seem able to get anything out, which feels like me-You asked me about my letters-My letters are better than my stories I suppose because I am not self-conscious because I am thinking of 'you.' In my stories I can't get the artistic point of view-I think 'how supercilious that sounds'-'Mother will think I'm going to the bad'-"Warner will think I am sentimental getting 'soft'"-'Peggy will think that pretentious'-'If I say that Martha will think me undeveloped, crude'- etc.-I fear to handle red-hot stuff-you see-and hesitation in literatics is ruin."

1 28
1908 March 18.
ALS, Pembroke East, Bryn Mawr

"I heard Miss Addams last night and feel better for having done so.... I am so glad I had the opportunity of hearing her when I heard her before, she seemed able and 'great' without seeming as this time a 'good Samaritan to all'"

1 28
1908 April 5.
ALS, Pembroke East, Bryn Mawr

"...Ibsen swells the ranks of my idols--How they would stare and go at each other if they all met on a campus martius, each with the din of the others' greatness in his ears--Michael angelo, Wagner, Napoleon, G. F. Watts, Meredith Burns, Shakespeare (!) W. James and a few scientists-- (and shake hands good friends if I am correct.) Genius burns--with a fire so incessant as to be inartictic [sic]...and I shall send you the fruits--Two verses and a story--I have not the heart to collect my 'poems for you yet-- Some are forgotten,

1 28
1908 May 17.
ALS, Pembroke East, Bryn Mawr

"…I must tell you about my story-The Dean spoke of the Tip [Tipyn O'Bob] in Chapel and said a certain story 'Philip the Sober' contained that kind of thing that made the college ridiculous to outsiders-phrases such as, 'chop-chopping along in the half-dried mud,' 'Promethean trained sensibilities'-That it seemed too bad that a girl who showed ability should be guilty of affectation-She said however that there were two excellent poems in the paper by the same author and she read out, 'To My Cupbearer' I was flattered that she should take me so much to heart-And anon I intend to try what may be done in the world of letters minus 'affectation' in a bald form-I have tried a college story which I think will do for next year and I am strong in the notion of imitating Ibsen in another, with an English setting-I shall tell you how I come on."

1 28
n.d.
ALS, S. S. Friesland

Moore expresses ambivalence about being in college, praises her friend Frances and thanks Haldeman for advice she had written to her, saying "In that thoughts from afar, make one well, I am no longer ill--medicine administered so gently, should dare seldom to be inefficacious. How did you contrive them?"

1 28
n.d.
ALS, n.p.

Moore writes of how glad she is that Haldeman has come to Bryn Mawr to visit along with Moore's mother and brother, complains of circumstances at school, "Why are you never through dinner at Denbigh till half-past seven?" and discusses Peggy James.

1 28

to Hansen, Harry (The New York Morning World).

Box
1
Folder
16
Box Folder
1929 June 22.
TLS, 152 W 13th Street, New York

"Your article in The World for May 28th concerning The Dial will always be remembered by the staff as valiant support. You allude to certain particulars dear to those of the present organization--the modest cover, the encouragement of new writers, the purpose of The Dial Award, and The Dial's hospitality. Whether we deserve it or not, we deeply feel your generosity in saying that to replace The Dial one would have to subscribe to three magazines."

1 16

to Hughes, Mrs.

Donor

Gift of Friends of the Library

Box
17
Folder
4
Box Folder
1938 July 3.
ALS, n.p.

"We come again, --to thank you for God's bounty as you dispense it in A London Child of the 70's, being given by my mother as a birthday present to one of my nieces." Application for a $4.00 money order for Mrs. Hughes accompanies the letter.

17 4

to Gifford, Marjorie "Dorothy" Young (Class of 1908).

Donor

Marjorie Young Gifford (Class of 1909)

Box
1
Folder
15
Box Folder
1956 February 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"...how am I ever to thank you for not hating my fables? Sown with stupidities and mishaps--have to rewrite--retranslate in each printing. You don't know how you help me by seeing a good outcome." Folder also contains letter of donation from Mrs. Gifford.

1 15

to Kahn, Miss.

Donor

Gift of Friends of the Library

Box
17
Folder
5
Box Folder
1941 February 16.
TL with autograph corrections, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"It is a pleasure to have your letter, to see the Winter Lantern and as it were be among you, in having lines of mine reprinted, --faint though they seem to me by comparison with some of the magazine's more positive content."

17 5

to King, Mrs.

Donor

Laurence Stapleton

Box
17
Folder
6
Box Folder
1947 August 11.
ALS (copy), Ellsworth, Maine

"Your siren invitation is doubly irresistible in being an invitation of kindness."

17 6

to Murz, Mrs.

Donor

Laurence Stapleton

Box
17
Folder
7
Box Folder
1961 April 25.
TLS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"C.J. Poole was a Brooklyn steeple-jack who worked on various high buildings and steeples..."

17 7

to Linn, Bettina.

Donor

Laurence Stapleton

Box
17
Folder
8
Box Folder
1954 June 2.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"Bettina? an answer to prayer, you are--and so calm, at least outwardly."

17 8
1955 June 21.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"I am glad you care to own the book. All such givings should have been by permission."

17 8
1956 February 11.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"Thank you for your enheartening letter about my Predilections and for word that Laurence is officially more of a professor even than she has been."

17 8
1956 December 26.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"Such a rarely beautiful angel and harp, Miss Linn."

17 8
1957 March 31.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"...I have been reading A Letter to Elizabeth (a good title surely); --wondering how you could teach and create this book at the same time..."

17 8
1957 November 30.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"I am much encouraged by this review--Edwin Muir's in The Observer." Attached is a transcribed copy of the review.

17 8

to Littlefield, Lester.

Box
3
Item
3
Box Item
1938 July 31.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"If you should care to come in to see me tomorrow evening, I shall be at home and should be glad to see you."

3 3
1938 August 2.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"My mother and I have been sad in feeling we knew nothing with which to make up to you for the struggle of coming to see us...and are indeed speechless that you should think of such many and great ways of bringing us good,--in addition to the constant reassurance we had from our visit with you that all who set forth as writers are not ruthless, worldly, and precipitate."

3 3
1938 August 18.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"How kind you are, and generous of strength. We are benefited, I wish you knew how much,--contradictory as our behaviour will seem, since we are not able to accept your invitation to the play or to dinner."

3 3
1938 August 19.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I am glad the tickets were prompt in their transit to you, but am sorry that so great a kindness as yours could bring to your mind questioning thoughts. To my mother and me it will always stir grateful remembering."

3 3
1938 September 11.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Your preceptive and overwhelmingly large giving makes us speechless. My brother...was amazed and delighted by the many pictures you have given us... He admired their artistry..."

3 3
1938 December 23.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"When the crowding things of this season have scattered, and quieted, we look forward to having a visit with you."

3 3
1938 December 30.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Your copyings of the T. S. Eliot poems and articles, and insights into them, have a potency and utility which the eager complimenters of T. S. Eliot in the present Advocate, alas are far short of... We do expect to emerge from our anomalous busy-ness and shall then hope to see you--and say some of the things I feel like saying and cannot just now, about the 'Ode' and 'Song' and Eliot book reviews." Folder also contains copies of "Ode" and "Song" and book reviews by T. S. Eliot.

3 3
1939 January 17.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I should greatly like to accept your kindness and effort for me and see the Hamlet. The past weeks make me wonder if I could--and my present shackles but I shall plan to be well and to go, and if it should be impossible, shall telephone you not later than Friday..."

3 3
1939 January 18.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"It is just not to be that I should go to Hamlet."

3 3
1939 February 26.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore thanks Littlefield for various gifts he has sent her.

3 3
1939 March 13.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

After discussing the infections and illnesses of her mother and brother, Moore turns to a discussion of T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound.

3 3
1939 April 1.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore thanks Littlefield for books he has sent her and discusses the improvement of her mother's health.

3 3
1939 April 14.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore requests that if Littlefield sees Victorian Panorama in a used book store, he procure some copies for her. She adds that he is not to go out of his way.

3 3
1939 May 19.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore thanks Littlefield for the "gift" of his lengthy letter describing the Cummings dinner, as well as for magazines and cookies he has sent her, as she has been ill.

3 3
1939 May 29.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"The English at Home is startling indeed in its dramatic vividness, a portfolio of stories really,--and something to study at recurring intervals. The seagull and masts, and the November oaks beyond the foreground of leaves are very rare triumphs, are they not,--in recording what one would care to preserve, but usually has to trust to memory.... I am not sorry to have James Joyce given assurance that his art is admitted, and felt to be a thing of power."

3 3
1939 June 11.
TL (copy), Northbridge Centre, Mass

"You are much more respectful to our love of reading than we are to it ourselves but we are grateful. The copy of Life came, almost as we did, and then the Blake Catalogue and the envelopes. Certain of the facts that Mr. Newton presents here in the Introduction make the life and the work of Blake more poignant than ever, and the reproductions, together in this way and so accessible, reveal much that we had never noticed."

3 3
1939 June 18.
TL (copy), Northbridge Centre, Mass

"We have received the Housman lecture. How reckless of strength and substance you are. To tell us of a helpful thing is more even than you should permit yourself. Though one does tend with A. E. Housman to let him speak personally on the printed page, he is so brave in attacking large subject matter and so terse."

3 3
1939 July 2.
TL (copy), 11 Chester Square, Annisquam, Mass

"It is good of you to give us the article on Joyce by Edmund Wilson--in the New Republic... Apart from the help which the article represents, it is interesting as a study in method, it seems to me, and should be kept also for that, and Heywood Broun on John Steinbeck was rather pleasing to me."

3 3
1939 July 10.
TL (copy), 11 Chester Square, Annisquam, Mass

Moore discusses terms with Littlefield for some typing she has asked him to do for her, urging him to take more money than he has proposed.

3 3
1939 July 14.
TL (copy), 11 Chester Square, Annisquam, Mass

"I shall send you some pages to type,--but could not for maybe a week; and not then, unless I have your word for it I may give you twenty or thirty dollars for the undertaking. There is no qualifying of this proposal."

3 3
1939 July 20.
TL (copy), 11 Chester Square, Annisquam, Mass

Moore provides formatting instructions to Littlefield so that he may begin typing for her.

3 3
1939 July 26.
TL (copy), Community House, Gloucester, Mass

Moore admonishes Littlefield, "Please do not drive yourself. You have seen the laborious slowness with which I produce material, and it will be a week or more perhaps till I have anything further to send."

3 3
1939 July 28.
TL (copy), 8 Angle Street, Gloucester, Mass

Moore responds to questions on formatting that Littlefield has asked.

3 3
1939 July 29.
TL (copy), 8 Angle Street, Gloucester, Mass

"In my haste to reply last evening, I did not say,--Never re-type a page because of some trifling correction or false start. Legibility is what is needed, not super-elegance."

3 3
1939 August 5.
TL (copy), 8 Angle Street, Gloucester, Mass

Moore offers more instructions on formatting her manuscript to Littlefield.

3 3
1939 August 7.
TL (copy), 8 Angle Street, Gloucester, Mass

"It is very forgiving of you to enclose us the picture of yourself,--as showing that inconsiderate oversights in the wretched manuscript sent you, have not strained friendship."

3 3
Friday.
TL (copy), n.p.

Moore thanks Littlefield for the pages he has sent her.

3 3
1940 February 9.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I think the comparison of North's Plutarch to Shakespeare and the prose-poetry Eliot analogy especially valuable and a distinctive part of your originality, and if subordinated,--in this case advisable. I don't so much favor the visual emphasis of the pictures."

3 3
to Loines, Elma (Class of 1905).
1 17
Box Folder
1956 July 15.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I shall certainly do it--nominate Marchette Chute for the Institute; I admire the Chutes very much. [I say Institute (of Arts and Letters) because the members of the Academy are chosen from the Institute-- these names are confusing. I almost never get them right.]" Folder also contains a typed copy of this letter.

1 17
1956 August 4.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I have the book--your brother's poems and letters and other significant pages...Too valuable a book to give; I thank you the more."

1 17
1956 September 26.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore has suggested several names to the secretary of the National Institute of Arts and Sciences to second Marchette Chute's nomination.

1 17
1956 September 28.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Typed on a letter from the secretary of the National Institute of Arts and Sciences that informed Moore that Marchette Chute had already been nominated. Moore writes, "Not to be returned....Don't take time to thank me, kind Miss Loines."

1 17
1956 November 13.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Thank you for approving my tribute to the Dodgers." Enclosed is a copy of "To the Dodgers:" The New York Times, October 3, 1956 which included the text of Moore's poem. Folder also contains a typed copy of the letter.

1 17
1957 February 11.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I am a most deplorable deputy. I exerted himself to reinforce Marchette Chute, said in a meeting where candidates were discussed, that I felt she belonged in the Institute, that her idealism and sparing no pains to be reliable, and her civic sense, make her an asset...There my participation ended. I have not even telephoned the Chutes."

1 17
1957 May 24.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I...attend[ed] the ceremonial and had a word with Marchette Chute. She has a beauty and sincerity that are as eloquent as what she writes, has she not?"

1 17
1959 June 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Yes, your brother's Memorial Prize was bestowed on a worthy recipient, Edwin Muir has most rare sensibility--and spiritual transcendence that I know will never forsake him." Folder also contains 2 typed copies of this letter.

1 17
1957 September 10.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I have felt that your brother's precious book was a loan; I am too frail a custodian of really valuable books. ...I...feel impelled to put this book in your keeping. It stirs my reverence; stands apart."

1 17
1957 October 3.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore turns down an invitation to visit Loines. Folder contains a typed copy of this letter.

1 17
1969 June 1.
ALS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"I am just home from Bryn Mawr...and an attendant I need, (temporarily I hope) stayed in Wyndham which has much of Miss Thomas's and Miss Garett's 'Deanery' 'furniture' in it."

1 17

to McBride, Katharine.

Source (Internal)

Letters from the Katharine McBride Papers are from General Correspondence Box 6 IDB4.

Box
1
Folder
18
Box Folder
1944 April 28 (recto)/ 1944 May 5 (verso).
260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Recto: TLS, "In receiving yesterday from the office of the Comptroller, fifty dollars, I feel deeply your generous goodness and that of the College. Being with you and the group that so trustfully joined with you...was more benefit to me than could possibly have been offered by my brief address." Verso: TL "It is I who should have written very promptly to tell you how much we enjoyed your visit to Bryn Mawr."

Source

From the Katharine McBride papers (General Correspondence Box6 IDB4).

1 18
1944 May 12.
Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore apologizes for having misspelled Miss McBride's first name in her previous letter.

1 18
1951 August 23.
TLS with copy, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore regrets that she must decline an invitation to teach a course on poetry at Bryn Mawr in 1951-52, but wishes if possible to be considered for the assignment in the future.

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1951 November 27.
Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

TLS with copy, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Having reconsidered her earlier decision, Moore writes to suggest conditions under which she would be able to teach a seminar on poetry and proposes a reading list for such a class in the spring of 1953.

1 18
1952 May 11.
Donor

Laurence Stapleton

TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM thanks McBride for her support with the Pulitzer Advisory Committee and discusses coming to Bryn Mawr in spring of 1953.

1 18
1952 June 20.
Donor

K. Laurence Stapleton

ALS (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM discusses poetry she has been reading and recommends some of it.

1 18
1952 August 4.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM discusses undertaking the Bryn Mawr series and possibly detaining the publication of her La Fontaine fables because of the teaching series.

1 18
1952 December 26.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM makes plans for her teaching series at Bryn Mawr.

1 18
1953 January 15.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

Plans for the upcoming teaching series at Bryn Mawr are finalized.

Donor

Laurence Stapleton

1 18
1953 March 9.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore tells McBride that she is sending her the gift of a copy of Creative Intuition in Art and Poetry by Jacques Maritain. Enclosed is a photo of a Moore's "lion" painting by Mary Meigs.

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1953 March 29.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Letter regarding particulars about the M. Carey Thomas Award ceremony.

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1953 May 16.
ALS, Penn-y-Groes, Bryn Mawr

Moore thanks McBride for the M. Carey Thomas Award, calling her experience at Bryn Mawr a "baptism of the spirit."

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1953 May 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"It is all so characteristic, your comprehensive benedictory care over us, me and my family--the two drawing rooms, your making me feel I had a home in which to stay and rest--your sending me the tall yellow roses which are now in their glory--even after a four or five hour drive in the sun..."

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1953 May 18.
Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I would not for anything have missed your talk at the LeRoy's; and Frances Browne tells me you spoke in Boston as ideally--I am always in a flutter before a journey but got off without a regret after the scholarship meeting."

1 18
1953 May 21.
Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I marvel. Nothing should deject me if you can say that I made 'Goodhart seem a small room and everyone' my 'friend'--incredulous as I am that you could think it. I also marvel that despite your many and varied obligations of hospitality, you could enjoy having me with you."

1 18
1953 June 24.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I shall take courage from your words of the 15th (of May) when I receive them. You must not be hurried about this--or ever, Miss McBride, be detained by writing to me what you could rid yourself by letting someone else write for you."

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1953 August 5.
ALS, 153 Summit Avenue, Brookline Mass.

Moore thanks McBride for a present.

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1953 August 10.
ALS, 153 Summit Avenue, Brookline Mass.

Moore thanks Miss McBride for the copy of McBride's remarks on the occasion of the presentation of the M. Carey Thomas Award.

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1953 August 23.
ALS, 153 Summit Avenue, Brookline Mass.

"How impressive to me; that with too much to think about already and trips to make, you should be concerned for my safety."

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1953 September 3.
ALS, 153 Summit Avenue, Brookline Mass.

Moore consults with McBride about a gift of silverware the poet intends to have engraved for Miss McBride.

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1953 September 9.
ALS, 153 Summit Avenue, Brookline Mass.

"I now infer something of why the College does not fall to pieces and do hope your path may be a safe one..."

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1955 January 22.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore confirms an invitation to come and give a reading to the students at Bryn Mawr.

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1955 February 23.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore is forced to decline her appearance at Bryn Mawr due to illness.

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1955 March 3.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore thanks McBride for having sent her a large arrangement of flowers.

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1955 June 4.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Katharine, the plates! Dear and wonderful friend! They will bring back to me former times, recent times, the present comeliness of Bryn Mawr, and at all times, the giver."

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1957 May 15.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore thanks McBride for the flowers she has received from the president at her recent visit to Bryn Mawr and declines an invitation to attend commencement that year.

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

Box
1
Folder
18
1959 June 11.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM thanks Bryn Mawr for hospitality during her recent visit.

Donor

Laurence Stapleton

1 18
1961 June.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Marianne Moore sends her regrets for being unable to attend the 1961 Commencement. Invitation included.

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1962 May 26.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Your letter of May 25th and enclosure--Bryn Mawr's check for a thousand dollars--finds me, an amateur who is almost illiterate, too stirred almost to know how to reply."

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
1967 May 13.
Donor

Laurence Stapleton

TLS, 35 West Ninth Street, New York

MCM mentions her educational preparation leading up to her college days at Bryn Mawr.

1

1

18

18

1969 May 12.
PcS, New York

"I cannot accept for Marianne C. Moore 1909 is unable to be at luncheon."

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
n.d.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

On the death of Charles J. Rhoads, Moore writes a note of condolence, "How many blows for you to sustain, dear dad to us all. Great Katharine your stirring letter... How unexaggerating and steadfast and full of delicacy those words."

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18
n.d.
AL, n.p.

"Miss Marianne Moore is most eager to accept Mrs. Marshall's invitation to luncheon on Saturday, May 30th and answers that she may,--if conveyed to Bryn Mawr by half past twelve on May 30th."

Source

From the Katharine E. McBride papers.

1 18

to Meigs, Mary R. (Class of 1939).

Box
1
Folder
19
Box Folder
1947 January 1.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I couldn't have credited what a feeling this picture would give me. The trees are not strictly vertical; so veracious, I mean and firmly rooted in the reddish needle covered ground. I think your free exact 'writing' on the tree-trunks is inspired; also the brittle ghosts of forever; green boughs suggested so unobtrusively by here and there a slight 'turkey foot'."

1 19
1947 November 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I have been wishing I could see you and wondering if you have seen the Ben Shawn pictures at the Museum of Modern Art and if you have any pictures 'like' your seagulls and trees."

1 19
1947 December 8.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore sorts out details of a meeting with Meigs.

1 19
[1947] Wednesday.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"...unless you hear from me Friday, could you telephone me Saturday morning? ...to see if I am fit to go to the play and be having luncheon with you..."

1 19
1947 December 14.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I marveled yesterday--the exquisite luncheon, confirming what one likes best if able to command it--the complex preparation; and your composure despite it; your rare surroundings and triumphant progress to the play, right on time! And then the play itself..."

1 19
1947 December 29.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I am helpless to write you, much less to speak to you if we should meet. I am in awe of those Maine woods! A brownie like myself lurks in such stateliness but is too small to possess anything. Your all-seeing eyes should have told you this. I really am all of atremble. That you could want to give me the picture! It is more than I can credit..."

