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Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives [Contact Us]
1876-1904
Creator:
Dorr, Dalton, cre
Extent: 4.25 linear feet (10 document boxes)
Dalton Dorr played a key role in the early years of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art (later known as the Philadelphia Museum of Art). Dorr was elected Secretary of the Corporation in 1880. In 1888 he acted as both Secretary and Curator, and by 1892 he was performing the duties of Secretary, Director, and Curator. In 1899 William Platt Pepper took over as Director of the Museum, and Dorr continued on as Curator and Secretary. Dalton Door died on February 26, 1901. Shortly after, Edwin Atlee Barber assumed the roles of Secretary and Curator. This collection contains letter books, dating from 1876 to 1904, containing the correspondences of Dorr, Pepper, and Barber. The correspondence pertains to the Centennial exposition, Museum collections, acquisitions, exhibitions, staff, and repairs to Memorial Hall, as well as information regarding the formation of the Museum and its associated schools. (View full finding aid.)
title
Dalton Dorr Records
creator
Dorr, Dalton, cre
id
DOR
repository
extent
4.25 linear feet (10 document boxes)
inclusive date
1876-1904
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Dalton Dorr played a key role in the early years of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art (later known as the Philadelphia Museum of Art). Dorr was elected Secretary of the Corporation in 1880. In 1888 he acted as both Secretary and Curator, and by 1892 he was performing the duties of Secretary, Director, and Curator. In 1899 William Platt Pepper took over as Director of the Museum, and Dorr continued on as Curator and Secretary. Dalton Door died on February 26, 1901. Shortly after, Edwin Atlee Barber assumed the roles of Secretary and Curator. This collection contains letter books, dating from 1876 to 1904, containing the correspondences of Dorr, Pepper, and Barber. The correspondence pertains to the Centennial exposition, Museum collections, acquisitions, exhibitions, staff, and repairs to Memorial Hall, as well as information regarding the formation of the Museum and its associated schools.
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Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives [Contact Us]
1876-1904
Creator:
Dorr, Dalton
Extent: 4.25 linear feet (10 document boxes)
Dalton Dorr played a key role in the early years of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art (later known as the Philadelphia Museum of Art). Dorr was elected Secretary of the Corporation in 1880. In 1888 he acted as both Secretary and Curator, and by 1892 he was performing the duties of Secretary, Director, and Curator. In 1899 William Platt Pepper took over as Director of the Museum, and Dorr continued on as Curator and Secretary. Dalton Door died on February 26, 1901. Shortly after, Edwin Atlee Barber assumed the roles of Secretary and Curator. This collection contains letter books, dating from 1876 to 1904, containing the correspondences of Dorr, Pepper, and Barber. The correspondence pertains to the Centennial exposition, Museum collections, acquisitions, exhibitions, staff, and repairs to Memorial Hall, as well as information regarding the formation of the Museum and its associated schools. (View full finding aid.)
title
Dalton Dorr records
creator
Dorr, Dalton
id
PMA.009
repository
extent
4.25 linear feet (10 document boxes)
inclusive date
1876-1904
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Dalton Dorr played a key role in the early years of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art (later known as the Philadelphia Museum of Art). Dorr was elected Secretary of the Corporation in 1880. In 1888 he acted as both Secretary and Curator, and by 1892 he was performing the duties of Secretary, Director, and Curator. In 1899 William Platt Pepper took over as Director of the Museum, and Dorr continued on as Curator and Secretary. Dalton Door died on February 26, 1901. Shortly after, Edwin Atlee Barber assumed the roles of Secretary and Curator. This collection contains letter books, dating from 1876 to 1904, containing the correspondences of Dorr, Pepper, and Barber. The correspondence pertains to the Centennial exposition, Museum collections, acquisitions, exhibitions, staff, and repairs to Memorial Hall, as well as information regarding the formation of the Museum and its associated schools.
