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Fight for Freedom, Inc. Records

MC025

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the Princeton University Library. Special Collections.Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library.Public Policy Papers.65 Olden StreetPrinceton, New Jersey 08540 USA. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
Princeton University Library. Special Collections.Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library.Public Policy Papers.65 Olden StreetPrinceton, New Jersey 08540 USA
Creator:
Fight for Freedom, Inc.MC025_b1
Title:
Fight for Freedom, Inc. Records
Date [inclusive]:
1922-1942
Date [bulk]:
1939-1942
Call Number:
MC025
Extent:
80 boxes
Extent:
1 folder
Location:
mudd
Language:
English
Abstract:
Fight for Freedom, Inc. (FFF), a national citizen’s organization established in April 1941, was a leading proponent of full American participation in World War II. Believing that the war was a threat to American freedom and security, FFF boldly and vehemently championed the interventionist cause, advocating that all necessary measures must be taken to insure the defeat of Adolf Hitler and the German Army. In addition, FFF worked to preserve fundamental American freedoms at home. An offshoot of the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies, FFF was supported by average citizens, as well as prominent educators, labor leaders, authors and playwrights, clergy, stage and screen actors, newspaper men, and politicians. Acting as a clearinghouse for information related to American intervention in World War II, FFF monitored the activities of the leading isolationist organization, the America First Committee, and many of its key individuals such as Charles A. Lindbergh, Burton Wheeler, and Gerald Nye. From its headquarters in New York City, FFF spread its message through an extensive network of state and local branches, as well as through heavy reliance on local newspaper editors supportive of the interventionist cause. Pearl Harbor effectively ended the isolationist-interventionist debate, and by early 1942 FFF had disbanded.
Finding Aid's Home Repository URL:
http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/xd07gs69m
PDF Version:

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Biography/History

From late 1939 through 1941, the United States was embroiled in a philosophical debate about the role of the nation in the global arena. War was sweeping across Europe, with Adolf Hitler’s German armies advancing through Poland in September 1939, invading Denmark and Norway in April 1940, and overrunning Belgium, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and France in May and June of that year. German U-boats were attacking and sinking ships in the Atlantic, and Britain was enduring air raids. The United States, an ally and friend to many of the occupied territories, initially held firm to a non-interventionist policy, but as the scope of the war increased and the threat of Hitler grew, so, too, did the debate about this country’s role in and response to the conflict. Some Americans argued for continued neutrality and adherence to the established non-interventionist policy of the 1920s and 1930s, while others urged involvement in a war they believed was a growing threat to American freedom and their way of life.

One of the legacies of World War I was a strong isolationist streak in American foreign policy and a belief that Europe’s problems should remain Europe’s. In the United States, this manifested itself in an opposition to intervention in future foreign wars, a dislike for binding military alliances, and a reluctance to enter into collective security agreements or organizations. Millions of Americans favored isolationism. The influence of isolationists on the crafting of American foreign policy was best seen in the passage of several acts that buttressed existing neutrality legislation. By May 1937 neutrality legislation prohibited loans and the sale of arms and munitions to warring countries and banned travel on belligerent ships by U.S. citizens. The Neutrality Act of 1939 relaxed the restrictions somewhat by introducing a "cash and carry" policy that permitted belligerent nations to purchase supplies and arms from the U.S. on the condition that those materials would be transported on non-American ships.

When Britain and France declared war on Germany in September 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt maintained American neutrality despite the fact that the Allies needed supplies for their war effort. Reversal of this position was slow and gradual. In September 1940, Roosevelt negotiated a "destroyers-for-bases" deal with Britain whereby Britain received fifty old American destroyers in exchange for America’s use of eight British Atlantic bases. A further erosion of the neutrality stance came in January 1941 when Roosevelt proposed the Lend-Lease Act. This act, passed on 11 March 1941, permitted the president to "sell, transfer title to, exchange, lease, [or] lend" war materials to countries whose defense was necessary for U.S. national security. Congress appropriated $50 billion for Lend-Lease, with aid going to 38 countries. Britain received $31 billion. With the vast majority of Americans opposed to an outright declaration of war, Lend-Lease was the best Roosevelt could do at the time to support the Allies.

Leading proponents of the isolationist position were Senator Burton Wheeler (D-Montana), Senator Gerald Nye (R-North Dakota), and Representative Hamilton Fish (R-New York). Supporters were also found in the small towns and rural areas of the Midwest, among Irish-Americans, and in certain business and anti-New Deal circles. The most prominent organization dedicated to the isolationist cause was the America First Committee. Believing that any involvement in European wars would weaken America, and shocked by the failures of peace following World War I, America First wanted nothing to do with a conflict involving the Axis Powers and did not see the Nazi army as a threat to U.S. security. Members of America First included Robert E. Wood (Chairman of Sears, Roebuck & Company), journalist John T. Flynn, and retired diplomat William R. Castle, with Charles A. Lindbergh, the American flying hero, as its most celebrated spokesman. He believed that German air power did not pose a threat to America, that America could not succeed militarily in a European conflict, and that the best response to the war would be to protect American freedoms at home. Lindbergh’s growing radicalism and anti-Semitic remarks made during a Des Moines, Iowa, speech in September 1941 tarnished his appeal and hurt the America First cause. At its peak, the organization had over 400 local chapters and a membership base of 85,000. It received hundreds of thousands of dollars in contributions and advanced its position by holding rallies, writing editorials, airing radio broadcasts, and sending speakers to meetings and events.

At the other end of the debate were the interventionists. Advocates of intervention wanted to redirect U.S. foreign policy toward a more active role in the European war. They sought a repeal of neutrality legislation, urged the severing of diplomatic ties with the Axis powers, and favored legislation that allowed for the sending of U.S. troops overseas. While isolationists saw the European conflict as a strictly European matter, interventionists linked the fate of the fallen European nations with the fate of the U.S. In their view, an Axis victory would not only mean defeat for the Allies, but also would threaten the very fiber of American liberties and compromise American security, both domestically and internationally.

Although the percentage of the American populace that supported intervention was less than that which supported the isolationists, two groups championed the interventionist cause: The Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies (CDAAA) and Fight for Freedom, Inc. (FFF). Founded by William Allen White in May 1940 as a bipartisan advocacy organization, CDAAA was an outspoken opponent of isolationism but shied away from the critical interventionist issue, that of an outright and immediate declaration of war against Germany. Although astute enough to realize the growing crisis would inevitably necessitate U.S. participation in the war, CDAAA never asked for such a declaration. While the two groups often cooperated and many of their activities overlapped, an eventual parting of the ways occurred over the war declaration issue.

No organization was more vocal or vehement in its position on the war than FFF, which was "willing to do whatever is necessary to insure a Hitler defeat [including] accepting the fact that we are at war, whether declared or undeclared." Most Americans first learned of FFF on April 18, 1941, during a radio broadcast by the Right Reverend Henry W. Hobson of Cincinnati, Ohio. Hobson, known as the "fighting bishop," was a World War I veteran and bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church of Southern Ohio. In his radio address, Hobson outlined the basic FFF beliefs, stating, "We believe that the present world conflict is an irreconcilable struggle between dictatorship and freedom, and that if dictatorship wins in the present area of conflict, there will be little hope for freedom. We therefore represent all citizens who share our convictions that this is our fight for freedom in which we must play our part." Hobson became one of the honorary chairmen of the organization, which maintained its headquarters at 1270 Sixth Avenue in New York City.

Fight for Freedom lobbied for full participation by the U.S. in the war, arguing that the conflict was a phase of military revolution against all Western democracies. If Hitler won in Europe, American freedoms and values would soon fall victim to a similar fate. Initially CDAAA and FFF sustained a cordial relationship and worked closely together, but the breaking point came over the issue of a declaration of war.

Like CDAAA, FFF was an advocacy organization that disseminated information while also closely monitoring the activities of isolationist groups such as America First. FFF’s leadership included Ulric Bell, Executive Committee Chairman and head of the Washington office of the Courier-Journal/Louisville Times newspaper; Elizabeth Worthington Best, Executive Chairman of the Women’s Division; Grace Coolidge, Vice Chairman and wife of former U.S. president Calvin Coolidge; F. H. Peter Cusick, Executive Secretary; Mrs. Dwight F. Davis, Vice Chairman; Senator Carter Glass (D-Virginia), Honorary Chairman; Wayne Johnson, Treasurer; Francis P. Miller, Chairman; and Elizabeth Cutter Morrow, head of the Women’s Division. Morrow’s involvement in FFF is particularly interesting because her daughter, Anne Morrow, was married to America First’s leading spokesmen, Charles Lindbergh.

Other key individuals, many of whom sat on the Board of Directors, included Herbert Agar, editor of the Courier-Journal/Louisville Times and a Pulitzer prize winner; his brother William Agar, a noted geologist on the Yale University faculty; Henry B. Cabot; Mary Ellen Chase, author and educator; Ward Cheney; attorney Grenville Clark; Harvard University president James B. Conant; Colonel William J. Donovan; Lewis W. Douglas, a New York City businessman; Allen Dulles; Marshall Field, philanthropist and publisher of the New York-based evening newspaper PM; publisher Harold Guinzburg; Jay Pierre, a New York financier; Dorothy Overlock, leader of the Student Defenders of Democracy; historian Conyers Read; Spyros Skouras, a motion picture executive; Henry P. Van Dusen, a Christian statesman affiliated with Union Theological Seminary; and financier James P. Warburg. The FFF headquarters was a hub of activity, and at its peak, FFF maintained an office staff of twenty-five.

Support for FFF came from thousands of citizens across America, many of whom sent in donations as small as one dollar. Additional support came from prominent educators, authors and playwrights, clergy, stage and screen actors and actresses, newspapermen, and politicians. Several key groups were particularly targeted for membership, and support from individuals affiliated with these groups was seen as key to ensuring that the FFF message reached many occupations and cut across religious, gender, and racial lines.

To achieve this goal, FFF created numerous divisions geared to directing its message to specific groups and audiences. The Lawyer’s Division, for example, reached out to prominent attorneys, especially those practicing in New York City and on Wall Street. A significant activity of the Lawyer’s Division was to host luncheons in the city with the purpose of drawing additional like-minded men to the organization’s efforts. The Youth Division, which was closely connected to the First-to-Fight Division, focused its efforts on getting FFF’s message out to America’s young people, particularly those in college and of draft age. Entertainers, writers, and those involved in the performing arts were the focus of the Stage, Screen, Radio, and Arts Division. Several prominent actors and actresses, including Burgess Meredith and Helen Hays, lent their support to FFF and channeled their activities through this division. Issues and concerns unique to African Americans were addressed primarily by the Harlem Division. The task of coordinating the work of numerous volunteers fell to the Volunteer Division.

