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Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center [Contact Us]
1850-2011
(Bulk: 1938-1971)
Creator:
Freedman, Abraham L., 1904-1971
Extent: 45 linear feet
The Honorable Abraham L. Freedman, a long-time attorney and later judge, was an influential civic leader in Philadelphia’s movements towards political and civic reform in the 1940s and 1950s. As a staunch Democrat, Freedman’s career highlights include helping draft a new charter for the city of Philadelphia (and later serving as city solicitor under the newly instated charter), extensive work as an anti-discrimination advocate for racial and ethnic minorities, and federal judicial appointments with the United States District Court and the United States Court of Appeals. This collection, which dates from 1850 to 2011, with bulk dates of 1938 to 1971, consists of correspondence, case files, logs, research, memoranda, writings, speeches, reports, manuscripts, and clippings evidencing the workings of city and state government, especially during the period of the City-County Consolidation. Additionally, the records document social turmoil regarding race relations in Philadelphia, and the efforts of civic associations to change the social climate and opinions on various ethnic and cultural groups. The collection provides an in-depth view of how Philadelphia politics and changes in government shaped the city into what it is today, as well as uniquely documenting the cultural climate in Philadelphia at the time. (View full finding aid.)
title
Abraham L. Freedman papers
creator
Freedman, Abraham L., 1904-1971
id
TUPJAC.001
repository
extent
45 linear feet
inclusive date
1850-2011
bulk date
1938-1971
abstract/scope/contents
The Honorable Abraham L. Freedman, a long-time attorney and later judge, was an influential civic leader in Philadelphia’s movements towards political and civic reform in the 1940s and 1950s. As a staunch Democrat, Freedman’s career highlights include helping draft a new charter for the city of Philadelphia (and later serving as city solicitor under the newly instated charter), extensive work as an anti-discrimination advocate for racial and ethnic minorities, and federal judicial appointments with the United States District Court and the United States Court of Appeals. This collection, which dates from 1850 to 2011, with bulk dates of 1938 to 1971, consists of correspondence, case files, logs, research, memoranda, writings, speeches, reports, manuscripts, and clippings evidencing the workings of city and state government, especially during the period of the City-County Consolidation. Additionally, the records document social turmoil regarding race relations in Philadelphia, and the efforts of civic associations to change the social climate and opinions on various ethnic and cultural groups. The collection provides an in-depth view of how Philadelphia politics and changes in government shaped the city into what it is today, as well as uniquely documenting the cultural climate in Philadelphia at the time.
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Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center [Contact Us]
1930-2007
Creator:
Schatz, Albert, 1920-2005
Extent: 14 boxes
Dr. Albert Schatz joined the staff of the Science Education Department at Temple University’s College of Education in 1969. Dr. Schatz was internationally known for his scientific research. His most important work, and the major subject of this collection, concerns the discovery of the first effective drug against tuberculosis – the drug streptomycin – during the years 1943 and 1944. His other research, which is also represented in this collection, explored a proteolysis-chelation theory of tooth decay and the potential dangers of water fluoridation. (View full finding aid.)
title
Albert Schatz, Ph.D papers
creator
Schatz, Albert, 1920-2005
id
TUSCRC.SPC.MSS.104
repository
extent
14 boxes
inclusive date
1930-2007
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Dr. Albert Schatz joined the staff of the Science Education Department at Temple University’s College of Education in 1969. Dr. Schatz was internationally known for his scientific research. His most important work, and the major subject of this collection, concerns the discovery of the first effective drug against tuberculosis – the drug streptomycin – during the years 1943 and 1944. His other research, which is also represented in this collection, explored a proteolysis-chelation theory of tooth decay and the potential dangers of water fluoridation.
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Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center [Contact Us]
1968 August-1969 December
Creator:
Black Coalition.
Extent: 3.5 linear feet
The Black Coalition was formed in response to the growing concern among certain members of the Greater Philadelphia Movement that efforts to establish a meaningful dialogue between whites and blacks in Philadelphia were failing. The reason for this was attributed to the lack of communication with the so-called “gang element” in the city. Convinced of the necessity to deal with this element, a meeting was planned for Good Friday, April 12, 1968, one week after the assassination of Martin Luther King. A broad cross section of both the white and black communities were invited to this meeting, including a number of gang leaders. It was at this meeting that the Black coalition was formed, as a vehicle to maintain an ongoing dialogue between the white business community and the gang element, as well as other segments of the black community within the city. This collection dates from April 1968 to December 1969 and the bulk of the materials cover the time during which the Black Coalition operated, from April 1968 to April 1969. The collection contains records from the Black Coalition, the Good Friday Group, and the Greater Philadelphia Movement, along with its fiduciary body, the Greater Philadelphia Foundation. All of the records, regardless of the originating organization, pertain to the operations of the Black Coalition, and include correspondence and clerical records relating to funding the Black Coalition and its programs or projects. (View full finding aid.)