1 19
1948 November 11.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Louise tells me Mary, that you think of getting me 'some little thing for my birthday.' This pains me very much Mary. You and Louise have just given me the marvel of a bag you brought from Guatemala..."

1 19
1948 November 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I have robbed you again, Mary. It isn't good. But the roosters are. What an original theme. A bevy! And every one an unsubordinated master of the colloquy..."

1 19
1948 December 28.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Nothing would induce me to part with my roosters, unless it is an insistently pitiless conscience--for I have no right to them any more than I have to a right to the Maine Woods. The alert, impersonal eye of each and your distributing of the combs, have roused in me a pride that resents any threat."

1 19
1949 November 12.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore declines an invitation to a movie and adds, "This is also a command, Mary; As I am saying to Louise too, I became the Aga Kahn last year, in the greatness of my acquisitions and might faint if I received a present."

1 19
[1949] November 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I wrote you to Iron Curtain my birthday partly, but mainly to say what I forgot in the rush of a sudden entanglement--that I am not going to have that ladle taken away from me."

1 19
1949 December 23.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"The musing deer, Mary! beneath its own inseparable Christmas tree. What a thought. The sky spangled with stars! ...I am entranced with it... That wonderful translucent plate-glass green, and ultramarine. You have me all excited. And how sure and eloquent the curlicues and implication of the eye..."

1 19
1950 March 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"This beneficent lion with his Durham Cathedral dogtooth mane, and brother-lion adjoining! I don't like you to have parted with it. And then the Klee, which is more persuasive almost than the entire exhibition at the Museum!"

1 19
1950 December 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"The heliotrope of the ox and ass is a thing of endless beauty and I marvel at the crucible in the ox's horn--a whole portrait in itself. The dove's almond eye and heavy-lead pencil beak-points are so very exact, also the swellings of the neck; and your eye for cerise and raspberry really is something, Mary."

1 19
1951 June 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Referring to the gifts of paintings from Meigs to Moore, the poet writes, "My art collection is quite impressive now--the Windsor Bear, the Bar Harbor Crab, the Guatemalan Pelican, Arkley's Roosters, the trees, and Lions on loan!"

1 19
1951 July 15.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I have lion-fever--a bad case. And so has my Arab passport photographer. He said, 'whoever painted that knows color values.' And what imagination! When you have a gift like that it's not a case of teaching. It's something you can't learn." With photocopy of second page of the letter.

1 19
1951 August 7.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore waxes poetic over gardens and flower fragrances as a result of writing a review on a book about gardens. With photocopy of first page of the letter.

1 19
1952 January 2.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"When I returned home Christmas evening and glanced at the lion before laying off my wraps, I felt an exhilaration I can't describe or suggest. ...Warner was really amused...when I told him how dreary and irritable I felt during the absence of the painting at the photographer's." With photocopy of the first page of the letter and a photograph of the painting described.

1 19
1952 February 24.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"And the elephants... What innocence, especially the fancy for resting one foot against the other as you describe it. The tail and rear third are ultra-expressive I should have them in a case under my lion. If there is anything I deplore it is a collector, but I guess I am getting to be one."

1 19
1952 March 11.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore thanks Meigs for an invitation and says she will be there.

1 19
1952 April 5.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I am happy about the picture, Mary. ...The Zebra should animate me for the whole last stretch of my Fables. What leg-stripes--veritable child's penciled horizontal sock-stripes! And the frown of action in the eye is remarkable." With photocopy of first page.

1 19
1953 May 22.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore considers it a "treat" that Meigs will be visiting her the following week.

1 19
1953 August 15.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I am fortunate that you can not only paint but write. The sheep--a genuine, literal flock...of sheep, and the staring contest between you and the goat! Their translucent grasshopper eyes always make me think of an enchanter as having had a hand in the uncivil, fixed aplomb of the animal."

1 19
1953 December 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Tom Fool would neigh and hurdle the shadows of all the furlong-poles, I am sure if he could see his three compatriots from Greece. To think of your parting with this unique memento, Mary. How can you be so unselfish?"

1 19
1954 December 23.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"How ever tell you, Mary, how your charity--blesses me. And I so thank you for liking the Fables and being able to think 'scholars' read them!"

1 19
1955 February 20.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"At my reading, Mary! And I didn't get to speak to you! The painting of the snow patches and a country road. It makes me happy to hear of it. As for the poodle, it is of a fineness indescribable--I see it in the mind's eye as the living dog!"

1 19
1955 March 27.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore sends Meigs a gift and tells her not to thank her.

1 19
1957 November 13.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore is pleased to receive an announcement that Meigs' paintings are to appear in an art show.

1 19
1957 November 26.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore discusses Meigs' paintings and some paintings she has seen recently in New York galleries.

1 19
1957 December 26.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore thanks Meigs for the gift of yet another painting.

1 19
1958 March 31.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"The Chinese hunting-scene is so rare, so innocent-looking! What musical instrument-like beautiful browns; and how daintily the 7 arrows are represented. I hope they speared nothing."

1 19
1958 December 23.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I am, you know, a minor M. Meigs centre, and wish you heard remarks made."

1 19
1959 December 29.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Ultra-exquisite Mary! Did I ever see anything like this? Masterpiece upon masterpiece--and your own Christmas one; veracious, and then enhanced with the most dashing security of brush--calligraphic in fact, your landscape."

1 19
1960 May 7.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"After seeing you, I hastened to the House of Detention...to talk to the prisoners--girls--about writing. They have sad faces, but were encouraging--so intent on art."

1 19
1962 April 15.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore discusses the work of Van Gogh and Dubuffet, noting of the latter, "Some of the coloring is superb and certain effects rival Daumier--as human expression."

1 19

to New York Committee: General Strike for Peace.

Box
1
Folder
20
Box Folder
1961 November 27.
TNS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"No, no, NO, friends. Paralyze what we are doing, to effect what CAN'T BE DONE BY SITTING DOWN? (Surprised at you!) I have medium brains, but this is suicide. (Pardon scratch paper)"

1 20

to Palmer, George Anthony.

Box
1
Folder
21
Box Folder
1926 November 4.
TLS, 152 W 13th Street, New York

In response to Palmer's request for criticism on his short story, Moore has enclosed the text of his short story with corrections in pencil. Folder also contains the text of Palmer's story with corrections in Moore's handwriting.

Donor

Friends of the Library

1 21

to Paul, Mrs. Samuel H. (Assistant to the President of Bryn Mawr.

Custodial History note

Removed from The Donnelly Fellowship Papers (December 1988).

Box
17
Folder
9
Box Folder
1950 November 25.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"It would seem to me, above all, that a recipient of the Award should be of a temper in keeping with Miss Donnelly's own literary exactitude and moral force. Candidates who have occurred to me are Elizabeth Bishop, Katherine Anne Porter, Margaret Rudd, and Pauline Hanson..."

17 9
1950 November 29 (Incoming).
TL (copy), n.p.

On the reverse of the November 25 letter: "We are interested in the candidates whom you mention..."

17 9
1950 December 24.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"I feel that Edith Finch should be induced to accept the Lucy Martin Donnelly Fellowship."

17 9
1955 October 27.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"What I have to suggest is this merely: that I saw something of Madame Yourcenar last summer and feel that she fully justifies reinforcement--that I believe Miss Donnelly would be in sympathy with Mme Yourcenar..."

17 9

to Pevear, Mary Frank Case (Class of 1911).

Donor

Mary Frank Case Pevear (Class of 1911)

(Internal)

Given on 10 June 1984.

Box
1
Folder
22
Box Folder
1953 August 14.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I think from time to time of your noble, philosophical attitude to the exigencies of school life and people."

1 22
1953 October 7.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore thanks Pevear for a velvet wrap Pevear has sent her. "Mary. This magnificent thing! I feel like the King of the Black Isles--also like Cinderella with your wand above me. If you knew how lame my neck and shoulders were from the draughty Museum of Modern Art platform--when I set out for Bryn Mawr on May 15th, you would be so glad you did this."

1 22
1953 November 18.
ALS, n.p.

"I so hope the year is going well for you. Every day I hope to lead a really peaceful life and don't--but I shall!"

1 22
1954 May 30.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore hopes that Pevear and she will be able to meet.

1 22
1954 December 15.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Thank you dear Mary for the harp and the halo and the peaceful dream. I think we understand each other--and have had some experiences that help us to treasure companionship as we travel along. I hope your path the coming year will be a safe one."

1 22
1955 June 23.
TPcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore regrets that she will not be able to meet Pevear in New Canaan and adds, "generous girl, it is so enthusiastic of you to buy that book; (many misprints, I am annoyed to find.)"

1 22
1956 February 15.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Do manage to keep well, Mary;--and I'll try to copy you. I hope you'll have it easier presently."

1 22
1956 March 3.
APcS, Waterloo House, Hamilton Bermuda

"I am sorry to hear of your attack of hives--I have had that--sieges of it--in times past. I hope this is your last."

1 22
1956 September 10.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"The mules look like ants--I hardly discerned them the [Grand] canyon is so fearsomely tall. ...I am working hard on my California talks. Hate assiduity but I have to work or stay home!"

1 22
1956 September.
ALS, n.p.

"I could not have a better present, Mary than to know you are basking, swimming and rejuvenating yourself, instead of grappling with school problems..."

1 22
1957 March 12.
ALS, Waterloo House, Hamilton Bermuda

"...wishing you were with us literally as well as in conversation. Never have I made or had served me, so perfect lemonade, soda biscuit and rare cheddar cheese were offered us... I am happy, dear Mary, to know from Frances that you had safety and rest in Florida, and that your apartment is going to be a good one for you."

1 22
1957 April 19.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"A good Easter, dear Mary. We have good days, very much in the assurance that others do, and I am consoled and hopeful as I realize that you transferred yourself safely from the College to 323 Main Street--hard but wise."

1 22
1958 February 22.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"The rats [rodents are an inside joke between Moore and Pevear] who brought me the Easter Egg traced the violets by scent to Vestry Street. Don't mistake them ever for regular rats--or maybe use the word pests ever at all."

1 22
1958 December 25.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"December has been a madness which makes me wonder what my mother would think of it. But one sweet apparition to calm my spirit... Nothing could inspire me like your example, Mary. Much goes wrong for all of us and it is what we do about it that matters."

1 22
1959 November 13.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"You looked and looked, and found, yes found, a panacea for a distracted friend."

1 22
1960 November 16.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Mary, How can you bring one such immense good! Cages of it and azure Siamese cat smiles. And fun. Yes I missed you, said every little while at N. Canaan, 'pity Mary isn't here'"

1 22
1962 January 11.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"The mouse came followed by snowtracks and I have not thanked you even for its brother of last year! I wish I were there with you where it is warm. And I wish you had been here with me...night before last, with a fire blazing on the bright brass andirons as we ate dinner preliminary to a lecture on handwriting forging."

1 22
1962 December 19.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Thank you dear Mary! For the mice."

1 22
1963 November 27.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"My birthday is not peaceful, so if I could have had my wish, it would be to have Mouse to Mouse... The past days, Mary! On Sunday our pastor, George Knight read as a commentary on the assassination of President Kennedy...from Pilgrim's Progress..."

1 22
1963 December 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Commenting on the card she is sending of a rat and cat curled up together, Moore writes, "Not a very good cat, Mary; but the rat is asleep."

1 22
1964 November 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"We are impatient to tell you about our trip, were sad you had more trouble with hives."

1 22
1966 January 22.
ALS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"I never envisaged such joyous possibilities as now! Seeing you and Captiva and sandpipers."

1 22
1967 March 21.
ALS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"Mary, the very thought of you makes me cheered and happier... When can you be back? Frances and I will be better when you are."

1 22
1967 December 31.
TLS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"Saw Frances at the Cosmop. Club a few days ago, and she is in fine shape, will be if she can be alone. What can we do, Mrs. Pevear? I miss you."

1 22
1968 May 4.
TLS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"I am glad you like me throwing out the ball [at the first Yankee baseball game of the season]."

1 22
1968 November 16.
TLS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"Yours is the fastest and the mostest and mouse-most elegant mouse I know."

1 22
1968 December 26.
ALS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"Thank you so very much for encouraging me.--A rather backward gosling, you know."

1 22
1969 April 26.
General note

"Mary I am delighted with an exaltation of cards a very unusual Book but an extravagant one, Very strange and scrupulously printed."

1 22
n.y. April 15.
APcS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"Well, we have to be reconciled, no matter how time speeds on. I wish I could see you, too."

1 22
n.d.
APcS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"No Mme. Tusseau Mouse, dear Mary! Movable one had been wishing to anticipate you among the shells and palms; but track you is all it does, with this."

1 22

to Plass, Sandison.

Box
1
Folder
23
Box Folder
1956 January 6.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore thanks Mrs. Plass for giving her a cape.

1 23
1956 January 10.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Mrs. Plass had evidently responded to Moore's thank-you note and Moore writes back, discussing Miss McBride and Mr. Rhoads of Bryn Mawr.

1 23

to Powys, Llewelyn.

Box
1
Folder
24
Box Folder
1926 June 28.
TL (carbon), 14 St. Luke's Place

"We anticipate with happiness, your review of the Peary and shall before long sending (sic) to you, some books for briefer mention. Won't you say so, however, if such work becomes tedious?"

1 24

to Pries, Janice.

Donor

Janice Pries

Immediate Source of Acquisition note

Gift of Janice Pries (June 16, 1981) 485 South Main Street Geneva, New York 14456

Box
17
Folder
10
Box Folder
1959 July 18.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"I am not doing any reading or commenting-dare not- am human however!"

17 10
1959 July 31.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"I know the feeling. One would like to be acknowledged. And one never is. The essence escapes the critic--I should say, reader."

17 10
1959 September 12.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"(I have never had an agent) several agents, of which I think you should try..."

17 10

to Putnam, John Francis.

Box
2
Folder
1-2
Box Folder
1943 January 7.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore offers upon request, criticism of some poems Putnam has sent her. She offers sentence structure changes, spelling changes and points out what she thinks is good and why. She adds, "Wallace Stevens is a philosopher and so concentrated in his reasoning, that often it seems to me, the person interpreting him, takes too strongly to heart, some facet of his thought. Always he is defining--saying 'By sentiment I mean' so and so. And often I find I had inferred some opposite meaning, from the one he implied. So if I may say so, let the enjoyment be your guide." (Copy of letter included)

2 1
1943 January 11.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore sends Putnam, who is hospitalized, some envelopes and stamps as well as money for snacks, cautioning him not to thank her, saying "Part of the drag of illness is the burden on one of not knowing how to accept people's kindness." (Copy of letter included.)

2 1
1944 January 7.
General note

Empty envelope addressed to John Putnam, Ward D -4, Bellevue Hospital, and dated 1944 Jan 7.

2 1
1944 January 13.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I am so situated I dare not be writing even little letters. And much less should you be taxed in strength and mind. Yet may I say to you just this--Your gifts of observation, of patient workmanship, and of 'feeling' are such that you are needed in the world. The only disaster that can happen...is to the mind." Moore enclosed a church bulletin. (Copy of letter included.)

2 1
1944 February 13.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore comments on another poem Putnam has sent her, concluding "I wish that you might have circumstances in strong contrast with your physical fight. (Copy of letter included.)

2 1
1944 March 27.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I am so very glad you are recovering...No one is so well that hope is not his salvation...May you recover on and on..." (Copy of letter included.)

2 1
1944 May 12.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"That, tried by more than mortal exigency, you can have faith, strengthens others' faith; I wish you knew how much. And what reward for your doctors, that you can trust the hospital and join with them in their battle for you." (Copy of letter included.)

2 1
1944 December 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore thanks Putnam for his Christmas gift of a poem and expresses her concern about his health. (Copy of letter included.)

2 2
1944 December 29.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"How victorious of you it is to write a long letter, to address the package which just now came, yourself, and how renouncing of you it is, to give the book. To lend it would be unselfish. I shall keep it a long time; but you must, you truly must, let it be yours, or I would be unhappy." (Copy of letter included)

2 2
1945 January 13.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I try to feel that something may be and is wrong with my work when it is returned to me. The difficult thing of course is to continue to be exhilarated by what one failed to do. One should, however, doggedly persevere with the composition--should go on submitting it I think; but possibly not for a time, since the very thought of it emphasizes to one its bad success." (Copy of letter included.)

2 2
1945 April 29.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Truly a wonderful blessing it is, to feel that one has friends,--friends whose life is keen and expanding,--unsubservient to circumstance. I cannot feel that I should have a Guggenheim Fellowship, and am all the more grateful for the good will of it, and thank you more than I can say..." (Copy of letter included.)

2 2

to Ridge, Lola (Given name Emily Rose Ridge).

Donor

From the Lola Ridge Collection at Smith College

Box
2
Folder
3
Box Folder
1920 May 11.
ALS (photocopy), 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"I am delighted that your article is to come out in The New Republic and am so sorry I did not know you were going to speak...last Tuesday."

2 3
1920 May 14.
ALS (photocopy), n.p.

"I am eagerly looking forward to coming. If you have made other plans since not hearing from me, don't give me a thought. I will understand."

2 3
1920 May 25.
ALS (photocopy), n.p.

"I didn't get any books from The Dial after all to review on the way south though I wrote them a week before leaving... We are just off Cape Hatteras and have had a high sea with waves towering half the height of the ship--a translucent aquamarine toward the top and there are guinea pigs, white mice and a goat on board so I need not tell you that I am having a good time."

2 3
1920 November 28.
TLS & ALS (photocopies), 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"The first thing I heard when I got back...was that you had been desperately ill in the summer and that you were working again but not seeing anyone....You were terribly missed but I think you are right to take what care of yourself you can. I find that if I try to work and be as social as people want me to be I am sick or on the verge of being sick half the time and finally I am in despair as to what is to be done."

2 3
1921 January 1.
ALS (photocopy), 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"Your knowledge of giving and great goodness to Mother and me are so palpably present to us, however long it may be since we have seen you or talked with you that to have you perform a great miracle of magnificence is frightening; I have no words in which to tell you how beautiful I think the handkerchief..."

2 3
1922 November 27.
ALS (photocopy), 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

Moore thanks Ridge for sending her money and reports, "I shall not be able to come to tea on Thursday but have hope that my schedule next month may be changed."

2 3
1924 February 24.
ALS (photocopy), 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"We were distressed to know of your being in the hospital and hope you are regaining your strength... I was delighted to read of Poetry's award to you for your poem. May it be one in a long series."

2 3
1925 June 3.
TLS (photocopy), 152 W 13th Street, New York

On Dial letterhead. "It seems desecration to return your tender, lovely description of Adelaide Crapsey. There seems to us--I wonder if you can agree that it is so--a diminution of intensity at certain points which impairs the symmetry? In the face of such frankness, I wonder if it is entirely out of place to hope that you will not punish us by never again giving us an opportunity to see your work?"

2 3
1926 June 23.
ALS (photocopy), 152 W 13th Street, New York

On Dial letterhead. "Although we are returning "Unburnt Offering" and "Appulse" and have really forbidden ourselves to accept anything for a long time to come, we feel that we cannot relinquish "Ray" and shall in a few days send a cheque to you..."

2 3
1927 January 1.
TLS (photocopy), 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"Perhaps even you do not know how much you have given to me in your gentle solicitude. I have been really very nearly just what you thought me--at the end of any vigorous output. You haven't been an editor without knowing that routine work is not exhausting and does not prey upon one--that strategic problems are the greatest drain upon one's vital force. Yet with such problems, in every case, that arises, there is the hope that it is the exception..."

2 3
n.y. April 18.
ALS (photocopy), 152 W 13th Street, New York

On Dial letterhead. "We have received for review, two copies of Red Flag. The one which is not being reviewed I have with my natural thrift secured for you, and we are sending it to you."

2 3
1927 May 8.
ALS (photocopy), 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"Your concept of life as one feels it in this book is a talisman to hear one company, transcending the winter evening as well as enriching it. "Eyrie" and "Still Water" are to me especially beautiful. There is here so much that is spiritually commanding that it is personally a hardship to me that Mr. Aiken should feel that he must find fault with the musical progress of the poems..."

2 3
1929 January 25.
TLS (photocopy), 152 W 13th Street, New York

On Dial letterhead. "We are grateful to you for having allowed us to see the poems and do exceedingly hope that it would not hurt you to give us "The Unarmed" with permission to end the poem with the line, 'and gazing always one way.' But should you rather not, I shall accept your decision understandingly and bear the disappointment with what patience I can summon."

2 3
1929 January 30.
TLS (photocopy), 152 W 13th Street, New York

On Dial letterhead. "Your heartiness is real encouragement, and to me it is a particular joy to have the poem. Enclosed is a cheque for twenty dollars."

2 3
n.d.
ALS (photocopy), n.p.

"I have just returned from the office and do beg that you will let me have a few pages to type. I have the leisure and am exceedingly eager to do it."