Critical to the success of FFF was enlisting the support of labor unions and organizations such as the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, the American Federation of Labor, the International Ladies’ Garment Workers Union, the United Automobile Workers of America, the United Rubber Workers of America, and the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen, and Helpers of America. Leaders of these organizations worked closely with Abe Rosefield, Fight for Freedom’s Labor Division Chairman. These unions endorsed the FFF message, particularly the repeal of the Neutrality Act, and saw the growing threat totalitarian governments posed to trade unionism. The Labor Division published a newsletter, the Labor News Service, which compiled labor-related news reports and stories from newspapermen around the country.

The Women’s Division had the purpose of broadening the existing base of support for FFF aims and principles, supplementing the work and resources of the Men’s Division, and providing an outlet through which all interested women could participate. Prior to the official announcement of the formation of the Women’s Division, women’s work with FFF fell under the umbrella of the Women’s Committee for Action. On November 21, 1941, the Women’s Division was launched at a meeting held at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York City. Mrs. Dwight (Elizabeth) Morrow, Honorary Chairman of the Women’s Division, ended the evening’s events by broadcasting a message over the Red Network of the National Broadcasting Company. Other women involved in the national leadership of the Women’s Division included Frederica Barach, who served as Executive Chairman, and Elizabeth Worthington Best.

Women were asked to assist and support FFF by hosting luncheons, teas, and cocktail parties. At these gatherings women often heard speeches from FFF-sponsored speakers and would encourage other women to join the effort. The Meetings Committee reached out to clubs, societies, and organizations in planning gatherings and benefits. A Solicitation Committee was formed with the purpose of organizing women into small groups that would solicit gifts for FFF. The intent was to establish good personal contacts with potential donors. Other women served on the Headquarters Committee. The purpose of this committee was to assist with the coordination of the entire women’s program, including meeting planning, event and speaker scheduling, gift solicitation, propaganda duties, and clerical work. Women interested in publicity and propaganda work were assigned to the Propaganda Committee. Here women worked to expand the list of members, arranged for notices to appear in publications, encouraged women to write their congressmen, helped with rallies, and studied the propaganda of opponent organizations. While the Women’s Division was short lived, disbanding in early January 1942, the male leadership of FFF recognized that women played a critical role in the overall success of the organization.

The Speaker’s Division, under the direction of George Havell, had the large task of coordinating all speaking and radio broadcasting engagements for FFF. Radio was a key tool for FFF, and many speakers used their air time to present the case for U.S. involvement in the war or to counter arguments and presentations made by isolationists. Speakers fanned out across the country, delivering messages to local chapters. Men as well as women spoke ardently on behalf of FFF, and prominent speakers such as Mrs. Irving (Ellin) Berlin, Alexander Woollcott, Struthers Burt, and Rex Stout, among others, were in high demand.

A key element in disseminating FFF’s message throughout the country was the development of an extensive network of organizations at the state and local level. In each of the forty-eight states, there was at least one local contact person or newspaper editor. Some states had highly organized committees with multiple chapters that were extremely active. The local committees were responsible for mobilizing and increasing the membership base, fundraising, communicating national policies and positions, and, often, sponsoring speakers and information sessions. An important component of FFF’s work on the state and local level was the use of newspapermen from small town weekly and daily presses. Relying heavily on the state’s press association, FFF actively recruited editors and publishers of papers to support their cause, seeing the papers as a critical link to the public. While FFF avoided dictating editorial policy, it encouraged editors to run editorials and advertisements that were supportive of FFF’s views.

A major public relations event held by FFF was the "Fun to be Free" patriotic pageant, held at Madison Square Garden in New York City on October 5, 1941. The show, orchestrated by Helen Hays and Burgess Meredith of the Stage, Screen, Radio, and Arts Division of FFF, was heralded as a demonstration for liberty and against slavery. "Fun to be Free" featured patriotic music, a pageant directed by Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur that included such stars as Tallulah Bankhead and Melvyn Douglas, a variety show with Jack Benny, Eddie Cantor, Ethel Merman, and others, and several speakers, including Hays, Meredith, New York City Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia, and Wendell Willkie. The show was so successful that similar versions were presented around the country, and a script was produced so that it could be performed as a play in schools or over the radio.

Another major event sponsored by FFF was the "Continental Congress for Freedom," which was held at the Hotel Washington in Washington, D.C., on October 9-10, 1941. This congress drew delegates from all forty-eight states, with each state sending at least two representatives and two alternates. The primary focus was to urge Congress to repeal or greatly modify the Neutrality Act. Allen Dulles, a prominent New York lawyer, opened the October 9th afternoon session, and Herbert Agar provided the keynote address. Delegates then spoke from the floor, asking questions, presenting statements, and debating issues. At the conclusion of this session, two resolutions were passed: one reiterated the fundamental principles of FFF, and the other demanded an immediate repeal of the Neutrality Act. There were other activities at the congress. At the White House, Eleanor Roosevelt received a large contingent of women delegates, and a grand banquet, featuring nationally and internationally known speakers, was held on the evening of the 9th. Many prominent individuals, including several senators and representatives were invited. Special activities for youth groups were conducted under the auspices of the First-to-Fight Division.

When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, prompting the United States to enter the war, the debate between the isolationists and interventionists ceased. With the declaration of war, one of the primary objectives of FFF was met, and the organization was forced to re-focus its efforts, shifting its emphasis from am advocacy campaign to education and morale-building initiatives. The leadership of FFF urged the local chapters to remain intact and active and encouraged members to undertake other types of war work, such as aiding the Red Cross and other relief organizations, fundraising, attending patriotic events, and watching for subversive elements within their communities. Recognizing the need for a united front, FFF recommended increased cooperation with other groups, especially the Citizens for Victory Committee. Within weeks of Pearl Harbor, the main headquarters of FFF closed down, and a significantly reduced staff moved operations to the offices of Freedom House, located on East Fifth Street in New York City. Most of the major divisions of FFF ended their work by January 1942, and many speakers who had been scheduled to appear at meetings in late December and early January were cancelled. The only division that continued operations was the Stage, Screen, Radio, and Arts Division. It kept to its plan to tour the country with a version of the "Fun to be Free" show.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

Princeton University Library. Special Collections.,  2006

Revision Description

Run through PULFA 2.0 normalization routines. Run through PULFA 2.0 normalization routines. 2012-05-02T16:33:50.348-04:002018-12-27T13:28:14.449-05:00

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Articles.
  • Correspondence.
  • Photographs.
  • Records.
Geographic Name(s)
  • United States -- Foreign relations -- 20th century.
Subject(s)
  • Nonprofit corporations -- United States -- 20th century.
  • Patriotism -- United States -- 20th century.
  • World War, 1939-1945 -- Propaganda.
  • World War, 1939-1945 -- United States -- Public opinion.
  • World War, 1939-1945 -- War work -- United States.
  • American history/20th century
  • Diplomacy
  • World War II

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Collection Inventory

Series 1: Correspondence, 1922-1942. 21 boxes.

Arrangement

No arrangement action taken or arrangement information not recorded at the time of processing.

Scope and Contents

Series 1, Correspondence, 1922-1942 [bulk 1939-1942], contains incoming and outgoing letters, telegrams, and additional supporting materials related to the key individuals working for and with Fight for Freedom (FFF). All the correspondence has been arranged in alphabetical order by author’s last name, by the recipient’s, or, in some cases, by the organization, group, or newspaper with which an individual was associated. While some of the letters are handwritten with original signatures, typed carbon copies comprise the majority of the correspondence.

At the beginning of each letter of the alphabet, there is a general grouping of correspondence. Often there are only a few letters from a given individual, and the contents of the letters tend to be very general in nature. Within these general groupings of correspondence, when there is more than one letter related to a particular person, all the letters concerning that individual have been organized in chronological order. Several types of letters are typical of the material contained in this part of the series. People generally wrote to express their support for FFF’s position or to recommend certain policy approaches. Others wanted clarification of an issue or a particular stance. Some of the letters center on the signing of petitions or involve requests for flyers, cards, membership information, or publicity materials. Still others inquire about working for FFF on various levels. Some individuals suggested manuscripts, books, or pamphlets that might be useful, and members of FFF often wrote people asking to use such materials in their campaign or publicity efforts. Some letters include attachments such as copies of speeches or articles. A few press releases related to a specific individual or topic can also be found in this part of the series. Finally, many of the letters acknowledge individual financial contributions or deal with fees related to services, especially advertising.

Following each general grouping of correspondence are folders related to more prominent individuals and those that had more significant correspondence or contact with FFF. Letters in these folders are sometimes accompanied by supporting material such as writings and articles, speeches, press releases, and editorials. The material found in a specific individual’s folder is arranged chronologically with undated material placed at the end.

There are several folders related to Alida, Herbert, and William Agar. Alida Agar was instrumental in organizing FFF’s work in Connecticut, and much of her correspondence is related to her leadership activities on the local level. Herbert Agar, editor of the Courier-Journal/Louisville Times, an influential Southern newspaper, wrote many key editorials and was in great demand as a speaker, and these activities are documented in his folder. His position at the Courier-Journal/Louisville Times drew others at the paper to FFF, including Barry Bingham, Mark Etheridge, and James Pope. The correspondence files of William Agar deal primarily with enlisting the support of prominent Catholics throughout the country. Agar worked closely with liberal Catholics as well as Protestant groups in garnering the support of religious leaders and laymen.

Material in the Max Ascoli file primarily relates to Ascoli’s position as president of the Mazzini Society. Representative Samuel Dickstein (D-New York) gave a speech in which he accused Ascoli and his society of being anti-American and pro-Fascist, and FFF’s involvement in this episode is revealed through the correspondence. Letters and supporting documents on military preparedness and the use of convoys can be found in Grenville Clark’s file. There are correspondence files documenting contacts with several college presidents, including James B. Conant of Harvard University and Ernest M. Hopkins of Dartmouth College. One folder contains material related to several telegrams addressed to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Also within this folder are exchanges with Stephen Early, Roosevelt’s press secretary from 1937-1945. Another folder contains letters, telegrams, and supporting material about Alexander Woollcott’s "A Voice from the Cracker Barrel" radio speech on May 25, 1941. Following the events at Pearl Harbor, FFF shut down its activities and joined its operations with those of Freedom House, and this transition is documented in the file entitled Post-Pearl Harbor Correspondence. Most of the letters FFF received and responded to after December 8, 1941 are contained in this folder.