title
Black Coalition records
creator
Black Coalition.
id
TUSCRC.296
repository
extent
3.5 linear feet
inclusive date
1968 August-1969 December
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
The Black Coalition was formed in response to the growing concern among certain members of the Greater Philadelphia Movement that efforts to establish a meaningful dialogue between whites and blacks in Philadelphia were failing. The reason for this was attributed to the lack of communication with the so-called “gang element” in the city. Convinced of the necessity to deal with this element, a meeting was planned for Good Friday, April 12, 1968, one week after the assassination of Martin Luther King. A broad cross section of both the white and black communities were invited to this meeting, including a number of gang leaders. It was at this meeting that the Black coalition was formed, as a vehicle to maintain an ongoing dialogue between the white business community and the gang element, as well as other segments of the black community within the city. This collection dates from April 1968 to December 1969 and the bulk of the materials cover the time during which the Black Coalition operated, from April 1968 to April 1969. The collection contains records from the Black Coalition, the Good Friday Group, and the Greater Philadelphia Movement, along with its fiduciary body, the Greater Philadelphia Foundation. All of the records, regardless of the originating organization, pertain to the operations of the Black Coalition, and include correspondence and clerical records relating to funding the Black Coalition and its programs or projects.
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Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center [Contact Us]
1862-1970
Creator:
Morice, Charles, 1861-1919
Extent: 9 boxes
Charles Morice was a prolific spokesman for the Symbolist movement. He was at times a poet, playwright, shipping clerk, literary critic, professor of literature, and lecturer. He collaborated in the founding of Mercure de France, the “organ of the purest Symbolism.” He attended Stéphene Maliarmé’a “Tuesdays,” weekly social gatherings of Symbolist writers and painters. While writing for Le Matin he was assigned to cover the death penalty debate. He corresponded with many famous artists on their thoughts on the death penalty. He also collaborated with the painter Paul Gauguin on his book Noa Noa, and with Auguste Rodin on his book Les Cathedrals des France. Morice wrote and had several unfinished manuscripts when he died on March 18, 1919. The collection of Morice’s papers comprises nine boxes and sixteen volumes. The collection is divided into printed material, his journals and notebooks which were called Petite Journaux, correspondence, and Morice manuscripts. Included in the correspondence are the letters sent to him concerning the death penalty. There are over 500 leaves of “fragments” that await a scholar knowledgeable in Morice’s career to identify the portions; many pages are readily indentified as belonging together (View full finding aid.)
title
Charles Morice papers
creator
Morice, Charles, 1861-1919
id
TUSCRC.SPC.MSS.LT016
repository
extent
9 boxes
inclusive date
1862-1970
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Charles Morice was a prolific spokesman for the Symbolist movement. He was at times a poet, playwright, shipping clerk, literary critic, professor of literature, and lecturer. He collaborated in the founding of Mercure de France, the “organ of the purest Symbolism.” He attended Stéphene Maliarmé’a “Tuesdays,” weekly social gatherings of Symbolist writers and painters. While writing for Le Matin he was assigned to cover the death penalty debate. He corresponded with many famous artists on their thoughts on the death penalty. He also collaborated with the painter Paul Gauguin on his book Noa Noa, and with Auguste Rodin on his book Les Cathedrals des France. Morice wrote and had several unfinished manuscripts when he died on March 18, 1919. The collection of Morice’s papers comprises nine boxes and sixteen volumes. The collection is divided into printed material, his journals and notebooks which were called Petite Journaux, correspondence, and Morice manuscripts. Included in the correspondence are the letters sent to him concerning the death penalty. There are over 500 leaves of “fragments” that await a scholar knowledgeable in Morice’s career to identify the portions; many pages are readily indentified as belonging together
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Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center [Contact Us]
1884-1937
Creator:
Stuart, Edwin S. (Edwin Sydney), 1853-1937
Extent: 40 boxes
Edwin Sydney Stuart (1853-1937) was a Philadelphia businessman and politician during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In addition to owning and operating a successful bookstore, Stuart also served as mayor of Philadelphia from 1891 to 1995 and governor of Pennsylvania from 1907 to 1911. The Edwin S. Stuart papers, as received by Temple University, reflect a portion of the files from the Stuart/Emmons family and material stored at Leary & Co. prior to the closing of the firm in 1969. The records date from 1884 to 1937, and reflect both the archives of the Leary firm and the political and social activities of Governor Stuart. His papers document a variety of personal activities and social functions as well as his work with Girard College and the Union League. While the papers do document some of his political functions in Philadelphia and Pennsylvania, this collection does not contain his formal political office files. (View full finding aid.)
