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Drexel University: College of Medicine Legacy Center [Contact Us]
1868-1918
Creator:
Bradford, Thomas Lindsley, 1847-1918
Extent: 36 containers
Dr. Thomas L. Bradford (1847-1918) was a practicing homeopathic physician in Maine, Europe and Philadelphia. While practicing and teaching in Philadelphia he served as curator for the Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital of Philadelphia. From 1896 to 1916, he collected, organized and maintained material for 35 scrapbooks of biographical information about homeopathic physicians. (View full finding aid.)
title
Bradford collection of biographies of Homoeopathic Physicians
creator
Bradford, Thomas Lindsley, 1847-1918
id
HU.SC.064
repository
extent
36 containers
inclusive date
1868-1918
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Dr. Thomas L. Bradford (1847-1918) was a practicing homeopathic physician in Maine, Europe and Philadelphia. While practicing and teaching in Philadelphia he served as curator for the Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital of Philadelphia. From 1896 to 1916, he collected, organized and maintained material for 35 scrapbooks of biographical information about homeopathic physicians.
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Drexel University: College of Medicine Legacy Center [Contact Us]
1820-2003
(Bulk: 1820-1940)
Creator:
Hering, Constantine, M.D., 1800-1880
Knerr, Calvin B., M.D., (Calvin Brobst Knerr), 1847-1940
Extent: 7 linear feet (12 document boxes, 4 half-size document boxes)
Dr. Constantine Hering (1800-1880), born and educated in Germany, immigrated to Philadelphia in 1833 and devoted his life to the study, practice and education of homeopathic medicine in the United States. As such, he is considered the father of homeopathy in America. Hering founded several schools and organizations devoted to teaching homeopathy, especially the North American Academy of the Homeopathic Healing Arts, aka the Allentown Academy, in 1836, and the Hahnemann Medical College of Philadelphia in 1848. Hering’s pupil and eventual son-in-law and professional assistant, Dr. Calvin B. Knerr, also practiced homeopathy. Knerr was integrally involved in the editing of two of Hering’s books and also devoted much time and effort to writing Hering’s biography, The Life of Hering. This collection primarily houses papers of Dr. Constantine Hering and his son-in-law, Dr. Calvin B. Knerr from 1820 to 1940. To a significantly lesser extent, the collection documents the North American Academy of the Homoeopathic Healing Arts, as well as the Hering, Knerr and Husmann families. The collection is comprised of correspondence; printed materials and publications, especially articles written by Hering; manuscripts; notes; diaries; medical school notebooks; family photographs; and other records; which evidence the life and work of Hering, Knerr and their families, as well as the practice and education of homeopathic medicine in the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. (View full finding aid.)
title
Constantine Hering and Calvin B. Knerr family papers
creator
Hering, Constantine, M.D., 1800-1880 Knerr, Calvin B., M.D., (Calvin Brobst Knerr), 1847-1940
id
HU.100
repository
extent
7 linear feet (12 document boxes, 4 half-size document boxes)
inclusive date
1820-2003
bulk date
1820-1940
abstract/scope/contents
Dr. Constantine Hering (1800-1880), born and educated in Germany, immigrated to Philadelphia in 1833 and devoted his life to the study, practice and education of homeopathic medicine in the United States. As such, he is considered the father of homeopathy in America. Hering founded several schools and organizations devoted to teaching homeopathy, especially the North American Academy of the Homeopathic Healing Arts, aka the Allentown Academy, in 1836, and the Hahnemann Medical College of Philadelphia in 1848. Hering’s pupil and eventual son-in-law and professional assistant, Dr. Calvin B. Knerr, also practiced homeopathy. Knerr was integrally involved in the editing of two of Hering’s books and also devoted much time and effort to writing Hering’s biography, The Life of Hering. This collection primarily houses papers of Dr. Constantine Hering and his son-in-law, Dr. Calvin B. Knerr from 1820 to 1940. To a significantly lesser extent, the collection documents the North American Academy of the Homoeopathic Healing Arts, as well as the Hering, Knerr and Husmann families. The collection is comprised of correspondence; printed materials and publications, especially articles written by Hering; manuscripts; notes; diaries; medical school notebooks; family photographs; and other records; which evidence the life and work of Hering, Knerr and their families, as well as the practice and education of homeopathic medicine in the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
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Drexel University: College of Medicine Legacy Center [Contact Us]
1890-1970
(Bulk: 1925-1965)
Creator:
Hay, George A.