Several files contain correspondence between Abe Rosenfield, FFF’s Labor Division Chairman, and many important labor leaders and organizations such as the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, the American Federation of Labor, the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen, Frank Grillo of the United Rubber Workers of America, the International Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union, the United Automobile Workers of America, and Daniel Tobin of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. Correspondence with Hollywood supporters including Jock Lawrence of the Association of Motion Picture Producers, Inc., Walter F. Wanger, Warner Brothers Pictures, Inc., and Darryl Zanuck of Twentieth Century Fox Films can also be found in this series.

The extensive correspondence files of Ulric Bell and Henry W. Hobson reveal their vast network of contacts, provide an outline of their work, and are useful in delineating the evolution of the organization’s policy. Many board members and staff within FFF are well represented in the correspondence files. These include Rose M. Chayes, Rhoda Cameron Clark, Lewis W. Douglas, John Farrar, Helen Hill Miller, Henry P. Van Dusen, and William W. Wymack. Other prominent individuals in this series include Hamilton Fish Armstrong, Allen W. Dulles, Clark Eichelberger, Herbert Bayard Swope, and Dorothy Thompson.

While the great majority of records relating to FFF’s work on the state and local level are contained in Series 3, the correspondence series also contains some relevant files. Both series should be consulted, and names appearing in Series 3 should be cross-checked for related files in Series 1. For example, those leaders active at the state or local level that also have files in the correspondence series include Bartley C. Crum of Colorado, John E. Ellingston of California, George Watts Hill of North Carolina, Augustus Lindbergh of Alabama, Maury Maverick of Texas, and Conyers Read of Pennsylvania.

Similarly, while correspondence with state, local, and regional newspapers can be found mostly in Series 3, some letters do appear in the correspondence series. Unfortunately, there was little consistency in how letters with newspapermen and editors were filed. Some letters were filed under the editor’s last name, while others were filed under the newspaper name. A sampling of the correspondence files related to specific newspapers, newspapermen, magazines, and related issues include American Mercury, the American Press Association, the Associated Press, Baltimore Sun, City News Association, Daily Mirror (New York), Daily News (New York), Des Moines Register and Tribune, Great Falls News (Montana), Edgar Ansel Mowrer ( Chicago Daily News), Paul Scott Mowrer ( Chicago Daily News), The New Republic, New York Herald Tribune, New York Post, New York Sun, New York Times, the North American Newspaper Alliance, PM (New York), and Washington Post.

Not all who corresponded with FFF supported the organization’s efforts. Letters in the "Cranks" folders were written by individuals who disagreed with the policy, approach, or tactics of FFF. These letters, written in 1941, with the bulk from April to October, are arranged in chronological order. Some writers wrote lengthy and dense letters, while others chose to be brief or to write post cards. Some returned flyers, petitions, or publicity materials with negative messages. Many people signed their names, but others did not. The tone of the letters ranges from polite disagreement to fervent opposition.

A, 1939-1942. 2 boxes.

A – General, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Adult Education Council of Greater St. Louis, 1941. 1 folder.

Agar, Alida (Mrs. William), 1941. 1 folder.
Scope and Contents

To a lesser extent, this folder also includes the correspondence of Ann Chilton Agar (Mrs. Herbert).

Agar, Herbert, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Agar, William, 1940. 1 folder.

Agar, William, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Agar, William, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Alabama Farm Bureau Federation, 1941. 1 folder.

Allen, Agnes Rogers, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Allen, Charles L, 1941. 1 folder.

Allen, Harland H, 1941. 1 folder.

Allen, Jay, 1940-1942. 1 folder.

Allen, Robert S, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Alsop, Joseph, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, 1941. 1 folder.

American Federation of Labor, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

American Friends of a Jewish Palestine, 1941. 1 folder.

American Mercury, 1939-1941. 1 folder.

American Press Association, 1941. 1 folder.

American Student Defense League - Harvard Chapter, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Armstrong, Hamilton Fish, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Ascoli, Max, 1941. 1 folder.

Associated League for a Declared War, 1941. 1 folder.

Associated Press, 1941. 1 folder.

Ayling, H. O. Keith, 1941. 1 folder.

B, 1940-1941. 4 boxes.

B - General (Bas – Bit), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

B - General (Bla – Byr), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Baker, Burke, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Balderston, John L, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Baldwin, Joseph Clark, 1941. 1 folder.

Baltimore Sun, 1940. 1 folder.

Barber, Courtenay, Jr, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Barnard College, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Barr, Stringfellow, 1941. 1 folder.

Bartol, Grier, 1941. 1 folder.

Baruch, Bernard, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Bassett, Amy G. (Mrs. Prentiss), 1941. 1 folder.

Bayless, Wayne W, 1941. 1 folder.

Beacom, J. Patrick, 1941. 1 folder.

Beck, Carl, 1941. 1 folder.

Beekman, Frederick W, 1941. 1 folder.

Bell, Ulric, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Bell, Ulric, 1941. 1 folder.

Bell, Ulric, 1941. 1 folder.

Bell, Ulric, 1941. 1 folder.

Bell, Ulric, 1941. 1 folder.

Bell, Ulric, 1941. 1 folder.

Bergman, Alfred, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Berkeley, R. B, 1941. 1 folder.

Berlin, Ellin Mackay (Mrs. Irving), 1941. 1 folder.

Berman, Manuel K, 1941. 1 folder.

Berriman, William, 1941. 1 folder.

Bill of Rights Sesqui-Centennial Committee, 1941. 1 folder.

Bingham, Barry (Courier-Journal), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Bingham, Mary C. (Mrs. Barry), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Bingham, Robert W, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Birdwell, Russell, 1941. 1 folder.

Birkhead, L. M, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Braden, Spruille, 1941. 1 folder.

Brittain, Martha C, 1941. 1 folder.

Brooks, John N., Jr, 1941. 1 folder.

Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen, 1941. 1 folder.

Brown, Barbara Trigg (Mrs. D. Tucker), 1941. 1 folder.

Buhler, Joseph S, 1941. 1 folder.

Bundles for Britain, Inc, 1941. 1 folder.

Bunzell, H. H, 1941. 1 folder.

Burt, Struthers, 1941. 1 folder.

Butler, Pierce, Jr, 1941. 1 folder.

Byrd, Richard E, 1941. 1 folder.

C, 1939-1941. 3 boxes.

C – General (Cab – Colg), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

C – General (Coll – Cut), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Cabot, Henry B, 1941. 1 folder.

Caffery, Edward, 1941. 1 folder.

Carey, Marjorie (Mrs. Walter C.), 1941. 1 folder.

Carter, Lewis A, 1941. 1 folder.

Causey, James, 1941. 1 folder.

Celler, Emanuel, 1941. 1 folder.

Chayes, Rose M, 1941. 1 folder.

Chayes, Rose M, 1941. 1 folder.

Cheney, Frances (Mrs. Ward), 1941. 1 folder.

Cheney, Ward, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Christian Science Monitor, 1941. 1 folder.

City News Association, 1941. 1 folder.

Clark, Grenville, 1941. 1 folder.

Clark, Rhoda (Mrs. Cameron), 1941. 1 folder.

Clayton, William L, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Cobb, Humphrey, 1941. 1 folder.

Cochran, William F, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Cocking, William and Marvin Pittman (Georgia educators), 1941. 1 folder.

Coffin, Henry S, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Cohen, Ben V, 1941. 1 folder.

Common Council for American Unity, 1941. 1 folder.

Conant, James B, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Co-ordinating Committee for Democratic Action, 1941. 1 folder.

Couch, William T, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Council Against Intolerance in America, 1941. 1 folder.

Council of National Defense, 1941. 1 folder.

Courier-Journal/Louisville Times (Louisville, KY), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Coxe, Elmyra P. (Mrs. H. W.), 1941. 1 folder.

Craig, Paul F, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Crum, Bartley C, 1941. 1 folder.

Cusick, H. Peter, 1939. 1 folder.

D, 1939-1941. 2 boxes.

D – General, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Dabney, Virginius (Richmond Times-Dispatch), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Daily Iowan (Loren Hickerson), 1941. 1 folder.

Daily Mirror (New York), 1941. 1 folder.

Daily News (New York), 1941. 1 folder.

Danielson, Richard E. (The Atlantic Monthly), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Davis, Clare Ogden, 1941. 1 folder.

Davis, John W, 1941. 1 folder.

Davis, Pauline Sabin (Mrs. Dwight), 1941. 1 folder.

Davison, Kate T. (Mrs. Henry P.), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

De Roussy de Sales, Raoul, 1941. 1 folder.

De Seversky, Alexander P, 1941. 1 folder.

Deák, Francis, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Delano, William (Mr. & Mrs.), 1941. 1 folder.

Des Moines Register & Tribune, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Dix, Marian, 1941. 1 folder.

Donahue, Elizabeth, 1941. 1 folder.

Donaldson, Linda G, 1941. 1 folder.

Donovan, William J, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Douglas, Lewis W, 1939-1940. 1 folder.

Douglas, Lewis W, 1940. 1 folder.

Douglas, Lewis W, 1941. 1 folder.

Douglas, Melvyn, 1941. 1 folder.

Dreyfus, George A, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Dulles, Allen W, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

E, 1940-1941. 2 boxes.

E – General, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Early, Stephen, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Eliot, George Fielding, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Ellingston, John R., dates not examined. 1 box.

Ellingston, John R, 1941. 1 folder.

Ethridge, Mark (Courier-Journal), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Eudy, Harrison, 1941. 1 folder.

Everitt, C. Raymond, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Everitt, Helen, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

F, 1940-1941. 1 box.

F – General, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Fairbanks, Douglas, Jr, 1941. 1 folder.

Farrar, John, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Fels, John Van Dyke, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Field, Marshall, 1941. 1 folder.

Fleming, D. F, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Fluegge, Rudolph, 1941. 1 folder.

Foreign Policy Association, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Fortune, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Fredenburgh, Theodore, 1941. 1 folder.

Fuller, Helen, 1941. 1 folder.

G, 1940-1941. 2 boxes.