title
Edwin S. Stuart papers
creator
Stuart, Edwin S. (Edwin Sydney), 1853-1937
id
TUSCRC.SPC.MSS.SP001
repository
extent
40 boxes
inclusive date
1884-1937
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Edwin Sydney Stuart (1853-1937) was a Philadelphia businessman and politician during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In addition to owning and operating a successful bookstore, Stuart also served as mayor of Philadelphia from 1891 to 1995 and governor of Pennsylvania from 1907 to 1911. The Edwin S. Stuart papers, as received by Temple University, reflect a portion of the files from the Stuart/Emmons family and material stored at Leary & Co. prior to the closing of the firm in 1969. The records date from 1884 to 1937, and reflect both the archives of the Leary firm and the political and social activities of Governor Stuart. His papers document a variety of personal activities and social functions as well as his work with Girard College and the Union League. While the papers do document some of his political functions in Philadelphia and Pennsylvania, this collection does not contain his formal political office files.
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Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center [Contact Us]
1948-2009
Creator:
Friends Housing Cooperative, Inc.
Extent: 3 linear feet
Two Quaker Organizations concerned about urban housing, The American Friends Service Committee and the Friends Neighborhood Guild (FNG) formed the Friends "self-help" Corporation (now called the Friends Housing Cooperative, Inc.) in 1952. The collection, consisting of three linear feet, covers the time period from 1948 to 2009, with the bulk of the materials dating from 2001 to 2009. Materials include correspondence; administrative, legal and financial records; and information regarding membership, projects and publications. (View full finding aid.)
title
Friends Housing Cooperative, Inc. records
creator
Friends Housing Cooperative, Inc.
id
TUSCRC.1073
repository
extent
3 linear feet
inclusive date
1948-2009
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Two Quaker Organizations concerned about urban housing, The American Friends Service Committee and the Friends Neighborhood Guild (FNG) formed the Friends "self-help" Corporation (now called the Friends Housing Cooperative, Inc.) in 1952. The collection, consisting of three linear feet, covers the time period from 1948 to 2009, with the bulk of the materials dating from 2001 to 2009. Materials include correspondence; administrative, legal and financial records; and information regarding membership, projects and publications.
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Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center [Contact Us]
1903-2004
Creator:
Friends Neighborhood Guild.
Extent: 19 linear feet (24 containers)
The Friends Neighborhood Guild social settlement was founded by Quakers in the Northern Liberties section of Philadelphia in 1879; its mission, “...to serve and respond to the needs of the people in its community, particularly those people who are less able to help themselves,” (FNG, p.3). Throughout its more-than-hundred-year history, this mission has guided the Guild’s programs, which have evolved to meet its ever-changing constituents’ needs. At different times, its work has focused on education, Americanization, recreation, housing, community organization and other areas of social need. The Friends Neighborhood Guild records date from 1903 to 2004, with the bulk of materials dating from the second half of the twentieth-century. The records evidence the social programs and activities of the Guild, as well as its relationships with other agencies, such as the Greater Philadelphia Federation of Settlements, Philadelphia Housing Authority and the United Way. In addition to general administrative records, financial records, meeting minutes and subject files, there is a nice collection of candid snapshots and scrapbooks, documenting Guild activities and its neighborhood from the 1950s to 1960s. Researchers interested in the history of settlement houses and social welfare programs, or in the history of the Northern Liberties/Kensington neighborhoods of Philadelphia during the twentieth century would find this collection useful. (View full finding aid.)
title
Friends Neighborhood Guild records
creator
Friends Neighborhood Guild.
id
TUSCRC.FNG
repository
extent
19 linear feet (24 containers)
inclusive date
1903-2004
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
The Friends Neighborhood Guild social settlement was founded by Quakers in the Northern Liberties section of Philadelphia in 1879; its mission, “...to serve and respond to the needs of the people in its community, particularly those people who are less able to help themselves,” (FNG, p.3). Throughout its more-than-hundred-year history, this mission has guided the Guild’s programs, which have evolved to meet its ever-changing constituents’ needs. At different times, its work has focused on education, Americanization, recreation, housing, community organization and other areas of social need. The Friends Neighborhood Guild records date from 1903 to 2004, with the bulk of materials dating from the second half of the twentieth-century. The records evidence the social programs and activities of the Guild, as well as its relationships with other agencies, such as the Greater Philadelphia Federation of Settlements, Philadelphia Housing Authority and the United Way. In addition to general administrative records, financial records, meeting minutes and subject files, there is a nice collection of candid snapshots and scrapbooks, documenting Guild activities and its neighborhood from the 1950s to 1960s. Researchers interested in the history of settlement houses and social welfare programs, or in the history of the Northern Liberties/Kensington neighborhoods of Philadelphia during the twentieth century would find this collection useful.
