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Colonel Richard Thomas papers

MS.Coll.159

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the Chester County Historical Society. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
Chester County Historical Society
Creator:
Thomas, Richard, 1744-1832
Title:
Colonel Richard Thomas papers
Date [inclusive]:
1741-1919
Call Number:
MS.Coll.159
Extent:
1 Linear feet
Language:
English
Abstract:
Richard Thomas (1744-1832) was a Revolutionary War colonel and a politician. He served in the Revolutionary War in the 5th Battalion Association despite his Quaker faith and served as an Assembly man from 1796 to 1790, as Pennsylvania Senator from 1790 to 1794, and as Congressman from 1794 to 1798. The collection dates from 1741 to 1919 with the bulk of materials dating from 1741 to 1857. The materials in the collection document the history of Chester County and the United States as well as the personal side of the Thomas family.
Cite as:
[Description and date of item], [Box/folder number], Ms.Coll. 159, Colonel Richard Thomas papers, 1741-1919, Chester County Historical Society.
PDF Version:

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Biography/History

Richard Thomas was born in West Whiteland Township on October 30, 1744, a descendant of Richard Ap Thomas of Whitford Garden, Flintshire, North Wales. Colonel Thomas was the third Richard in the Ap Thomas lineage. (“Ap” is a prefix that was used in Wales to indicate “son of.” 1)

A Quaker, Thomas was appointed a colonel of the 5th Battalion of Association in Chester County by John Morton on April 19, 1776 (see Box 2, Folder 3). He was disowned from Uwchlan’s Friends Meeting for his military service on August 10, 1775 2. His brother George remained in the Society of Friends, but according to a letter in the collection, seems to have aided the Revolutionary cause in other ways (see Box 2, Folder 4). After the war, George was a member of the Commission that planned the building of the “Philadelphia-Lancaster Turnpike.” George died after contracting yellow fever in 1793 after attending a commission meeting in Philadelphia.  3

During the Revolutionary War, Colonel Thomas participated in a campaign into New Jersey (as far as Amboy) as part of the military’s efforts to protect Philadelphia.

Thomas was appointed Brigadier General of Chester County on April 19, 1793, (see Box 2, Folder 4), but declined the promotion according to Futhey & Cope’s History of Chester County (1881). He began his political career in 1786, serving as an assemblyman until his election as a State Senator in 1790. In 1794 he became a member of Congress for the fourth, fifth and sixth sessions (1794, 1796, 1798).

Thomas was married to Thomazine Downing on October 20, 1774, at Uwchlan Meeting. They had eight children: Richard, Mary, George, Jacob, Phebe, Thomazine, Samuel and William. Richard married Rebecca Malin. 4 Thomazine married William Ashbridge and Phebe married Samuel Hains.

Colonel Richard Thomas died January 19, 1832 in his eighty-eighth year.

Sources for above include:

History of Chester County, Futhey & Cope, 1881.

1Brown, Francis G.  Downingtown Friends Meeting, p 47.

2Ashbridge, W.T.,  The Ashbridge Book, p. 153.

3Ibid, p. 48.

4Chester County Historical Society Broadside T-15.

Scope and Contents

The collection spans the years 1741 to 1919, with the bulk of the collection ending in 1857. The documents, especially Thomas’ letters, give a detailed account of not only Chester County and U.S. history, but of the personal side of the Thomas family. Military records in the collection include “Accounts of a Revolutionary War Soldier, Richard Thomas 1776-1777,” and “A Size Book of Firelocks 1776/Field Book 1775, Richard Thomas.” These manuscripts record the activity of the Chester County Militia during Thomas’ service in the Revolutionary War and are a record of supplies. In 1775, a Committee of Safety was appointed by the Assembly and part of their duty was to make sure each county furnished a certain number of firelocks for their militia in preparation for defense. Chester County’s quota was 600 guns, which were manufactured by one man, Dunwicke. 1 In the “Size Book of Firelocks,” Thomas lists the Captains of each company of the 5th Battalion of Association of Chester County and the number and gauges of guns and firelocks that they had. He also lists other supplies needed or used along with expenses.

Thomas’ records in “Accounts of a Revolutionary War Soldier, Richard Thomas 1776-1777,” list the Returns of the Officers and Privates at their muster on August 3, 1776. Revolutionary war records are at the front and back of this book and at a later date, he used the middle of the book to record the survey of the route of the Lancaster-Philadelphia turnpike. There are twelve other manuscripts in the collection that relate to this time period.