G – General (G. P. – Grif), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

G – General (Grig – Gut), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Geoffrey, William, 1941. 1 folder.

Gibson, Ernest William, Jr, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Gillespie, George R, 1941. 1 folder.

Glasgow, Arthur Graham, 1940. 1 folder.

Glass, Carter, 1941. 1 folder.

Goldsmith, Arthur J, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Graham, A. Liddon, 1941. 1 folder.

Granbery, John C, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Granik, Theodore, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Gray, Mary (Mrs. Roland), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Great Falls News (Montana), 1941. 1 folder.

Greene, Roger S, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Grey, Robert G, 1941. 1 folder.

Griffin, R. A, 1941. 1 folder.

Grillo, Frank (United Rubber Workers of America), 1941. 1 folder.

Guinzburg, Harold, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Guthrie, Ernest Graham, 1941. 1 folder.

Gyllenhaal, Charles P, 1941. 1 folder.

H, 1940-1942. 3 boxes.

H – General (Haa – Hig), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

H – General (Hil – Hym), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Hall, Charles H, 1941. 1 folder.

Hard, William, 1941. 1 folder.

Hayes, Helen, 1941. 1 folder.

Hays, Brooks, 1940. 1 folder.

Hegeler, H. H, 1941. 1 folder.

Helm, Carl, 1941. 1 folder.

Heyman, Nicholas N, 1941. 1 folder.

High, Stanley, 1941. 1 folder.

Hill, George Watts, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Hobson, Henry W, 1940. 1 folder.

Hobson, Henry W, 1941. 1 folder.

Hobson, Henry W, 1941. 1 folder.

Hobson, Henry W, 1941. 1 folder.

Hobson, Henry W, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Hoffman, Robert A, 1940. 1 folder.

Holland, Dudley, 1941. 1 folder.

Hoover, J. Edgar (John Edgar), 1940-1942. 1 folder.

Hopkins, Ernest W, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Howard, Roy, 1941. 1 folder.

Hull, Cordell, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Hull, Denison B, 1941. 1 folder.

Hurley, Joseph P, 1941. 1 folder.

Hurley, Robert A, 1941. 1 folder.

I, 1940-1942. 1 box.

I – General, 1940-1942. 1 folder.

Ickes, Harold L, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

International Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, 1941. 1 folder.

International Coordination Council, 1941. 1 folder.

International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, 1941. 1 folder.

International Student Service, 1941. 1 folder.

International Union, United Automobile Workers of America, 1941. 1 folder.

Irwin, Joe, 1941. 1 folder.

Irwin, Josephine (Mrs. J. Preston), 1941. 1 folder.

Italian World War Veterans, 1941. 1 folder.

J, 1940-1941. 2 boxes.

J – General, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Jackson, Gardner, 1941. 1 folder.

Jackson, Katherine, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

James, Marquis, 1940. 1 folder.

Javitz, Benjamin, 1941. 1 folder.

Jay, Pierre, 1941. 1 folder.

Jewish Daily Forward, 1941. 1 folder.

Johnson, Wayne, 1941. 1 folder.

Johnston, Albert E, 1941. 1 folder.

Jolas, Maria (Mrs. Eugene), 1941. 1 folder.

Joseph, Ralph L, 1940. 1 folder.

K, 1940-1941. 1 box.

K – General, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Kaufman, Beatrice (Mrs. George), 1941. 1 folder.

Knox, Frank, 1941. 1 folder.

Kohn, Hans, 1941. 1 folder.

Kriendler, Maxwell, 1941. 1 folder.

L, 1940-1942. 2 boxes.

L – General, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

La Guardia, Fiorello H, 1941. 1 folder.

Lanthier, Ronald, 1941. 1 folder.

Larner, William A., Jr, 1941. 1 folder.

Lash, Joseph P, 1941. 1 folder.

Lawrence, Gertrude, 1941. 1 folder.

Lawrence, Jock (Association of Motion Picture Producers, Inc.), 1941. 1 folder.

League for Human Rights, 1941. 1 folder.

Léon, Maurice, 1941. 1 folder.

Lesser, Arthur, 1941. 1 folder.

Lewis, Alfred Baker, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Lewis, Leon L, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Life Magazine, 1941. 1 folder.

Lindbergh, Augustus, 1941. 1 folder.

Lippmann, Walter, 1941. 1 folder.

Luce, Henry R, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

M, 1940-1942. 2 boxes.

M – General (Maa – Mit), 1940-1942. 1 folder.

M – General (Moe – Mur), 1940-1942. 1 folder.

MacCarthy, Alan W, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

MacCawley, John S. (National Student Merger), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

MacLeish, Archibald, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

MacPhail, Archibald, 1941. 1 folder.

Malakis, Emile (Mrs. Marion M.), 1941. 1 folder.

Maryland Democrats of Baltimore City, 1941. 1 folder.

Maverick, Maury, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

McCloy, John J, 1941. 1 folder.

McMahon, Francis E, 1941. 1 folder.

Meredith, Burgess, 1941. 1 folder.

Miller, Douglas, 1941. 1 folder.

Miller, Francis P, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Miller, Helen Hill (National Policy Committee), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Miller, Merle, 1941. 1 folder.

Morrow, Elizabeth (Mrs. Dwight), 1941. 1 folder.

Mowrer, Edgar Ansel (Chicago Daily News), 1941. 1 folder.

Mowrer, Paul Scott (Chicago Daily News), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Mumford, Lewis, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Mutual Broadcasting Company, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Myers, A. J. William, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

N, 1940-1942. 1 box.

N – General, 1940-1942. 1 folder.

Nash, Arnold, 1941. 1 folder.

Nation, The, 1941. 1 folder.

National Broadcasting Company, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

National Conference of Christians and Jews, 1941. 1 folder.

New Republic, The, 1941. 1 folder.

New York Herald Tribune, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

New York Journal-American, 1941. 1 folder.

New York Post, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

New York Public Library, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

New York Sun, 1941. 1 folder.

New York Times, 1941. 1 folder.

New York World-Telegram, 1941. 1 folder.

Niles, David, 1941. 1 folder.

Noble, G. Bernard, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

North American Newspaper Alliance, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

O, 1940-1941. 1 box.

O – General, 1941. 1 folder.

Office of Civilian Defense, 1941. 1 folder.

Office of Production Management, 1941. 1 folder.

Ogle, Kenneth, 1941. 1 folder.

Oliver, Bryce, 1941. 1 folder.

O'Sheel, Shaemas, 1941. 1 folder.

Overseas News Agency, Inc, 1941. 1 folder.

Oxford University Press, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

P, 1922-1942. 1 box.

P – General, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Palmer, Casimir P, 1922. 1 folder.

Penton, Beatrice Holmes, 1941. 1 folder.

Peoples' Lobby, 1941. 1 folder.

Pepper, Claude, 1941. 1 folder.

Philadelphia Record, 1941. 1 folder.

PM (New York), 1941. 1 folder.

Pope, Arthur Upham, 1941. 1 folder.

Pope, James S. (Courier Journal), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Post Pearl Harbor Correspondence, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Powell, John (Inter-Allied Information Center), 1941. 1 folder.

Pulsifer, Susan (Mrs. H. T.), 1941. 1 folder.

Q, 1940-1941. 1 box.

Q – General, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

R, 1940-1942. 2 boxes.

R – General, 1940-1942. 1 folder.

Radetsky, Ralph, 1941. 1 folder.

Rahn, Andrew A. D, 1941. 1 folder.

Randolph, Alice, 1941. 1 folder.

Read, Conyers, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Read, Evelyn Plummer (Mrs. Conyers), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Robinson, Martha G. (Mrs. R. B.), 1941. 1 folder.

Rogers, Allan, 1941. 1 folder.

Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1941. 1 folder.

Roosevelt, Franklin D, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Rosedale, Grace L, 1941. 1 folder.

Rutgers University, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

S, 1940-1942. 2 boxes.

S – General (Sab – Sfo), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

S – General (She – Stel), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

S – General (Step – Szo), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Sapieha, Paul (Prince) and Virgilia (Princess), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Seiferheld, David F, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Sender, Toni, 1941. 1 folder.

Shaffer, Isidor, 1941. 1 folder.

Shelley, Martin, 1941. 1 folder.

Shepardson, Whitney H, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Sherwood, Robert E, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Shipp, Nelson M. (Columbus Ledger-Enquirer), 1941. 1 folder.

Simon, Evelyn, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Skouras, Spyros P, 1941. 1 folder.

Smith, Paul (San Francisco Chronicle), 1941. 1 folder.

Smith, Robert Aura, 1941. 1 folder.

Spivack, Robert G, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Spofford, William B, 1941. 1 folder.

Standley, William H, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Stassen, Harold, 1941. 1 folder.

Stevens, Guy, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Stevenson, Adlai E, 1941. 1 folder.

Stewart, George, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Stewart, Henry C. F, 1941. 1 folder.

Stimson, Marshall, 1941. 1 folder.

Stites, Henry J, 1941. 1 folder.

Stonehill, Charles A, 1941. 1 folder.

Stout, Pola (Mrs. Rex), 1941. 1 folder.

Stout, Rex, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Straight, Michael, 1941. 1 folder.

Sulzberger, Marion B, 1940. 1 folder.

Sweeny, Robert, 1940. 1 folder.

Swing, Raymond Gram (Mr. and Mrs.), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Swope, Herbert Bayard, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Syracuse University, 1941. 1 folder.

T, 1940-1942. 1 box.

T – General, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Thompson, C. Mildred, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Thompson, Dorothy, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Thomson, Kenneth, 1941. 1 folder.

Tobin, Daniel (International Brotherhood of Teamsters), 1941. 1 folder.

Typographical Union, 1941. 1 folder.

U, 1940-1941. 1 box.

U – General, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

United Press Association, 1941. 1 folder.

Upton, T. Graydon, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

V, 1940-1942. 1 box.

V – General, 1940-1942. 1 folder.

Van Dusen, Henry P, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Veillier, Anthony, 1941. 1 folder.

Vital Issues, 1941. 1 folder.

W, 1940-1941. 2 boxes.

W – General (Wa – Wil), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

W – General (Win – Wy), 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Walker, H. W, 1941. 1 folder.

Wallace, David, 1941. 1 folder.

Wallace, Henry A, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Wanger, Walter F, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Warburg, Ingrid, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Warburg , James P, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Warner Brothers Pictures, Inc, 1941. 1 folder.