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Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center [Contact Us]
1946-1994
Creator:
Germantown Settlement.
Extent: 62.3 linear feet (63 containers)
Germantown Settlement was founded in 1934, when two existing social welfare agencies, Morton Street Day Nursery and Working People's Aid, Inc. and Germantown Community Center merged. Like most settlements, it provided wide-ranging services to its community, including child care, educational and vocational instruction, and classes in art and music. In the 1950s and 1960s, it also worked closely with city agencies to facilitate urban renewal in the Morton neighborhood, while at the same time encouraging community participation and empowerment. The Germantown Settlement collection houses the records of this social welfare organization from 1946 to 1994, with a majority of the material dating from 1970 to the early 1990s. The collection contains business records, correspondence, financial documents and program files. Taken together, the records evidence Germantown Settlement’s efforts to assist and generally improve the lives of Germantown residents, particularly the youth and elderly populations, fight crime and eradicate urban blight. While the collection does not offer exhaustive documentation of the Settlement or any of its program, the records do enable an overall understanding of the organization, its programs and the overarching issues of its community. There is some documentation of the general administration of the Settlement, especially its leadership and finances, as well as its relationship with other social welfare agencies. (View full finding aid.)
title
Germantown Settlement records
creator
Germantown Settlement.
id
TUSCRC.Germantown.Settlement
repository
extent
62.3 linear feet (63 containers)
inclusive date
1946-1994
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Germantown Settlement was founded in 1934, when two existing social welfare agencies, Morton Street Day Nursery and Working People's Aid, Inc. and Germantown Community Center merged. Like most settlements, it provided wide-ranging services to its community, including child care, educational and vocational instruction, and classes in art and music. In the 1950s and 1960s, it also worked closely with city agencies to facilitate urban renewal in the Morton neighborhood, while at the same time encouraging community participation and empowerment. The Germantown Settlement collection houses the records of this social welfare organization from 1946 to 1994, with a majority of the material dating from 1970 to the early 1990s. The collection contains business records, correspondence, financial documents and program files. Taken together, the records evidence Germantown Settlement’s efforts to assist and generally improve the lives of Germantown residents, particularly the youth and elderly populations, fight crime and eradicate urban blight. While the collection does not offer exhaustive documentation of the Settlement or any of its program, the records do enable an overall understanding of the organization, its programs and the overarching issues of its community. There is some documentation of the general administration of the Settlement, especially its leadership and finances, as well as its relationship with other social welfare agencies.
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Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center [Contact Us]
1945-1985
(Bulk: 1965-1977)
Creator:
Health/PAC.
Extent: 70.4 linear feet (169 containers)
The Health Political Advisory Center, a health advocacy and research organization, was based in New York City and active from 1968 until 1977. The policies advocated by Health/PAC were largely left-wing and socialist health care programs, with special attention given to national health insurance, patients’ rights, and health care for disadvantaged, minority, and/or immigrant populations. The main purpose of Health/PAC was to spread information and foster activism through publications, conferences, and other events. Health/PAC published a variety of pamphlets, newsletters, bibliographies, and two books: The American Health Empire (1971) and Prognosis Negative (1976). The organization's newsletter, The Bulletin, was published regularly from 1968 until the late 1990s. After Health/PAC closed in 1977, The Bulletin's publication was carried out by a volunteer board of editors. This collection contains papers relating to Health/PAC’s primary functions and operation. The materials date from 1945 to 1985, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1965 to 1977. This collection includes research on various health and health care issues gathered by Health/PAC, Health/PAC’s newsletter ( The Bulletin), and correspondence with doctors, activists and politicians. Though the organization was based in New York City, Health/PAC was interested in health and health care globally, the materials collected by the organization reflect that interest, with records covering health care events and issues throughout the United States and in several foreign countries. Of particular interest are the materials about changes in women’s health care during this time period; mental health and the treatment of mental illnesses; drug abuse; the Marxist, Socialist, and Communist movements within the United States and their relationship to health care issues; and specific health events that occurred during the 1960s and 1970s, such as Legionnaire’s Disease and the swine flu outbreak of 1976. (View full finding aid.)