Items in the collection from Thomas’ time in Congress include tickets to dine with President Washington and an invitation to attend the first celebration of the President’s birthday. Thomas also wrote numerous letters to friends and loved ones back in Pennsylvania during 1800-1801 when he was with the first session of Congress to serve in Washington City. The letters provide insight into the young city and Congress as well as Thomas’ personality.

Thomas maintained a mill on his property and his account book is in this collection along with receipts and letters. His business expertise is shown in the advice he gave in several letters to Richard Trimble, who was considering purchasing a mill, and also in a letter of recommendation for William Yardley as flour inspector of the Port of Philadelphia.

There are many family letters in the collection, two are especially poignant: Thomas describes the death of his daughter Mary in a letter dated May 18, 1798, and in another dated February 14, 1830, writes of his son Richard’s head injury and death.

Many letters tell of weddings, new babies, dinners, and business happenings. Topics include his trip, via many modes of transportation, across New York State in 1819. These letters provide a detailed account of the people, sights, and landscape of the times. He eventually had a report of his trip published in the Village Record newspaper shortly after he returned home.

Also included in the collection are poetry, written by family members and friends or copied from published works. A travel journal is a record of a trip to Madeira by Samuel Hains that began July 15, 1796, and along with the daily record of events and reflections, Hains wrote a sketch of the country at the end of the journal.

1  Futhey & Cope, p. 62.

Arrangement note

When initially added to Chester County Historical Society’s manuscript collection, each document was assigned a unique consecutive number. In the current arrangement, they are grouped by relationship and subject.

The individual manuscript numbers listed in this guide date from the original arrangement and are no longer used. (They are listed for in-house reference purposes only.) Researchers should use box and folder numbers when requesting documents.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

Chester County Historical Society,  2010.09.15

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Margaret Miles Baillie

Sponsor

The processing of this collection was made possible by a grant from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, 2006 The creation of the electronic guide for this collection was made possible through generous funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, administered through the Council on Library and Information Resources’ “Cataloging Hidden Special Collections and Archives” Project. Finding aid entered into the Archivists' Toolkit by Garrett Boos.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may apply. Please contact the Chester County Historical Society with requests for copying and for authorization to publish, quote or reproduce the material.

Immediate Source of Acquisition note

Gift of Francis D. Brinton and George Ashbridge, III.

Processing Information note

The creation of the electronic guide for this collection was made possible through generous funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, administered through the Council on Library and Information Resources’ “Cataloging Hidden Special Collections and Archives” Project.

Finding aid entered into the Archivists' Toolkit by Garrett Boos.

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Related Materials

Related Archival Materials note

Chester County Historical Society: See newspaper clippings files, manuscript card catalog, and book card catalog for additional sources on Colonel Richard Thomas;

The curatorial department holds some items related to Colonel Richard Thomas and his family: Colonel Thomas’ clothing (museum id. #1994.522, 1994.523, and 1997.695), and a charcoal portrait, (PTG211) of Richard Thomas, Jr. (President of Bank of Chester County, 1819-1830).

Metropolitan Museum of Art: Colonel Thomas had his portrait painted by James Peale as a miniature on ivory which can be viewed online at: www.metmuseum.org.

A book that may help in understanding how the militia was organized and functioned is The Pennsylvania Militia in 1777, by Hannah Benner Roach.

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Pennsylvania. General Assembly. Senate.
  • Pennsylvania. Provincial Assembly.
  • United States. Congress.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Family papers
  • Genealogical tables
Geographic Name(s)
  • Chester County (Pa.)
Personal Name(s)
  • Thomas, Richard, 1744-1832
Subject(s)
  • Pennsylvania--Politics and government--1775-1865
  • Transportation
  • United States--History--Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775
  • United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783

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Collection Inventory

Series I. Family documents.

Box Folder

Marriage, 1741-1746. Manuscript 1456 – Marriage Certificate of Richard Downing and Mary Edge, March 21, 1741. Recorded in the Chester Monthly Meeting Book A, Page 189 and witnessed and signed by almost one hundred people; Manuscript 1482 – A wedding invitation to John Smith, Philadelphia, from Aaron Ashbridge, October 19, 1746; (see also Oversized documents at end of this finding aid).

1 1

Death – Epitaphs, circa 1754. Manuscript 1472 – “Epitaph written by Grandfather on his father’s tombstone,” copy of epitaph for R. Thomas, 1713-1754; Manuscript 1476 – “Copy of the Epitaph on the tombstone of Richard Thomas,” another copy of epitaph for R. Thomas, 1713-1754.