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Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives [Contact Us]
1898-1933
(Bulk: 1901-1916)
Creator:
Barber, Edwin Atlee, 1851-1916
Extent: 19.6 linear feet (47 document boxes)
Edwin Atlee Barber was Curator/Secretary of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art from 1901to 1907, Director/Curator from 1907 to 1916 and Honorary Curator of American Pottery and Porcelain from 1893 to 1916. His great interest was in pottery, porcelain, and ceramics, primarily early American works. A scholar and prolific writer, Barber wrote and published numerous articles on his specialty. He is considered a pioneering scholar in his field. The Edwin Atlee Barber records include both general and administrative correspondence from Barber’s tenure at the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art. The Museum was know as the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art until 1938, when it was changed to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Materials date from 1898 to 1933. Included in the collection are letters sent to Barber after his death; some of these letters were answered by Barber’s wife or daughter. This collection contains correspondence covering a broad range of topics and is especially rich in correspondence regarding acquisitions, appraisal, and the identification and authentication of artifacts. Consequently, the files also include rubbings of identification marks, tracings of patterns and sketches and photographs of artifacts. This collection also provides considerable information about day-to-day decisions that Barber made regarding staffing, building maintenance, acquisitions, publications, and exhibitions; as a result, the files include blueprints, measured drawings, and paper and fabric samples. (View full finding aid.)
title
Edwin Atlee Barber Records
creator
Barber, Edwin Atlee, 1851-1916
id
BAR
repository
extent
19.6 linear feet (47 document boxes)
inclusive date
1898-1933
bulk date
1901-1916
abstract/scope/contents
Edwin Atlee Barber was Curator/Secretary of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art from 1901to 1907, Director/Curator from 1907 to 1916 and Honorary Curator of American Pottery and Porcelain from 1893 to 1916. His great interest was in pottery, porcelain, and ceramics, primarily early American works. A scholar and prolific writer, Barber wrote and published numerous articles on his specialty. He is considered a pioneering scholar in his field. The Edwin Atlee Barber records include both general and administrative correspondence from Barber’s tenure at the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art. The Museum was know as the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art until 1938, when it was changed to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Materials date from 1898 to 1933. Included in the collection are letters sent to Barber after his death; some of these letters were answered by Barber’s wife or daughter. This collection contains correspondence covering a broad range of topics and is especially rich in correspondence regarding acquisitions, appraisal, and the identification and authentication of artifacts. Consequently, the files also include rubbings of identification marks, tracings of patterns and sketches and photographs of artifacts. This collection also provides considerable information about day-to-day decisions that Barber made regarding staffing, building maintenance, acquisitions, publications, and exhibitions; as a result, the files include blueprints, measured drawings, and paper and fabric samples.
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Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives [Contact Us]
1898-1933
(Bulk: 1901-1916)
Creator:
Barber, Edwin Atlee, 1851-1916
Extent: 19.6 linear feet (47 document boxes)
Edwin Atlee Barber was Curator/Secretary of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art from 1901to 1907, Director/Curator from 1907 to 1916 and Honorary Curator of American Pottery and Porcelain from 1893 to 1916. His great interest was in pottery, porcelain, and ceramics, primarily early American works. A scholar and prolific writer, Barber wrote and published numerous articles on his specialty. He is considered a pioneering scholar in his field. The Edwin Atlee Barber records include both general and administrative correspondence from Barber’s tenure at the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art. The Museum was know as the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art until 1938, when it was changed to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Materials date from 1898 to 1933. Included in the collection are letters sent to Barber after his death; some of these letters were answered by Barber’s wife or daughter. This collection contains correspondence covering a broad range of topics and is especially rich in correspondence regarding acquisitions, appraisal, and the identification and authentication of artifacts. Consequently, the files also include rubbings of identification marks, tracings of patterns and sketches and photographs of artifacts. This collection also provides considerable information about day-to-day decisions that Barber made regarding staffing, building maintenance, acquisitions, publications, and exhibitions; as a result, the files include blueprints, measured drawings, and paper and fabric samples. (View full finding aid.)