title
Health/PAC records
creator
Health/PAC.
id
TUSCLR.Health.PAC
repository
extent
70.4 linear feet (169 containers)
inclusive date
1945-1985
bulk date
1965-1977
abstract/scope/contents
The Health Political Advisory Center, a health advocacy and research organization, was based in New York City and active from 1968 until 1977. The policies advocated by Health/PAC were largely left-wing and socialist health care programs, with special attention given to national health insurance, patients’ rights, and health care for disadvantaged, minority, and/or immigrant populations. The main purpose of Health/PAC was to spread information and foster activism through publications, conferences, and other events. Health/PAC published a variety of pamphlets, newsletters, bibliographies, and two books: The American Health Empire (1971) and Prognosis Negative (1976). The organization's newsletter, The Bulletin, was published regularly from 1968 until the late 1990s. After Health/PAC closed in 1977, The Bulletin's publication was carried out by a volunteer board of editors. This collection contains papers relating to Health/PAC’s primary functions and operation. The materials date from 1945 to 1985, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1965 to 1977. This collection includes research on various health and health care issues gathered by Health/PAC, Health/PAC’s newsletter ( The Bulletin), and correspondence with doctors, activists and politicians. Though the organization was based in New York City, Health/PAC was interested in health and health care globally, the materials collected by the organization reflect that interest, with records covering health care events and issues throughout the United States and in several foreign countries. Of particular interest are the materials about changes in women’s health care during this time period; mental health and the treatment of mental illnesses; drug abuse; the Marxist, Socialist, and Communist movements within the United States and their relationship to health care issues; and specific health events that occurred during the 1960s and 1970s, such as Legionnaire’s Disease and the swine flu outbreak of 1976.
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Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center [Contact Us]
1802-2002
(Bulk: 1888-1980)
Creator:
Female Hebrew Benevolent Society (Philadelphia, Pa.).
Hebrew Education Society (Philadelphia, Pa.).
Hebrew Sunday School Society of Philadelphia (Pa.).
Extent: 35 linear feet
In 1838, Rebecca Gratz (a Jewish philanthropist in Philadelphia), along with the Female Hebrew Benevolent Society, founded a Sunday School in Philadelphia that was open to all Jewish children regardless of parental financial standing or synagogue affiliation. Founded in 1819, the Female Hebrew Benevolent Society was the first Jewish charitable organization in Philadelphia, and the first such organization in the United States to offer free basic Jewish religious education. In the first year of operation, attendance at the school grew to 80 students, a number which represented nearly 90 percent of the Jewish children in Philadelphia at the time. The Female Hebrew Benevolent Society operated the Sunday School until 1858 when it was incorporated as the Hebrew Sunday School Society (HSSS). Rebecca Gratz served as president of the organization until she was 80 years of age. The Hebrew Sunday School Society records house the organizational records of HSSS. This collection, which dates from 1802 to 2002, consists of minutes, reports, correspondence, budgets and financial statements, staff and student lists, event programs, clippings, books and research materials, photographs, lantern slides, pins, plaques, and other memorabilia. These records and materials document the history and evolution of HSSS and evidence an organization concerned with the betterment of Jewish children through religious education, including those with special needs. The collection is a unique and rich example of the growth and establishment of the first Hebrew Sunday schools that existed outside of any synagogue, with records that provide a look into how decisions were made over the course of the Society’s existence regarding what and how to teach, as well as a look into Jewish life in Philadelphia. (View full finding aid.)
title
Hebrew Sunday School Society of Philadelphia (Pa.) records
creator
Female Hebrew Benevolent Society (Philadelphia, Pa.). Hebrew Education Society (Philadelphia, Pa.). Hebrew Sunday School Society of Philadelphia (Pa.).
id
TUPJAC.002
repository
extent
35 linear feet
inclusive date
1802-2002
bulk date
1888-1980
abstract/scope/contents
In 1838, Rebecca Gratz (a Jewish philanthropist in Philadelphia), along with the Female Hebrew Benevolent Society, founded a Sunday School in Philadelphia that was open to all Jewish children regardless of parental financial standing or synagogue affiliation. Founded in 1819, the Female Hebrew Benevolent Society was the first Jewish charitable organization in Philadelphia, and the first such organization in the United States to offer free basic Jewish religious education. In the first year of operation, attendance at the school grew to 80 students, a number which represented nearly 90 percent of the Jewish children in Philadelphia at the time. The Female Hebrew Benevolent Society operated the Sunday School until 1858 when it was incorporated as the Hebrew Sunday School Society (HSSS). Rebecca Gratz served as president of the organization until she was 80 years of age. The Hebrew Sunday School Society records house the organizational records of HSSS. This collection, which dates from 1802 to 2002, consists of minutes, reports, correspondence, budgets and financial statements, staff and student lists, event programs, clippings, books and research materials, photographs, lantern slides, pins, plaques, and other memorabilia. These records and materials document the history and evolution of HSSS and evidence an organization concerned with the betterment of Jewish children through religious education, including those with special needs. The collection is a unique and rich example of the growth and establishment of the first Hebrew Sunday schools that existed outside of any synagogue, with records that provide a look into how decisions were made over the course of the Society’s existence regarding what and how to teach, as well as a look into Jewish life in Philadelphia.