Washington Post, 1941. 1 folder.

Waymack, William W, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Weaver, Charles A, 1941. 1 folder.

Wheeler, William E, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Whitaker, Ridley, 1941. 1 folder.

White, William Allen, 1940. 1 folder.

Wilcox, Westmore, Jr, 1941. 1 folder.

Williams, Michael, 1941. 1 folder.

Winkler, Wolfe, 1941. 1 folder.

Winton, David J, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Woollcott, Alexander, 1941. 1 folder.

Wylie, Philip, 1941. 1 folder.

Y, 1940-1941. 1 box.

Y - General, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

York, Alvin C, 1941. 1 folder.

Z, 1939-1941. 2 boxes.

Z - General, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Zanuck, Darryl (Twentieth Century Fox Films), 1941. 1 folder.

Zobian, James, 1941. 1 folder.

Crank Letters, 1941. 1 folder.

Crank Letters, 1941. 1 folder.

Crank Letters, 1941. 1 folder.

Crank Letters, 1941. 1 folder.

Crank Letters, undated. 1 folder.

Miscellaneous, 1939. 1 folder.

Series 2: Subject Files, 1923-1942. 17 boxes.

Arrangement

No arrangement action taken or arrangement information not recorded at the time of processing.

Scope and Contents

Series 2, Subject Files, 1923-1942 [bulk 1940-1942], contains materials related to issues and topics relevant to the isolationist/interventionist debate, as well as files that document the specific activities of Fight for Freedom. Records in this series are arranged in alphabetical order, and within each folder items are arranged chronologically, with undated material following dated material. Typical record types include correspondence, inter-office memoranda, press releases, speeches, printed material, and supporting articles or writings. Notations and draft materials are occasionally found in this series. A folder of biographical information on many of the key players within FFF, as well as speakers and others affiliated with the organization, provides essential background material.

In its role as an advocacy organization, and one devoted to monitoring the activities of isolationists, FFF collected documentation on the America First Committee and many of its leading supporters and proponents, including Charles A. Lindbergh, Senators Gerald Nye and Burton Wheeler, and Robert E. Wood. One issue of concern for FFF was the abuse of the Congressional franking privilege by members of Congress such as Nye and Wheeler, and there is material related to this subject in this series. The response of FFF to Charles A. Lindbergh’s anti-Semitic speech in Des Moines, Iowa, in 1941 is documented in the subject file on William W. Waymack. Waymack, editor of the Des Moines Register and Tribune, was FFF’s point person on this issue, and the radio address that he presented as a counter to Lindbergh’s remarks is contained in this folder.

FFF kept its eye on other organizations, individuals, and issues within the isolationist, appeasement, and anti-war movements. Relevant files include American Student Union, fascism and pro-fascists, Hamilton Fish, Germany, Adolf Hitler, Nazism, Nazi Sympathizers, Robert M. Hutchins, isolationism and isolationists, Keep America Out of War Congress, and Robert Reynolds. Additionally, there are files related to China, communism, Japan, Joseph P. Kennedy, Japan, and the Soviet Union.

FFF also collected materials related to other topics prevalent in the public discourse on America’s participation in the war. Within this series are folders related to army morale, the Committee for National Morale, the use of convoys, the question of a declaration of war, destroyers, the Lend-Lease Bill (H.R. 1776), neutrality legislation and the need for repeal, and Selective Service. A prominent support of FFF was Wendell L. Willkie, who urged America to prepare for war. His activities related to FFF are documented in two folders.

The plight of European nations, particularly Britain and France, was also a concern for FFF. The debate over how best to support and feed Britain and the occupied territories is outlined in several folders related to the Hoover Food Plan. The subject files document a petition sent to President Roosevelt regarding food aid to Britain, as well as other issues arising from the European situation, including files on Belgium, Britain, Finland, France, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, and a radio round-up program related to Iceland. The role of Ireland and Irish Americans is also examined.

There are several files containing information on the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies (CDAAA), an organization closely allied with FFF. The two groups shared many of the same concerns, and their activities often overlapped, especially in the New York City area. Within the subject files related to CDAAA is correspondence from key individuals such as George Field, Secretary for the New York City Chapter; Frank Kingdon, Chairman of the New York City Chapter; and Clark Eichelberger, National Chairman. The activities of CDAAA are documented through additional letters, telegrams, memoranda, mass mailings, press releases, and speeches. Flyers, pamphlets, membership materials, statements of policy, and reprints of lectures and radio presentations associated with CDAAA can be found here as well.

The subject files also document the wide range of activities that FFF undertook. Specific events such as the "Continental Congress for Freedom" (CCF) and the "Fun to be Free" program merit particular attention. Within the CCF files are state delegation lists, correspondence, telegrams, announcements, press releases, and speeches related to the event. Information on the Thursday evening banquet and the White House reception hosted by Eleanor Roosevelt for women delegates is also included. Materials related to the "Fun to be Free" program document the production and planning of both the Madison Square Garden show and the traveling show. FFF also held numerous street meetings, rallies, and corner protests, some of which were met with counter-demonstrations and, at times, degenerated into shouting matches with opponents, particularly those from America First. The rallies often drew prominent politicians such as New York City Mayor Fiorello La Guardia and Wendell Willkie. Information on this aspect of FFF can be found in the folder entitled Street Meetings, Rallies, and Corner Protests. Finally, there are materials concerning the "V for Victory" campaign.

The divisional breakdown of work within FFF is documented through files related to the First-to-Fight Division, labor, Lawyer’s Division, Press Bureau, Speaker’s Division, Stage, Screen, Radio, and Arts Division, Volunteer Division, and Women’s Division. FFF used radio as one of its primary tools in spreading its message across the land, and substantial documentation is available on the numerous radio broadcasts FFF presented. Additional radio-related material includes files on specific series such as the "Speaking for Freedom" series, heard over WMCA radio, the "Voices of Freedom" series, and "The Patriarch," a show sponsored by Women in Democracy.

Agents of Foreign Principles and of Foreign Governments, 1939. 1 folder.

Almat-Kotmk Affair, 1941. 1 folder.

America First Committee, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

American Committee for Defense of British Homes, 1941. 1 folder.

American Defense Harvard Group, 1940. 1 folder.

American Forum of the Air, 1941. 1 folder.

American Friends of German Freedom, 1941. 1 folder.

American Friends of Yugoslavia, 1941. 1 folder.

American Legion, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

American Outpost in Great Britain, 1941. 1 folder.

American People's Mobilization, 1941. 1 folder.

American Student Union, 1940. 1 folder.

American Youth for Freedom, 1941. 1 folder.

Army Morale, 1941. 1 folder.

Articles and Writings, 1923. 1 folder.

Articles and Writings, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Bastille Day Program, 1941. 1 folder.

Belgium, 1941. 1 folder.

Bevin, Ernest, 1941. 1 folder.

Biographical Data, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Britain, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Britain Petition to President Roosevelt Regarding Food Aid, 1941. 1 folder.

British American Ambulance Corps, 1941. 1 folder.

British Library of Information, 1941. 1 folder.

British Press Service, 1941. 1 folder.

Canada, 1941. 1 folder.

China, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Christianity and Crisis, 1941. 1 folder.

City Reporter (New York City Coordinating Committee for Democratic Action), 1941. 1 folder.

Civilian Technical Corps, 1941. 1 folder.

College Students, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Committee for National Morale, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Committee for National Morale, 1941. 1 folder.

Committee to Aid Britain by Reciprocal Trade, 1940. 1 folder.

Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies, 1940-1942. 4 folders.

Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies, undated. 1 folder.

Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies, Press Releases, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies, Press Releases, undated. 1 folder.

Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies, Progress Bulletin, 1941. 1 folder.

Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies, Publications, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies, Washington Office Information Letter, 1941. 1 folder.

Committees, Organizations, and Societies, undated. 1 folder.

Communism, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Congress of Industrial Organizations, 1941. 1 folder.

Congressional Intelligence, 1941. 1 folder.

Continental Congress for Freedom, 1941. 1 folder.

Continental Congress for Freedom, Delegate Lists and Information, 1941. 1 folder.

Continental Congress for Freedom, Delegate Registration Cards, Maryland, 1941. 1 folder.

Continental Congress for Freedom, State Delegations, Alabama-Kentucky, 1941. 1 folder.

Continental Congress for Freedom, State Delegations, Louisiana-New York, 1941. 1 folder.

Continental Congress for Freedom, State Delegations, North Carolina-Wyoming, 1941. 1 folder.

Continental Congress for Freedom, Thank You Letters, 1941. 1 folder.

Continental Congress for Freedom, Thursday Evening Banquet, 1941. 1 folder.

Continental Congress for Freedom, White House Reception with Mrs. Roosevelt, Women, 1941. 1 folder.

Continental Congress for Freedom, Youth Division, 1941. 1 folder.

Convoys, 1941. 1 folder.

Council for Democracy, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Council on Foreign Relations, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Creel, George, undated. 1 folder.

Day, Stephen, 1941. 1 folder.

Declaration of War, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Department of Justice, Voorhis Act Registration for Fight for Freedom, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Destroyers, 1940. 1 folder.

"Do You Know Why" Pamphlet, circa 1940. 1 folder.

Draft Extension, undated. 1 folder.

Editor and Publisher, 1941. 1 folder.

Emergency Rescue Committee, 1941. 1 folder.

Farm Publications, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Fascism and Pro-Fascists, 1939-1941. 1 folder.

Federal Bureau of Investigation, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Federal Union, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Finland, 1941. 1 folder.

First-to-Fight Division, 1941. 1 folder.

Fish, Hamilton, 1941. 1 folder.

France, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

France, undated. 1 folder.

Franking Privilege, 1941. 1 folder.

Freedom House, 1941. 1 folder.

Fun to Be Free Program, Madison Square Garden, 1941. 2 folders.

Fun to Be Free Program, Traveling Show, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Gallup Polls, 1941. 1 folder.

Germany, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Gridiron Club Dinner, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Harlem Division (African-Americans), 1940-1942. 1 folder.

Hitler, Adolf, Nazism, and Nazi Sympathizers, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Hoover Food Plan, 1940-1941. 2 folders.

Hoover Food Plan, undated. 1 folder.

Hour, The, 1941. 1 folder.

Hutchins, Robert M, 1941. 1 folder.

Iceland Round-up Radio Program, 1941. 1 folder.