title
Edwin Atlee Barber records
creator
Barber, Edwin Atlee, 1851-1916
id
PMA.007
repository
extent
19.6 linear feet (47 document boxes)
inclusive date
1898-1933
bulk date
1901-1916
abstract/scope/contents
Edwin Atlee Barber was Curator/Secretary of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art from 1901to 1907, Director/Curator from 1907 to 1916 and Honorary Curator of American Pottery and Porcelain from 1893 to 1916. His great interest was in pottery, porcelain, and ceramics, primarily early American works. A scholar and prolific writer, Barber wrote and published numerous articles on his specialty. He is considered a pioneering scholar in his field. The Edwin Atlee Barber records include both general and administrative correspondence from Barber’s tenure at the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art. The Museum was know as the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art until 1938, when it was changed to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Materials date from 1898 to 1933. Included in the collection are letters sent to Barber after his death; some of these letters were answered by Barber’s wife or daughter. This collection contains correspondence covering a broad range of topics and is especially rich in correspondence regarding acquisitions, appraisal, and the identification and authentication of artifacts. Consequently, the files also include rubbings of identification marks, tracings of patterns and sketches and photographs of artifacts. This collection also provides considerable information about day-to-day decisions that Barber made regarding staffing, building maintenance, acquisitions, publications, and exhibitions; as a result, the files include blueprints, measured drawings, and paper and fabric samples.
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Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives [Contact Us]
1964-1978
Creator:
Turner, Evan H.
Extent: 146 linear feet (146 containers)
Evan H. Turner (born 1927), an art historian and scholar, was the Director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA) from 1964 to 1978, leading the Museum through a period of significant growth and transformation. He created new art departments for American and 20th Century Art, and the innovative Department of Urban Outreach (DUO) to promote art across the City of Philadelphia. These progressive activities were matched by a groundbreaking exhibition in 1973, the Marcel Duchamp retrospective, which drew upon significant scholarship and assembled virtually the entire oeuvre of one of the most important artists represented in the Museum. In 1975, Turner led the Museum in a major construction project to install a new climate control system in the building, and in 1976, he helped plan the United States’ Bicentennial and the PMA’s Centennial celebrations. Turner was an active member of a number of professional organizations, as well as a professor at the University of Pennsylvania. The Evan H. Turner records document Turner’s tenure as Director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA) from 1934 to 1978 (bulk: 1964-1978). A mix of correspondence, inter-office memoranda, reports, minutes and other records provide ample evidence of Turner’s leading position in the Museum’s growth and transformation during that time, as well as exhibition and event planning, and the daily operations of the Museum. The collection also documents Turner’s work with professional organizations, his efforts to help the City plan the 1976 Bicentennial celebrations, and his professorship at the University of Pennsylvania. (View full finding aid.)
title
Evan H. Turner records
creator
Turner, Evan H.
id
PMA.004
repository
extent
146 linear feet (146 containers)
inclusive date
1964-1978
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Evan H. Turner (born 1927), an art historian and scholar, was the Director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA) from 1964 to 1978, leading the Museum through a period of significant growth and transformation. He created new art departments for American and 20th Century Art, and the innovative Department of Urban Outreach (DUO) to promote art across the City of Philadelphia. These progressive activities were matched by a groundbreaking exhibition in 1973, the Marcel Duchamp retrospective, which drew upon significant scholarship and assembled virtually the entire oeuvre of one of the most important artists represented in the Museum. In 1975, Turner led the Museum in a major construction project to install a new climate control system in the building, and in 1976, he helped plan the United States’ Bicentennial and the PMA’s Centennial celebrations. Turner was an active member of a number of professional organizations, as well as a professor at the University of Pennsylvania. The Evan H. Turner records document Turner’s tenure as Director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA) from 1934 to 1978 (bulk: 1964-1978). A mix of correspondence, inter-office memoranda, reports, minutes and other records provide ample evidence of Turner’s leading position in the Museum’s growth and transformation during that time, as well as exhibition and event planning, and the daily operations of the Museum. The collection also documents Turner’s work with professional organizations, his efforts to help the City plan the 1976 Bicentennial celebrations, and his professorship at the University of Pennsylvania.