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Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center [Contact Us]
1958-2002
Creator:
Oakes, Helen
Extent: 37 linear feet (38 containers)
Helen Oakes was a nationally recognized activist for public education from the 1960s to the 1980s. Oakes was chairman of the West Philadelphia Schools Committee from 1965 to 1970, chairman of the Education Committee of the League of Women Voters in 1965, and in 1968, she wrote The School District of Philadelphia: A Critical Analysis. From 1971 to 1980, she was a member of the board of the Citizens Committee on Public Education in Philadelphia. She was a member of the Philadelphia Board of Education from 1982 to 1989. From 1989 to 1998 she served as liaison in the educational partnership between ARCO Chemical Company and James Rhoads Elementary School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She also wrote, published and distributed the “Oakes Newsletter,” from 1970 to 1989, which addressed issues affecting the Philadelphia School District. The Helen Oakes papers date from 1958 to 2002, and include correspondence, printed materials, such as newsletters and pamphlets, newspaper clippings, educational and statistical reports, meeting minutes, financial reports and memoranda. The materials relate to Helen Oakes’ long-term involvement with a wide-range of educational institutions and initiatives, specifically in Philadelphia. Of particular note, are significant materials related to Oakes’ research, writing and publication of the “Oakes Newsletter.” (View full finding aid.)
title
Helen Oakes papers
creator
Oakes, Helen
id
TUSCRC.Helen.Oakes
repository
extent
37 linear feet (38 containers)
inclusive date
1958-2002
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Helen Oakes was a nationally recognized activist for public education from the 1960s to the 1980s. Oakes was chairman of the West Philadelphia Schools Committee from 1965 to 1970, chairman of the Education Committee of the League of Women Voters in 1965, and in 1968, she wrote The School District of Philadelphia: A Critical Analysis. From 1971 to 1980, she was a member of the board of the Citizens Committee on Public Education in Philadelphia. She was a member of the Philadelphia Board of Education from 1982 to 1989. From 1989 to 1998 she served as liaison in the educational partnership between ARCO Chemical Company and James Rhoads Elementary School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She also wrote, published and distributed the “Oakes Newsletter,” from 1970 to 1989, which addressed issues affecting the Philadelphia School District. The Helen Oakes papers date from 1958 to 2002, and include correspondence, printed materials, such as newsletters and pamphlets, newspaper clippings, educational and statistical reports, meeting minutes, financial reports and memoranda. The materials relate to Helen Oakes’ long-term involvement with a wide-range of educational institutions and initiatives, specifically in Philadelphia. Of particular note, are significant materials related to Oakes’ research, writing and publication of the “Oakes Newsletter.”
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Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center [Contact Us]
1963-2004
Creator:
Pennsylvania Ballet.
Extent: 91 linear feet (165 boxes and mapcase)
In 1962, Barbara Weisberger, a protégé of George Balanchine, started the School of the Pennsylvania Ballet to train dancers for her forthcoming dance company. The “Philadelphia Ballet,” later known as the Pennsylvania Ballet, was officially founded the following year. George Balanchine served as artistic advisor and the Ford Foundation provided the funds to help the struggling company establish itself. Based in Philadelphia, the Pennsylvania Ballet is still operational as of 2011, although it has undergone many changes in artistic direction and administration. The Pennsylvania Ballet records document the activities of the Pennsylvania Ballet Company, active from 1963 through 2011. The materials in this collection cover the years 1963 to 2004, with the bulk of materials dating from 1969 to 1990. This is still an active organization, so these records do not offer a complete picture of the company’s history and activities, as most records are active and retained by the Pennsylvania Ballet. While there is some administrative material, most of the collection is comprised of visual and graphic material: photographs and negatives, slides, posters and program art. This collection may be particularly useful to researchers interested in set, lighting, and costume design; choreography; and marketing and publicity. (View full finding aid.)