1 2

Death – Wills and Eulogy, 1826-1832, undated. Manuscript 1451 – Copy of the draft attached to the will of Richard Thomas, deceased (fragile); Manuscript 1452 – Richard Thomas’ last will and testament, April 12, 1826. Addendum February 13, 1830, certification of the copy by Robert Ralston, February 27, 1832; Manuscript 1471 – Eulogy of George Ashbridge, the second, written by his daughter, Jane Maris.

1 3

Death – Mary Thomas, 1798. Manuscript 1511 – “Mary Thomas’s Dying Moments described, May 18 1798.” “Description of my Daughter Mary in her Dying Moments with reflections (sic.) on the occasion &....deceased May 15, 1798, aged 20 years”.

1 4

Death – Richard Thomas, Jr., and Miscellaneous, 1829-1832. Manuscript 1558 – Sale of land from John G. and Julia M. Miles, Huntingdon, to Richard Thomas, September 24, 1829. Witnessed by Daniel Africa; Manuscript 1561 – Letter from Richard Thomas, W. Whiteland, to [Richard Trimble], February 14, 1830. He tells of the death of his son Richard and gives the details of his injury and eventual mortality; Manuscript 1562 – A list of internments at the Cherry Street burial ground of Friends in Philadelphia. 13 names listed including Richard Thomas with a date of 23rd January, 1832.

1 5

Lineage, 1880. Manuscript 1450 – “Memoir of the family of Ap. Thomas of Whitford Garden,” by Thomasine Hines and Elizabeth H. Benners, May 15, 1880.

1 6

Lineage, 1823-1849, undated. Manuscript 1469 – “Pedigree of the Ashbridge Family,” handwritten genealogy, undated; Manuscript 1470 – “Memoirs of the Family of Richard Ap. Thomas of Whitford Garden, Flintshire, North Wales, in Great Brittain,” manuscript, undated; Manuscript 1473 – “Private Register of The family of Richard Ap Thomas,” covers the years 1683 to 1849; Manuscript 1474 – “Genealogy (sic.) of the Family of Richard Ap. Thomas of Flintstone in Wales....” A family tree drawn and written by Richard Thomas, 1823.

1 7

Lineage, 1811-1879, undated. Manuscript 1475 – “Children of A. Mitchell Ashbridge residing at Lake Providence, Louisiana.” Seven names listed with the dates from 1865 to 1879; Manuscript 1477 – “Memoir of the family of Ap. Thomas of Whitford Garden, Flintshire, North Wales, Great Britain, original written January 15, 1811 by Richard Thomas the 4th;” Manuscript 1478 – Hand drawn coat of arms for Ap Thomas. undated; Manuscript 1479 – “Of the Crest,” pencil written report about the Ap Thomas Crest; Manuscript 1480 – A pencil written report about various Thomas family crests recorded in “Guillim’s Heraldry Folio;” Manuscript 1555 – Letter to David Townsend and others, a Committee of the Literary Association of Chester and Delaware Counties from Richard Thomas, W. Whiteland, April 25, 1822. He relates the family history of Richard Ap Thomas and others of Whiteland, including Henry Atherton.

1 8

Land, 1808. Manuscript 1453 – Copy of the draft of Richard Thomas’s Land, West Whiteland. Last date on draft 1808. Color outlines of the lots, detailed.

1 9

Land, 1790, undated. Manuscript 1454 & 1455 – Draft of W. Whiteland Estate No. 1, Draft of W. Whiteland Estate No. 2; Manuscript 1457 – Manuscript map of the Lancaster Turnpike, circa 1790, Chester County Historical Society Collections. Printed by the Tinicum Press No. “Proof Only” of 2500 copies.

1 10

Land, 1805, undated. Manuscript 1458 – Sketch of Smith Shop lot, undated; Manuscript 1459 – Draft of land, undated (border lands mentioned: A. Zook, P. Sauder, creek, S. Harris and Ashbridge line); Manuscript 1460 – draft of Ashbridge’s line, undated; Manuscript 1503 – Deed Jacob Sowder and wife to Richard Thomas May 20, 1794. Land in Whiteland. Not executed, but a line reads “witness my hand and sear April 29, 1805".

1 11

Series II. Military and political documents.