2 3
n.y. April 19.
ALS (photocopy), 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"I shan't be able to come up Saturday night. I am so sorry to miss a party at your house; some of the happiest evenings to have ever had, have been with you. We talk of you daily and always we send you our love."

2 3
n.y. December 1.
ALS (photocopy), 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"I am apprehensive to know of your being alone when I know you need to be taken care of, and above all things are not need to give a reception."

2 3
1929 September 18.
ALS (photocopy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"When I last saw you I had no thought of what was shortly to happen to Mother and me--to say nothing of The Dial. Mother was dangerously ill for nine weeks and her recovery, my brother and I knew, was retarded by conditions at St. Luke's Place, so when he got us away from town he found the apartment we are now in, where we can have the use of a sunny roof, and have in our rooms a circulation of air..."

2 3
1929 October 23.
ALS (photocopy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I am truly blessed in knowing that your book is to appear, and to appear soon. I do honour the publishers for the confidence they show you in their mode of payment. ...I cannot bear to think of your suffering. I do hope the winter will be an easier one than you have had for many a year."

2 3
1941 May 22.
TM (photocopy), 111 Montague Street, Brooklyn

Manuscript of the memorial service for Lola Ridge. Includes the note that Marianne Craig Moore was among the mourners. Folder also contains a TM (photocopy) by Marianne Moore, a review of a poem presumably by Lola Ridge, a TM (photocopy) of Marianne Moore's poem "Sojourn in a Whale" and photocopies of Lola Ridge's entries in American Women Writers, Vol. 3 and Notable American Women 1607-1950, Vol. 3.

2 3

to Ritchie, M. H. (Secretary of Bryn Mawr College).

General note

Box
2
Folder
4
Box Folder
1903 November 23.
ALS, Carlisle, Pennsylvania

Moore thanks Secretary Ritchie for her letter and discusses her room assignment. She mentions that Miss Norcross influenced her decision to go to Bryn Mawr College rather than Vassar.

2 4

to Sandison, Helen E. (Class of 1906).

Donor

Helen E. Sandison (Class of 1906)

Box
2
Folder
5
Box Folder
1951 August 7.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"'Retired' is an anomaly in connexion (sic) with you, Helen. You never will be. When your last revisions have gone to press, or rather when your treatise can be announced, I wish to know where I can get it." Photocopy of letter in folder.

2 5
1951 December 5.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"My La Fontaine keeps me animated and subdued by turns. I am still even making mistakes in the meaning..." Photocopy of letter in folder.

2 5
1952 December 17.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Holiday greeting from Moore to Sandison. Photocopy of letter in folder.

2 5
1953 May 18.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I am deeply touched by your writing to me.... It matters to me intensely that you do not feel startled--that's to say dismayed--by my being chosen for this Award. On what possible ground could I be thought suitable for it? Mystery." Photocopy of letter in folder.

2 5
1955 December 22.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Well; may the 'holidays'--all days bless you. You make it easier for me to try to be a benefit to people, blunder as I do." Photocopy of letter in folder.

2 5
1965 May 21.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore discusses a visit to Bryn Mawr she made to give a reading of her poetry. "What a consolation you were to me at Bryn Mawr when things did not go too well for me Freshman year--my first time away from home!" Photocopy of letter in folder.

2 5
1965 June 29.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

In reference to a reading she gave at Vassar, Moore writes, "I couldn't have borne it if you had even considered going all that way to Vassar. In enthusiasm, good people envisage what is super-heroic. I would not have been able to form a word, had you been listening." Photocopy of letter in folder.

2 5

to Savage, Jane B. Yeatman (Class of 1922).

Donor

Jane D. Yeatman Savage (Class of 1922)

(Internal)

Given on April 29, 1959.

Box
2
Folder
6
Box Folder
1955 November 23.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"You just don't know the good you do me, Mrs. Savage."

2 6
1959 April 18.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore declines an invitation from Mrs. Savage, who was the Chair of the Friends of the Bryn Mawr College Library saying, "I dare not--hampered (and restricted for a long time) by a near stroke."

2 6
1959 May 12.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore thanks Savage for writing to her.

2 6

to Schaffer, Arthur.

Donor

Gift of the Marianne Moore Poetry Fund.

Box
17
Folder
11
Box Folder
1951 December 3.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"How kind of you to offset the disadvantages of a birthday by taking your time to look for select, and send me, a unique remembrance..."

17 11
1952 January 26.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"...I hope you would not be coming just to see me; the responsibility of possibly wasting your time and money appalls me;..."

17 11
1952 January 30.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"...If you have verse you might wish to ask about, either mail it to me in advance; or have it with you if it does not need intensive study."

17 11
1952 February 15.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"I have a good many care on me at the moment and am trying to take things philosophically--but may I say that it worries me that you are not more matter of fact about your prospective visit to N. York..."

17 11
1952 June 15.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"The question was legitimate, and if it had not been you can be sure I am not one to 'take offense'."

17 11
1952 December 12.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"Thank you for the Christmas scene."

17 11
1953 September 9.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"I am glad, Mr. Schaffer, that you have had these good months abroad and have been able to be in France and Italy."

17 11
1962 January 13.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"...These days require stamina, with materialism determined, it seems to swallow us up.

17 11
1962 May 26.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"...A little Negro about up to my waist rang the bell (hall-bell) selling Jehovah's Witness magazine...the very picture of integrity..."

17 11
1965 November 17.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

On a change of address card. "A friend in N. York who takes the Saturday Review is giving me the Niebuhr article."

17 11
1966 November 9.
APcS, 35 West 9th Street, New York City

"I do wish a blessing on you Arthur Andre-make a prayer for you."

17 11
1967 February 2.
APcS, 35 West 9th Street, New York City

"How handsome and cheering to me, your card of the 'Old Lady' (which I constantly forget that I am)!"

17 11

to Seldes, Gilbert.

Folder Contents

Folder also contains a TM (copy) of an explanation of the oblique references in the letters in this folder and the bill of sale for these letters to Bryn Mawr College.

Box
2
Folder
7
Box Folder
1928 July 17.
TLS, 152 W. 13th Street, New York

Written on The Dial letterhead. "The Conrad and the Stendhal briefer mentions came yesterday; the other briefer mentions on Friday. They are very far from "summer" reading or the result of summer thinking; we are proud to present them."

2 7
1928 October 22.
TLS, 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

Moore, as editor of The Dial, discusses reviews to be presented by Seldes to the magazine.

2 7
1929 April 11.
TLS, 152 W. 13th Street, New York

On letterhead from The Dial, Moore writes, "We have just received, and it was a pleasure to receive your article on the censorship."

2 7
1929 May 13.
TL, 152 W. 13th Street, New York

Written on The Dial letterhead. "It is a pleasant satisfaction to have you once more within the Dial radius and I am greatly impressed by your resilience despite the exigencies of travel, trunks, authorship, and official obligation. I couldn't compass a fraction of it even for the glory of being the chambered nautilus."

2 7
1929 May 16.
TLS, 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"After the July issue, The Dial is to be discontinued. I had thought even when last writing you that I might not have this message to give, but our triumvirate must yield to the cruelties of remoteness."

2 7
1936 January 2.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To Mr. and Mrs. Seldes. Holiday greetings from Moore.

2 7
1957 January 19.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore responds to an article Seldes had sent her, "I am very pleased to have you to agree with."

2 7
1965 October 5.
TPcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I remember it well, Gilbert. It was at Edmund Wilson's apartment... I am obliged to move to New York, Gilbert; it is not very safe in this neighborhood..."

2 7
1966 January 26.
APcS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

Moore refers again to the tea at Edmund Wilson's apartment and informs Seldes of her new address.

2 7

to Sewall (Mrs.).

Donor

Mary Case Pevear (Class of 1911)

Box
2
Folder
8
Box Folder
1959 August 15.
Copy of ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Copy in another hand. "I am dismayed to see 'April 24, 1959' on your message. I have been away from home and only now received the pages;--undamaged however, and if I seemed ungrateful or under a spell, please know that I could not be more grateful or more charmed than I at last am, in pondering the picture and careful French narrative so typically French in its delicacy and decorum." Note to Mary Case Pevear that accompanies this copy.

2 8

to Shippen, Ellen F. (Class of 1909).

Box
2
Folder
9
Box Folder
1936 January 21.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"When explaining over the telephone that I had written to my friend at Macmillan's, I unfortunately added 'Ellen Shippen;' so if, despite my explanation, someone should come to you for a position--I don't know the name of the young girl--do be definite and brief and don't let yourself be preyed on or encroached on."

2 9

to Stapleton, K. Laurence.

Donor

K. Laurence Stapleton

Box
17
Folder
12-16
Box Folder
1953.
17 12
Box Folder
1953 January 23.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

Discussion about what will be taught in the Verse Composition course. "Since you think it might be profitable to include Ezra Pound, let us substitute him for E E Cummings."

17 12
1953 January 28.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM thanks Stapleton for sending her seven more poems to read.

17 12
1953 March 10.
ALS, n.p.

"I can surmise how concerned you are about your father."

17 12
1953 March 29.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM talks about returning to Bryn Mawr in May.

17 12
1953 April 17.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"Am I not grateful to you, Miss Stapleton, giving me these suggestions about my reading?"

17 12
1953 May 11.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM discusses details her upcoming visit to Bryn Mawr.

17 12
1953 May 12.
TPcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM talks about seeing a boxwood at the Scully residence in Bryn Mawr.

17 12
1953 May 19.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"Your interposition for my welfare-and Miss McBride's will be treasured in memory along with my Award."

17 12
1953 May 25.
APc, n.p.

"My mind is undistracted and my rooms are in an uproar."

17 12
1953 May 29.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"...Let me say that my brother, Miss Stapleton, wishes to send Miss McBride on behalf of him, me, and my sister-in-law, a daphne...to be planted somewhere among her outdoor plants."

17 12
1953 June 8.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM responds to Stapleton's letter telling her that daphnes do not grow in the area.

17 12
1953 June 17.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

Instead of a daphne, MCM and her brother will ask Stapleton to purchase something silver for Miss McBride.

17 12
1953 June 26.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"It doesn't seem my classroom, my Deanery..."

17 12
1953 June 27.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"Your chivalry is not wasted-your chivalries indeed. You do not let us feel that we have been pestilent in asking your help with the unobtainable plant."

17 12
1953 October 27.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"Before leaving for Chicago, I ordered of Faber & Faber Ezra Pound's translations-one for each of us and since mine has come, I hope yours has."

17 12
1953 November 7.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM empathizes with Stapleton about her father's handicaps and lists some quotations for study.

17 12
1954-1955.
17 13
Box Folder
1954 January 7.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"I am charmed by the annuals in action and the mechanics of locomotion."

17 13
1954 January 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM wishes to send a copy of her translation of La Fontaine to Stapleton and Miss McBride.

17 13
1954 June 9.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM responds to Stapleton's letter in which she commented on La Fontaine.

17 13
1954 December 30.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"always benefitting me. I am happy to have MILTON AND THE NEW MUSIC; and how great your scrupulousness in letting me seem to contribute..."

17 13
1955 January 7.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"Yes, I could come, and also talk about La Fontaine to the students in your English 211; but not take money;"

17 13
1955 January 16.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM gives details about her upcoming trip to Bryn Mawr.

17 13
1955 January 22.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM schedules a day for a reading at Bryn Mawr.

17 13
1955 February 8.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"...I received in S. Delivery, from Mrs. Leighton of the Guggenheim Foundation, one of the sets of pages of Yushin's Log and it is surely a remarkable and remarkably perfected piece of work."

17 13
1955 February 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"It was anything but inept to attend to the Guggenheim application now. I suffered no harm, took care that I wouldn't."

17 13
1955 February 23.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"I have just been to a throat specialist..."

17 13
1955 March 3.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"I travel now. Could you have me Tuesday the 15th, speak to your English group?"

17 13
1955 March 9.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM works out details for her upcoming trip to Bryn Mawr.

17 13
1955 March 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"A note; though your masterly, unbelievable order and executing of tasks (obligatory and voluntary) makes me afraid to approach you with my pen."

17 13
1955 April 5.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"I find this hard to credit. I was confident you would get the Fellowship-nothing could be more promising, it seems to me."

17 13
1955 June 30.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"I came on this, Laurence. Don't trouble to acknowledge it." Transcribed copy of a review of Milton & The New Music is included.

17 13
1955 August 12.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"A sore throat; I know how it feels and am sad to infer the several causes-"

17 13
1956-1957.
17 14
Box Folder
1956 July 26.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"It helps me to know that you are free of academic shackles--free in a sense."

17 14
1957 April 5.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM discusses details about a poetry reading at Bryn Mawr.

17 14
1957 May 15.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM describes her train travel.

17 14
1957 May 20.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM thanks Stapleton for Bryn Mawr's hospitality.

17 14
1957 June 4.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"You are making an embezzler of me."

17 14
1957 August 1.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"I shall certainly not despise the essay." Separate sheet of paper with quotations from unsigned paragraphs in sections entitled 'Comment' or 'Announcement' in The Dial accompany the card.

17 14
1957 December 5.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"...e.e. Cummings had a desperate operation recently and has had to cancel engagements on which he was much dependent financially. Maybe we could speak each for half an hour and I give him all the money?"

17 14
1957 December 16.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"You shouldn't make a special case of me. (e.e. didn't go to Bryn Mawr of course.)"

17 14
1958.
17 15
Box Folder
1958 April 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM discusses details about her upcoming visit to Bryn Mawr.

17 15
1958 April 25.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM reminisces about her visit to Bryn Mawr.

17 15
1958 July 18.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"There is no real need for me to 'read the article'-if I were afflicted by amnesia perhaps! Even now- in fair shape mentally- I can hardly account for your researches and originality concerning my entirely average product."

17 15
1958 July 30.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"...The Yeats was mutilated editorially so that I am saying at one point just the opposite of what I meant, was meant as a help!"

17 15
1961-1969.
17 16
Box Folder
1961 January 4.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"So like you to manage to make winter, summer for me."

17 16
1961 January 31.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"The Thoreau Journal-This book is a lure."

17 16
1961 February 14.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"Thoreau as a naturalist-: to you? Ironic that fishing scene..."

17 16
1963 January 26.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"Am dulled - dejected by the death of Bettina Linn."

17 16
1963 May 6.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM writes about details of her upcoming visit to Bryn Mawr.

17 16
1963 May 15.
TPcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM writes about her recent visit to Bryn Mawr.

17 16
1965 March 3.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"This aware, hypercompassionate, scrupulous book of Bettinas."

17 16
1965 August 24.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"Am lost in drudgery-with too many thoughts to move;"

17 16
1966 October 18.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"So glad, Laurence, you could be in Dublin."

17 16
n.y. May 7.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM works out a train schedule.

17 16
1966 November 15.
ALS, 35 West Ninth Street, New York City, New York

MCM thanks Stapleton for her friendship and encouragement. Postcard accompanies the note.

17 16
1967 March 15.
ALS, 35 West Ninth Street, New York City, New York

"What an honor to have this letter from you who have suffered so much-mind and body..."

17 16
1968 July 17.
TLS, 35 West Ninth Street, New York City, New York

"...It is a great shame publishers are so tardy, reluctant about anything good."

17 16
1968 July 29.
ALS, 35 West Ninth Street, New York City, New York

"So glad it is to be published. I don't know Yeats very well."

17 16
1969 April 25.
ALS, 35 West Ninth Street, New York City, New York

"Still your student."

17 16

[5 empty envelopes].

17 16

to Thacher, Barbara Auchincloss (Class of 1940).

Donor

Mr. Thacher and Mrs. Barbara B. Thacher Plimpton (Class of 1965)

Box
2
Folder
10
Box Folder
1967 February 24.
Autographed Two Dollar Bill, n.p.

"Miss Moore wanted to give Mrs. Thacher something more than an inscribed copy of her book. She signed a two dollar bill and attached it to a gift copy of 'Tell Me, Tell Me.'"

Donor

M. Leahy on July 12, 1983

2 10
1967 March 4.
TLS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

Moore thanks Thacher, the President of the Bryn Mawr College Alumnae Association, for the check she received for her part in honoring Miss McBride on the occasion of her 25th anniversary as President of the school.

2 10
1967 March 29.
TLS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

Moore to Mr. and Mrs. Thacher. The poet thanks them for visiting her and for taking care of her transportation when she came for the anniversary celebration.

2 10
1967 December 1.
TLS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

Moore offers to send a "train-lantern Bryn Mawr pin" to Thacher that had belonged to her friend Mary Norcross, 1899. "I am very childish in thinking my retrieving of the lantern-pin matters so much but you started a trophy-club didn't you and this pin is seldom on me."

2 10
1968 March 10.
TLS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

Moore thanks the Thachers for a luncheon she went to on their invitation.

2 10

to Thomas, M. Carey.

Box
2
Folder
11
Box Folder
1907 April 23.
ALS, Pembroke East

"My dear President Thomas, I should like to make application for the room 35 in Pembroke East. I feel that I am justified in doing so, as it would be an effort if it would be possible at all for me to come back next year without my occupying a room of less than ordinary value. I am able to give particulars regarding my financial condition and shall be glad to withdraw my claims to special consideration if I am found to be in less need than others."

2 11

to Turco, Lewis.

Donor

Lewis Turco

Folder Contents

Folder contains letter from Lewis Turco giving copies of two letters to the Marianne Moore Collection of the Bryn Mawr College dated April 7, 1977. A letter of thanks from John G. Jaffe, Rare Books Assistant, is included.

Box
2
Folder
12
Box Folder
1968 October 19.
TLS (photocopy), 35 West 9th Street, New York

"You augment my often tentative efforts incalculably by your instructive pages in the June issue of American Weave."

2 12
1969 September 5.
TLS (photocopy), 35 West 9th Street, New York

"I thank you for sending your new book. I look forward eagerly to reading it."

2 12

to Vauclain, Myra Elliot (Class of 1908).

Box
2
Folder
13
Box Folder
1953 November 12.
TPcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Thank you Myra, for being a cover girl and for the news of your daughter, Mrs. J. Pulitzer! I seem to make a business of being boorish. If, however, I can at some time attend a meeting of the Friends of the Library, I shall send word..."

2 13
1954 October 4.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"How good of you to write about my trifle of help and my La Fontaine."

2 13
1957 December 18.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"How valiant of you to do this; this writing and promoting [on behalf of the Friends of the Library]. I am not useful in such ways but revere the benevolence and unselfishness of it. I did not know we had so large a library."

2 13

to Vaudrin, Betty.

Box
2
Folder
14
Box Folder
1968 April 20.
TLS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

Moore expresses her approval of works by Daniel Hoffman to Vaudrin, an employee of Oxford University Press.

2 14
n.d.
Custodial History note

Removed from RBR PS 3525 O5216 T4 1966 Copy 6.

TLS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

Moore approves of Conrad Aiken's Collected Criticism.

2 14

to Waldman, Bernard.

Donor

Bernard Waldman

Box
2
Folder
15
Box Folder
1965 June 26.
TLS (photocopy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Am growing simpler day by day, subsist on plain rations, am reduced to minimal social life and recreations; minimal "elegance"--am thrifty I mean, despite largesse from various sources."

2 15
1967 May 2.
TLS (photocopy), Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"Mr. Waldman, what a friend! And Grace, without a moment's hesitation when I said I would miss the 10:15 broadcast, 'We'll send you another' and about 40 minutes before the program your Russian Mercury arrived, with a transistor even better than my first one."

2 15

to Walker, Evelyn (Secretary of Bryn Mawr College).

ALS, Carlisle, Pennsylvania

"I enclose the nineteen selections I have made and hope the way I have indicated them will not be confusing. I had hoped to have one of the lowest priced rooms in Denbigh, but evidently Denbigh is a popular hall with upper classes."

Box
2
Folder
16
Box Folder
1905 June 14.
ALS, Carlisle PA

"I enclose the nineteen [room] selections I have made... I had hoped to have one of the lowest priced rooms in Denbigh, but evidently Denbigh is a popular hall with upper classes."

2 16
1905 July 3.
ALS, 343 N. Hanover St, Carlisle, Pennsylvania

"I think there must be some mistake about the room assigned me, for I had selected one room in Pembroke East and all the rest in Radnor. Besides, a two-hundred and twenty-five dollar suite has been assigned me and it is a matter of great importance that I pay but one hundred and twenty-five dollars for my room. Moore is so common a name that perhaps someone else has been confused with me. I am very sorry to burden you farther and hope the matter may be adjusted with as little inconvenience to you as possible."

2 16
1905 August 30.
ALS, Carlisle, Pennsylvania

"If application for the matriculation examination this fall is necessary, I should like to make it now. In my final examination in June I failed in History (Greek and Roman), German Grammar, and English Grammar. As I passed in Punctuation, I suppose I do not have to take that part of the English examination again."