title
Pennsylvania Ballet records
creator
Pennsylvania Ballet.
id
TUSCRC.PA.Ballet
repository
extent
91 linear feet (165 boxes and mapcase)
inclusive date
1963-2004
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In 1962, Barbara Weisberger, a protégé of George Balanchine, started the School of the Pennsylvania Ballet to train dancers for her forthcoming dance company. The “Philadelphia Ballet,” later known as the Pennsylvania Ballet, was officially founded the following year. George Balanchine served as artistic advisor and the Ford Foundation provided the funds to help the struggling company establish itself. Based in Philadelphia, the Pennsylvania Ballet is still operational as of 2011, although it has undergone many changes in artistic direction and administration. The Pennsylvania Ballet records document the activities of the Pennsylvania Ballet Company, active from 1963 through 2011. The materials in this collection cover the years 1963 to 2004, with the bulk of materials dating from 1969 to 1990. This is still an active organization, so these records do not offer a complete picture of the company’s history and activities, as most records are active and retained by the Pennsylvania Ballet. While there is some administrative material, most of the collection is comprised of visual and graphic material: photographs and negatives, slides, posters and program art. This collection may be particularly useful to researchers interested in set, lighting, and costume design; choreography; and marketing and publicity.
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Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center [Contact Us]
1974-2003
Creator:
Safe Energy Communications Council.
Extent: 64 linear feet (149 containers)
Safe Energy Communication Council (SECC) was a national, non-profit council of ten environmental and public interest media groups, founded in 1980 after the 1979 partial meltdown of Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. From 1980 to 2003, SECC educated the public and the media about energy efficiency and renewable energy’s potential to produce a larger share of our nation’s energy needs, as well as the economic and environmental liabilities of nuclear power. SECC provided local, state and national organizations with technical assistance through media skills training and outreach strategies. Scott Denman served as Executive Director for the majority of SECC’s existence. This collection contains the records of the Safe Energy Communication Council. The collection dates from 1974 to 2003, and covers a wide range of materials and subjects. The bulk of the collection is comprised of administrative records, which include internal communications, meeting minutes of the Board of Directors, and extensive financial and fundraising materials. Other records in the collection include newspaper and magazine clippings, correspondence, internal communications and planning materials, SECC publications and press releases, video and audio tapes, and the results of public opinion polls and surveys about energy and environmental issues. (View full finding aid.)
title
Safe Energy Communication Council records
creator
Safe Energy Communications Council.
id
TUSCRC.SECC
repository
extent
64 linear feet (149 containers)
inclusive date
1974-2003
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abstract/scope/contents
Safe Energy Communication Council (SECC) was a national, non-profit council of ten environmental and public interest media groups, founded in 1980 after the 1979 partial meltdown of Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. From 1980 to 2003, SECC educated the public and the media about energy efficiency and renewable energy’s potential to produce a larger share of our nation’s energy needs, as well as the economic and environmental liabilities of nuclear power. SECC provided local, state and national organizations with technical assistance through media skills training and outreach strategies. Scott Denman served as Executive Director for the majority of SECC’s existence. This collection contains the records of the Safe Energy Communication Council. The collection dates from 1974 to 2003, and covers a wide range of materials and subjects. The bulk of the collection is comprised of administrative records, which include internal communications, meeting minutes of the Board of Directors, and extensive financial and fundraising materials. Other records in the collection include newspaper and magazine clippings, correspondence, internal communications and planning materials, SECC publications and press releases, video and audio tapes, and the results of public opinion polls and surveys about energy and environmental issues.
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Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center [Contact Us]
1947-2005
Creator:
Joyner, Samuel, b. 1924
Extent: 5.8 linear feet
Samuel R. Joyner is among the small number of African American cartoonists in the United States. Born in Philadelphia in 1924, he received early attention and publication credits. Joyner enlisted in the United States Navy after graduating from high school during World War II. Upon his return to the United States, he enrolled into the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art (now University of the Arts). His experience with racism and discrimination, primarily in the Navy, served as the backdrop for the kind of artwork he desired to produce. Over the years he would become a recognized “visual voice” for African Americans as represented in mass-circulated magazines and newspapers. His work has been published in over 40 different publications. The Samuel Joyner collection includes photographs, original art work and sketches (and photocopies), posters, signs, newspapers and clippings, newsletters, one book of African American illustrations, and ephemera. This collection spans 60 years, from 1947 to 2005. The majority of the material is dated in the 1990s. (View full finding aid.)