Extent: 4.25 linear feet (8 document boxes; 1 half size document box)
From 1925 to 1970, the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania (WMC) underwent significant change, adapting to both survive and prosper in a transforming society. Administrative change was brought about and explored to spark institutional growth and/or to mollify financial stress. Among the more significant events in the College’s history was the 1930 move to new and larger facilities in East Falls, and an administrative reorganization in 1942. In the 1940s and 1960s, WMC also explored the financial and administrative benefits of merging with other institutions in the Philadelphia area; Kensington Women’s Hospital and the Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Jefferson Medical College. Amidst all of the change, WMC continued to honor its traditions and celebrate milestones, especially its Centennial Anniversary in 1950. In 1970, the College made the decision to admit male students for the first time and change its name to the Medical College of Pennsylvania. The George A. Hay collection of administrative files is a assemblage of records created by various administrators of the Woman’s College of Medicine from 1925 to 1965. Creators of the records include: George A. Hay, comptroller; Sarah Logan Wister Starr, president of the Board of Corporators; Vida Hunt Francis, secretary; Dr. Ellen Culver Potter, a member of the faculty as well as acting president in the 1940s; and others. In addition, there is a small sampling of very early administrative records, that are dated 1796, and from 1861 to 1928. Those files include a deed to land in East Falls in Philadelphia, report cards, correspondence and other materials. Generally speaking, the records housed in this collection evidence the day to day administration of the college, especially relating to its finances; financial planning; fundraising; future needs of the college; and a few significant landmarks in institutional history, the 1942 administrative reorganization, the 1950 Centennial Celebration, and explored institutional mergers with Jefferson Medical College, Kensington Women’s Hospital and Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia. (View full finding aid.)
title
George A. Hay collection of administrative files of the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania
creator
Hay, George A.
id
WMCP.R.293
repository
extent
4.25 linear feet (8 document boxes; 1 half size document box)
inclusive date
1890-1970
bulk date
1925-1965
abstract/scope/contents
From 1925 to 1970, the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania (WMC) underwent significant change, adapting to both survive and prosper in a transforming society. Administrative change was brought about and explored to spark institutional growth and/or to mollify financial stress. Among the more significant events in the College’s history was the 1930 move to new and larger facilities in East Falls, and an administrative reorganization in 1942. In the 1940s and 1960s, WMC also explored the financial and administrative benefits of merging with other institutions in the Philadelphia area; Kensington Women’s Hospital and the Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Jefferson Medical College. Amidst all of the change, WMC continued to honor its traditions and celebrate milestones, especially its Centennial Anniversary in 1950. In 1970, the College made the decision to admit male students for the first time and change its name to the Medical College of Pennsylvania. The George A. Hay collection of administrative files is a assemblage of records created by various administrators of the Woman’s College of Medicine from 1925 to 1965. Creators of the records include: George A. Hay, comptroller; Sarah Logan Wister Starr, president of the Board of Corporators; Vida Hunt Francis, secretary; Dr. Ellen Culver Potter, a member of the faculty as well as acting president in the 1940s; and others. In addition, there is a small sampling of very early administrative records, that are dated 1796, and from 1861 to 1928. Those files include a deed to land in East Falls in Philadelphia, report cards, correspondence and other materials. Generally speaking, the records housed in this collection evidence the day to day administration of the college, especially relating to its finances; financial planning; fundraising; future needs of the college; and a few significant landmarks in institutional history, the 1942 administrative reorganization, the 1950 Centennial Celebration, and explored institutional mergers with Jefferson Medical College, Kensington Women’s Hospital and Woman’s Hospital of Philadelphia.
