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Haverford College Quaker & Special Collections [Contact Us]
1922-1960
Creator:
Bowles, Gilbert, 1869-1960
Bowles, Minnie, 1868-1958
Extent: 1.5 linear feet
The Bowles family was deeply involved with Quaker missionary and relief work during the 20th century. In 1900, the Bowles moved to Japan under the auspices of the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting and managed the Friends School and established the Tokyo Friends Center. During World War II, the Bowles family moved to Hawaii and worked with war refugees. The Bowles family correspondence consists of correspondence from Gilbert and Minnie Pickett Bowles to their son Gordon Townsend Bowles from 1922 to 1932 and to Gordon Townsend and Jane T. Bowles from 1932 to 1960. This correspondence is essentially family correspondence, but also includes information regarding the Bowles' Quaker relief work, their views on Quakerism and their day-to-day activities. (View full finding aid.)
title
Bowles family correspondence
creator
Bowles, Gilbert, 1869-1960 Bowles, Minnie, 1868-1958
id
HC.Coll.1212
repository
extent
1.5 linear feet
inclusive date
1922-1960
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
The Bowles family was deeply involved with Quaker missionary and relief work during the 20th century. In 1900, the Bowles moved to Japan under the auspices of the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting and managed the Friends School and established the Tokyo Friends Center. During World War II, the Bowles family moved to Hawaii and worked with war refugees. The Bowles family correspondence consists of correspondence from Gilbert and Minnie Pickett Bowles to their son Gordon Townsend Bowles from 1922 to 1932 and to Gordon Townsend and Jane T. Bowles from 1932 to 1960. This correspondence is essentially family correspondence, but also includes information regarding the Bowles' Quaker relief work, their views on Quakerism and their day-to-day activities.
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Haverford College Quaker & Special Collections [Contact Us]
1896-2003
Creator:
Steere, Dorothy M., 1908-2003
Steere, Douglas V. (Douglas Van), 1901-1995
Extent: 128.5 linear feet
Douglas and Dorothy Steere were prominent figures of the Quaker movement in the twentieth century, and deeply committed to the causes of peace and spiritual enrichment. This commitment is evident in their involvement with Quaker-led relief work after World War II, Quaker spiritual retreats, international diplomacy, and Dorothy’s work with the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. Douglas taught philosophy at several institutions including Haverford College, and published extensively on topics in Quaker philosophy and history. This collection contains considerable material related to Douglas’s work as a writer, professor, and diplomat. Given his role as a distinguished figure within twentieth-century Quakerism, this material is also relevant to researchers interested in recent Quaker history as a whole. There is also some fascinating material produced and collected by Dorothy related to the Civil Rights movement, including a letter from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (View full finding aid.)
title
Douglas V. and Dorothy M. Steere papers
creator
Steere, Dorothy M., 1908-2003 Steere, Douglas V. (Douglas Van), 1901-1995
id
HC.Coll.1174
repository
extent
128.5 linear feet
inclusive date
1896-2003
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Douglas and Dorothy Steere were prominent figures of the Quaker movement in the twentieth century, and deeply committed to the causes of peace and spiritual enrichment. This commitment is evident in their involvement with Quaker-led relief work after World War II, Quaker spiritual retreats, international diplomacy, and Dorothy’s work with the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. Douglas taught philosophy at several institutions including Haverford College, and published extensively on topics in Quaker philosophy and history. This collection contains considerable material related to Douglas’s work as a writer, professor, and diplomat. Given his role as a distinguished figure within twentieth-century Quakerism, this material is also relevant to researchers interested in recent Quaker history as a whole. There is also some fascinating material produced and collected by Dorothy related to the Civil Rights movement, including a letter from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
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Haverford College Quaker & Special Collections [Contact Us]
1938-1964
Creator:
Chance, Harold J., 1898-1975
Extent: 6.5 linear feet
Harold J. Chance (1898-1975) worked for peace education through the American Friends Service Committee, the Peace Caravans, the Youth Section of the Emergency Peace Campaign, the Institute of International Relations, and the Friends Peace Service from 1934-1964. Included in the Harold Chance papers are correspondence, journals, writings, mailings, reports, and materials on the Friends Peace Service. Also included are Harold Haines Brinton's (1884-1973) lectures and course notes on topics such as history and religion, mysticism in various religions, religion and social change, and the philosophy of pacifism. Researchers will find this collection is especially rich in Quaker history, specifically relating to the discussion of the use of the Quaker voice by individual Friends’ groups, in the mid 1950’s. (View full finding aid.)