Imperial Policy Group, 1940. 1 folder.

In Fact, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Ireland and Irish Americans, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Isolationism and Isolationists, 1941. 1 folder.

Japan, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Jewish War Veterans of the United States, 1941. 1 folder.

Keep America Out of War Congress, 1941. 1 folder.

Kennedy, Joseph P, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Kiwanis Club Luncheon (not sponsored by Fight for Freedom), 1941. 1 folder.

Labor, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Labor News Service, 1941. 1 folder.

Labor's Non-Partisan League of New Jersey, 1941. 1 folder.

Lawyer's Division, 1941. 1 folder.

Lend-Lease Bill, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Lindbergh, Charles A, 1937. 1 folder.

Loyal Americans of German Descent, 1941. 1 folder.

Market Analysts, Inc, 1941. 1 folder.

Mazzini Society, Inc, 1941. 1 folder.

Motion Picture Industry, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

National Association of Manufacturers, 1941. 1 folder.

National Defense Alliance, 1941. 1 folder.

Netherlands, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Neutrality Act Repeal, 1937. 1 folder.

New York College Teachers Union, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Newspapers, 1941. 1 folder.

Non-Sectarian Anti-Nazi League, 1941. 1 folder.

Norway, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Nye, Gerald, 1941. 1 folder.

People’s Column For World Democracy, dates not examined. 1 folder.

Poland, 1941. 1 folder.

Pope, Generoso, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Press Bureau, 1941. 1 folder.

Propaganda Analysis, 1939. 1 folder.

Protestant Digest Associates, 1941. 1 folder.

Public Affairs Committee, Inc, 1940. 1 folder.

Radio Broadcasting, 1940-1941. 2 folders.

Rapp-Coudert Committee, 1941. 1 folder.

Religious Freedom, 1941. 1 folder.

Reporter of Direct Mail Advertising, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Reynolds, Robert, 1941. 1 folder.

Rivero, Joseph Ignacio, 1941. 1 folder.

Roosevelt, Franklin D, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Saint Lawrence Seaway Project, 1941. 1 folder.

Selective Service, 1941. 1 folder.

Sheehy, Maurice, 1941. 1 folder.

Smith Labor Bill, 1941. 1 folder.

Songs and Music, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Southern Regional Conference, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Soviet Union, 1941. 1 folder.

Spain, 1938. 1 folder.

Speaker’s Division, 1941. 1 folder.

Speaker's Division, Individuals Offering to be Speaker, 1941. 1 folder.

Speaker's Division, Requests and Scheduling, 1941. 3 folders.

Speaker's Division, Requests and Scheduling, 1941. 5 folders.

Speaker's Division, Requests and Scheduling, 1941. 2 folders.

Speaker's Division, Speaking and Radio Engagements Schedules, 1941. 1 folder.

"Speaking for Freedom" Series, WMCA Radio, 1941. 3 folders.

Stage, Screen, Radio, and Arts Division, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Street Meetings, Rallies, and Corner Protests, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Student Defenders of Democracy, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Sweden, 1941. 1 folder.

Trade Associations, Convention Dates, 1941. 1 folder.

Union for Democratic Action, 1941. 1 folder.

United Americans, 1941. 1 folder.

Universal Life Assurance and Annuity Company (Canada), Publications, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

"V for Victory" Campaign, 1941. 1 folder.

Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, 1941. 1 folder.

"Voices of Freedom" Radio Broadcasts, 1941. 1 folder.

Volunteer Division, 1941. 1 folder.

Waller, Odell, 1941. 1 folder.

Waymack, William W., Reply to Charles Lindbergh Anti-Semitic Speech, 1941. 1 folder.

Western Union Telegraph Company, 1941. 1 folder.

Wheeler, Burton K, 1941. 1 folder.

Wilkie, Wendell L, 1940-1941. 2 folders.

Women in Democracy, "The Patriarch" Radio Program, 1941. 1 folder.

Women's Division, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Wood, Robert E, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Workers Defense League, 1941. 1 folder.

World Series Game Scorecard, 1941. 1 folder.

Youth, 1941. 1 folder.

Youthbuilders, Inc, undated. 1 folder.

Miscellaneous, 1939-1941. 1 folder.

Series 3: State and Local Organizations, 1940-1942. 13 boxes.

Arrangement

No arrangement action taken or arrangement information not recorded at the time of processing.

Scope and Contents

Series 3, State and Local Organizations, 1940-1941, documents the activities of the numerous local chapters of Fight for Freedom. Records in this series are grouped by state, and within each folder items are arranged chronologically, with undated material at the end. The most common record types are correspondence, including telegrams and form letters sent to chapter heads, and memoranda, membership lists, and local press surveys. Occasionally, some of the correspondence contains attachments such as articles, speeches, and press releases.

Material in this series provides information on each state in four areas: local activities, membership, local press correspondence, and local press surveys. Local activities are documented in the correspondence run, which constitutes the largest portion of this series and includes letters between FFF headquarters and local individuals, such as state chairmen, chapter heads, newspaper editors, and FFF members. Also represented are local leaders in academia, business and industry, unions, and men and women interested in supporting FFF. Many of the letters are written by A. Liddon Graham, Director of Organization. The correspondence reflects an ongoing discussion of policies and positions and provides insight into the workings and successes of the local organizations. Many of the letters express gratitude for the support an individual has provided, while other letters acknowledge financial contributions, contain suggestions or clarifications relating to a particular policy, or report on the activities and events occurring at the local level. Still other letters contain requests for speakers, postcards, stickers, buttons, or membership cards.

The membership folders within this series provide the names and addresses of FFF members in each state. Often, in larger states with multiple local chapters, county or regional divisions were made. While these membership lists are probably not complete, they do provide a good listing of those individuals most active within each state.

Finally, there are two types of records related to the local press. Most of the material in the folders designated as local press correspondence relates to a special questionnaire created by FFF. This questionnaire asked local newspapermen about their willingness to cooperate with FFF in running editorials, allowing advertising, and distributing materials. Local editors were also asked to provide the names of men and women who might be willing to serve on local committees. The general correspondence for each state should be consulted for additional correspondence with local presses. Completed questionnaires are found in the local press surveys folders. The surveys contain information on the size of the newspaper, advertising rates, publication day, editor, and location of the newspaper. Within each state the surveys are arranged in alphabetical order by the name of the newspaper.

Alabama, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 2 folders.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Alaska, 1941. 1 folder.

Arizona, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Arkansas, 1941-1942. 1 box.

General, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

California, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 2 folders.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Colorado, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Denver, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Connecticut, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 3 folders.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Delaware, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Florida, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Georgia, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Idaho, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Illinois, 1941-1942. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Chicago, 1941-1942. 1 box.

General, 1941-1942. 3 folders.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Indiana, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941 and undated, 1941. 2 folders.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Indianapolis, dates not examined. 1 folder.

Iowa, 1941-1942. 1 box.

General, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Kansas, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Kentucky, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Louisiana, 1941-1942. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941-1942. 1 box.

Louisiana: New Orleans, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Maine, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Maryland, 1941-1942. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941-1942. 1 box.

Maryland: Baltimore, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Massachusetts, 1941-1942. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Boston Region, 1941. 1 folder.

Springfield, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Worcester, 1941. 1 folder.

Michigan, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, dates not examined. 1 folder.

Minnesota, 1941-1942. 1 box.

General, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Mississippi, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Missouri, dates not examined. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 box.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Montana, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, dates not examined. 1 folder.

Nebraska, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Nevada, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence and Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

New Hampshire, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

New Jersey, 1941. 1 box.

General (Folder 1), 1941. 1 folder.

New Jersey, 1941. 1 box.

General (Folder 2), 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

New Mexico, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

New York, 1940-1942. 1 box.

General, 1940-1942. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Albany, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Buffalo, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

New York City, 1940-1942. 1 box.
Bronx, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Brooklyn, 1940-1941. 1 box.

General, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Manhattan, 1940-1942. 1 box.

General, 1940-1942. 1 folder.

Washington Heights, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Queens, 1940-1941. 1 box.

General, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Staten Island, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

New York, 1940-1942. 1 box.

Rockland County, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Rochester, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Schenectady, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Syracuse, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Westchester County, 1941-1942. 1 box.

General, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

North Carolina, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

North Dakota, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Ohio, 1941-1942. 2 boxes.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Akron, 1941. 1 folder.

Cincinnati, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Ohio: Cleveland, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Dayton, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Youngstown, 1941. 1 folder.

Oklahoma, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Oregon, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Pennsylvania, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Muncy, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Philadelphia, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Pittsburgh, 1941. 1 folder.

Rhode Island, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence and Survey, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

South Carolina, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

South Dakota, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Tennessee, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Memphis, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Texas, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 3 folders.

Local Press Correspondence, dates not examined. 1 folder.

Texas, 1941. 1 box.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Utah, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Vermont, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Virginia, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 2 folders.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Washington D.C., 1941-1942. 1 box.

General, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Washington (State), 1941-1942. 1 box.

General, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

West Virginia, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Wisconsin, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Milwaukee, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

Wyoming, 1941. 1 box.

General, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Correspondence, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press Surveys, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership, 1941. 1 folder.

General Information, 1941. 1 folder.

Local Press General Information, 1941. 1 folder.

Newspapers: Stencil and Mat Requests and Lists, 1941. 1 folder.

Plan of Organization for Local Committees, 1941. 1 folder.

Organization Department, 1941. 1 folder.

State Committee Information, 1941. 1 folder.

Series 4: Administrative Records, 1940-1942. 5 boxes.

Arrangement

No arrangement action taken or arrangement information not recorded at the time of processing.

Scope and Contents

Series 4, Administrative Records, 1940-1942, documents the administrative functions of Fight for Freedom. Information in this series sheds light on policy formation among the executive leaders of FFF, inter-office communications, routine office operations, financial matters, fundraising, and membership development. This series has been divided into three subseries: Administrative Events and Operations, Financial Records, and Membership Records.

Subseries 4A: Administrative Events and Operations, 1940-1942 February. 2 boxes.

Arrangement

No arrangement action taken or arrangement information not recorded at the time of processing.

