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Donnaldson family papers

1773-1915, 1.25 linear feet

45

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the Historical Society of Montgomery County. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
Historical Society of Montgomery County
Creator:
Donnaldson family
Title:
Donnaldson family papers
Date [inclusive]:
1773-1915
Call Number:
45
Extent:
1.25 Linear feet
General Physical Description note:
3 document boxes
Language:
English
Abstract:
John Donnaldson (1754-1831) was a merchant and insurance broker who owned shares in the Canton, the first ship to sail from Philadelphia to China in 1785-1787. All of his five sons also had mercantile careers, and three of them--Edward Milner Donnaldson (1778-1853), Richard M. Donnaldson (1787-1873) and Hugh Donnaldson (1796-1819)--traveled to China. The Donnaldson family papers, 1773-1915, include documents relating to various family members, but principally Richard M. and Harriet Donnaldson. Documents include correspondence, land draughts, marriage certificates, etc. Of special interest are two original accounts of voyages to China, 1818-1819.
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Biography/History

John Donnaldson (1754-1831) was the son of Mary Wormley (1734-1817) and Hugh Donnaldson (1719-1772), an Irish immigrant who manufactured sea biscuits. John was a merchant and insurance broker, and owned shares in the Canton, the first ship to sail from Philadelphia to China in 1785-1787. John married Sarah Milner (1760-1839).

John's eldest son Edward Milner Donnaldson (1778-1853) worked as a crew member on his father's ships, and first traveled to China on the Canton in 1800. He soon became a captain and traveled to Europe, India, and other parts of the world.

Another of John's sons, Richard M. Donnaldson (1787-1873) was also involved in the China trade. He travelled to China and made many trips between Liverpool and the West Indies from about 1804-1825, but seems to have stopped sailing around 1825. He married Harriet Shewell Currie in 1832.

Of John's three remaining sons, all three had mercantile careers, but only Hugh Donnaldson (1796-1819) also traveled to China.

Bibliography:

Lee, Jean Gordon. Philadelphians and the China Trade, 1784-1844. Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1984.

Scope and Contents

This collection consists of miscellaneous original documents relating to various Donnaldson family members, principally Richard Martin Donnaldson and Harriet Shewell Currie Donnaldson. Document types include correspondence (1801-1820s), land draughts (1775-1818), marriage certificates, and other items. Of special interest are two original accounts of voyages to China, 1818-1819. There are also some published items, including a family Bible and a tangrams book.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

Historical Society of Montgomery County

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Celia Caust-Ellenbogen and Michael Gubicza through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories

Sponsor

This preliminary finding aid was created as part of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Hidden Collections Initiative for Pennsylvania Small Archival Repositories. The HCI-PSAR project was made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Access Restrictions

Contact Historical Society of Montgomery County for information about accessing this collection.

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Controlled Access Headings

Family Name(s)
  • Donnaldson family
Geographic Name(s)
  • China
  • Guangzhou (China)
  • Montgomery County (Pa.)
  • Norristown (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Donaldson, John, 1754-1831
  • Donaldson, Richard M., 1787-1873
  • Donnaldson, Harriet S. C.
Subject(s)
  • Merchants
  • Shipping
  • Tangrams

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