2 16
1905 September 2.
ALS, Carlisle, Pennsylvania

"Please find enclosed my application card for the matriculation examinations. I infer from the form sent me that no fee is charged for examinations taken at Bryn Mawr."

2 16

to Walsh, Cynthia.

Box
2
Folder
17
Box Folder
1956 November 7.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore acknowledges receipt of a shipment of books from The Hampshire Bookshop of which Walsh was the manager.

2 17
1956 December 25.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore admits she likes the work of Mr. Roche whose work, Antigone, Walsh had forwarded to Moore for critical review.

2 17
1959 October 13.
ALS, Hotel Commodore, New York

"I am all of atremble inscribing this little book for these historic schools which my brother has made real to me in having visited them."

2 17
n.y. November 10.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Note sent back with something Moore had accidentally taken home with her. "I wish I weren't so clumsy."

2 17

to Watson, J. Sibley.

Donor

Michael Watson

Folder Contents

Folder 18 contains an empty envelope addressed to Dr. Watson, dated 1927 July 20. Folder 21 contains an empty envelope addressed to Dr. Watson, dated 1957 October 4.

Box
2
Folder
18-21
Box Folder
1925 August 3.
ALS, 152 W 13th Street, New York

On The Dial letterhead. "Should you think of accepting "The Master Beggar"? The inadvertent flavor of Alfred Kreymborg is against it perhaps, but with a few "changes" I like it. The form of the other poems submitted with it disqualifies them but there is talent in them."

2 18
1925 August 4.
ALS, 152 W 13th Street, New York

On The Dial letterhead. "If we should not accept Mr. Rosenfeld's offer of the article on American Criticism, I suppose we ought to tell him promptly that we are declining it, so I have written the enclosed letter which is ready to mail if you approve of it."

2 18
1925 August 14.
TLS, 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

Moore thanks Watson for his decision on which manuscripts to publish.

2 18
1925 August 21.
ALS, 152 W 13th Street, New York

On The Dial letterhead. "At the risk of seeming unfortunate, I am writing to say that we still await your comment... [it] could be two, three, or four pages. You spoke of having written a page and a half, so unless we hear from you, we shall count on two pages. If, however, we may count on three pages, or four, would you be so good as to telegraph us?"

2 18
1925 September 2.
ALS, 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"Mr. Munson's [essay] is eight pages and is entitled 'The Socratic Virtues of Irving Babbitt.' It is impressive as showing Mr. Munson's effort to be orderly and simple but I should say no. Mr. Rosenfeld's essay which is eleven pages long, is an appreciation of El Greco's Portrait of Himself. I should say yes, if Mr. Rosenfeld would permit us to reduce it to five pages and to change certain words."

2 18
1925 September 3.
TLS, 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

...we have no long reviews for November. Ought not The Vatican Cellars by Gide to have a long review, and should you be willing to review it? Or, if we review it, should you prefer to have it done by someone else, possibly Glenway Wescott? (We could not offer it to Ezra Pound I suppose, until we hear if he will do the Stendhal.)"

2 18
1925 September 14.
ALS, Biddeford Pool, Maine

Moore thanks Watson for his editorial advice.

2 18
1925 November 26.
ALS, 152 W 13th Street

"The manuscripts came Wednesday. I accepted the Lawrence and the Damon review and am returning the German articles and Leon Srabian Herald's work. I feel with you, that these pages from Mr. Herald ought to be returned."

2 18
n.d.
n.p.

Title page of An Extraordinary Revealing Life of Edgar Saltus The Man By His Wife, Marie Saltus with handwritten note in pencil in MCM's hand "I rather mistrust this?

2 18
1925 December 21.
TLS, 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"I suggested asking Mr. Llewelyn Powys to review The Oxford Book of Prose, but do you not think Logan Pearsall Smith would be better? ...I had wished my review of Gertrude Stein to be within three pages, but the make-up seems to require four."

2 18
1926 January 7.
TLS, 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

Moore expresses concern to Watson over demands made of the staff of The Dial due to the emerging paranoia of Scofield Thayer, co-owner of The Dial. Includes an enclosure entitled, "Suggested Subjects for a Series of Essays on Anatole France."

2 19
1926 January 14.
TLS, 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"We were sorry to telegraph this morning with regard to Mr. Seldes' leaving. ...We ought, however, ought we not, to secure a substitute? ...I should not object to Mr. Wilson but unless he apologizes to Scofield, I suppose we could not have him. Mr. Cummings articles in Vanity Fair are so pleasing, might we not pre-empt him?"

2 19
1926 March 1.
ALS, 152 W 13th Street, New York

"Scofield cabled today, a very reasonable inquiry respecting his poem. I have not spoken of this letter to anyone..."

2 19
1926 November 16.
TLS, 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"T. S. Elliot will review Science and Poetry. Waldo Frank declines The Vespasiano Memoirs. Mr. McBride will send a review of Rien Que La Terre by Saturday and Mr. Block's article will come Saturday." Includes an article for Dr. Watson's perusal with corrections by MCM.

2 19
1927 January 5.
ALS, 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"Our news of Scofield was so painful as to create an atmosphere of sorrow which it seemed really impossible to surmount and I marvel that in a single word--such as 'genial'--and the fact that he is aware of The Dial, we could be permitted to hope that Scofield is not in tortured rebellion every moment, or at the point of death as we feared."

2 19
1927 January 6.
TLS (initials only), 152 W 13th Street

On The Dial letterhead. "We are announcing in this issue 'two poems by W. C. Williams,' (March is a Light and Young Sycamore) 'and a poet's acknowledgement,' (the bottle poem)."

2 19
1930 September 18.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"I can't help taking this opportunity to urge you to bring out your Rimbaud in America, by itself, in book form. It has been a loss to our readers to be without it."

2 20
1930 October 6.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Mr. Latham [of the MacMillan Publishing Company]...says of the Rimbaud, 'We are afraid we could not find a large enough market for it to justify the cost of producing it. In more normal times we might be inclined to take a chance; but these are, as you know, very dark days for the book world and we must watch rather carefully every venture to which we commit ourselves.'" Enclosed is a letter Moore sent to MacMillan.

2 20
1948 February 15.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"These 'royalties' won't solve any problems for you and Hildegarde...but I would like you to receive them, so am giving you the bother of the paper."

2 20
1951 January 5.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"The special thing about The Dial was inherent attraction, wasn't it? But you know my diffidence about thinking I know what you and Scofield would think."

2 20
1960 December 20.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Warner glories in the hat--authoritative and severe, as it is....he marvels as I do, at your devotion to the guest. Would anyone else on earth, take such exhaustive trouble?"

2 20
1962 September 3.
APcS, [Athens]

On a postcard from the Basilica of St. Clement, "The Beheading of Saint Catherine". "Hildegarde and I have been wishing that you were with us..."

2 21
1962 September 14.
APcS (initials only), The Grande Bretagne, Athens, Greece

On a postcard with a picture of a ruined Greek temple, Moore writes, "Everything looks and seems like this here, Sibley, as you know."

2 21
1962 September 20.
APcS, The Grande Bretagne, Athens, Greece

"Back from the Islands, Sibley--saw the crusaders' citadel at Lindos and this shadowy ship in a recess of one stage of the ascent. Rather rugged seeing places, but worth it."

2 21
1965 March 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore thanks Watson for having her watch repaired and requests that he send her the bill.

2 21
1965 May 24.
TPcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore thanks Watson for purchasing her brother a hat. (Letter from John Warner Moore to J. Sibley Watson accompanies this card.)

2 21
1966 July 20.
TLS, 35 West 9th, New York

"Your color prints are so perfect, could the same printer make me 4 of the tiny film enclosed? the ball-game? so I could give on to Warner the 26th? (and save me the film?)" Letter is accompanied by 2 photographs of MCM, another lady, and the Mets' Casey Stengel signing an autograph.

2 21
1966 August 13.
TLS (initials only) Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"Pardon the inconsequential nature of this letter. I realize that those green pills are unparalleled equine progenterine importance and of commensurate rarety."

2 21
1966 August 14.
TLS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

Moore forwards to Watson a letter she has sent to a bookstore requesting a book to be sent to Watson on her behalf.

2 21
1966 August 18.
TLS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

Moore forwards a check to Watson for the use of an article she had written in The Dial. Folder includes letter from Prentice-Hall, Inc. to MCM that accompanied the original check and the check stub.

2 21
1966 September 3.
TLS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"Would it embarrass you to ask the man at the Kodak Company to make me 3 more of this film...?" Enclosed are two black and white snapshots of MCM receiving an honorary degree at Moravian College in Bethlehem.

2 21
1967 January 28.
ALS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"That little Bewick teapot is the most genial miniature objet I ever laid eyes on--in keeping with the very essence of Bewick."

2 21
1967 August 16.
TL, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"Wonderful flowers by the dusty miller. Miss Smith's garden has produced some slip-proof tires! and trees. Hildegarde like me, has a weeping elm, I think."

2 21
1967 November 14.
TL, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"You hadn't done it. Procured that sea-green jade with a choice of holes by which to hang it. Nothing--nothing so delicate or so firm! I regard it with veneration and the elephant tusk, peopled with sages or shepherds or forest-folk. The hugeness of your gifts stuns me! Infinite because compounded of romance."

2 21
1968 June 14.
TL, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"It seems to me a year since you and Hildegarde were here. And [she] talks of coming about the 20th I am delighted, and most of my penances will be over. And I need not annoy her with those."

2 21
1968 November 7.
TLS (initial only), Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

Moore discusses the manuscript of Hildegarde Watson's memoirs with Sibley Watson.

2 21
1968 November 14.
ALS ("The Rat") n.p.

"Excited Rat; to Sibley, dear fellow. This rat has a birthday and could play forever with the blue-lined box. Its button is perfection; an octagon! The excited animal finds a cake--with writing on it, Happy Birthday."

2 21
n.d.
TLS, Apt. 7B 35 West 9th Street, New York

"I am dementing myself right now with the Notes to my little book, --that word Imagnifico which I think I saw in Monroe Spears on W. H. Auden but it must have been somewhere else, Well--a few winnowings won't hurt" Enclosed is a typed copy of MCM's poem Granite and Steel.

2 21
n.d.
ALS, n.p.

"That little book, Sibley, is no Christmas present. It's a regular perquisite--and doesn't deserve even a word. Save the time..." Removed from RBR PS3525 O5616 Z54 1958 Copy 3.

2 21
n.d.
Donor

Marianne Moore Fund from the Hildegarde and J. Sibley Watson Library

Custodial History note

"Removed from R.B.R PQ1877 A25 1963, cop. 3. Perrault, Charles, 1628-1703. Puss in boots...[translated by Marianne Moore]. New York, Macmillan, 1963. Translator's presentation copy to Hildegarde and Sibley Watson.

AL, n.p.

"Not for sale or distribution till September 1st They're strict about this" The note was in the copy of "Puss in Boots" which MCM translated and presented to Hildegarde and J. Sibley Watson.

2 21

to Williams, William Carlos.

Box
2
Folder
22
Box Folder
1926 November 29.
TLS (Carbon), 152 W 13th Street

"May I extend our confidence to you in saying that it is the intention of Mr. Thayer and Doctor Watson to give you The Dial Award for 1926."

2 22

to Woodworth, Mary K. (Class of 1919).

Donor

Mary K. Woodworth (Class of 1919)

Box
2
Folder
23
Box Folder
1948 November 10.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"H. D. is in Switzerland. I have not her address but anything sent her in care of Mrs. A. W. Bryher...would be carefully forwarded"

2 23
1953 April 4.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

MCM reminisces about a museum visit.

2 23
1953 May 20.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"How kind, how needful, your encouragement and reassurances... Never can I forget your welcome... Nor can I forget your ungrudging care of me the afternoon of my last class, and how you pondered the advantages of each Friday in May, for the presenting of the Award. Please infer at least some of the gratitude I feel to you, dear Miss Woodworth!"

2 23
1954 June 8.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"How rare of you, Miss Woodworth, to be glad of my fables... Am delighted that the bookshop can sell it."

2 23
1955 December 13.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"You send me this fascinating Raeburn of the reverend skater and say I am not to thank you."

2 23
1957 November 13.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"The Parisian Apollo is fascinating to an extent that makes little flaws in my calendar of growing up, inconsequential."

2 23
1959 June 2.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"As we ate Class [Reunion] Supper in the Deanery, I looked steadfastly at the mantelpiece and Canalettos and thought how you made my reading start off confidently and with the talisman of friendship to take off the uncertainty...in facing a course of all that is the literary."

2 23
1959 June 6.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore thanks Woodworth for having taken the trouble to find and return to Moore a bag she had left at Bryn Mawr during the Reunion.

2 23
1959 June 9.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Moore thanks Woodworth again for her search efforts, saying, "If I had mislaid the gold leopard set with emeralds the size of hickory-nuts, carried off by Queen Victoria (or representative) from Nepal, your concentration on my reprieve could not have impressed me more."

2 23
1961 January 21.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

"...The Mazzola-Bedoli girl in the Ashmolean is a great advance on all the Antoines and Elizabeth Ardens in our wicked city."

2 23

to Zuckerman, Ben (Fashion Designer and Tailor).

Donor

Dr. J. Sibley and Mrs. Hildegarde Watson.

Folder Contents

Folder contains a note with hand drawings on it. Note is in the hand of MCM. Removed from May 22, 1961 envelope.

Box
2
Folder
24
Box Folder
1966 February 16.
TLS (initials only), 34 W 9th Street

To the fashion designer, "If you really are a wizard could you not, please make yourself want to make a suit for Mrs. J. S. Watson?"

2 24

to Unknown, Laura.

Box
2
Folder
25
Box Folder
1926 June 16.
ALS (copy), 152 West Thirteenth Street, New York City

"Who Looks on Beauty is so full of beauty that even if you hadn't written it I should be unhappy in returning it." On The Dial letterhead.

Donor

Bernard Waldman

2 25

to Unknown.

Box
2
Folder
26
Box Folder
1963 October 29.
APcS, n.p.

Postcard of a Giant Pangolin "Foto of Manis Gigantea From Marianne"

Donor

Frances Browne (Class of 1909) and Norvelle W. Browne (Class of 1911)

Custodial History note

Removed from: RBR PS3525 f05616 A17 1962 copy 2 ("Eight Poems").

2 26

Incoming Correspondence.

Box
3
17
Folder
1
Box Folder
from Agnew, Janet (Bryn Mawr College Library).
3 1
Box Folder
1951 March 19.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

"At a meeting of the Rare Book Room Committee of Bryn Mawr on Thursday last, the members decided that we would like very much to have an exhibit of the women poets who have achieved a permanent place in American letters. Naturally we are very anxious to have something of yours... The members of the Committee were wondering if you would consider loaning us a manuscript, a picture or some such that would make for a more personal aspect of the exhibit."

3 1
1951 March 30.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

"I hasten to acknowledge the receipt of your "Reading Diary 1916-21", which has just been delivered."

3 1
1951 May 10.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

"The exhibit has been of extraordinary interest, so much so that we have decided to extend it, and we would be grateful therefore if we may keep the notebook until after Commencement."

3 1
1952 June 3.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

"Thank you very much for sending so promptly the list of the books that you will be needing for the seminar on selected contemporary poets. As you surmise, most of these are in the library but the few that are not here will be purchased and available for you at the beginning of the second semester."

3 1
1954 May 27.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

"You are a very generous thoughtful person to send the library a copy of your Fables of La Fontaine. It is being placed in its mint condition in our new Rare Book Room and we are very pleased and proud to have it there."

3 1
1956 May 2.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

"We have had considerable correspondence with a man by the name of Eugene P. Sheehy...who has been compiling a bibliography of your work. It has occurred to me that you may not know about this compilation and since his most recent letter is about your poems published during your undergraduate years, I felt perhaps I should write to you before releasing this information."

3 1
1963 March 5.
TL (copy), Bryn Mawr

"Mr. S. V. Baum wrote...asking if it would be possible for us to supply your contributions to Tipyn O'Bob and The Lantern. I wrote Mr. Baum that this would not be possible unless he had your permission." Agnew goes on to say that copies were supplied but that his bill had not been paid. She fears he has "misrepresented" himself.

3 1
1963 March 9.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

"Please, please do not bother about money owing the college by Mr. Baum. That has long since been written off.... My only concern is that I let Mr. Baum have your material without getting your direct permission. I somehow felt when he wrote that his saying that you had given your permission was sufficient." Attached are Baum's Letters to Agnew, Agnew's letters to Baum, bills from the Comptroller's Office and a photocopy of Baum's cancelled check.

3 1
1963 March 13.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

"I had a letter from Mr. Baum explaining that he had sent his cheque direct to the Comptroller's office. I am so sorry that this happened and that you have been bothered."

3 1
from Epes, Isota A. Tucker (Class of 1940, Editor of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 1959).
3 2
Box Folder
1959 November 23.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

"I fell in love with the George Platt-Lynes photograph of you the minute I opened my September 19th issue of the Saturday Review...so I am writing to see if you will be kind enough to lend it to us."

3 2
from Littlefield, Lester.
3 3-4
Box Item
1938 July 31, 5:00 pm.
TL (copy), Long Island Railroad Depot, Brooklyn

"I should very much like to see you for a short while and talk to you. Two or three years ago I wrote you from my home...at a time when I was hunting for indexes to the files of The Dial...Should be delighted with any time that is convenient to yourself."

3 3
1938 August 18.
TL (copy), William Sloane House

"The tickets arrived just a moment ago; and the promptness is a delight, although all the rest, of course, is a tremendous disappointment."

3 3
1938 September 5.
TL (copy), n.p.

"...thank you for your kindness in lending me these magazines; they have been helpful and interesting."

3 3
1938 November 2.
Telegram (typed copy), n.p.

"Really happy to be doing something that might please you even if so very indirectly. Refused to listen to your stern admonition not to take thought."

3 3
1938 November 2.
TL (copy), n.p.

"Had the good luck just now to find these among some papers in my locker. All of them are yours to keep and do with as you like. I have no further use for them myself, still persisting in not thinking them very good."

3 3
1938 November 22.
TL (copy), William Sloane House

"While in Macy's I saw a copy of the huge new Oxford Book of American Literature and noted with special pleasure your own work in it." Littlefield has purchased it for her.

3 3
1938 December 26.
TL (copy) and ALS (photocopy), 7 Phillips Ave, East Lynn, Mass.

Littlefield thanks Moore for the gift of a cigarette lighter and mentions that the season has been tarnished by the death of a young co-worker of pneumonia. "Last Tuesday I spent some time in the Gotham Bookmart...and finally came away feeling ill. Such a scourge, really, of new little magazines, so many strident ambitions, so many and diverse manifestoes, persuasions, and keys to literature. And so many writers whose only object is a literary reputation,--as though that were a final goal, and not a pleasant by-product!

3 3
1939 January 19.
TL (copy), William Sloane House, New York

"It's much too early to make a decision [about seeing Hamlet] for there is a world of time, really a tremendous distance between now and the curtain Saturday night at 6:30. And there's no actual decision necessary; the seat is yours, occupied or unoccupied, merely put off thinking about it...until Saturday, when, if you are rested enough, there is plenty of time for the coat and hat ritual, followed by the short walk to the subway."

3 3
1939 February 16.
TL (copy), William Sloane House, New York

"It's absolutely outside of belief that you should bring this heavy bundle here, errand or no errand... Being at the moment distraught won't prevent me from telling you I shall be happy, and content, in knowing that you can now go about outside, and that Mrs. Moore will soon be well."

3 3
1939 February 26.
TL (copy), William Sloane House, New York

Littlefield offers some suggestions to Moore of works on College life and continues, "I am grateful to both of you for arranging such a pleasant evening last Friday. I haven't had such a really good time in many months, and keep thinking of it as a little private celebration of your mother's being well again."

3 3
1939 March 10.
TL (copy) and ALS (copy), William Sloane House, New York

Referring to a phone call that he recently had with John Warner Moore regarding the health of Mrs. Moore and Marianne, Littlefield writes, "What he must have been referring to are not courtesies at all... It's simply that one is inspired to protect two such rare persons from callousness and insolence, to surround them with devotion, to build a strong wall against every kind of difficulty. (A wall of books even!)"

3 3
1939 April 1.
TL (copy), n.p.

Cover letter, showing concern for the health of MCM and her mother, for books which he has sent.

3 3
1939 April 20.
TL (copy), William Sloane House, New York

"You were much too kind to send my name to the editors of Measures and Twice a Year. What a risk your generosity inspired you to take. I wish I were worth recommending; I've done nothing worth printing, and I haven't resigned myself to being merely competent."

3 3
1939 April 30.
TL (copy), William Sloane House, New York

"You were very thoughtful and generous to arrange that your E. E. Cummings dinner invitation should come to me."

3 3
1939 May 3.
TL (copy), 117 West 84th Street, New York

"I had a really good time at the Cummings dinner last night, and I'm anxious to tell you what happened and some of the things said, when I have gotten back to normal. The last four days have been strenuous ones!"