Scope and Contents

Series 4, Subseries A, Administrative Events and Operations, 1940-1942, documents administrative events such as committee and dinner meetings, as well as office operations. The two files related to dinner meetings reveal the workings of a select group of men within the leadership of FFF, including William Agar, Herbert Agar, Ulric Bell, Ward Cheney, and others. Beginning in July 1940, dinner meetings were often held twice a month at various venues around New York City, including the Columbia Club, the Century Club, and the Rockefeller Center Club. Key policy issues and positions were discussed, and special speakers often addressed the group. Records from these meetings include correspondence, often relating to invitation and attendance; meeting minutes and agendas, though not consistently produced for every meeting; invitation and attendance lists; and sometimes a write-up produced after the meeting. Materials related to these dinner meetings are the closest thing in the collection to an executive committee record.

The daily operations of the FFF office are also documented. There are several files of inter-office memoranda between FFF leaders, division chairmen, and members of the support staff. The bulk of these memoranda date from June to September 1941 and relate to appointments and meetings, the planning of activities and events, suggestions of individuals who might assist the organization, and discussions about issues facing FFF. Typically, these memos are brief and most often typewritten. However, a few are longer, providing fuller explanations and descriptions.

The Situation Reports provide a general accounting of FFF’s activities from June 21, 1941, to December 1, 1941. These documents contain a summation of the work of the men’s and women’s gift committees; a synopsis of the various luncheons and meetings with targeted interest groups such as lawyers, members of trade industries, and women; updates on the number of names added to the membership roll; lists of work to be completed; and details on publicity efforts. Most reports were prepared for the Steering Committee members and are usually typed, although a few draft versions are included.

Material in this subseries also relates to daily office operations. General in nature, these folders provide brief information on office staff, including a list of departmental heads and attendance sheets for salaried workers.

Committees, 1941. 1 folder.

Dinner Meetings, 1940. 1 folder.

Dinner Meetings, 1941. 1 folder.

Employment Inquiries, 1941. 1 folder.

Memorandum, 1941 January-June. 1 folder.

Memorandum, 1941 July-August. 1 folder.

Memorandum, 1941 September-1942 February. 1 folder.

Memorandum, undated. 1 folder.

Office Operations, 1941. 1 folder.

Office Staff, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Reports, 1941. 1 folder.

Salaried Staff Attendance Sheets, 1941. 1 folder.

Situation Reports, 1941. 1 folder.

Subseries 4B: Financial Records, 1941-1942. 2 boxes.

Arrangement

No arrangement action taken or arrangement information not recorded at the time of processing.

Scope and Contents

Series 4, Subseries B, Financial Records, 1941-1942, is concerned with financial matters, particularly fundraising and donations. The majority of this material is presented in the form of contributor lists. These monthly lists contain the names, addresses, and donations of individuals around the country. Most contributions were small, ranging from $1 to $25. Each month typically has a day-by-day accounting of donations, with a consolidated list at the end of the month. Individuals who gave larger amounts, typically exceeding $100, are listed in the large gifts category. This subseries also contains a collection of correspondence – simple reminder letters sent to individuals who agreed to solicit gifts, urging them to follow up on their commitments.

Other files in this subseries contain typical financial documents such as cash statements from May to December 1941, income and expense statements from April to November 1941, and two reports on the examination of cash receipts and disbursements.

Cash Statements, 1941. 1 folder.

Contributor's List, 1941 April. 1 folder.

Contributor's List, 1941 May. 1 folder.

Contributor's List, 1941 June. 1 folder.

Contributor's List, 1941 July. 1 folder.

Contributor's List, 1941 August. 1 folder.

Contributor's List, 1941 September. 1 folder.

Contributor's List, 1941 October. 1 folder.

Contributor's List, 1941 November. 1 folder.

Contributor's List, 1941 December. 1 folder.

Contributor's List Geographical Breakdown, 1941. 1 folder.

Contributor's List "Joe America" Campaign, 1941. 1 folder.

Contributor's List Large Gifts, $100 or more, 1941. 1 folder.

Contributor's List Solicitation of Gifts Correspondence, Men, 1941. 1 folder.

Contributor's List Solicitation of Gifts Correspondence, Women, 1941. 1 folder.

Fundraising, 1941. 1 folder.

Income and Expense Statements, 1941. 1 folder.

Report on Examination of Cash Receipts and Disbursements, 1941-1942. 1 folder.

Special Gifts Campaign Organization and Plan, 1941. 1 folder.

Special Gifts Campaign Subscription Report, 1941. 1 folder.

Miscellaneous, undated. 1 folder.

Subseries 4C: Membership Records, 1940-1941. 2 boxes.

Arrangement

No arrangement action taken or arrangement information not recorded at the time of processing.

Scope and Contents

Series 4, Subseries C, Membership Records, 1940-1941, consists of records related to the enlisting of support for the FFF cause. Membership development was divided between men and women. Certain individuals within FFF agreed to contact potential members, and the assignment sheets provide the names and addresses of the latter, together with the name of the person responsible for contacting them. While not complete, these records often include notations regarding financial contributions and the date when an individual joined FFF. There are several iterations of these membership lists within the subseries.

A key aspect of membership development and recruitment for both men and women was the use of luncheons and cocktail parties as a way of presenting the FFF message. These events provided an opportunity to inform small groups of interested individuals about FFF and often included a prominent speaker such as Herbert Agar or Ulric Bell. Men’s luncheons were usually held in New York City at locations such as the Wall Street Club, the Banker’s Club, or the 21 Club and targeted business and professional men and lawyers. Women’s luncheons, afternoon teas, and cocktail parties were often held in private homes or in clubs such as the Cosmopolitan. Record types associated with these events include correspondence related to invitations, thank you letters, attendance sheets, and lists of individuals who agreed to work for FFF.

Finally, this subseries contains a file entitled Important Sponsors/Who’s Who Names, which lists prominent individuals who lent their names in support of FFF. These sponsors included leading educators, noted clergymen, labor leaders, authors and playwrights, stage and screen stars, newspapermen, and others.

Assignment Lists, Men's Assignment Record, 1941. 1 folder.

Assignment Lists, Men's Lists, 1941. 1 folder.

Assignment Lists, Men's Lists, circa 1941. 1 folder.

Assignment Lists, Women's Assignment Record, 1941. 1 folder.

Assignment Lists, Women's Lists, 1941. 1 folder.

Assignment Lists, Women's Lists, circa 1941. 1 folder.

Endorsement of Fight for Freedom Principles, Petition Signers, 1941. 1 folder.

Important Sponsors/Who's Who Names, 1941. 1 folder.

Meeting at Helen Reid's (Mrs. Ogden Reid) Camp, 1941. 1 folder.

Membership Lists, 1941. 1 folder.

Men's Luncheons and Cocktail Parties, 1941. 1 folder.

Special Interest Groups, 1941. 1 folder.

State Contacts, 1941. 1 folder.

Women's Luncheons, Teas, and Cocktail Parties, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Miscellaneous, 1941. 1 folder.

Series 5: Press Series, 1940-1942 May. 6 boxes.

Arrangement

No arrangement action taken or arrangement information not recorded at the time of processing.

Scope and Contents

Series 5, Press Series, 1940-1942, contains records related to publicity created by Fight for Freedom as well as publicity received from other news and press organizations, both at home and abroad. Typical record types in this series include editorials, form letters, newsletters, press releases, position statements, and speeches. This series has been divided into two subseries: Organizational Communications and Domestic and Foreign Press Releases/News Services.

Subseries 5A: Organizational Communications, 1940-1942 May. 3 boxes.

Arrangement

No arrangement action taken or arrangement information not recorded at the time of processing.

Scope and Contents

Series 5, Subseries A, Organizational Communications, 1940-1942, documents the variety of publicity efforts used by FFF. This subseries contains information on advertisements and flyers, mailings, postcards for enrollment and financial contributions, and pamphlets. FFF supporters wrote numerous editorials on a wide range of topics, and these were printed in a variety of newspapers. Editorials that appeared in the Courier-Journal/Louisville Times are grouped together in a separate folder. Form letters sent to chapter heads, newspapers editors, senators and representatives, and the general membership are included and are arranged in chronological order. The weekly Labor News Service, published by the Labor Division, contains information on labor related issues at home and abroad. There is a fairly complete run of press releases from October 1940 to December 1941. A small number of press releases were generated in foreign languages, such as German, Italian, French, and Lithuanian. There are numerous speeches in this subseries. Most of the speeches were given by individuals affiliated with FFF, and include radio addresses, talks at luncheons, meeting addresses, and speeches from special events. Finally, there is a collection of policy and position statements, including a few documents that outline a brief history of FFF.

Advertisements and Flyers, 1941. 1 folder.

Car Card, Poster Advertising and Printing, 1941. 1 folder.

Editorials, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Editorials, Courier-Journal/Louisville Times, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Eyewitness Project, 1941. 1 folder.

Foreign Language Service, 1941. 1 folder.

Form Letters, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Freedom Press, 1941. 1 folder.

Labor News Service, 1941. 1 folder.

Mailings, Postcards for Enrollment, Financial Contributions, and Requests, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Newsletters, 1941. 1 folder.

Pamphlets, 1941. 1 folder.

Press Releases, 1940 October-1941 June. 1 folder.

Press Releases, 1941 July-August. 1 folder.

Press Releases, 1941 September-December. 1 folder.

Press Releases, undated. 1 folder.

Speeches, 1940 August-1941 January. 1 folder.

Speeches, 1941 February-May. 1 folder.

Speeches, 1941 June-August 17, 1941 June-August. 1 folder.

Speeches, 1941 August 18-October, 1941 August. 1 folder.

Speeches, 1941 November-1942 May. 1 folder.

Speeches, undated. 1 folder.

Statements, Positions, and Organization History, 1941. 1 folder.

Subseries 5B: Domestic and Foreign Press Releases/News Services, 1940-1941. 3 boxes.

Arrangement

No arrangement action taken or arrangement information not recorded at the time of processing.

Scope and Contents

Series 5, Subseries B, Domestic and Foreign Press Releases/News Services, 1940-1941, contains press releases from a variety of domestic and foreign organizations and new services. These releases deal primarily with a range of issues related to the situation in Europe. The largest collection of press releases is from the British Press Service.

American Protestant Defense League, 1941. 1 folder.

American Red Cross, 1941. 1 folder.

American Swedish Home Exchange, Inc, 1941. 1 folder.

Australian News and Information Bureau, 1941. 1 folder.

British Embassy Press Releases, 1940. 1 folder.

British Press Service, 1940 November-1941 March 14, 1940 November-1941 March. 1 folder.

British Press Service, 1941 March 15-April, 1941 March. 1 folder.