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Drexel University: College of Medicine Legacy Center [Contact Us]
1848-2009
(Bulk: 1928-1994)
Extent: 240 linear feet
Hahnemann University’s long history began in 1848 with the founding of the Homeopathic Medical College of Pennsylvania. Over the years, the institution evolved in many ways, eventually becoming Hahnemann University and, later, the Drexel University College of Medicine. In the mid- to late-twentieth century, with the decline of homeopathy, Hahnemann re-invented itself as a nationally known academic medical center with prominence in cardiac surgery and cardiology, oncology, transplantation, training of non-physician health professionals, community health, and community mental health. This expertise led to many firsts for Hahnemann, including international advances in cardiac surgery. The Hahnemann University Academic Affairs records house the files of Hahnemann University and date from 1848 to 2009. The collection consists of annual and accreditation reports; minutes, memoranda, and correspondence from various committees, councils, and departments; records of student life and research; departmental research and publications; curriculum development and teaching materials; and other records created as a result of medical school governance. This collection thoroughly evidences the challenges, mission, accomplishments, and changes of a long-standing medical education program. While similar medical school records likely exist elsewhere, this collection provides a unique perspective on a school rooted in alternative medicine that evolved to remain prominent in the ever-shifting realms of medical education, research, and practice. (View full finding aid.)
title
Hahnemann University Academic Affairs records
creator
id
HU.003
repository
extent
240 linear feet
inclusive date
1848-2009
bulk date
1928-1994
abstract/scope/contents
Hahnemann University’s long history began in 1848 with the founding of the Homeopathic Medical College of Pennsylvania. Over the years, the institution evolved in many ways, eventually becoming Hahnemann University and, later, the Drexel University College of Medicine. In the mid- to late-twentieth century, with the decline of homeopathy, Hahnemann re-invented itself as a nationally known academic medical center with prominence in cardiac surgery and cardiology, oncology, transplantation, training of non-physician health professionals, community health, and community mental health. This expertise led to many firsts for Hahnemann, including international advances in cardiac surgery. The Hahnemann University Academic Affairs records house the files of Hahnemann University and date from 1848 to 2009. The collection consists of annual and accreditation reports; minutes, memoranda, and correspondence from various committees, councils, and departments; records of student life and research; departmental research and publications; curriculum development and teaching materials; and other records created as a result of medical school governance. This collection thoroughly evidences the challenges, mission, accomplishments, and changes of a long-standing medical education program. While similar medical school records likely exist elsewhere, this collection provides a unique perspective on a school rooted in alternative medicine that evolved to remain prominent in the ever-shifting realms of medical education, research, and practice.
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Drexel University: College of Medicine Legacy Center [Contact Us]
1819-1902
Creator:
Longshore, Hannah, 1819-1901
Longshore, J. S. (Joseph Skelton), 1809-1879
Longshore, Thomas E.
Extent: 20 folders
The Longshore family was active in Philadelphia medicine in the 19th century and the Longshore family papers includes material from Thomas Longshore, his brother Joseph Longshore, and his wife Hannah E. Myers Longshore. Thomas Longshore was a teacher and a supporter of women's education and social reform, especially abolition. Joseph Longshore (1809-1879) was a physician who supported women in acquiring quality medical education. He was active in founding the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania and later, the Penn Medical University in Philadelphia. Hannah E. Myers Longshore, M.D. (1819-1901), enrolled in and graduated from the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania’s first class in 1851 and became Philadelphia’s first female physician in private practice. She lectured extensively first at the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania and then at the Pennsylvania Medical University. She operated her private practice in Philadelphia for forty years before retiring in 1892. The Longshore family papers contains biographical and autobiographical sketches, a history of the Female Medical College, and a small amount of correspondence. (View full finding aid.)
title
Longshore family papers
creator
Longshore, Hannah, 1819-1901 Longshore, J. S. (Joseph Skelton), 1809-1879 Longshore, Thomas E.
id
WM.SC.075
repository
extent
20 folders
inclusive date
1819-1902
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
The Longshore family was active in Philadelphia medicine in the 19th century and the Longshore family papers includes material from Thomas Longshore, his brother Joseph Longshore, and his wife Hannah E. Myers Longshore. Thomas Longshore was a teacher and a supporter of women's education and social reform, especially abolition. Joseph Longshore (1809-1879) was a physician who supported women in acquiring quality medical education. He was active in founding the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania and later, the Penn Medical University in Philadelphia. Hannah E. Myers Longshore, M.D. (1819-1901), enrolled in and graduated from the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania’s first class in 1851 and became Philadelphia’s first female physician in private practice. She lectured extensively first at the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania and then at the Pennsylvania Medical University. She operated her private practice in Philadelphia for forty years before retiring in 1892. The Longshore family papers contains biographical and autobiographical sketches, a history of the Female Medical College, and a small amount of correspondence.
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