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Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives [Contact Us]
1964-1978
Creator:
Turner, Evan H., cre
Extent: 146 linear feet (146 containers)
Evan H. Turner (born 1927), an art historian and scholar, was the Director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA) from 1964 to 1978, leading the Museum through a period of significant growth and transformation. He created new art departments for American and 20th Century Art, and the innovative Department of Urban Outreach (DUO) to promote art across the City of Philadelphia. These progressive activities were matched by a groundbreaking exhibition in 1973, the Marcel Duchamp retrospective, which drew upon significant scholarship and assembled virtually the entire oeuvre of one of the most important artists represented in the Museum. In 1975, Turner led the Museum in a major construction project to install a new climate control system in the building, and in 1976, he helped plan the United States’ Bicentennial and the PMA’s Centennial celebrations. Turner was an active member of a number of professional organizations, as well as a professor at the University of Pennsylvania. The Evan H. Turner records document Turner’s tenure as Director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA) from 1934 to 1978 (bulk: 1964-1978). A mix of correspondence, inter-office memoranda, reports, minutes and other records provide ample evidence of Turner’s leading position in the Museum’s growth and transformation during that time, as well as exhibition and event planning, and the daily operations of the Museum. The collection also documents Turner’s work with professional organizations, his efforts to help the City plan the 1976 Bicentennial celebrations, and his professorship at the University of Pennsylvania. (View full finding aid.)
title
Evan H. Turner Records
creator
Turner, Evan H., cre
id
PMA.004
repository
extent
146 linear feet (146 containers)
inclusive date
1964-1978
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Evan H. Turner (born 1927), an art historian and scholar, was the Director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA) from 1964 to 1978, leading the Museum through a period of significant growth and transformation. He created new art departments for American and 20th Century Art, and the innovative Department of Urban Outreach (DUO) to promote art across the City of Philadelphia. These progressive activities were matched by a groundbreaking exhibition in 1973, the Marcel Duchamp retrospective, which drew upon significant scholarship and assembled virtually the entire oeuvre of one of the most important artists represented in the Museum. In 1975, Turner led the Museum in a major construction project to install a new climate control system in the building, and in 1976, he helped plan the United States’ Bicentennial and the PMA’s Centennial celebrations. Turner was an active member of a number of professional organizations, as well as a professor at the University of Pennsylvania. The Evan H. Turner records document Turner’s tenure as Director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA) from 1934 to 1978 (bulk: 1964-1978). A mix of correspondence, inter-office memoranda, reports, minutes and other records provide ample evidence of Turner’s leading position in the Museum’s growth and transformation during that time, as well as exhibition and event planning, and the daily operations of the Museum. The collection also documents Turner’s work with professional organizations, his efforts to help the City plan the 1976 Bicentennial celebrations, and his professorship at the University of Pennsylvania.
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Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives [Contact Us]
1916-1929
(Bulk: 1917-1923)
Creator:
Bell, Edward Hamilton, cre
Warner, Langdon, cre
Woodhouse, Samuel W., Jr., cre
Extent: 4.58 linear feet (11 document boxes)
Langdon Warner, a scholar of Asian art and an archeologist, was Director of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art from 1917 to 1923. Warner also served as Curator of the Wilstach Collection (the Wilstach family art collection was bequeathed to the city in 1892 and custodianship was transferred to the Museum in 1917). While serving as Director of the Museum Warner, traveled extensively in Asia and was often away from the Museum. Almost immediately after taking the job, he departed for Japan where he set about acquiring works of art that "were thought too good to lose." The Langdon Warner records contain correspondence of Langdon Warner, Museum Director between 1917 and 1923, and E. Hamilton Bell, Acting Director during Warner’s absence. At the time, the Museum's collections were housed in Fairmount Park's Memorial Hall. The correspondence mainly concerns the Museum's facilities, collections, exhibitions and purchases. This collection is divided into two series: Series “I. Director’s correspondence”, covering the period from 1917 to 1923; and Series “II. Acting Director E. Hamilton Bell correspondence”, dating from 1918 to 1929. Due to previous filing conventions, E. Hamilton Bell’s correspondence is found throughout both series, although the series name suggests a separation of materials. (View full finding aid.)