Box Folder

Revolutionary War – Manuscripts, 1777-1850 and undated. Manuscript 1461-1463 – Manuscript of history of Colonel Thomas and the Revolutionary War, mentioning the soldiers’ pay and later pensions, undated; Manuscript 1464 – Certified extracts from the “Minutes of the Council of Safety,” copied by A. L. Russell, Secretary of the Commonwealth, March 6, 1850; Manuscript 1465 – Certified extracts from “A Return of the Field Officers, Elected for the County of Chester with their Rank, as was allotted by them the 28th day of April 1777,” copied by A.E. Benedict, Deputy Secretary of the Commonwealth, March 6, 1850.

2 1

Revolutionary War – Notes, undated. Manuscript 1466-1468 – researcher’s notes concerning Chester County and the Revolutionary War.

2 2

Revolutionary War – Appointment, 1776. Manuscript 1485 – Richard Thomas’ appointment to be “Colonel of the fifth Battalion of Association in the County of Chester,” signed by John Morton, Speaker, April 19, 1776.

2 3

Revolutionary War – Correspondence and Commission, 1776-1793. Manuscript 1486 – Letter from George Thomas, W. Whiteland to Richard Thomas at Amboy Camp, August 27, 1776. The letter discusses deserters, problems with getting lime burned as the busyness of farming. He also mentions troops in Long Island (document has water damage, but whole body of letter is intact); Manuscript 1487 – Letter from George Thomas, W. Whiteland, to Richard Thomas, Bucks County, June 14, 1778. He tells of “Waggon Masters” allowing their teams to feed in a nearby field, sickness in the area, and currency changes, and mentions the wedding of Jimmy Dunwoody to Rachel Burns, et. al.; Manuscript 1502 – “Circular” to Richard Thomas from Thomas M., Philadelphia, April 19, 1793, containing a copy of the act for regulating the Militia of this Commonwealth and his commission as Brigadier General of the County of Chester.

2 4

Congressional Service – Philadelphia, 1796-1798. Manuscript 1505 – A dinner invitation card from The President of the United States to Mr. Thomas, February 18, 1796; Manuscript 1506 – Invitation to Mr. Thomas to a Ball for The President’s Birth Night, February 22, 1796, held at the Amphitheater; Manuscript 1507 - A dinner invitation card from The President of the United States to Mr. Thomas, January 7, 1796; Manuscript 1510 - Invitation to Mr. Thomas to a Ball in honor of the Birth of George Washington, February 22, 1798. (Printer listed); Manuscript 32845 – A dinner invitation card from The President of the United States to Mr. Thomas, [January 10, 1798].

2 5

Congressional Service - Washington City, 1800. Manuscript 1513 – Letter to Richard Trimble, Miller, Newburgh, New York, from Richard Thomas, West Whiteland, November 1800. Richard Thomas relays news of the death of William Hunter of Newtown and then tells of others still doing well: [including] James Jones, Mr. Trimble’s father, and himself. Election news is given with much detail as well as social details and names; Letter 25600 – Letter to son George from Richard Thomas, Washington, December 3, 1800. Envelope included. Good description of “Capitol Hill” and the surrounding area. Gives name of “chambermate” and those he has dined with such as Governor Morris of New York and others he refers to as “high flyers.” He also refers to Hain’s letter written from Bush, Maryland (This document was “silk” treated); Manuscript 1514 – Letter to Phebe R. Thomas, near Downingstown, from her father, Richard Thomas, Washington City, December 6, 1800. This letter contains lots of social information about individuals and Washington City. One of the families named is the Hartshorne Family, who owned Strawberry Hill, and had a daughter at Westtown School; Manuscript 1512 – Letter to Richard Thomas Esq., M.C., at the Capitol City of Washington from Samuel Haines, Bush, [MD], answered by Thomas, December 8, 1800. Samuel relates an event that happened to him and his horse during their travels from Baltimore to Bush. A couple men, black and white, aid him when his horse goes down on the road. He is particularly impressed with the skill and horse knowledge of one of the black men named Prush. He states that “had the manumission of the Blacks in the United States depended upon my will at that moment they would have been free”.

2 6

Congressional Service – Washington City, 1801. Manuscript 1515 – Letter to Samuel Hains, Downingstown, from Richard Thomas, January 2, 1801. This letter has the “Wash City” stamp on it. Relates recent travel trips to McPhersons Mills and a narrow escape from “Davy Jones’ Locker;” Manuscript 1516 – Letter to Samuel Hains, Downingstown, from Richard Thomas, Washington, January 9, 1801. He jokingly justifies why he has abandoned quality reading for reading of novels; Manuscript 1517 – Letter to Phebe Thomas from Richard Thomas, Washington, January 23, 1801. Regarding family matters.