title
Samuel R. Joyner artwork collection
creator
Joyner, Samuel, b. 1924
id
TUSCRC.967
repository
extent
5.8 linear feet
inclusive date
1947-2005
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abstract/scope/contents
Samuel R. Joyner is among the small number of African American cartoonists in the United States. Born in Philadelphia in 1924, he received early attention and publication credits. Joyner enlisted in the United States Navy after graduating from high school during World War II. Upon his return to the United States, he enrolled into the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art (now University of the Arts). His experience with racism and discrimination, primarily in the Navy, served as the backdrop for the kind of artwork he desired to produce. Over the years he would become a recognized “visual voice” for African Americans as represented in mass-circulated magazines and newspapers. His work has been published in over 40 different publications. The Samuel Joyner collection includes photographs, original art work and sketches (and photocopies), posters, signs, newspapers and clippings, newsletters, one book of African American illustrations, and ephemera. This collection spans 60 years, from 1947 to 2005. The majority of the material is dated in the 1990s.
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Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center [Contact Us]
1966-2002
Creator:
Socialist Review.
Extent: 68.75 linear feet (167 containers)
The Socialist Review records collection houses correspondence, financial records, administrative records, manuscripts, and publications dating from 1966 to 2002. This collection relates to the daily operations of the leftist periodical Socialist Review (titled Socialist Revolution prior to 1978, and Radical Society: Review of Culture and Politics after 2002), and the collectives that formed its editorial staff. Manuscript submissions make up the bulk of the collection. Overall, this collection offers insight into the inner workings of one of the New Left movement’s most important publications, Socialist Review. Many prominent leftist intellectuals associated with the publication are represented in these files: Noam Chomsky, Barbara Ehrenreich, and Barbara Epstein, among many others. This collection will be an invaluable resource for researchers studying the evolution of leftist ideology at the end of the 20th century, who may find the name change from Socialist Revolution to Socialist Review and the dynamics between the East Coast and West Coast collectives, both of which are well documented in this collection, to be particularly intriguing. The records will also be of interest to researchers studying the running of a small academic journal. (View full finding aid.)
title
Socialist Review records
creator
Socialist Review.
id
TUSCRC.Socialist.Review
repository
extent
68.75 linear feet (167 containers)
inclusive date
1966-2002
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
The Socialist Review records collection houses correspondence, financial records, administrative records, manuscripts, and publications dating from 1966 to 2002. This collection relates to the daily operations of the leftist periodical Socialist Review (titled Socialist Revolution prior to 1978, and Radical Society: Review of Culture and Politics after 2002), and the collectives that formed its editorial staff. Manuscript submissions make up the bulk of the collection. Overall, this collection offers insight into the inner workings of one of the New Left movement’s most important publications, Socialist Review. Many prominent leftist intellectuals associated with the publication are represented in these files: Noam Chomsky, Barbara Ehrenreich, and Barbara Epstein, among many others. This collection will be an invaluable resource for researchers studying the evolution of leftist ideology at the end of the 20th century, who may find the name change from Socialist Revolution to Socialist Review and the dynamics between the East Coast and West Coast collectives, both of which are well documented in this collection, to be particularly intriguing. The records will also be of interest to researchers studying the running of a small academic journal.
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Temple University Libraries Special Collections Research Center [Contact Us]
1969-1991
Creator:
South Street Dance Company (Philadelphia, Pa.) .
Extent: 15 linear feet
The South Street Dance Company was founded by Ellen Forman and Alice Forner in 1974, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Company choreographed and performed original dance works, and hosted community programs for students and the elderly. The South Street Dance Company records houses audiovisual materials, photographs, administrative records, playbills, flyers, posters, newspaper clippings, financial records, correspondence, costumes and props dating from 1969 to 1991. This collection documents the performances and some daily operations of the Company and its founder, Ellen Forman. There is relatively little textual material in this collection; the bulk is made up of videotapes, audiotapes and photographs of performances and programs, and objects used during performances. (View full finding aid.)
title
South Street Dance Company records
creator
South Street Dance Company (Philadelphia, Pa.) .
id
TUSCRC.South.Street.Dance
repository
extent
15 linear feet
inclusive date
1969-1991
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abstract/scope/contents
The South Street Dance Company was founded by Ellen Forman and Alice Forner in 1974, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Company choreographed and performed original dance works, and hosted community programs for students and the elderly. The South Street Dance Company records houses audiovisual materials, photographs, administrative records, playbills, flyers, posters, newspaper clippings, financial records, correspondence, costumes and props dating from 1969 to 1991. This collection documents the performances and some daily operations of the Company and its founder, Ellen Forman. There is relatively little textual material in this collection; the bulk is made up of videotapes, audiotapes and photographs of performances and programs, and objects used during performances.
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