3 3
1939 May 7.
TL (copy), 117 West 84th Street, New York

Littlefield provides a lengthy and extensive description of the Cummings dinner.

3 3
1939 May 23.
TL (copy), William Sloane House, New York

"You must think I was obsessed with the notion that [Ezra] Pound should meet both of you,--and perhaps I was in a way--but I'm tremendously pleased now to think that the meeting came about. Somehow I thought it an event that ought to be."

3 3
1939 July 6.
TL (copy), William Sloane House, New York

"I'm glad you read the Heywood Broun note...I wished that he had made some attempt to link the obscenity and blasphemy in Steinbeck with the flights of fancy writing and strained-for purple patches. I don't believe I have too much respect for the established critics...but I've been amazed by their top ratings for Grapes of Wrath. Not a murmur of disapproval....I could understand the reviewers' blindness to the superabundance of blasphemy and obscenity...but I was puzzled to read no criticism of the regularly spaced 'lyric' passages,--so lush, unreal, forced, and inferior to the average Freshman theme on a set subject."

3 3
1939 July 12.
TL (copy), 7 Phillips Avenue, East Lynn, Mass

Littlefield reports that his vacation has begun, that he is practicing his typing and asks after the health of Mrs. Moore.

3 3
1939 July 12.
TL (copy), 7 Phillips Avenue, East Lynn, Mass

"Your firmness about the rate to be paid for a page of typing, especially when underlined in red, is something I would not dare gainsay. ...In these treaty discussions between the British and the Russians, you know, the former are always and forever coming handsomely forward to protest that, 'Indeed, we agree in principle, but...' And so it is with the typing."

3 3
1939 July 24.
TL (copy), High Rock Hotel, Ogunquit, ME

Littlefield waxes nostalgic about the town, which has changed considerably from its appearance in his youth. He hopes that Moore will send some typing to arrive as soon has he returns to New York.

3 3
1939 August 6.
TL (copy), William Sloane House, New York

Littlefield poses further questions about Moore's personal formatting conventions, adding "The typing is coming along very well. Last Tuesday I lost myself in it so completely that I forgot lunch, and suddenly reminded, went rushing downstairs to the Automat about two hours late."

3 3
1939 August 8.
TL (copy), William Sloane House, New York

"Surely your saying that I might make an alteration where I find something 'wrong,' is the highest kind of compliment,--but I can't believe that I'm competent to do so; and in the one or two places where I've been puzzled, I've banished any question from my mind, saying to myself that I lack the proper focus to see precisely what you're getting at, in these details."

3 3
Thursday.
TL (copy), n.p.

Littlefield explains his daily schedule and expresses his concern over the health of Mrs. Moore in the heat and with the prospect of many relatives visiting MCM and her mother.

3 3
1939 September 1.
TL (copy), n.p.

Littlefield acknowledges receipt of another manuscript which had been hand-delivered by John Warner Moore and expresses his regret that he was not present when Moore arrived.

3 3
1939 October 15.
TL (copy), n.p.

"Your mother's letter and your own are heartening in what they say and demonstrate about improving health, and otherwise."

3 3
1939 October 30.
TL (copy), n.p.

"Would your mother and yourself like to go to the Fair Tuesday morning to see Iraq and Eastman Kodak?"

3 3
1939 November 5.
Note

Copy of this postcard provided by the Rosenbach Museum & Library.

APcS (copy), n.p.

"Home for a two day vacation. Left so suddenly there was no chance to ask if you had errands in this neighborhood."

3 4
1939 November 19.
TL (copy), n.p.

"Both of you are kind to ask me to supper, and nothing I can think of would make me happier. It will be the plainest possible fare, won't it. Sandwiches perhaps, and something to drink? And have me leave at nine, or sooner."

3 3
1939 November 21.
TL (copy), n.p.

"It takes a day or two in this present mental state to assimilate things said and the wonderful things seen this evening, but before I go to bed I want to tell you how good your dinner was, and how thoughtful,--more than thoughtful..."

3 3
1939 November 24.
TL (copy), n.p.

Littlefield discusses Hollywood movies, adding "I think I've made another side-splitting error in having solemnly written you about a sheep-dog trial as a court session, when you must have meant sheep-dog tests... However, in the movie there are lengthy...sheep-dog competitions,--and there may even be a court session which puts the 'leading dog' on trial for killing sheep."

3 3
1939 November 29.
Note

Copy of this postcard provided by the Rosenbach Museum & Library.

APcS (photocopy), New York

"Your note about the sheepdog film reached me Tuesday evening; and though I thank you for inviting me, I couldn't have arranged it, I'm afraid."

3 4
1939 December 3.
TL (copy), n.p.

Littlefield reports that he is glad he had not earlier offered Moore suggestions on finishing a short story she was writing, as he particularly appreciated the different way in which she handled it. He discusses works by Henry James and André Gide.

3 3
1939 December 12.
TL (copy), n.p.

"I was very glad to have your reassuring sentences about my work; and I shall follow your advice explicitly, in a thankful and concurring way. Ezra Pound's postcard sounds like such a large order. Perhaps I should avoid the declaration of faith he seems to ask for until I hear from you...and in the meantime, write him a pleasant letter..."

3 3
1940 January 13.
TL (copy), n.p.

Littlefield offers suggestions for the dust-jacket for the manuscript they are working on and discusses news items about the war.

3 3
1940 January 22.
TL (copy), n.p.

"I think it would be wrong,--and certainly a fatal injustice to your story...to allow Mr. Latham to be its sole and final arbiter. If he really thought that the book was an inexplicable deviation, and that in refusing it, he was doing you a service,--and not himself;--I should applaud your generosity toward him, and your courage of the less obvious kind, in treating his letter as a decree."

3 3
1940 February 1.
Note

Copy of letter provided by the Rosenbach Museum & Library.

ALS (photocopy), n.p.

Littlefield discusses the technical writing of Ezra Pound and mentions that he is due to write a volume on the poet.

3 4
1940 February 4.
TL (copy) n.p.

"Your letter about the Pound compendium has raised my spirits; it is about the most heartening letter ever to come my way I think."

3 3
1940 February 5.
ALS (photocopy), n.p.

Littlefield continues to discuss Pound, "Just exactly as you say, it is a mistake to compile a digest for publication, singling out the publication, as the guiding aim in constructing the digest."

Note

Copy of this letter provided by the Rosenbach Museum & Library.

3 4
1940 February 7.
Note

Copy of this letter provided by the Rosenbach Museum & Library.

ALS (photocopy), n.p.

"However this project may turn out, you mustn't feel 'responsible'...for anything, excepting for the encouragement and help you give me. I feel greatly inspirited again (as I did last summer, while typing your story)"

3 4
1940 February 16.
Note

Copy of this letter provided by the Rosenbach Museum & Library.

ALS (photocopy), n.p.

"...the manual,--or rather, digest,--progresses extremely well, and the thickets and underbrush are not too discouraging so far."

3 4
from McBride, Katharine.
Immediate Source of Acquisition note

From the McBride Papers.

(Internal)

From the McBride Papers. General Correspondence Box 6, IDB4.

3 5
Box Folder
1952 April 25.
TL (carbon), n.p.

In reference to a letter from a student at Wilson College asking for personal information about MCM, McBride's secretary writes, "The enclosed letter was received in Miss McBride's office this morning. Mrs. Paul has suggested, in Miss McBride's absence, that I forward the letter to you."

3 5
1953 April 24.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

With regard to Moore's receipt of the M. Carey Thomas Award on May 15, McBride writes to settle details about the dinner to take place on the evening of the ceremony.

3 5
1953 May 15.
TMs (carbon, 2 copies) and TMs with autograph corrections, Bryn Mawr College

Katharine McBride's speech for the presentation of the M. Carey Thomas Award to Marianne Moore. Invitation to the presentation is also in this folder.

3 5
1953 June 17.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

"Everyone speaks of your kindness in answering letters. I am struck by the fact that through this award we have put added burdens of this kind upon you--and very sorry. Do please ignore us, except to come for a visit from time to time!"

3 5
[1953] July 7.
AL (draft), Bryn Mawr

"As you well know the occasion of the award was one I shall never forget. I need no reminder and yet I shall greatly enjoy having the additional reminder."

3 5
1960 March 4.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

For the occasion of the Bryn Mawr College's 75th anniversary convocation and citations to be awarded. "It gives me great pleasure to tell you that you are one of those to whom the Board would like to present a citation... We would consider it an honor to the College to recognize at this time your work as a poet."

3 5
1960 March 28.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

"We shall of course want you to be the guest of the College over the [75th Anniversary Convocation] weekend... There will be many events which we hope you will attend beginning with a dinner Friday evening in honor of those who will receive citations."

3 5
1960 June 3.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

Miss McBride reports that she has arranged for transportation for MCM. MCM's reply attached. Also in the folder is the June 5, 1960 release of Marianne Moore's Citation for Distinguished Service.

3 5
1961 April 12.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

Miss McBride's secretary forwards a letter from a scholar requesting permission to use Moore's published poems.

3 5
from Mearns, David (Chief of the Manuscript Division, Library of Congress).
3 6
Box Folder
1964 July 27.
Donor

Gift of Laurence Stapleton (1 copy).

TL (carbon), Washington D. C.

"I was pleased that my invitation was one that appealed to you. I should emphasize, however, that the Library of Congress would not want to upset plans already made between you and officials at Bryn Mawr. It would be a cause of disappointment to the Library of Congress if your papers did go elsewhere, but we would rather bear out disappointment grimly than act in any way out of keeping with the obligations of the national library."

3 6
from Stapleton, Laurence.
Donor

K. Laurence Stapleton

Existence and Location of Originals note

Original letters are in the Rosenbach Museum and Library.

17 1
Box Folder
1953 January 21.
TLS (copy), 229 North Roberts Road, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

"I have been tempted before this to write to you..."

17 1
1953 January 27.
TLS (copy), 229 North Roberts Road, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

"I have just come back from a few days in New England, and here is your reassuring letter (reassuring because it makes me feel that my lengthy note to you was not an unwelcome interruption).

17 1
1953 March 22.
ALS (copy), 229 North Roberts Road, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

"We--the students, & Kathy McBride, & guests who came to your class--well, everyone at all that you saw here--miss you."

17 1
1954 June 6.
ALS (copy), 229 North Roberts Road, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

"I don't believe I can ever describe how I felt when I opened the sturdy package from Viking, and found The Fables, and then opened the book and read your inscription."

17 1
1957 May 18.
TL (copy), 229 Roberts Road, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

"How much pleasure you created, in your short visit, for the students and other listeners that afternoon!"

17 1
1963 May 19.
ALS (copy), 229 North Roberts Road, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

"So many kinds of goodness emanated from your being here that I can hardly single out one--yes, I can. Most of all I was happy that you seemed so well."

17 1
1966 November 13.
ALS (copy), 229 North Roberts Road, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

"Thank you, Marianne, for the dauntless Pocahontas from Fruitland Museum. I have nothing worthy of her so resort to an ordinary piece of note paper."

17 1
1971 July 2 (to Clive Driver for MCM).
ALS (copy), n.p.

"Here is the little book of drawings I thought M.M. might enjoy, & that would not tax her."

17 1
1971 November 7.
ALS, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

"You understand, Marianne, that I seldom write, unwilling to add to your stacks of mail."

17 1
from Thacher, Barbara Auchincloss (Class of 1940).
Donor

Mr. Thacher and Mrs. Barbara B. Thacher Plimpton (Class of 1965)

3 7
Box Folder
1967 January 30.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

Thacher writes to Moore to ask her to write a poem in honor of Katherine McBride for her 25th anniversary celebration.

3 7
1967 March 2.
TM, Bryn Mawr

Manuscript with corrections of a speech about Marianne Moore. The folder also contains a letter from Frances Browne to Barbara Thacher which says that Moore is working on the poem as well as a memo from Carol Biba regarding a box of flowers that had been ordered for MCM for the McBride celebration. Additionally, there is a text describing the events of the anniversary with particular attention to MCM. This text is dated 1972 February 2 and is addressed "To the Editors." A manuscript with handwritten corrections by BT entitled "Some additional Comments by Miss Moore, before I forget them" dated 1967 March 8 in included.

3 7
from Wofford, Harris (President of BMC 1970-1978).
3 16
Box Folder
1976.
TMs with autograph corrections, Bryn Mawr

Speech on behalf of Marianne Moore Fund

3 16

Third Party Correspondence.

Box
3
17
Folder
(multiple)
17
Box Folder
to/from Agnew, Janet (BMC Librarian).
3 8
Box Folder
1956 April 24 to Agnew from Eugene P. Sheehy.
TLS, Bryn Mawr

"We are naturally distressed by your library's decision not to lend volumes of The Title for the Moore era, the more so since their unavailability was neither stated nor implied in your letter."

3 8
1956 May 9 from Agnew to Eugene P. Sheehy.
TL, West 105th Street, New York

"I have had some correspondence with Miss Moore about the bibliography which you and Mr. Lohr are compiling."

3 8
1959 June 5 to Agnew from Katharine G. Ecob (Class of 1909).
ALS, New York

"I telephoned Marianne Moore this morning and she said she would send you the hand-written verses of 'Combat Cultural' which she read in Goodhart Hall.... She thinks they ought not to be shown until after The New Yorker has printed them." Attached to this letter is a news clipping from the February 13, 1959 Herald Tribune of a poem by Marianne Moore called, For February 14. An editorial called, A Valentine from Miss Moore, is also attached.

3 8
1959 June 15 to Agnew from Fannie Barber Berry (Class of 1909).
ALS, 441 East Twentieth Street, New York

Letter regarding adding MCM materials to Bryn Mawr's library.

3 8
1966 November 4 to Agnew from Katharine G. Ecob (Class of 1909).
ALS, New York

"When I attended my last reunion you told me that you wanted all available material about my classmate Marianne Moore. Here is a postcard from her..."

1 10
1964 March 16 from Agnew to Laurence H. Scott.
TLS, Cambridge 38, Massachusetts

"I am probably extra-dim, but I am afraid that I do not quite understand the meaning of the slip (enclosed) which I received this morning."

3 8
1964 March 17 from Agnew to Laurence H. Scott.
TL, n.p.

"This is indeed an order for the work by Marianne Moore. The announcement you sent did not mention the price nor that money was to be sent in advance. Please send the unsigned copy at $25.00 and invoice in triplicate."

3 8
1964 May 19 from Agnew to Mrs. Lee (BMC Alumnae Office).
TL, Bryn Mawr

"The following are some of the more recent and available publications of Marianne Moore..."

3 8
1967 July 25 to Agnew from Elma Loines.
ALS, The Quarterback, Bloton Landing, New York

"I am reading you a rather nice letter from Edith Hamilton. I met her at little dinner parties the Leubas(?) gave when she was a graduate student."

3 8
n.y. August 6 to Agnew from Jane B. Yeatman Savage (Class of 1922).
ALS, East Gravers Lane, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia

"I enclose these cute notes [from Marianne Craig Moore] for your collection."

3 8
from Berry, Fannie Barber (Class 0f 1909).
3 17
Box Folder
1956 November 12.
Donor

Fannie Barber Berry (Class of 1909)

ALS, 441 East 20th Street, New York

Berry notifies Hammond of the publication of MCM's book Like a Bulwark.

3 17
to Browne, Frances (Class of 1909).
Donor

Mrs. Gilbert Charbonneau (of West Southport, Maine)

3 22
Box Folder
1969 October 8 (from Mrs. Gilbert Charbonneau ?).
AL (copy), Indian Harbor House, 630 Steamboat Road, Greenwich, Conn.

"Marianne if told about the matter of Mildred Plessinger's portrait I know would be eager to try to meet the requirements of writing script for it."

3 22
n.y. February 8.
ALS, n.p.

"When I read Marianne Moore's obituary in The Times I thought of those summer days in New Canaan when I met her with you and what a pleasure it has been for me to have know [sic] such an unusual person as she was."

3 22
from Burke, Kenneth about Marianne Moore.
3 9
Box Folder
1972 February 6.
Quotations from portions of a letter, Englewood, Florida

"When we first worked on the two sides of that big desk in the fron (sic) upstairs office, she scrupulously felt it her duty to tell me how severely she judged my writings. Then, in time, we developed a quite humane modus vivendi. I got a glimpse into the ingenious intricacies of her conscientiousness."

3 9
from Celli, Anne to Carol Biba.
3 18
Box Folder
1953 June 19.
TLS, 488 Madison Avenue, New York

Celli sends regrets to Biba that "Look" Applauds cannot include MCM in their column.

3 18
from Chamberlain, Marcia to Mary [Woodworth?].
Donor

Laurence Stapleton

17 17
Box Folder
1954 September 8.
ALS (copy), 10 Chester Street, Cambridge

"Marianne stopped to see me on her way to Kittery, Maine..."

17 17
to "Marty".
3 19, 21
Box Folder
from di Gesu, Anthony.
3 19
Box Folder
1974 March 14.
TL, 1320 Madison Ave, New York

A. di Gesu recounts his interaction with MCM when he took pictures of her in her "10th Street apartment."

Donor

Ronny Schwartz

Custodial History note

Letter accompanied the photo album of Marianne Moore portrait studies taken by Anthony di Gesu

3 19
from Schwartz, Ronny.
3 21
Box Folder
1977 August.
ALS, n.p.

"These studies (I think) give one quite a feeling of knowing the little lady [MCM]!"

3 21
from Feldman, Evelyn (Rosenbach Museum) to Leo Dolenski (BMC Library).
3 4
Box Folder
1988 January 20.
TLS, Philadelphia

"I hope the enclosed copies fill in some of the gaps in the Lester Littlefield correspondence recently received by Bryn Mawr."

3 4
from Jaffe, John G (BMC Acquisitions Librarian) to Bob Wilson.
3 10
Box Folder
1977 March 2.
TLS (copy), Bryn Mawr

To Bob Wilson of the Phoenix Book Shop: "We have in our collection a fair number of Marianne Moore items. We are trying to complete our holdings of her works... I am sending you our list of desiderata in hopes that you might have some of the items..." [Attached is a list of the desiderata of Marianne Moore.]

3 10

from Littlefield, Lester to various individuals.

Box
3
Item
3
from Littlefield, Lester to Dr. Elizabeth Manwaring (Wellesley College).
Immediate Source of Acquisition note

From the collection of letters collected by Lester Littlefield.

Box
3
Item
3
1936 September 30.
TL (copy) Box 333, Lynn, Massachusetts

"I wonder if any of the New England colleges have ever thought to ask Marianne Moore to read? At Dartmouth I seem to recall suggesting her name, but somehow it was considered inappropriate to invite such a shy person when the platform performances of the more dashing Miss Millay were so widely...advertised. You have probably seen the interesting Eliot introduction to Marianne Moore's Collected Poems." In black, loose-leaf book kept by Littlefield with note that this was enclosed in a letter to MCM.

from Littlefield, Lester to John Warner Moore.
Box
3
Item
3
Box Item
1938 December.
TL (copy) William Sloane House

"Last Friday evening your sister came over to Manhattan, and way out of her way to bring me a most useful and excellent cigarette lighter, so that I might have it for Christmas. The little note on the package said that the gift really came from you....much more important to me than any possible use is its history, the knowing that it came from Miss Moore and yourself."

3 3
1941 August 25.
Note

Copy of this postcard provided by the Rosenbach Museum & Library.

APcS (copy), Ogunquit, Maine

"...I revive, and feel now like someone I recognize."

3 4
from Littlefield, Lester to Mary Warner Moore.
Box
3
Item
3
Box Item
1939 January 16.
TL (copy) n.p.

"When I saw this Victorian Panorama I thought you might like to have it for a few of the pictures, and a paragraph here and there. You must not be at all impressed, though, for the book sold for only a few pennies."

3 3
1939 February 7.
TL (copy) William Sloane House, New York]

"I was truly relieved Saturday to learn of your gradual but certain recovering. You will give all your time and every bit of your energy these next few weeks to becoming stronger and really rested, won't you? ...Could Miss Moore send me a note in a week or so, telling of your progress?

3 3
1939 November 5.
Note

Copy of this postcard provided by the Rosenbach Museum & Library.

APcS (Copy), n.p.

"I hope to see the House of Seven Gables while here-my 10th visit to it I guess-and shall want to send you some pictures of it."

3 4
1939 November 29.
APcS (photocopy), New York

I hope enjoyed To the Victor; and that the pleasure derived was greater than the trouble of going in town."

Note

Copy of this letter provided by the Rosenbach Museum & Library.

3 4
1940 January 10.
TL (copy), n.p.

Littlefield apologizes for not replying to Mrs. Moore's letters, thanks her for the dinner she (and MCM) gave him the night before, and concludes by expressing his hope that her health will continue to improve.

3 3

from Littlefield, Joseph D. to John Warner Moore.

Box
3
Folder
4
Box Folder
1973 July 1.
ALS (copy), The High Rock Hotel, Ogunquit, ME

J.D. Littlefield offers to send to Moore a loose leaf book of correspondence between his late cousin, Lester Littlefield, and Marianne Craig Moore.