2 7

Congressional Service – Washington City, 1801. Manuscript 1518 – Letter to Tammy Thomas from Richard Thomas, Washington, January 23, 1801, “sixth day morning.” Expresses concerns for her workload at home and relates social and personal events such as gaining weight and planning to visit Mount Vernon; Manuscript 1519 – Letter to Samuel Hains, Downings Town, from Richard Thomas, Washington, January 30, 1801; Manuscript 1520 – Letter to Phebe R. Thomas from father Richard Thomas, Washington, January 31, 1801. Relates social visits, i.e. one from Jane Whelen and her father and requests more letters and social accounts of her life; Manuscript 1570 – “Envelope” for letter to Samuel Hains, Downingtown, from Richard Thomas, Washington, February 3, [1801] Note jotted on inside; Manuscript 3822 – Letter to Jesse Jones, Downings Town, from R. Thomas, Washington City, February 8, 1801. He reports on the congressional actions concerning the election of Jefferson or Burr. Good insight on political thoughts of the time; Manuscript 1521 – Letter to Samuel Hains, Downingstown, from Richard Thomas, Washington, February 13, 1801. Some social news, but an excellent account of action in the Congress on the election of Jefferson or Burr for President.

2 8

Congressional Service – Washington City, 1801. Manuscript 1522 – Letter to Richard Thomas, Esq., M.C. [Master of Ceremony] at the Capitol in the City of Washington from Samuel Hains, Downingstown, February 20, 1801. He discusses social and family items as well as his time serving jury duty in West Chester; Manuscript 1523 – Letter to Phebe Thomas from her father Richard Thomas, Washington, February 20, 1801. He recounts social and family items and lists several names of people he has written. Mentions her sister Tammy; Manuscript 1524 – Letter to Richard Thomas from Tammy Thomas, February 8, 1801. Letter from wife to husband. She relates health and work problems and comments that she is glad he has “grown fat and fleshi (sic)” as he will then “look young and me, old.” She looks forward to his homecoming.

2 9

Joseph Stansbury, 1779 and undated. Manuscript 1491 – “Historical Ballad of the proceedings at Philadelphia 24th and 25th of May 1779 – By a Loyalist who happened to pass through the City at the time from the Southward to New York.” Two Cantos. [probably by Joseph Stansbury]; Manuscript 1492 – “Towns Meeting a poem by Jos. Stansbury.” There is a footnote reference to Dunlap’s Packet, a newspaper otherwise known as The Pennsylvania Packet which eventually became the first daily newspaper in the United States.

2 10

Travel Documents, 1794-1796. Manuscript 1504 – “Passport” for William Ashbridge, dated November 22, 1794, and signed by Edmond Randolph, the second Secretary of State of the United States; Manuscript 1508 – “Passport” for William Ashbridge, dated March 19, 1796, and signed by Timothy Pickering, the third Secretary of State of the United States; Manuscript 1509 – Bill of Lading of the ship Jenny to Mess. Haines and Thomas from Michael Alcorn dated September 15, 1796 in Funchal, Madeira.

2 11

Travel Documents, 1796. Manuscript 1586 – Samuel Hains’ journal of his travel to Madeira on the Brig Jenny, July 15, 1796 to September 11, 1796. There are thirty pages on which recounts his trip and four pages contain his “Sketch of History, Manners and Customs of the Island of Madeira and Its Inhabitants” (pages 31 to 36).

2 12

Miscellaneous, 1805-1821. Manuscript 1533 – Proposals for Constitutional changes made at a General Federal Republican Meeting at the May 1805 Term of the Circuit Court (document is in two pieces); Manuscript 1554 – A meeting of “The President and Managers of the Philadelphia and Lancaster Turnpike Road” announcement addressed to Richard Thomas, October 11, 1821; Manuscript 1583 – Letter to Andrew Greg from Richard Thomas, Philadelphia, February 22, 1821. Letter of Recommendation for William Yardley as a candidate for Flour Inspector of the Port of Philadelphia.

2 13

Series III. Correspondence, poetry, receipts, and miscellaneous.

Box Folder

Letters to Thomazin Thomas – 3 Letters, 1779. Manuscript 1488 – Letter to Thomazin Thomas from Richard Thomas, [October] 5, 1779. He tells her of items of food and drink he has sent her and tells of his health and that he expects to travel by water the third day, et.al. (bottom of document torn, but whole body of letter intact); Manuscript 1489 – Letter to Thomazin, “Tammy,” Thomas, Downings Town, from Richard Thomas, Delaware, October 12, 1779. Inquiry into the families’ health and request for leather goods; Manuscript 1490 – Letter to Thomazin Thomas from Richard Thomas, Philadelphia, October 31, 1779. Letter is addressed, “To the care of Richard Downing in Downing’s Town for Thomazin Thomas”.