title
Harold J. Chance papers
creator
Chance, Harold J., 1898-1975
id
HC.Coll.1214
repository
extent
6.5 linear feet
inclusive date
1938-1964
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Harold J. Chance (1898-1975) worked for peace education through the American Friends Service Committee, the Peace Caravans, the Youth Section of the Emergency Peace Campaign, the Institute of International Relations, and the Friends Peace Service from 1934-1964. Included in the Harold Chance papers are correspondence, journals, writings, mailings, reports, and materials on the Friends Peace Service. Also included are Harold Haines Brinton's (1884-1973) lectures and course notes on topics such as history and religion, mysticism in various religions, religion and social change, and the philosophy of pacifism. Researchers will find this collection is especially rich in Quaker history, specifically relating to the discussion of the use of the Quaker voice by individual Friends’ groups, in the mid 1950’s.
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Haverford College Quaker & Special Collections [Contact Us]
1708-1995
(Bulk: 1912-1932)
Creator:
Vaux family
Vaux, George, III, 1909-1996
Vaux, George, Jr., 1863-1927
Vaux, George, Sr., 1832-1915
Walcott, Mary Vaux, 1860-1940
Extent: 12 linear feet (24 containers, 2 rolled documents)
The Vaux family was deeply involved with Quaker and Native American affairs throughout much of the nineteenth and early 20th centuries. George Vaux, Sr. was involved in Quaker activity through the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting and other Quaker meetings throughout the world (including Antigua and London). Both George Vaux, Jr. and his sister Mary Morris Vaux Walcott served as commissioners for the U.S. Board of Indian Commissioners. This organization was established by the United States Congress in 1869 to watch over federal policies regarding Native Americans and to make certain that treaty obligations were fulfilled, especially in reference to supply deliveries. George Vaux, III also worked as the treasurer of the Indian Committee of the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting. Within the collection are letters, reports, photographs, land surveys, and administrative records. This collection may be of special interest to researchers who are studying both the history and recent state of affairs of Native Americans in the United States. Of note in the collection are original Department of Interior documents, first-hand written accounts, and letters. Also, of great note are the land surveys, which provide valuable information from the early 1920s regarding the health, education, population, and land ownership of Native Americans, as well as maps, and photographs. (View full finding aid.)
title
Vaux family papers
creator
Vaux family Vaux, George, III, 1909-1996 Vaux, George, Jr., 1863-1927 Vaux, George, Sr., 1832-1915 Walcott, Mary Vaux, 1860-1940
id
HC.Coll.1217
repository
extent
12 linear feet (24 containers, 2 rolled documents)
inclusive date
1708-1995
bulk date
1912-1932
abstract/scope/contents
The Vaux family was deeply involved with Quaker and Native American affairs throughout much of the nineteenth and early 20th centuries. George Vaux, Sr. was involved in Quaker activity through the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting and other Quaker meetings throughout the world (including Antigua and London). Both George Vaux, Jr. and his sister Mary Morris Vaux Walcott served as commissioners for the U.S. Board of Indian Commissioners. This organization was established by the United States Congress in 1869 to watch over federal policies regarding Native Americans and to make certain that treaty obligations were fulfilled, especially in reference to supply deliveries. George Vaux, III also worked as the treasurer of the Indian Committee of the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting. Within the collection are letters, reports, photographs, land surveys, and administrative records. This collection may be of special interest to researchers who are studying both the history and recent state of affairs of Native Americans in the United States. Of note in the collection are original Department of Interior documents, first-hand written accounts, and letters. Also, of great note are the land surveys, which provide valuable information from the early 1920s regarding the health, education, population, and land ownership of Native Americans, as well as maps, and photographs.
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