Note

Copy provided by the Rosenbach Museum & Library.

3 4
1973 July 12.
Note

Copy provided by the Rosenbach Museum & Library.

ALS (copy), The High Rock Hotel, Ogunquit, ME

"It pleases me that you will accept the loose leaf notebook sent under separate cover. I hope the pleasure you derive from it approximates mine in sending it."

3 4

from Manwaring, Dr. Elizabeth to Lester Littlefield.

Box
3
Item
3
Box Item
1936 October 2.
TL (copy) Stone Hall, Wellesley College

"Thank you for your letter. I am always glad to have suggestions, especially if the suggester has heard the poet read to a sizable audience with good effect...Miss Moore's poems I know, but I feel that she is too abstruse for a general audience. The too abstruse and the too popular are so expensive, have both to be considered in such a series." In black, loose-leaf book kept by Littlefield with a note that this letter was enclosed in a letter to MCM.

3 3

to/from Moore, John Warner (brother) to various individuals.

Box
2
3
3
Folder
4
21
from Moore, John Warner to Lester Littlefield.
Box
3
Item
3
Box Item
1938 December 31.
TL (copy), Norfolk, VA

"I'm glad you like the lighter. It's of no value in itself; but if it shows you I'm grateful for your kindness this summer, it has served its purpose; and it may entertain you and be a convenience.

3 3
1939 February 10.
TL (copy), Norfolk, VA

"Here are some negatives that are yours. I appreciate the use of them very much."

3 3
from Moore, John Warner to Joseph D. Littlefield.
Box
3
Folder
4
Box Folder
1973 July 9.
TL (copy), n.p.

"Thank you very much for writing to me as you did. I was shocked and sad to hear of Lester's death. He was a friend of long-standing of my sister, and she valued his friendship. I would very much like to have the loose-leaf file of correspondence between Lester and Marianne, and am grateful of your offer of it."

Note

Copy provided by the Rosenbach Museum and Library.

3 4
1973 July 19.
TL (copy), n.p.

J. Warner Moore acknowledges receipt of the loose-leaf correspondence file and adds, "Lester was a person of scholarship and many interests and, as his letters show, a man of great kindness. He was fortunate to have a relative equally kind and conscientious, as you are..."

Note

Copy of this letter provided by the Rosenbach Museum and Library.

3 3
to/from Moore, John Warner to Katharine McBride.
Note

From the McBride Papers.

Immediate Source of Acquisition note

From the Katharine McBride Papers (General Correspondence Box 6 IDB4).

Box
3
Folder
11
Box Folder
1953 May 20.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"It is commonly thought I believe that a true evaluation of one's life can be made only some years after one dies. I am moved to say, however, that although I can claim no credit for it, the accolade of your presenting to Marianne the M. Carey Thomas Award on May fifteenth, has crowned my life, though once removed, as nothing else can crown it, now or later."

3 11
1953 June 2.
TLS, Plum Hill Road, Connecticut

Moore offers to purchase a flowering shrub for McBride as a thank-you for the award and dinner, saying "Memorable as were the events of May fifteenth, their spiritual values, as is ever so, transcended them and grow the brighter for me as the days go on. Your tone of voice, may I say, when you presented Marianne with the M. Carey Thomas Award was thrilling, as implying a gift not merely official but from the heart."

3 11
1953 June 17.
TL (carbon), Bryn Mawr

"Your letter has been a great pleasure to me, for we wanted the award to be given just as you felt that it was given. But never as I thought ahead to its presentation could I have imagined the evening your sister gave us. She carried us away and made us each feel that we were sharing with her, as a friend might, her recollections about Bryn Mawr and then something of her present experience in the fables and the poems."

3 11
1953 June 22.
ALS, Plum Hill Road, Connecticut

Discussion about purchasing an appropriate plant for McBride's garden.

3 11
from Moore, John Warner to J. Sibley Watson.
Box
2
Folder
21
Box Folder
1965 May 24.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

John Warner Moore to J. Sibley Watson, thanking Watson for the hat he has purchased for him. (Postcard from MCM accompanies this letter.)

2 21

from Moore, Marianne Craig "Bee" to various individuals.

Box
3
Folder
12
from Moore, Marianne Craig "Bee" to Leo Dolenski (Canaday Library).
Box
3
Folder
12
Box Folder
1992 October 29.
TLS, West Hartford, CT

"Here are the copies of the obituaries of our father, John Warner Moore, for the Bryn Mawr College archives." 4 printed obituaries are enclosed.

3 12
to/from Moore, Marianne Craig "Bee" to Jane A. Hinson (Bryn Mawr College Archives).
Box
3
Folder
14
Box Folder
1981 March 23.
TLS (copy), Bryn Mawr

"We are delighted to hear through Miss Stapleton that you will allow us to publish Mary Warner Moore's correspondence with the college secretary. Enclosed are xerox copies of the letters in our possession... They may be of interest to you and certainly don't need to be returned."

3 14
1981 March 31.
TLS, West Hartford, CT

Moore grants permission to the college to edit and publish the recently-discovered letters of Mary Warner Moore and Marianne Craig Moore and thanks Hinson for sending her copies of the letters.

3 14
1981 April 30.
TLS (copy), Bryn Mawr

"In order to afford full protection to Mrs. Moore's correspondence, and to acknowledge your generosity as well, we would like to state that the letters are under copyright of the Moore family. I hope this arrangement will be satisfactory."

3 14
1982 January 16.
TLS, West Hartford, CT

"Did you ever publish the letters of our grandmother, Mary Warner Moore, and of Marianne Craig Moore in Bryn Mawr Now? We should be glad to see the article when it's ready."

3 14

from Moore, Mary Warner (mother) to various individuals.

Box
3
Item
3
from Moore, Mary Warner to Lester Littlefield.
Box
3
Item
3
Box Item
1938 October 17.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Yesterday, a most beautiful bouquet of flowers came to my daughter and me, that has become two instead of one, and we see your kindness and great giving whenever we pass through the little long hall, or come into our living room. I wonder if you could come over to see us, and enjoy them too--say Saturday evening?"

3 3
1939 January 19.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Marianne was as distressed as I, that your laborious trip should be futile, and that you should again be at a closed door--that was ours! O never take again a risk that hurts us through and through!"

3 3
1939 February 2.
TL (copy), 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Having heard nothing of us but dire vexations, I think you would like to know that troubles are quieting. I didn't know I was proud; or thought I did 'well' by my children, but since I am learning humility by seeing myself cared for by day and by night, I see clearly that I felt important in household work, and fully able to take responsibility of what made the day go forward, but not now!"

3 3
from Moore, Mary Warner to Fannie S. Barber Berry (Class of 1909).
Donor

Gift of Fannie S. Barber Berry (Class of 1909)

Box
3
Folder
13
Box Folder
1935 April 19.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn New York

"I must prolong our telephone conversation just to say as it were, Goodbye. But I say it as fathers would, in its beginning use- that is, as your father & mine would use it--for you brought me as much more yesterday than you knew in your remembrance of Marianne. I feel just as she does, that her closest friends must be protected from outlay on her behalf and not even be burdened with more things to dust and handle. (It is the unloved public we would tax--large hearted Christians that we are.)"

3 13
from Moore, Mary Warner to Bryn Mawr College Secretaries.
Custodial History note

Transferred from the Bryn Mawr College Archives in 1987.

Box
3
Folder
14
Box Folder
1904 January 23.
ALS, Carlisle PA

"Would it be possible for my daughter--Marianne C. Moore--to take her preliminary examinations here in Carlisle? She is already registered on your books as an applicant for entrance to Bryn Mawr in 1905, and hopes to take the preliminary examinations in May of this year." Folder contains a typed copy of this letter.

3 14
1904 January 27.
ALS, Carlisle PA

"I thank you for your letter...and for the sets of examination papers which you sent me... Miss Mary J. Norcross who is an alumna of yours, and is not engaged in teaching, is a resident of Carlisle, and perhaps would be willing to give the examination." Folder contains a typed copy of this letter.

3 14
1904 February 3.
ALS, Carlisle PA

"It has seemed to me it would give my daughter a certain amount of assurance could she test her strength by representative examinations which I should give her from your pamphlets... The subjects she hopes to present in May are Physiology, Latin, French and Algebra." Folder contains a typed copy of this letter.

3 14
1904 February 16.
ALS, Carlisle PA

"Thank you very much for the pamphlet of examinations which, with your letter, I received last week. Scarcely had I written my last letter to you, when a letter from Miss Norcross to me, arrived; in which she told me she would be glad to proctor my daughter." Folder contains a typed copy of this letter.

3 14
1904 March 14.
ALS, Carlisle PA

"In order to be in good season, I write now to make application for my daughter's examinations in June. You have already granted her the privilege of taking them in Carlisle, under the care of Miss M. J. Norcross." Folder contains a typed copy of this letter.

3 14
1904 May 2.
ALS, Carlisle PA

"I am sorry...that an increase in tuition is necessary. I have been teaching for four years in order to make college education possible to my two children...and of course under the new arrangement, the weight is greater; I am sorry from another point of view also--to make Bryn Mawr the most expensive college, is to mark it as representing not the bone and sinew of the land, but the fibre that has grown without effort. If such criticism appears, in a stranger, unwarrantable, allow me to say that one cannot subscribe to a college without having in it a sense of ownership, and responsibility regarding its attitude toward the world." Folder contains a typed copy of this letter.

3 14
1904 October 16.
ALS, Carlisle PA

"Will you tell me what German Reading the professors of German recommend in preparing for entrance examinations: prose, poetry, dramatic selections, or all three? My daughter, Marianne Craig Moore, hopes to take the examination in June; and so far has done only a trifling amount of translation." Folder contains a typed copy of this letter.

3 14
1905 February 20.
ALS, Carlisle PA

Mary Warner Moore requests that MCM be permitted to take her final entrance exams in Carlisle with Miss Jackson as proctor again and asks about her room assignment. Folder contains a typed copy of this letter.

3 14
1905 March 14.
ALS, Carlisle PA

"I thank you for your good wishes for my daughter's success... She has for years been deeply attached to the interests of Bryn Mawr, and is curiously at home in her feeling toward the College. We read with pleasure the fine article in one of the Boston papers on Bryn Mawr; its nobility of being..." Folder contains a typed copy of this letter.

3 14
1905 April 7.
ALS, Carlisle PA

Mary Warner Moore writes to request the last set of entrance examinations and specifies the subjects of: "German, English, Algebra, Geometry, and Greek and Roman History." Folder contains a typed copy of this letter.

3 14
1905 September 4.
ALS, Carlisle PA

Mary Warner Moore writes to request a change in date and time of MCM's English examination because of her unwillingness to let MCM travel to Bryn Mawr alone. Folder contains a typed copy of this letter.

3 14
1905 September 11.
ALS, Carlisle PA

"I am grateful to you for your wish to consider my perplexities in regard to settling my daughter in her prospective school home; the kindliness of your refusal to transfer her examination certainly takes away the bitterness from disappointment. ...I doubt not Marianne will gain the worth--in experience--of any burden or unpleasantness that results from our various handicaps in getting her to her destination." Folder contains a typed copy of this letter.

3 14
1906 January 18.
ALS, Carlisle PA

"When Marianne was at home, she happened to mention that when you had asked her to give her father's business or profession, she was obliged to own that she did not remember what it was. That she did not, evidently had no trace of queerness to her; but I at once determined to answer the question myself. For the sake of statistics, I know it is important that otherwise unimportant questions be asked; and answered. Marianne's father...was a mechanical engineer by profession." Folder contains a typed copy of this letter.

3 14
from Moore, Mary Warner to Lola Ridge.
Donor

From the Lola Ridge Collection, Smith College.

Box
3
Folder
15
Box Folder
1921 March 13.
ALS (photocopy), 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"Were I born in another time, in the time in which mothers took young children to One, that He might lay his hands upon them and bless them, I should take mine; my two children--And I also should say to Him: 'Here is yet another child,--the little book, called Sun-Up--bless it also, and send it out on its way, with the smile of God upon it."

3 15
1921 March 19.
ALS (photocopy), 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"I trust you will be greatly aided by being in a more retired spot... Marianne takes great pride in the achievement you have made in your precious book. She sends you love and far-back congratulations."

3 15
1928 February 29.
ALS (photocopy), 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"Someone hinted to Marianne that you had had cheques that you had not expected and were unwilling to use them....If I may say so, I do feel that one who checks and throttles generous love, stultifies the life of another. Does the wrong not go further? Is it not saying to the Father of us all--'I refuse thy gift; I do not like the way you send it.'...Be patient, dear child, with goodness, as you are with ill; and have that faith which sees in the dark."

3 15
1928 April 30.
ALS (photocopy), 14 St. Luke's Place, New York

"Marianne and I are heartsick at thought of your helpless buffetings at the hands of one physician and another; you as a blind man being begged to reach here; now there; and for you neither rest nor respite."

3 15
1928 May 29.
ALS (photocopy), n.p.

"I am not by you to drop in with flowers, or a bowl of soup or a chicken, and I am so much a child that I cannot be denied an innocent enjoyment without being injured. This so-called--money--is just in the rough my rose, or my loaf of brown bread, brought you again through the winter. To deny me would be to deny love, with from Marianne and me you have, and ought to let us give of to you always."

3 15
from Norcross, Mary Jackson (MCM's Entrance Exam Proctor & Class of 1899) to Bryn Mawr College.
3 14
Box Folder
1904 February 3.
ALS, The Concord, Washington D.C.

"I can hold the examinations [for MCM] this spring in Carlisle and I am glad to be able to do anything to make the arrangements as simple as possible for Mrs. Moore. There was strong influence brought to bear to have Marianne sent to Vassar, so I am especially glad to do anything to help the cause of Bryn Mawr."

3 14
n.y. April 17.
ALS, Atlantic City

To M. Carey Thomas, "After carefully considering the position of Assistant Bursar, I have decided to accept your offer of it."

3 14
from Schoen, J. Wesley to Mrs. Mason.
3 20
Box Folder
1971 April 27.
TLS, 30th and Market Streets, Philadelphia

Letter thanks Mrs. Mason for returning a photo of MCM, presumably used in an edition of The Evening and Sunday Bulletin.

3 20

Hildegarde and J. Sibley Watson Correspondence with MCM.

Donor

Gift of J. Sibley and Hildegarde Watson

Box
9-15
Outgoing Correspondence.
Box
9-14
Dated Letters.
Box
9-14
Box Folder
1926.
9 1
Box Folder
1926 February 23.
ALS, n.p.

To JSW "Elizabeth Roberts wrote a book of poems called "Under the Tree" published by Huebsch."

9 1
1926 May 30.
TLS, 14 St. Luke's Place, New York City

To JSW "Aware of the fact that you and Mr. Powys are very good friends, I feel our dilemma in the matter of his book, Bridlegoose, to be a grave one."

9 1
1927.
9 2
Box Folder
1927 April 16.
TLS with an autograph postscript, n.p.

To JSW "Could we condone the obscurity of the college magazine or shall I tell Mr. Kwei Chen that we are not at liberty to publish MY FRIEND THE BACHELOR?"

9 2
1927 May 6.
TLS, n.p.

To JSW "On writing Laurence Gilman today it occurred to me that Scofield has expressly stipulated that no change in the staff be made without consulting him, so I addressed a note to him in care of Mr. Riccius saying that I had suggested Laurence Gilman and that you were willing to have him as Mr. Rosenfeld's substitute."

9 2
1927 September 21.
ALS, n.p.

To JSW "Since Mr. Galautiere's essay measures 10 pages instead of 6, we have rearranged the order of the make-up a little..."

9 2
1933.
9 3
Box Folder
May 25.
Transcript of a letter, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "With regard to the play - to be thwarted by bozos about which one knows a great deal is a distress but if things do not go as they could, I hope you will feel as the indelicate Rivera felt about the Detroit murals..."

9 3
June 8.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "When I opened your letter I dropped the check out and in picking it up, thought I saw $3.00 on the corner and hoped you were asking me to do an errand for you."

9 3
June 1.
Transcript of a letter, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Remarks like those of your niece would intimidate me if it were not that you are protected against witchcraft - like the man Yeats speaks of, 'and blessing he was blessed' - you are so generous in your care of others and so pardoning."

9 3
June 9.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Since your letters came yesterday, I feel as if I could not say a word, ever; but want you to know what a pleasure it is to hear about the animals you saw, and the mandrakes."

9 3
June 17.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "It is good news to us that Friday or Saturday will bring you to New York and we shall book for you any afternoon you say for I know you will not let the many things you have to do, defraud us of our visit."

9 3
June 29.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I'm afraid some haven't the reasons I have for not being a fatalist."

9 3
July 8.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I had been thinking--with regard to the Bates--for treatises are expensive--that one ought not to be too sincere in letting people help one, and seeing it, does not relieve my sense of oppression;"

9 3
July 17.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "It is a beautiful thing; I can't [?] your sending it unregistered."

9 3
July 22.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "What an El Greco! I have never seen anything by him to which I was indifferent and this is a maximum peak of sensibility."

9 3
July 31.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Your dazzling and exciting secret burns holes in the pocket. I am so delighted that you think of appearing in one of your talents."

9 3
August 6.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Being willing to work means success--and you are--but I pale at the thought of such fearful closings and goings as those connected with music."

9 3
August 20.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "That is news--that you think you are going to be stronger than in recent years."

9 3
September 3.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "You are overwhelmed by the film--by the strength of it and the interrelated beauty of the various high [fruits?]" Letter contains illustration of a flower.

9 3
September 11.
ALS, H.R. Conroy, Black Lake, Hammond, New York

To HW "I wish you need not have felt bothered the day you had planned to leave New York,"

9 3
September 17.
Transcript of a letter, Black Lake, Hammond, New York

To HW "Your letter is as Mary said about her present, a glorious and terrific thing."

9 3
September 21.
ALS, n.p.

To HW "There is too much to say for any of it to be put in words, but in a blank of saying I will tell you that I hope never again to know how it feels to see something come close and slip into nothing..." Typed poem (not by MCM) attached to letter.

9 3
September 29.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW and JSW "About your sympathy, and wish to send a nurse and doctor--for of course the agony to me of this experience has been the jeopardy to Mother." Letter is 6 pages long on Japanese stationary with flowers.

9 3
October 11.
ALS, Memorial Hospital, New York

To HW "The [?] is so beautiful I am keeping it on my desk door at the foot of my bed."

9 3
October 25.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I don't know how you can say such things--or wish to say them."

9 3
October 30.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "No no, dear Hildegarde, You must come for luncheon. On Saturday afternoon at the Institute that auditorium is full of children with candy in rustling papers..."

9 3
November 7.
ALS, Brooklyn, New York

To HW "I have just got back the poems with a somewhat frightening-courageous note."

9 3
November 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Pressed flowers usually lurk in a book to afflict the person trying to verify something;"

9 3
November 29.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "These are beautiful things--startling in their perfection;"

9 3
December 15.
ALS, Carlisle, Pennsylvania

To HW "I hope it is true. Judging from my own heart I think it must be."

9 3
December 27.
ALS, Deepwood, Sterretts Gap, Carlisle, Pennsylvania

To HW "Not in your realizing about telegrams but in all ways, you take care of us."

9 3
1934.
9 4
Box Folder
January 13.
ALS, Deepwood, Sterretts Gap, Carlisle, Pennsylvania

To HW "I am glad Lot was at 66 Fifth Avenue but marvel at the way I keep missing it. It will be shown other places I feel."

9 4
January 25.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "[Griff?] makes you feel as if every degradation & desperation known to humanity were in you and yours only; so I am sorry about Jeanne."

9 4
January 28.
Telegraph, Brooklyn, New York

To HW "Mr. Shapiro promises special showing of Lot Tuesday morning time and place to be telephoned me Monday Monarchs of the Air at Institute Wednesday evening wish you and Sibley could see both and would have supper..."

9 4
February 12.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "We are not ready yet to walk in the Elysian Fields and when I saw the flowers I kept saying 'How Beautiful!'"

9 4
February 25.
TLS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...The music is a triumph and I shall not be satisfied till I hear some of Virgil Thompson's organ music."

9 4
March 18.
Transcript of a letter, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I should like to see you feeding the ducks. You should like Wagner's island in Switzerland - with your mother and Jeanne and Michael journeying to see you."

9 4
May 2.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Your return this afternoon--about three--gave us strange feelings;"

9 4
May 23.
ALS, Brooklyn, New York

To HW "You are very consoling and as I am beginning to realize, self-stabilizing;"

9 4
June 24.
ALS with APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, New York

To HW "You say in your letter to Mother 'We are soon off' but I think you are still there?"

9 4
July 4.
ALS, Brooklyn, New York

To HW "Your beautiful German words and English words and carefulness of friends and prowess have consoled us in the midst of inner and outer chaos." Letter has drawing of a firecracker at the top.

9 4
August 1.
ALS, n.p.