3 1

Letters to Tammy Thomas – 7 Letters, 1787-1790. Manuscript 1493 – Letter to Tammy Thomas at Israel Whelen’s, Philadelphia, from Richard Thomas, W. Whiteland, May 10, 1787; Manuscript 1495 – Letter to Tammy Thomas, W. Whiteland, from Richard Thomas, Philadelphia, March 11, 1788; Manuscript 1496 – Letter to Tammy Thomas, from Richard Thomas, Philadelphia, September 29, 1788; Manuscript 1497 – Letter to Tammy Thomas, W. Whiteland, from Richard Thomas, Philadelphia, September 19, 1788; Manuscript 1499 – Letter to Tammy Thomas, W. Whiteland, from Richard Thomas, Philadelphia, February 8, 1790; Manuscript 1500 – Letter to Tammy Thomas, W. Whiteland, from Richard Thomas, Philadelphia, March 13, 1790; Manuscript 1501 – Letter to Tammy Thomas, W. Whiteland, from Richard Thomas, Philadelphia, December 25, 1790.

3 2

Letters addressed to “My Dear” – 2 Letters, 1787, 1789. Manuscript 1494 – Letter to “My Dear,” from Richard Thomas, W. Whiteland, May 15, 1787; Manuscript 1498 – Letter to “My Dear,” from Richard Thomas, Philadelphia, November 28, 1789.

3 3

Letter to Richard Trimble, 1803. Manuscript 1525 – Letter to Richard Trimble, Newburgh, New York, from his uncle Richard Thomas, W. Whiteland, October 5, 1803. Business details as well as family and social (Original document is hard to read due to bleeding of ink through paper. Typed transcript included).

3 4

Letters to Richard Trimble, 1804-1808. Manuscript 1531 – Letter to Richard Trimble, Newburgh, New York, from Uncle Richard Thomas, W. Whiteland, November 12, 1804. He relates wedding details, discusses business. Manuscript 1534 – Letter to Richard Trimble, Newburgh, New York, from Uncle Richard Thomas, W. Whiteland, January 30, 1806. Discusses local real estate and the mill business as Trimble seems to be interested in buying a mill. Includes a draft of mills and Hoopes land for sale. Lists land of others such as Cloud, Hawley and Ingram; Manuscript 1535 – Letter to Richard Trimble, Miller, Newburgh, New York, from Richard Thomas, W. Whiteland, February 14, 1807. Reports the death of his daughter-in-law (?) and the death of Daniel Trimble and then discusses the bad weather and mill business; Manuscript 1536 – Letter to Richard Trimble, Newburgh, New York, from uncle Richard Thomas, W. Whiteland January 10 1808. Discusses social and family events including the marriage of his daughter, Thomazine to William Ashbridge.

3 5

Letters to Richard Trimble, 1808-1826. Manuscript 1537 – Letter to Richard Trimble, Miller, Newburgh, New York, from Uncle Richard Thomas, W. Whiteland, April 5, 1808. Lots of social and family news, discusses the embargo and the impact on the flour business. Mentions a patent on a washing mill by Trimble and also the poor health of Richard Tunis; Manuscript 1538 – Letter to Richard Trimble, Newburgh, New York, from uncle Richard Thomas, W. Whiteland, May 22, 1808. Continuation of the April 5, 1808, letter; Manuscript 1546 – Letter to Richard Trimble, Newburgh, New York, from Richard Thomas, W. Whiteland, June 19, 1819. Report of trip to see some mills; social and family news; Manuscript 1556 – Letter to Richard Trimble, Newburgh, New York, from Richard Thomas, Philadelphia, December 20, 1826.

3 6

Letters to Phebe Haines, 1809-1812. Manuscript 1540 – Letter to Phebe Hains, Philadelphia, from Jacob Thomas, W. Whiteland, July 19, 1809. Relates the theft of a parasol and family news; Manuscript 1543 – Letter to Phebe Hains from Thomazin Ashbridge, Philadelphia, July 22, [1812]. Regarding her discussion with a weaver to have their yarn woven into fabric. Family news.