British Press Service, 1941 May-June. 1 folder.

British Press Service, 1941 July-August 10, 1941 July-August. 1 folder.

British Press Service, 1941 August 11-September 13, 1941 August. 1 folder.

British Press Service, 1941 September 16-October 19, 1941 September. 1 folder.

British Press Service, 1941 October 20-December 2. 1 folder.

British Press Service, Information Papers, 1941. 1 folder.

British Press Service, Labor, 1941. 1 folder.

Bulletins from Britain, 1941. 1 folder.

Embassy of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Information Bureau, 1941. 1 folder.

France Speaks, 1941. 1 folder.

French Relief News, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Jewish Telegraphic Agency Daily News Bulletin, 1941. 1 folder.

National Defense Mediation Board, 1941. 1 folder.

Netherlands News, 1941. 1 folder.

News from Belgium, 1941. 1 folder.

News from Czechoslovakia, 1941. 1 folder.

News from Norway, 1941. 1 folder.

News Letter, 1940-1941. 1 folder.

Office of Production Management Labor Division, 1941. 1 folder.

Overseas News Agency, 1941. 1 folder.

Protestant Press Association, 1941. 1 folder.

Trans-Pacific News Service, 1941. 1 folder.

William Allen White News Service, 1940. 1 folder.

Series 6: Photographs, dates not examined. 5 boxes.

Arrangement

No arrangement action taken or arrangement information not recorded at the time of processing.

Scope and Contents

Contains a modest number of images that provide a photographic record of individuals and events related to Fight for Freedom. Among the photographs of individuals are portraits of prominent FFF leaders, spokesmen, supporters, and speakers, including Herbert Agar, Helen Hayes, Bishop Henry W. Hobson, Augustus Linbergh, Burgess Meredith, Mrs. Calvin (Grace) Coolidge, Admiral William H. Standley, Harry E. Yarnell, and Wendell L. Willkie. Most but not all of the individuals have been identified. There are a few photographs of individuals in groups, as well as some images from Nazi Germany that may have been used in publicity efforts.

The photographs of FFF events complement subject files related to the "Continental Congress for Freedom," the "Fun to be Free" program, and various rallies and street corner meetings. A small grouping of photographs documents the work of some local chapters, including parades, fair booths, and store fronts. Other images include photographs of the main office in New York City and the "V for Victory" campaign. A good number of the images in this series were used in the FFF newsletter, which can be found in the oversize materials series.

Individuals, A-H, dates not examined. 1 box.

Individuals, L-Z, dates not examined. 1 box.

Unidentified Individuals, dates not examined. 1 box.

Germans, dates not examined. 1 box.

Individuals in Groups, dates not examined. 1 box.

Rallies/Events, dates not examined. 1 box.

Halloween, dates not examined. 1 box.

Programs: Fun to be Free, Continental Congress for Freedom, dates not examined. 1 box.

Local Chapters, dates not examined. 1 box.

Office, dates not examined. 1 box.

Miscellaneous, dates not examined. 1 box.

Oversize, dates not examined. 1 box.

Series 7: Phonograph Records, 1941 February 14-November 23. 9 boxes.

Arrangement

No arrangement action taken or arrangement information not recorded at the time of processing.

Scope and Contents

The Phonograph Records series includes recordings of speeches, interviews, and radio broadcasts made on behalf of Fight for Freedom. With two exceptions, the phonograph records are all 16" recordings. While the majority of the records are vinyl, a few extremely fragile glass records are contained in this series. Noted presentations include Mrs. Irving (Ellin) Berlin’s July 22, 1941, "Why I Changed My Mind About War" address on WMCA radio; Rex Stout’s August 1, 1941, "Why America Does Not Go to War" address on WMCA radio; Herbert Agar’s address from London, England, on August 18, 1941; Mrs. Dwight Morrow’s address of November 21, 1941; and some presentations from the "Voices of Freedom" series. Additional radio talks and addresses by Alexander Woollcott, Anthony Veillier, Dr. Eugene Staley, Douglas Miller, author of "You Can’t Do Business with Hitler," and Wendell L. Willkie can be found in this series.

Herbert Agar Speaking from London, 1941 August 18. 1 box.

Herbert Agar, Fight for Freedom Talk (Copy 1-5), 1941 September 19. 1 box.

Anderson, Keep 'Em Rolling (Part 2), Valley Forge, 1941 November 10. 1 box.
Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

(Glass record—fragile; record is cracked)

Mrs. Irving Berlin, "Why I Changed My Mind About War" (Copy 1-3), 1941 July 22. 1 box.

Mrs. Irving Berlin, "Why I Changed My Mind About War" (Copy 4-5), 1941 July 22. 1 box.

Thomas D. Campbell, "Fight for Freedom", 1941 May 12. 1 box.

Douglas Miller Interview, 1941 September 31. 1 box.
Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

(Glass record—fragile; record is cracked and broken)

Douglas Miller Interview by Sidney Walton (Copy 1-5), undated. 1 box.

Mrs. Dwight W. Morrow (Copy 1-10), 1941 November 21. 1 box.
Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

(Glass record—fragile, copy 1 only)

Dr. Lena Madesin Phillips Interview by Sidney Walton (Copy 1-7), undated. 1 box.

Major Seversky, "Fight for Freedom", 1941 September 11. 1 box.

Dr. Eugene Staley, 1941 July 2. 1 box.

Rex Stout on Why America Does Not Go to War (Copy 1-3), 1941 August 1. 1 box.

Anthony Veillier (Part 1 and Part 3), undated. 1 box.
Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

(Glass record—fragile)

Anthony Veillier (Part 2), undated. 1 box.
Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

(Glass record—fragile)

Wendell Willkie, All Chicago Citizens Committee Mass Meeting, (Part 1 and Part 3) (Copy 1-3), 1941 June 6. 1 box.

Wendell Willkie, All Chicago Citizens Committee Mass Meeting, (Part 2) (Copy 1-3), 1941 June 6. 1 box.

Wendell Willkie, All Chicago Citizens Committee Mass Meeting, (Part 1 and Part 3) (Copy 4-8), 1941 June 6. 1 box.

Wendell Willkie, All Chicago Citizens Committee Mass Meeting, (Part 2) (Copy 4-8), 1941 June 6. 1 box.

Wendell Willkie, Fight for Freedom Committee Program (Part 1 and Part 3), 1941 July 23. 1 box.

Wendell Willkie, Fight for Freedom Committee Program (Part 2), 1941 July 23. 1 box.

Wendell Willkie, "Americans United," San Francisco, 1941 July 24. 1 box.

Alexander Woollcott, "Fight for Freedom", 1941 May 19. 1 box.

Alexander Woollcott, "Fight for Freedom" (Copy 1-2), 1941 June 3. 1 box.

Alexander Woollcott, "Fight for Freedom", 1941 June 13. 1 box.

Alexander Woollcott, "Fight for Freedom" (Copy 1-4), undated. 1 box.

Fight for Freedom (Part 1), 1941 July 12. 1 box.

Fight for Freedom (Part 2), 1941 July 12. 1 box.

Fight for Freedom (KFWB) (Part 1), 1941 November 23. 1 box.

Fight for Freedom (KFWB) (Part 2), 1941 November 23. 1 box.

Fight for Freedom (KFWB) (Part 3), 1941 November 23. 1 box.

Untitled (Part 1 and Part 3), undated. 1 box.
Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

(Glass record—fragile)

Untitled (Part 2 and Part 4), undated. 1 box.
Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements

(Glass record—fragile)

"Voices of Freedom" (Part 1), 1941 July 3. 1 box.

"Voices of Freedom" (Part 2), 1941 July 3. 1 box.

"The World Today", 1941 September 3. 1 box.

Mrs. E. Sternburger, "Peace Ways" (Part 1), 1941 February 14. 1 box.

Mrs. E. Sternburger, "Peace Ways" (Part 2), 1941 February 14. 1 box.

"The Peril We Face at Sea", undated. 1 box.

Series 8: Oversize Materials, 1941. 2 boxes.

Arrangement

No arrangement action taken or arrangement information not recorded at the time of processing.

Scope and Contents

The Oversize Materials series contains financial records and printed materials collected by and related to Fight for Freedom. The financial records consist of a voucher register from April and May 1941 and a ledger of cash receipts dating from April 7, 1941, to August 29, 1941. The entries made in this ledger are handwritten.

The remaining oversize materials are all printed matter. There are selected copies of the America First Bulletin, produced by the New York Chapter of the America First Committee; Social Justice, a national weekly affiliated with Father Charles Coughlin; and SOS, a publication from the Student Defenders of Democracy. Copies of News from Fight for Freedom, the organization’s newsletter, which was produced in a newspaper style, are also located in this series. Additionally, several large advertisements and posters created by FFF can be found here.

Voucher Register, 1941. 1 box.

Cash Receipts Book, 1941. 1 box.

America First Bulletin, August –November, 1941. 1 box.

Miscellaneous, dates not examined. 1 box.

Newspaper Advertisements, dates not examined. 1 box.

Posters and Cartoons, dates not examined. 1 box.

S.O.S. (Student Defenders of Democracy publication), 1941 February-November. 1 box.

Social Justice, 1941 May-July. 1 box.

Social Justice, 1941 August-September. 1 box.

Fight for Freedom Newsletter, undated. 1 folder.

Freedom Press Newspaper, 1941. 1 folder.

Moore County News, 1941. 1 folder.

Newspaper advertisements, 1941. 1 folder.

Posters, 1941. 1 folder.

Maps, 1941. 1 folder.

Series 9: Ephemera, 1941. 2 boxes.

Arrangement

No arrangement action taken or arrangement information not recorded at the time of processing.

Scope and Contents

The Ephemera series is a small collection of material that includes numerous "V for Victory" pins, several "Rise Up America – Smash Hitler" pins, two badges from the "Continental Congress for Freedom," round placards with a "Remember Pearl Harbor" message, two Cue magazine covers from July 5, 1941, related to Fight for Freedom, and a Braille version of "Our Secret Weapon," a CBS radio address by Rex Stout.

Pins, Badges, and Campaign Tags, 1941. 1 box.

Placard, Magazine Covers, Braille Script, 1941. 1 box.

ML.2018.025.  Series 10: Microfilms, undated. 2 boxes.

Access Restrictions

This series is open for research use.

Scope and Contents

This series includes microfilms of materials in the collections.

Arrangement

Microfilms are arranged by reel number.