To HW "Your letter, a much wished for one, came this morning."

9 4
September 11.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Your letter on the hall table was a cheering sight when we three got home Friday afternoon, and did us real good, though not good too, since like the one I had from you in Norfolk it did not tell us how your back was."

9 4
September 19.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "We were both thinking, as Mother said, last evening where we saw these flowers, may the garden of your mind never be without flowers and the song of birds."

9 4
September 25.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I know you can't sing without singing on a certain day but I can scarcely confess the excitement of the thought"

9 4
November 2.
TLS, Brooklyn, New York

To HW "You would be disgusted, dear Hildegarde, if you knew how the first thing we think of is health and how we read your letter anxiously, to know if you have been well." Letter on Japanese stationary with a pressed leaf inserted into the page.

9 4
November 30.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "What an exciting Thanksgiving Day and Friday and other days (I'm an expert in making flowers last)."

9 4
December 25.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "It is like you to bring us a plant with-pink flowers-I think it is heather-and a snowwhite gardenia, and I shall just thank you."

9 4
December 26.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "We are stunned, and turn away from ourselves that we could be capable of possessing so much, as being a principal in what you have done. I am afraid to go on existing."

9 4
1935.
9 5
Box Folder
January 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW " 'Mrs. Moore and Marianne' --how it makes Hildegarde seem to be here with the flowers, more even than that the flowers have brought Hildegarde;"

9 5
March 25.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I lost my head as well as the rest of me and came away with the press notices in my pocket--the notes were so much for us, but I shall never lose them."

9 5
April 7.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Your uncle. How this grieves us;"

9 5
April 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "What ways are yours. And what they result in. Mother was saying yesterday how glad she was you were as we know striven for in Cleveland..."

9 5
May 14.
ALS, Brooklyn, New York

To HW "Wondering about you and wishing things about your concerts."

9 5
May 30.
ALS, n.p.

To HW "Like the Indian princes with my baggage full of white clothes; and the requisitely invisible stocking in a safe corner--though I took a spare pair of the wrong kind in case a weevil should get in unaware and gnaw a hole in one..."

9 5
June 14.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "To think of your being ill. How much there is to that, I fear."

9 5
July 13.
ALS, 619 Western Branch Boulevard, Portsmouth, Virginia

To HW "I have been writing you letters and you have been spared the reading of them..."

9 5
July 19.
ALS, 619 Western Branch Boulevard, Portsmouth, Virginia

To HW "Here is a letter from Anne that I think you might like to see;"

9 5
August 8.
ALS, 619 Western Branch Boulevard, Portsmouth, Virginia

To HW "If it had to be on or the other, Sibley would not be long in choosing between the writing and any picture;"

9 5
September 16.
AL (incomplete), 619 Western Branch Blvd, Waterview, Portsmouth, Virginia

To HLW about HLW's singing and the Lasell family.

9 5
October 5.
ALS, Brooklyn, New York

To HW "The telephone just now rang and I couldn't but hope it was you."

9 5
November 25.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...I am happy the concerts had not withered but seemed when you got to them to flower as they should."

9 5
November 28.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "How remarkable of you to be able to think as a holiday approaches, of someone else's holiday!"

9 5
December 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "How eat breakfast and do other ordinary things with your letter before me? I couldn't for I was somewhere else, away with you."

9 5
1936.
9 6
Box Folder
February 24.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Even if the babies had not been mixed up as in Pinafore, they would not be so very right but both are dressed--and the offensive croaker does not croak as it did."

9 6
March (Sunday).
Transcript of a letter, n.p.

To HW "Hildegarde, did you not know that we are two mitted Cranford villagers?"

9 6
March 31.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "One almost never feels that it is really the person who is speaking-rare experience."

9 6
April 12.
ALS, Brooklyn, New York

To HW "It is only you who could make us (invalid hares) wonder if we ought to freeze ourselves--shut all heat off."

9 6
April 19.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I am glad the wild flowers did you no harm, or lunching with a wild animal."

9 6
May 27.
ALS, Brooklyn, New York

To HW "I am sending you my book, the much portended "lizard" " Included in letter are clippings, one of a flower and the other of an airplane.

9 6
May 28.
ALS, Brooklyn, New York

To HW "Sick yourself, and giving to us, and thinking about us!"

9 6
June 28.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "What letters! --making potent thoughts come flocking into the mind."

9 6
August 2.
Transcript of a letter, 446 Oak Grove Road, Norfolk, Virginia

To HW "...We are well, and slothfully industrious, with books, sewing and kitchen-shopping."

9 6
September 26.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "So you have been dancing; you must tell me what you wore when we see you,--what you each wore, and if there was a moon."

9 6
October 20.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "What has stricken you! I had a strange feeling about you but brushed it aside. Mother was reading Mrs. Eddy Sunday evening; and there had in my mind a long time some things to ask you; that is, discuss with you--arising from this book."

9 6
October 31.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "You can't think what pleasure it was for me to be with you there listening to Gilbert & Sullivan."

9 6
November 24.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...We think you are in Rochester perhaps, but hope the concerts were not altered or delayed in any way and make you know even better than before what you are going to do next."

9 6
December 19.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "How can it be that of some who love one another it is yet time that giving comes only from one and always the same one?"

9 6
1937.
9 7
Box Folder
February 27.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Dear Hildegarde of the flowers and stars, and large heart drawn with marvelous effect of [?],--a valentine is much received in this desert of Arabia."

9 7
March 19.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "It makes one faint to see, let alone think of wearing, anything so beautiful. Silk so fine, such ingenuity and minutely deft execution!"

9 7
April 25.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "As sweet the violets seem as when you put them in the letters; the blue so real and intense against the blue of your writing."

9 7
July 4.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Just after talking to you that day on the telephone, when we had got back from Norfolk, I was talking to a Mrs. Norman...who is thinking of starting a magazine, 'if there is a need for it' and if there are some who are not writing so much as they should be, or are not writing at all."

9 7
July 24.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "What tremendous implications in the first lines of your letter! I could not be guilty of laughter nor dare I groan and lament!"

9 7
August 15.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Are you there, --having songs and wisdom for the autumn? But how like a tiger on fire for recklessness of you to take time when you were in the midst of so much to write me!"

9 7
December 12.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Stars and candles are sublime things to give, and in order to see them, there must be twilight."

9 7
1938.
9 8
Box Folder
January 19.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "First wish respect to the missing package,--which I would rather have send and had lost, than that nothing went to you from a spot which never loses the sense of your presence."

9 8
March 20.
Transcript of a letter, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "What sculptures, Hildegarde! How could mind or hand have fashioned that narrowness and that sacro-sanctity of remoteness, and how could you be thinking of them or us, in this momentous return from your concerts?"

9 8
April 3.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...Nothing but music can say what music is; but this [ordeal?] report of how you seemed when singing in Brussels is a joy in every word."

9 8
April 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I wish very much that you could see this movie of 'a road-runner' (a very lovable bird) photographed by the Woodards who photographed 'the River'. Letter has news clipping attached.

9 8
April 24.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I hope this Easterlike day is doing you as much good as your letter does us,--the radio playing the most excellent tunes although it turned off, and the sun shining."

9 8
June 6.
Transcript of a letter, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...We are proud of Michael--though in shattering fear of him, to tell the truth,-and his confederates Palestrina and Satie."

9 8
September 29.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "How like you to have us each in your care;"

9 8
November 20.
ALS, 446 Oaks Grove Road, Norfolk, Virginia

To HW "We have been poring over your program of November 5th, imagining and re-imagining what it might have seemed to the audience, and how the triumphant climax, perhaps left you feeling."

9 8
December 23.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW and JSW "The Christmas star and flower, and sprig of holly, with the frightening gift underneath, make me so I cannot speak as think."

9 8
1939.
9 9
Box Folder
January 1.
ALS, n.p.

To HW "New Year's Day! As we went down town on a mundane errand after your receiving your Christmas week letters, Mother said 'that much of life! I go out with peace in my soul.' "

9 9
March 31.
ALS, n.p.

To HW "Your letter to Mother, Hildegarde, is a guide for one to life--not just life but the life of Christ as we try to relive it." (Important letter regarding Mary Warner Moore's health.)

9 9
April 3.
Transcript of a letter, n.p.

To HW "I've been bothering with Woolworth safety-pins that jam or rust the dressings or keep me annoying Mother when I can't get them through the material, and the ones neighbors have got me are no better and knowing that Hildegarde's things "happen to work," I'm asking if she could conjure me up two papers of the tiny ones and two of the next larger? I enclose the size and a dollar. There is no hurry."

9 9
Wednesday.
ALS, n.p.

To HW "Strange of me to remember what I should be doing and not write on and on till you would have to have rest from me."

9 9
April 17.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW and JSW "Who but you could transform helplessness into peace and assurance?"

9 9
Tuesday.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW and JSW "Dr. Kramer has been here and said 'the time for blood transfusions is past. She's over this, every evidence that she is...' "

9 9
Wednesday.
ALS, n.p.

To HW "So dear, Hildegarde, of you to keep with us at home and as you travel."

9 9
April 24.
ALS, Brooklyn, New York

To HW "To be vague is to be stronger so say no more, dear Hildegarde. I understand."

9 9
May 6.
Transcript of a letter, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I have longed day by day to tell you and Sibley how she is, but feared to be premature, the ultra-short wave apparatus made so immediate a change for the better apparently."

9 9
September 24.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "We don't see you and feel far away."

9 9
October 22.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "After writing you last, I almost wrote you again--feeling that you were sad and [?] with intensifying pressures of some kind--but not knowing what to do, only knowing what to write--I did not.

9 9
October 30.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "To entrust us with Jeanne's letter--which no amount of describing could have suggested!"

9 9
December 25.
ALS, n.p.

To HW "...I have thought so much about the 'party', and Michael and Jeanne, and Mrs. Lasell, and yourselves, knowing that in bringing to pass what was not easy, and what at best is almost from your work, you can make a precious and memorable thing of it."

9 9
1940.
9 10
Box Folder
March 22, 24.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"How shall I ever tell you what I feel in thinking of your thoughts about illness, and your saying the customary resig[nation?] is all wrong."

9 10
April 3.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Mrs. Watson 'well.' "

9 10
April 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Such beauty! The mulberry suit with its imperceptibly squared shoulders and tiny herringbone, and [?] buttoning buttonholes on the sleeve, so very French."

9 10
April 27.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I'm glad you know me so well you know what I feel and can't say."

9 10
June 16.
ALS, 35 Bellevue Place, New London, Connecticut

To HW "...Mother, Warner and I are alone here, while Constance, Johnny, Mary, and Sallie and Bee are at Wellesley..." Pressed flower is inserted in the letter.

9 10
August 24.
ALS, 35 Bellevue Place, New London, Connecticut

To HW "We are in New London and were thinking about you and wondering if you are at the Farm, when your letter came."

9 10
August 31.
ALS, 35 Bellevue Place, New London, Connecticut

To HW "After such a letter, Hildegarde, as yours to Mother, how am I writing you just an ordinary note, and perhaps unnecessary, but we now plan to go back Monday to Brooklyn."

9 10
September 8.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I am to this exasperation of insufficiency in my attempt to receive "souvenirs" of The Dial, by your help and willingness to be with me in it, is a relief I'd hardly looked for, and I have been as busy as a fly on a window pane correcting more things..."

9 10
September 30.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...It is an excitement to us, that in thinking of the Farm, you could imagine us there again;"

9 10
December 6.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Your thoughts about music,--about [?] which increases only through more minute attention to detail, and the process reversed..." With a drawing of a holly at the top.

9 10
1941.
9 11
Box Folder
January 10.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "When write you "must" let it be to me."

9 11
February 9.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "These wondrous faces--here as by a miracle,--crowding together so one just thinks of the fragrances and unsordiness, and garden liveness."

9 11
March 8.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "The blouse, the mere thought of it when we are not seeing it at all, makes our lives different."

9 11
March 29.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Loved Hildegarde, who strives, who prays only for what is in accordance with God's wish, and good for all! Aware that you suffer, we do not know how..."

9 11
April 29.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "As we sat in the sun on the window sill, Hildegarde, Mother reading the Sentinel, she shared with me such triumphant things; and there I saw a poem..."

9 11
May 7.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...Mother though something light would be better, since it is almost summer so we decided I could wear the white dress you helped me get; that I wore at Bryn Mawr."

9 11
May 23.
Transcript of a letter, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I wonder if you have been to Vassar, Hildegarde, besides being with me on Wednesday! It was all so nice, --despite premonitory agues of unconfidence."

9 11
May 31.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "How happy we are to feel, as you make it seem, that the singing and work you must do are just right..."

9 11
June (early in the month on Tuesday).
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...The warfare with [?sation] ought not to be so dire it seems to me, in view of such things;"

9 11
July 8.
ALS, n.p.

To HW "How consoling, Hildegarde, to know you are gaining; and that you have been where trees and water can look as they do in the twilight picture..."

9 11
Wednesday.
ALS, n.p.

To HW "I wonder if I said, Hildegarde, that we are looking forward to the 28th as the day we shall be coming to the farm?"

9 11
July 23.
TL, 35 Bellevue Place, New London, Connecticut

To Mr. Raymond Jorritsma "May I say for Mrs. Watson who has left it for my mother and me to decide just when we shall be arriving at the farm, that my brother will be bringing us Monday afternoon, the 28th, and two of my nieces are to accompany us."

9 11
July 29.
ALS, The Farm, Massachusetts

To HW "What a feeling to be here in the midst of love and my real beauties..."

9 11
August 5.
ALS, The Watson Farm, Northridge Centre, Mass.

To HLW "...Your voice and the picture of you here right away almost;"

9 11
August 14.
ALS, 35 Bellevue Place, New London, Connecticut

To HW "Its you made the conversation interesting after dinner remembering so naturally and optimistically this or that person and experience. I hoped we were not doing you harm."

9 11
August 31.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "We are so happy, dear Hildegarde, that you can say you are well and going to be well."

9 11
September 26.
ALS, n.p.

To HW "The precious enclosure--from Ruth Carver 'So much lives even in death after all.' How I treasure this, Hildegarde..."

9 11
November 30.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Yes dear Hildegarde, you wrote,--a letter that has been making us happy ever since; been making us think in prisms."

9 11
December 13.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Your blue dress, Hildegarde, had much to do with my getting a pass on my talks, for it distracted attention from what I was saying, and really monopolized the conversation afterward..."

9 11
1942.
9 12
Box Folder
March 24.
Transcript of a letter, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "It is like Sibley to put urgent things aside and give that first-aid instruction. What wouldn't I part with if only I could attend; would like to have the instruction--even from anyone--but especially as he would be systematizing and giving it. I have two resuscitation formulas, and the Red Cross First aid booklet, but there seem to be contradictions..."

9 12
May 8.
Transcript of a letter, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...The name of that young musician Hildegarde, is Britten. I don't remember his first name. And his Requiem that the Boston Symphony played is 'Sinfonia da Requium, Op. 20'... "

9 12
1943.
9 13
Box Folder
June 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "These consoling, almost imagined things you say, dear Hildegarde, about my poems, and how Michael played the Bach; and the gift of the beautiful shoes, and not a word about the music and the hovering possibility Vergil Thomson mentioned!"

9 13
August 27.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...Jean Wahl (Professeur Jean Wahl I should say) is an eff[?] teaching exile, escaped from prison; and just now at Holyoke--one time at lunch he said he had asked Mrs. Cummings..."

9 13
December 9.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Just now we looked into a book of peasant art, about Sweden--at white bone utensils and hanging--buttons of hammered silver..."

9 13
1944.
9 14
Box Folder
January 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Rushing help to us and yourself doing up the package--the dainty yellow pad. But this is not the one!"

9 14
January 23.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "The pad! Although I said you mustn't tax yourself by trying to send it! It came safe and what protection it is. We can now each use one as you said,--and are saved the somewhat hampering delay and effort of changing covers."

9 14
January 31.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "How sink to earth or falter, dear Hildegarde, with such friends as you and Sibley to care?"

9 14
February 11.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "It is not ideal that "Cummings" as I call him (you wouldn't call Homer 'Mr.')--has written the introduction himself. How touching and incredible of you, however, to say I could have produced one!"

9 14
April 14.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "It is as if there were no war and no worries."

9 14
April 23.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I had been invited to Bryn Mawr by Miss Edith Finch of the English Department and Miss Donnelly who for years was head of the Department, -now retired...I was conveyed from the station by Miss Finch in her car, to a little cell in Pembroke East (dormitory) where a speech specialist with a microphone vainly tried to make me sound human."

9 14
June 2.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "am sending you the Pavlova article..."

9 14
1945.
9 15
January 9.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "The doggedness and sense that there are no heroes because all are heroes of the war-paralyzes understanding, does it not?"

Box Folder
February 4.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...Mother lost a beet-stem (don't be horrified) in the bed clothes--that fell off her lunch tray..."

9 15
April 10.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "For Mother to struggle as she must, grieves me. I found only last night that her shoulder that has pained her, seems to be dislocated or out of joint somehow, and Dr. Nevins is to come to help it in some way."

9 15
April 13.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...I can't help but think the bright sun will bring mother more independence."

9 15
April 27.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I said to Mother the when she had read your letter yesterday, 'Hildegarde doesn't know about the Guggenheim award but I think I'll tell her, and tell her that even so we're going to keep her gift for special help for you!' "

9 15
April 30.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Just to tell you, that Dr. Von Riper this morning was an amazement to us. As Mother said, 'I have had osteopathy before--have been brought up on it--but nothing like this.' "

9 15
July 1.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...I can think, Hildegarde, what work and vigilance have gone into this occasion and the delicacy of your planning in having the Cummings with you."

9 15
1946.
10 1
Box Folder
April 8.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "How dear, how dear! This little jewel that is also useful. And the 'aura' about it of your thoughts..."

10 1
August 13.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW and JSW "How penetrating, how touching, that in extremely yourselves with that helplessness to relieve suffering for those one loves."

10 1
August 15.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I have been thinking about this. Jeanne, it would seem to me, needs something enticing? That is undecidedly hers to fix her mind on; --and look at? Of course she likely has it."

10 1

October 2 (envelope only).

10 1
October 6.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "The geranium seems to enchant Mother into a thousand joys."

10 1
November 22.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "But 'welfare and happiness' surely are meant for you and Sibley--and if you could see hopeful, grateful almost..."

10 1
1947.
10 2
Box Folder
March 10.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I hope that you will never be too sad to feel that flowers are speaking to you. We were shocked that you should bring more than yourself, when recovering from great effort and with strain of various kinds..."

10 2
March 23.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "The blue coat is exactly like Jeanne, and I do not see, I think you must have imagined, that it would not be just the thing for her."

10 2
May 8.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I shall dragon guard these gloves and be often saying to myself that I have them;"

10 2
June 29.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "We are excited and grateful to have the clipping--so glad we may keep it. The account of the apparatus is a wonder of science itself. Had Sibley anything to do with that?"

10 2
July 16.
ALS, 5304 Moorland Lane, Bethesda, Maryland

To HW and JSW "Consolation? a word, just a word. I have always felt, but now?" MCM talks about her grief at the death of her mother, Mary Warner Moore." Signed MCM and John Warner Moore

10 2
July 26.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "You do not need broaches, Hildegarde, and as for pan[?], are a-quiver with memory."

10 2
August 4.
ALS, Ellsworth, Maine

To HW and JSW "The test for Warner this time is something I cannot easily dwell on; and partly to encourage him."

10 2
August 23.
ALS, Ellsworth, Maine

To HW "Maybe you and Sibley could come to see me when I have gone back to Brooklyn?" Map of where Ellsworth is located is drawn below signature.

10 2
September 7.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn (?)

To HW "What a pleasure, dear H., on reaching home to open the desk and find the inkwell and 6 Sibley Place (on the sheets I enclose)"

10 2
October 6.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I do not know what to make of myself, Hildegarde. I did not wish to intrude this on you..."

10 2
October 22.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...There is no answer--merely a longing to have not too great a discrepancy between what you feel, and what one is."

10 2
November 24.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...Last night I was at a dinner--a 'Tribute to Poetry' dinner given by the Academy of American Poets--rescused by Louise Crane and put at her mother's table with Stephen Spender and the Colums..."

10 2
December 12.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...I shall not drift away (either) from Elise Becker. I was affected by her as I can't express..."

10 2
December 29.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW and JSW "...And what joys you bring to Christmas gratitude, in the word 'Watson Farm'..."

10 2
1948.
10 3
Box Folder
March 4.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "You have been so concerned for me, I want you to be sure all is well, as it is."

10 3
March 8.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I became so irretrievably hampered as not to be in [?] sooner or stay better when I got better; ...and I felt apprehensive in misleading Warner about me."

10 3
March 25.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "May I just say, Hildegarde, that my physiological burdens are being surmounted? surmounted for me by you and Sibley."

10 3
March 31.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "So if Sibley doesn't want to be exhibited, I'm recorded...It was asking too much."