3 7

Letter from Samuel Haines, 1808-1812. Manuscript 1539 – Letter to Richard Thomas from Samuel Hains, Philadelphia, June 24, 1808. Family and social news and discussion of the embargo; Manuscript 1541 – Letter to Richard Thomas from Samuel Hains, Philadelphia, July 25, 1810. Relates conflict with Hoopes, naming of new baby, and the marriage of Napoleon; Manuscript 1542 – Letter to Richard Thomas, W. Whiteland, from Samuel Hains, Philadelphia, November 28, 1810. Family and social news as well as an account of the trial of John Evans prosecution of Friends in Philadelphia; Manuscript 1544 – Letter to Richard Thomas from Samuel & Phebe Hains, Philadelphia, November 17, 1812. Regarding the birth of their son and his name.

3 8

New York State Trip, 1819. Manuscript 1547 – Report of a trip to “the Lakes, Canada’s July 14, 1819, in Company with William Ashbridge, his Son William aged 10 years and Joseph Lownes & Alexander Elmslee during about a month.” It is addressed to Mr. Miner, September 3, 1819. This report was published in the Village Record on Wednesday September 22, 1819, and continued in another issue; Manuscript 1548 –Letter to Samuel Hains, Arch Street, Philadelphia, from Richard Thomas, Manchester, July 23, 1819. Describes arrival at Niagara Falls and gives a description of the area and more of his itinerary; Manuscript 1549 – Letter to Samuel Hains, Arch Street, Philadelphia, from Richard Thomas, Sackets Harbour (sic), July 27, 1819. He describes departure from Lewistown to the Genesee River and various other sailing vessels and locations including Sackets Harbor where he viewed the USS Orleans. Names other men that are with him on the trip; Manuscript 1550 – Start of a letter to Mr. Miner from, it is assumed, Richard Thomas, September 3, 1819, in regards to publishing his New York travel story in the paper; Manuscript 1551 – New York travel story article written to Mr. Miner. In-depth descriptions of the natural sites on the trip as well as locations, such as the Mansion House Hotel in Montreal. He also has listed mileage of the trip in the margin of the article; Manuscript 1552 – A footnote to the article regarding a passenger; Manuscript 1553 – A description of Saratoga Springs and its three hotels and medicinal springs.

3 9

Ashbridge Family, 1835-1919. Manuscript 1563 – Invitation to Mr. William Ashbridge, Philadelphia, “to a Harvest Home at the Barn of Thomas H. B. Jacobs, on Saturday the 8th of August,” 1835. Eight managers’ names listed; Manuscript 1564 - Invitation to Mr. Richard Ashbridge to a Harvest Home Party “To be given at the Farm of Thomas H. B. Jacobs, on the 27th of August, 1836.” Ten managers’ names listed; Manuscript 1565 - Invitation to Mr. Richard Ashbridge to a Harvest Home Party to be held at the Farm of Thomas H. B. Jacobs, Esquire, on Saturday, the 14th instant, at 10 o’clock.” 1841. Five managers’ names listed; Manuscript 1566 – Letter to Thomazin Ashbridge from Jon T. Baldwin, Philadelphia, November 3, 1836. He refers to writing by her father in 1787 about an oak tree. He encloses a poem entitled, “To the ‘Old Oak’”; Manuscript 1568 - Invitation to Mr. Richard Ashbridge and Lady to a Harvest Home Party to be held at the Farm of Thomas H. B. Jacobs, Esquire, on Saturday, the 9th of August at 10 o’clock.” 1845. Six managers’ names listed; Manuscript 1569 – Certificate from the American Red Cross to Thomazine Ashbridge, Philadelphia, for service given April 1917 to May 1919; Manuscript 1532 – Invitation Card from Hannah Ashbridge & Samuel Grubb to Thamzon Thomas, 1805; Manuscript 1573 – Small calling card envelope addressed to Mary B. Ashbridge.

