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Stonega, Virginia coal camp photograph

251

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the Hagley Museum and Library. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
Hagley Museum and Library: Audiovisual Collections and Digital Initiatives Department
Creator:
Stonega Coke and Coal Company.
Title:
Stonega, Virginia coal camp photograph
Date:
circa 1900
Call Number:
251
Extent:
1 photographic prints
General Physical Descripton:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 7 x 5 in. mounted on board.
Location:
GL Box 2.
Language:
English
Abstract:
This photograph is of a coal camp in Stonega, Virginia built and operated by the Stonega Coke and Coal Company. The Stonega Coke & Coal Company was a typical large southern Appalachian bituminous coal producer with mines in Virginia and West Virginia. Coal operations and their associated towns, or coal camps, consisted of company-built houses, churches, schools, theatres, dance halls, and even graveyards. The company provided each camp with a doctor, nurse, and hospital.
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Biography/History

The Stonega Coke & Coal Company was a typical large southern Appalachian bituminous coal producer with mines in Virginia and West Virginia. It built nine coal camps near the town of Appalachia, Virginia. These coal camps are representative of the more than 500 coal towns built from the late 1800's to the early 1900's. The building of company towns, or coal camps, began in the 1880's and peaked in the early 1920's. Coal operations and their associated towns consisted of company-built houses, churches, schools, theatres, dance halls, and even graveyards. The company provided each camp with a doctor, nurse, and hospital.

During the 1950's, life changed dramatically for the residents of the coal camps. Economic troubles began and many of the company facilities were dismantled. With the advent of the automobile, the need to live close to work was not as great. As the use of machinery increased, the need for workers decreased. Many moved to Ohio and Indiana to work in the automotive industry. With workers leaving the coal camps, stores, theatres, and everything else began to close. Most of the coal camps are still in existence, but they are now small communities with maybe a church and a small post office.

Scope and Contents

This photograph, probably looking towards the Virginia-Kentucky border, shows two roads of camp houses and the company store. Stonega Store No. 2 sign is visible in foreground.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

Audiovisual Collections and Digital Initiatives Department

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research.

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Related Materials

Related Materials

Stonega Coke and Coal Company, Records 1902-1974, (accession 1765, Part II), Manuscripts and Archives, Hagley Museum and Library.

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Controlled Access Headings

Subject(s)
  • Company towns--History.--Appalachian Region, Southern

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