10 3
April 9.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...The fact that the magazine [Chronos] is starting and by no means 'An International Quarterly Review' is a reason for giving it a little something, I think?"

10 3
April 24.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...I leaving for Washington as you arrived. Constance thought I should see the German pictures. I wanted to see my cousin in Hagerstown..."

10 3
April 29.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...Tell me do when you have been working something special out...singing or other thing."

10 3
July 19.
ALS, Ellsworth, Maine

To HW "I needn't be so impulsive, Hildegarde, as I am and fear my concern for Dudley Huppler is trying."

10 3
November 11.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...in the eyes of E.E.C. and Akkeb Tate because I went to the Vanguard Press--Gotham Book Mart [?] where two [?] from Life circled and photographing; and descended on victims at will!"

10 3
December 14.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...And Sunday, I got home, Saturday afternoon, when called on by an adventuring Frenchman, Pierre Emmanuel."

10 3
1949.
10 4
Box Folder
January 29.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...this exquisite dress, so daintily cut..."

10 4
May 18.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...I am thinking of you ashamed, Hildegarde, to have let you know I had made best preparations for you..."

10 4
July 10.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...I see that Sibley does not slack off and try to make himself lazy just because winter is over. Neither do we, you'll admit."

10 4
November 1.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...Jeanne has bad severities so acute is it not strange she has had endurance to surmount them?"

Box
10
Folder
4
November 13.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...but meanwhile, am sending you the picture. --have not given one of these to anyone but Warner, who returned it to me to 'keep for' him. He says, thought, it is my best--'don't have any more taken.' "

10 4
November 14.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "P.S. You so touchingly spoke of expense, Hildegarde. George Lynes gave me the picture--and if he hadn't, what of it!"

10 4
November 18.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...so if I let you buy the picture, I would just be devoting my life to craft and the ways of the Sacred police for whom Mr. Beedle Smith has such reverence."

10 4
December 1.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...I'll have to take [the shoes] to Nancy Haggerty's Saturday and see if they can shoe a pre-civilization foot of the saurus kind."

10 4
December 6.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Wonderful you are, Hildegarde-what a vision of thoughts--are flowers;"

10 4
December 23.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...You must bear me up as Faust would like to have been borne up into radiance too good for him!"

10 4
1950.
10 5
Box Folder
January 13.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I resolved a year ago when the winds were keen and snow threatened to be slush, to get some boots or galoshes so my stocking would not be a hazard (half dry and half snow!)..."

10 5
February 7.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...I so hope the skies brighten for you and Sibley--and that Mrs. Farell is not having a struggle..."

10 5
February 14.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...and I have several prospects that are rather a problem as regards dress--am going to the Boston Symphony with Mrs. Coleman..."

10 5
February 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "A ticket, dear H., (and if you can't use it, maybe you'll know in advance? So we can return it.) They tell me the series is about subscribed."

10 5
February 27.
TL with an autograph note, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Chamber's Etymological Dictionary doesn't give anything better, Hildegarde" with typed poem "Cherry Tree" by Sacheverell Sitwell and Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable's Entry for Salamander.

10 5
February 28.
APc, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...My first gardenia to wear & first crown jewels!"

10 5
March 8.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Spiritual currents, Hildegarde. What else could impel these celestial thoughts you have."

10 5
April 3.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...I meant to write--then was borne along on the current of impersonal pressure have wondered about Mrs. Lasell and if you managed to counteract the image of the hospital..."

10 5
April 26.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW " 'Could hardly talk to me.' Hildegarde. 'except to say come.' hardly talk to you. Others' thoughts, others' words are but ghosts at such a time. You are with her, Hildegarde, and I pray she may be spared for you. ...I saw Mother losing the fight."

10 5
April 28.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I have not yet been able to leave you to yourself, Hildegarde."

10 5
May 13.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "You felt 'too ill' Hildegarde, too ill. You who give strength reading strength. I can hardly bear it."

10 5
June 1.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...Warner has let me see your letter; is consoled and feels its touch of Grace."

10 5
July 5.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...Hildegarde, emotionally you must be firm with yourself."

10 5
August 3.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...'If in New York' you say, before I go to Harvard. Do be, I should feel so strengthened."

10 5
August 14.
APcS, 14 Quincy Street, Dana-Palmer's House, Cambridge, Mass.

To HW "A penetrating welcome, Hildegarde, that mysterious box--which I opened with trembling incredibly."

10 5
August 24.
ALS, Ellsworth, Maine

To HW and JSW "I thought of you constantly at Harvard."

10 5
September 11.
ALS, Ellsworth, Maine

To HW "That was hard for you, going back again to Whitinsville--consolation is out of the question."

10 5
December 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...All is not quite well, when we cannot crown your days with things, consoling and tangible yours and Sibley's."

10 5
1951.
10 6
Box Folder
March 7.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Was talking of you and Sibley to Wallace Stevens last evening, after he'd received the National Book Award medal for his 'The Auroras of Autumn,' telling him about the Farm and the dwarf laurel in the rocky pastures on the way to the Devil's Den."

10 6
May 4.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Have just received Mr. Wilson's invitation--notice and a word or two? Is not this the friend of Seufrelit(?), your's & Sibley's who wrote for The Dial some rather daring pieces?"

10 6
May 9.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW and JSW "Official retrospect never before has brought me so close to one all longed to keep."

10 6
May 17.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...came back from Boston not very well-(had gone to Wellesley to speak to some English students) very nearly fainted at a dinner last week-a long, too late Fund for Intellectual Freedom dinner; and now I have laryngitis."

10 6
May 24.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I never have tasted such crackers-unsweetened crackers..."

10 6
May 27.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I missed the Yankee Clipper to Boston and it was quite a serious matter!"

10 6
June 5.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "You don't know how excited I am to think of seeing you and Sibley."

10 6
June 7.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "It is evident to me, clear H., that if I come for commencement--and I am determined to do it--I should not leave till Monday night."

10 6
June 7.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I have wanted so much to see the paintings (Arthur Wilsons') that I considered asking Lousie (Louise Crane) to come & get me & take me to see them..."

10 6
June 14.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW and JSW "No other degree will ever do one the good that this one did. I felt as if I should be taking 'The Cascade Elf', nearly for N. York; but 'Garden Valley' was not an inappropriate one (of the 17 cars coming this direction?"

10 6
June 15.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "The paintings are truly seas of sensibility."

10 6
June 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW and JSW "It seems to me when I was reporting Wallace Stevens as ultra terse, I might have said what Mrs. Church says every month for a long time..."

10 6
June 25.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "As we sat by the fire after dinner the evening I left, and my eye would rest on your portraits of Nancy Clare with its sea blue background, I suddenly was impelled to say 'you must not subtract my [?] chair from the others.' "

10 6
August 13.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

TO HW, "...And the Pietas(?)--the Michelangelo--it is timeless, is it not."

10 6
August 23.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I have just been on the point of writing you today that Warner seemed apprehensive when I said I was going to wear pink to the wedding. He said 'you get a pink suit or dress, but wear your green dress to the wedding that you wore to Rochester...I immediately saw his reasoning."

10 6
September 3.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...'Maybe I myself will stop accumulating.' You inspire me."

10 6
September 12.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...you wonder about my silence when a letter so touching accompanied Jocelyn S's poems. I received them the 6th and wrote you that very evening saying how much I admired his fervor and sensibility..." Letter from HW dated September 10 accompanies the letter.

10 6
December 24.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Christmas Greetings to HW.

10 6
December 25.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW and JSW "I make this Nativity an excuse for sending you this rather strange card." Postcard of 'Flight to Egypt' accompanies letter.

10 6
1952.
10 7
Box Folder
January 20.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "There the former owner of the Historical Society's House was present--at this church meeting."

10 7
July 24.
ALS, Rock Lodge Inn, Spruce Head, Maine

To HW. MCM discusses her trip to Boston

10 7
August 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I am felled by a jag of work (as Warner calls it). Book XI to emend and type before I leave for Maine and must make a call and attend a party..."

10 7
August 26.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I wish I might see the exhibit, Hildegarde!"

10 7
October 10.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I feel [?] by reason to me of what you told me--of your stay in Maine, Bishop Laurence, Claire, and Michael;"

10 7
November 19.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Have just been looking at Esther's smiling face in 'Life' for this Friday; and how commanding is Wallace Stevens with his frown."

10 7
November 26.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "A symbol of yourself, Hildegarde, this exquisite thing with its silver ribbons and white pearl pin"

Box
10
Folder
7
December 14.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

MCM writes to HW and JSW to inform them of how to reach her in the upcoming weeks.

10 7
December 23.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I went away excited and am still excited. The treasure, meanwhile, of this elephant is standing by Warner's picture and ever so often, I take it off to put it back in the envelope which says 'elephant.' "

10 7
December 31.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "How am I go about (?) with this position of the Crown Jewels making me--treasure for the Tower of London!"

10 7
1953.
10 8
Box Folder
January 4.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "One of our tenants here in the house for a time--James Freeman was in the (?) Department at Tiffany's but decided to go into a watch making enterprise of his own."

10 8
January 31.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I am so refreshed, Hildegarde, by talking with you."

10 8
February 5.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Marion Crocker was seated in the classroom with my twelve students when Miss Stapleton and I appeared. All rose and were introduced."

10 8
March 25.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Marion Crocker's courtesies and generosities, Hildegarde! Every day but one, of my series--English '211'--she was there competently equipped with her pen & notebook; (and her verse is very very good.)"

10 8
April 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Are you at the Park Chambers, I wonder?"

10 8
April 23.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...What a hard sleep for me to miss seeing you."

10 8
May 6.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "We indeed do 'know several things,' Hildegarde, in matters sacred to our essential selves."

10 8
May 11.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "How beautiful and brave a friend, Hildegarde, Sent for to help Jeanne--yet you pause to get his message to me."

10 8
June 24.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...Jeanne so far from you; and the Farm!"

10 8
July 11.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "How deprived I am, Hildegarde, so eagerly waiting till your telephone--call might tell me that we were to meet--And instead, suddenly rushing away to Washington. Connecticut by way of New Canaan."

10 8
July 17.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I am consoled that I did not miss you by my errand to Connecticut."

10 8
July 29.
ALS, 153 Summit Ave, Brookline, Mass.

To HW "Well--you know it all before I tell it, and how childish of me to elaborate. The Hospital is so liberal toward me. I marvel--trusting me to stay even three hours since I sit quiet or wait on Marcia, and let her sleep or talk as she finds she can--"

10 8
August 3.
ALS, 153 Summit Ave, Brookline, Mass.

To HW "In my extremity, Hildegarde, I made you suffer too--which I ought to have known a way not to do."

10 8
August 6.
ALS, 153 Summit Ave., Brookline, Mass.

To HW "...These things are mysterious but living [?]. I said to John, Sunday, 'No one can prove the fact of Deity but I am sure of it as that I am alive.' He said, 'So am I.' "

10 8
August 14.
ALS, 153 Summit Ave., Brookline, Mass.

To HW "Hildegarde, the impossible! I have felt again and again since the storm, 'if I could just see that tree again!' "

10 8
August 18.
ALS, 153 Summit Ave., Brookline, Mass.

To HW. MCM discusses caring for her friend Marcia.

10 8
August 19.
ALS, 153 Summit Ave., Brookline, Mass.

To HW "To think of your telephoning me, Hildegarde! waiting till I came down, then talking to me as though face to face with no hampering sense of the clock."

10 8
August 26.
ALS, 153 Summit Ave., Brookline, Mass.

To HW "...Jeanne's room 'across the way'; and yourselves so near, to be with and speak with! What demonic compulsion could ever rob you and Sibley?"

10 8
August 29.
ALS, 153 Summit Ave., Brookline, Mass.

To HW "...I was looking up 'Conscience' in the Britannica at Warner's suggestion--couldn't find it..."

10 8
September 9.
ALS, 153 Summit Ave., Brookline, Mass.

To HW "How you give, Hildegarde, something and everything. The Plato and what you say of the pictures taken in India..."

10 8
September 19.
ALS, 153 Summit Ave., Brookline, Mass.

To HW "[Life] magazine took a picture of me in Mrs. Lasell's cape, took it from a distance--of me overtaking six children with balloons--conducted along from a path of the Zoo by their parent (or a man with his proteges). I have been impatiently waiting to show it to you."

10 8
September 24.
ALS, 153 Summit Ave., Brookline, Mass.

To HW "I deplore the fact that I was not home to talk with Michael"

10 8
September 28.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...I came home Friday."

10 8
September 29.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

MCM writes to HW to discuss meeting up in NYC.

10 8
November 8.
Transcript of a letter, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Wednesday I spoke at Warner's school and last evening at the YMHA. I hope this is all for a while; but no matter how much of fool or flea museum I happen to be, the people are so kind."

10 8
November 28.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I see Chicago in retrospect--knowing that you and Sibley were there on your honeymoon..."

10 8
December 15.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Life is lent lustre by the fact that some live--and have lived..."

10 8
December 22.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Christmas Greetings to HW.

10 8
1954.
Box
10
Folder
9-10
Box Folder
January - June.
10 9
Box Folder
January 13.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...The 22nd I said I would go with the Brownes to hear Gieseking; and have lunch with Mrs. Church, Wallace Stevens, and Thomas McGrievy."

10 9
January 29.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I guess you're seen this--i: Six Nonlectures?" With review article of E.E. Cummings i: Six Nonlectures attached.

10 9
January 30.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...After I saw you my neighbors brought me a Feb. Harper's Bazaar with my 'Lion in Love' in it."

10 9
February 8.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW thanking her for a gift of clothing.

10 9
February 16.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...I hope diminutive Mrs. Folbert will not dwindle [?] because of me."

10 9
March 6.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Your tremendous, unqualified hospitality and untyrannical, Socratic modesty, are so affecting to me."

10 9
March 10.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

Letter thanks HW for a skirt.

10 9
March 18.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...And you have that velvet! It is going to Vassar next Wednesday and to a wedding in Sudbury in April I think."

10 9
April 5.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...I hear nothing of my artfully oblique tribute to 'Vogue'."

10 9
April 11.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "What 'poem' could suggest ever, in any language, this hazard of self to console another self?"

10 9
April 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

MCM is excited at the prospect of seeing HW soon.

10 9
May 14.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "You will understand, whatever he says-and don't if you think it would burden Sibley, have him read it. We are so 'trustful'!"

10 9
May 15.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Thinking of me, Hildegarde? and of my fables? and I so uncouth?"

10 9
May 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Life is worthwhile, Hildegarde."

10 9
June 2.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I parted from you reluctantly-so concerned lest you be too tired to find the trip home and easy one..."

10 9
June 4.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Found I needed no operation, Hildegarde (a ligament with a calcified spot?) and am home from N Haven resuming my routine."

10 9
June 8.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Yes, dear Hildegarde, I noticed your eye but never suspected that something had to come off. How good that we don't have to do these things for ourselves."

10 9
June 14.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "What a feeling! 'She would like you to have something elegant!' Mr. Anthony said. 'That is for hunters' as I picked up a brief case of their leather about the size of a card table-but light."

10 9
June 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

MCM thanks HW for a gift of "gorgeous" bags.

10 9
July - December.
10 10
Box Folder
July 11.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

"Well-, I am the spur entangled in the fur. I would rather be Willie Mossuk, (John Mills!!). If he is here in August we must go to see him again! and Miss Maggie."

10 10
July 20.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

MCM thanks HW for shirts.

10 10
July 22.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Warner is delighted, Hildegarde; so please, I am glad I let you do it. Only I wish you and Sibley could have done the presenting."

10 10
July 26.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...You must never never arrest your impulsiveness NEVER."

10 10
August 11.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

MCM thanks HW for a gift of pens to herself and John Warner Moore.

10 10
August 14.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "How rare, Sibley's innovations! Inventiveness, I should say, and fascinating the possibilities of the scientific pen!"

10 10
August 17.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "How vivid, this little pink note. I am elated, Hildegarde, that you have these delightful and confiding children." Pink note in child's handwriting accompanies the letter.

10 10
August 24.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "A slight elation, Hildegarde? I am happy; and indeed sure that your Handel--as w hole and in detail, was rare;"

10 10
August 24.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "You and Sibley are not like T.R. & Sagamore Hill, Hildegarde--'unbelievably noisy.' "

10 10
August 31.
ALS, 23 Nowen Road, Kittery, Maine

To HW "Yes, Hildegarde, Marcia is better--more steady, and more resolute mentally. She talks of going back to her home in Brookline; I doubt that she can."

10 10
September 8.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...The hurricane was a disaster for many but did us no harm."

10 10
September 26.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

MCM thanks HW for lotion and remarks on the beauty of her handwriting.

10 10
October 13.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

MCM thanks HW for gloves and talks about other items of clothing.

10 10
October 14.
ALS, Master's Lodgings-Eliot House, Cambridge, Mass.

To HW "...what beauty, to startle and bless me; welcoming me at Eliot House and helping me..."

10 10
October 19.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "The operation yesterday. How controlled you are, Hildegarde--all this strain and shared strain,-all this time."

10 10
October 25.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Walter! Hildegarde! I almost called him that. I found him so compatible and well, touching is what I really mean. Consoling-"

10 10
October 29.
APcS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...I long to see you--and infer that you plan to come to the program tomorrow evening. I have been delayed or managed so badly, that I am only beginning my preparation now..."

10 10
November 4.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "The picture, Hildegarde! Do I really possess such a thing! Your presence, so naturally exact, as you did not know anyone but Bishop Laurence was there, your hand, and intent expression, every detail!"

10 10
November 11.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Warner's money, Hildegarde? No. I doubt that Sibley's pen is what we hoped it would be and I see that yours writes a little thin at some points. The quest may have to be continued."

10 10
November 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "So pardoning and hopeful. I shall be surprised if the pictures do you justice. Then you will say it is not my fault--"

10 10
November 27.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I will have suffered a mental tragedy if I could ever cease to be thankful for [your notes]."

10 10
December 4.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I was about to write to you to thank you for helping me to see Thanksgiving at 6 Sibley Place;"

10 10
December 9.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Could heart be more touching, Hildegarde? Panting here as I read and think of you, finding it impossible not to dissolve mentally in tears. What speech, what words, Hildegarde."

10 10
December 13.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "The 7th and 8th of January, I have to go to Yale (the Bollingen Committee meeting to help choose someone to the B-Yale Library Prize)."

10 10
December 20.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW and JSW "...might you care for 'The Celebration of Christmas Trees?'"

10 10
December 31.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...I went to a party--a tea Tuesday afternoon--and was nearly an hour late because when I paused to assure myself that I had the letters and one from a friend in Oisilly containing a peacock feather, (that were in my plaid bag with some other things)-I could not find them..."

10 10
1955.
Box
11
Folder
1-3
Box Folder
January - April.
11 1
Box Folder
January 1.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

New Year's greetings to HW.

11 11
January 17.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Hildegarde, can it be true that this has happened to me? That I possess so rare a thing as this pattern of stars that you have given me!"

11 1
February 18.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "A virus infection for two weeks, Hildegarde! This makes me very sad. I hope it is over."

11 1
February 23.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...The Brahms--rhythmically original."

11 1
March 3.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...No, I never made willow flutes, romantic Hildegarde. But have blown on the grass-edge hoping to make a piercing sound..."

11 1
March 23.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "...I said 'There is nothing like music; and you said 'or poetry.' "

11 1
April 4.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW. Letter about Easter and related holidays.

11 1
April 19.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I thank you, dear Hildegarde. My diamonds are going with me. None of them will be stolen."

11 1
April 23.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I have found my briefcase. Had it here (had stowed it away as I was leaving for Boston).

11 1
April 29.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Magic, Hildegarde! You are a magician--I supposed I was to speak in the Aula(?). You were already here greeting me in Avery auditorium; and what a greeting--"

11 1
May - August.
11 2
Box Folder
May 3.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Desperation, Hildegarde! I was disconsolate to be so pressed and distracted Sunday as to get almost no good of your telephone-call. Some people never could get in the frenzies I do. It is deplorable."

11 2
May 10.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "Why could you not have been at Vassar? Because it would have been effort disproportionate to the offering."

11 2
May 14.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I somehow felt the pictures might not be good, Hildegarde--we were so intense about it and I was like an 'escape' from some institution-- in fact have been for the last six weeks."

11 2
May 21.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I am catching up with my tasks, (but surprised by new ones constantly)."

11 2
May 24.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "I am looking for you! any day; --have been afraid I would be going to Boston, Marcia is so depleted and tested by an attack, an infection she has had..."

11 2
June 5.
ALS, New Haven, Connecticut

To HW "I went to Boston to the service for Marcia, who died Sunday evening--at about the time we were saying goodly."

11 2
June 8.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn

To HW "My scintillating diamond arabesques, my dark blue cape; --and at Smith, my pearls as well. I was disguised as I spread my dress and prepared to be calm."

11 2
June 10.
ALS, 260 Cumberland Street, Brooklyn
<