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Poetry and Writings, 1781-1849 and undated. Manuscript 1527 – “Anecdote of Washington,” Copied from the Baltimore Federal Gazette of 1804. One compares human character and religion and the other tells of Isaac Potts finding George Washington in prayer at Valley Forge; Manuscript 1481 – “To the Old Oak, by Joseph Baldwin,” poem written in the summer of 1836; Manuscript 1571 – A poem entitled, “The Deserted Dwelling,” William Augustus White, Tacony, Philadelphia, April 30, 1845; Manuscript 1572 – “Soliloquy Addressed to the spreading White Oak near the Old House. 1787” by Richard Thomas, 4th. “To the Old Oak by Joseph T. Baldwin 1836,” copied May 25th, 1849; Manuscript 1574 – Copy of “Address to the Spreading White Oak near the Old House, Richard Thomas 1781” for T. Ashbridge, Jr., 1857. Addressed to Thomazine Ashbridge; Manuscript 1575 – “Soliloquy Address’d to the Spreading white Oak near the Old House 1787.” no name, but may be a copy written by Richard Thomas. Paper has 1799 watermark in it; Manuscript 1576 - “Soliloquy Addressed to the spreading White Oak near the Old House, 1787” by Richard Thomas, 4th. “To the Old Oak by Joseph T. Baldwin 1836,” copied May 20th, 1849; Manuscript 1577 – copy of two poems, “Paraphrase of within Ode by Russel,” with some notes and Sapho’s Odes” undated; Manuscript 1578 – Poem which starts “Where now are all my flattering hopes of Joy?” no name or undated; Manuscript 1579 – Poem which starts “Oh Fortune! Wilt thou ever prove.” The name Thomson is written on the bottom with a notation “Genuine Warmth & feeling.” undated; Manuscript 1580 – Two poems: one by William Penn “William Penn on Marriage” and “The Doubting Bachelor;” Manuscript 1581 – “The Young Man’s Wish,” transcribed by J. H. January 30, 1789. “Federal Valey;” Manuscript 1560 – Copy of a Dogral (sic), Address found among old papers of the writer 1830. “To Daniel Ashbridge a juvenile associate about the year 1766 or 7.” “Address written on back of the Farce entitled The Money Hunters;” Manuscript 1557 – Statement by Richard Thomas, 1827, on his philosophy with a quote from Alexander Pope; Manuscript 1585 – A paper entitled “Mausoleum,” undated. It is a patriotic piece which mentions Washington.

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Receipts, 1804-1845. Manuscript 1526 – Receipt – August 3, 1804, items purchased by Richard Thomas at Joseph Gibbon’s vendue; Manuscript 1528 – Receipt – September 29, 1804, purchased by Richard Thomas from Edward Shoemaker; Manuscript 1529 – Receipt – September 21, 1804, purchased by Richard Thomas from Edward Shoemaker. Itemized list; Manuscript 1530 – Receipt – October 15, 1804, purchased by Richard Thomas from Samuel Richards. Itemized list of silver items; Manuscript 1567 – Receipt of payment to William Fife from Richard Ashbridge, Philadelphia, May 19, 1845, thanking him for writing his Marriage Certificate.

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Miscellaneous, 1775-1829 and undated. Manuscript 1483 – Ornate advertisement for Samuel Hains’ real estate office in Philadelphia; Manuscript 1484 – Copy of D. Major’s letter from Kingston, Jamaica, July 19, 1775, to Richard Thomas; Manuscript 1545 – Letter to Mr. Miner from W. Whiteland, 1818, (assumed it is R. Thomas). A rough draft list of names and ages of the oldest W. Whiteland Township residents. “First Class” lists those above 80 years; “Second Class” lists those above 70 years, “Third Class” above 60 years, and numbers those above 50; Manuscript 9805 – Addendum to a letter by R. Thomas which describes John Jacobs, an early settler. Addendum was from the W. C. Literary Association; Manuscript 1559 – Letter to Richard Thomas from T. Downing, Downingtown, October 27, 1829, regarding his portrait being painted by Samuel Moon; Manuscript 1582 – Penciled notation of “Poisons & Antidotes.” undated; Manuscript 1584 – Letter to Jacob from “Thy Affectionate Cousin,” undated. Recounts a trip to Baltimore and lists many landmarks and names such as Evan Poultney and Nathaniel Ellicot, son in law to Richard Trimble.

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Series IV. Account books, 1744-1832.

Manuscript 1446 – Account book of Richard Thomas, farmer, West Whiteland Township. Includes workmen’s accounts, store accounts, and frequent mention of “mill” accounts (grist) and “store” accounts, 1744-1832.

Manuscript 1447 – Accounts of a Revolutionary War Soldier, Richard Thomas and surveying for roads (Note with booklet reads “A relic of the Revolution presented to Samuel Hains by Colonel Richard Thomas"), 1776-1777, 1792.

Manuscript 1448 – “Field Book 1775, Richard Thomas” and “Size Book of Firelocks,1776” (Accounts of Chester County militia activity during the Revolutionary War), 1775, 1776.

Series V. Oversized items, 1804.

Manuscript 1449 - Marriage Certificate Samuel Hains to Phebe R. Thomas October 24, 1804. Recorded in Uwchlan Monthly Meeting book page 120 and witnessed and signed by over one hundred people (This document is in OV section of closed stacks), 1804 October 24.