title
Langdon Warner Records
creator
Bell, Edward Hamilton, cre Warner, Langdon, cre Woodhouse, Samuel W., Jr., cre
id
WAR
repository
extent
4.58 linear feet (11 document boxes)
inclusive date
1916-1929
bulk date
1917-1923
abstract/scope/contents
Langdon Warner, a scholar of Asian art and an archeologist, was Director of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art from 1917 to 1923. Warner also served as Curator of the Wilstach Collection (the Wilstach family art collection was bequeathed to the city in 1892 and custodianship was transferred to the Museum in 1917). While serving as Director of the Museum Warner, traveled extensively in Asia and was often away from the Museum. Almost immediately after taking the job, he departed for Japan where he set about acquiring works of art that "were thought too good to lose." The Langdon Warner records contain correspondence of Langdon Warner, Museum Director between 1917 and 1923, and E. Hamilton Bell, Acting Director during Warner’s absence. At the time, the Museum's collections were housed in Fairmount Park's Memorial Hall. The correspondence mainly concerns the Museum's facilities, collections, exhibitions and purchases. This collection is divided into two series: Series “I. Director’s correspondence”, covering the period from 1917 to 1923; and Series “II. Acting Director E. Hamilton Bell correspondence”, dating from 1918 to 1929. Due to previous filing conventions, E. Hamilton Bell’s correspondence is found throughout both series, although the series name suggests a separation of materials.
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Philadelphia Museum of Art Archives [Contact Us]
1916-1929
(Bulk: 1917-1923)
Creator:
Bell, Edward Hamilton
Warner, Langdon
Woodhouse, Samuel W. Junior
Extent: 4.58 linear feet (11 document boxes)
Langdon Warner, a scholar of Asian art and an archeologist, was Director of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art from 1917 to 1923. Warner also served as Curator of the Wilstach Collection (the Wilstach family art collection was bequeathed to the city in 1892 and custodianship was transferred to the Museum in 1917). While serving as Director of the Museum Warner, traveled extensively in Asia and was often away from the Museum. Almost immediately after taking the job, he departed for Japan where he set about acquiring works of art that "were thought too good to lose." The Langdon Warner records contain correspondence of Langdon Warner, Museum Director between 1917 and 1923, and E. Hamilton Bell, Acting Director during Warner’s absence. At the time, the Museum's collections were housed in Fairmount Park's Memorial Hall. The correspondence mainly concerns the Museum's facilities, collections, exhibitions and purchases. This collection is divided into two series: Series “I. Director’s correspondence”, covering the period from 1917 to 1923; and Series “II. Acting Director E. Hamilton Bell correspondence”, dating from 1918 to 1929. Due to previous filing conventions, E. Hamilton Bell’s correspondence is found throughout both series, although the series name suggests a separation of materials. (View full finding aid.)
title
Langdon Warner records
creator
Bell, Edward Hamilton Warner, Langdon Woodhouse, Samuel W. Junior
id
PMA.008
repository
extent
4.58 linear feet (11 document boxes)
inclusive date
1916-1929
bulk date
1917-1923
abstract/scope/contents
Langdon Warner, a scholar of Asian art and an archeologist, was Director of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art from 1917 to 1923. Warner also served as Curator of the Wilstach Collection (the Wilstach family art collection was bequeathed to the city in 1892 and custodianship was transferred to the Museum in 1917). While serving as Director of the Museum Warner, traveled extensively in Asia and was often away from the Museum. Almost immediately after taking the job, he departed for Japan where he set about acquiring works of art that "were thought too good to lose." The Langdon Warner records contain correspondence of Langdon Warner, Museum Director between 1917 and 1923, and E. Hamilton Bell, Acting Director during Warner’s absence. At the time, the Museum's collections were housed in Fairmount Park's Memorial Hall. The correspondence mainly concerns the Museum's facilities, collections, exhibitions and purchases. This collection is divided into two series: Series “I. Director’s correspondence”, covering the period from 1917 to 1923; and Series “II. Acting Director E. Hamilton Bell correspondence”, dating from 1918 to 1929. Due to previous filing conventions, E. Hamilton Bell’s correspondence is found throughout both series, although the series name suggests a separation of materials.
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