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filtered Repository: The Historical and Interpretive Collections of The Franklin Institute
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The Historical and Interpretive Collections of The Franklin Institute [Contact Us]
circa 1885-1925
Creator:
Philadelphia (Pa.). Water Department
Extent: 5 linear feet
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was the first city in the United States to provide water as a public utility and was known for its advances in water distribution technology, such as using a centralized distribution system and employing the use of hydropower for pumps. The Philadelphia Water Department (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) traces its roots to 1799 when the Joint Committee on Supplying the City with Water (known as the Watering Committee) was established by the city council in response to pressure from the city's residents to provide them with clean water for drinking, fire fighting, and cleansing the streets following a series of yellow fever epidemics. The Philadelphia Water Department lantern slides, circa 1885-1925, consist of two hundred and ninety-four lantern slides depicting images of documents, machinery, and other subjects related to the Water Department's research and operations. (View full finding aid.)
title
Philadelphia Water Department lantern slides
creator
Philadelphia (Pa.). Water Department
id
FI.05
repository
extent
5 linear feet
inclusive date
circa 1885-1925
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was the first city in the United States to provide water as a public utility and was known for its advances in water distribution technology, such as using a centralized distribution system and employing the use of hydropower for pumps. The Philadelphia Water Department (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) traces its roots to 1799 when the Joint Committee on Supplying the City with Water (known as the Watering Committee) was established by the city council in response to pressure from the city's residents to provide them with clean water for drinking, fire fighting, and cleansing the streets following a series of yellow fever epidemics. The Philadelphia Water Department lantern slides, circa 1885-1925, consist of two hundred and ninety-four lantern slides depicting images of documents, machinery, and other subjects related to the Water Department's research and operations.
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The Historical and Interpretive Collections of The Franklin Institute [Contact Us]
1801-1980
Creator:
Philadelphia (Pa.). Water Department
Extent: 6.33 linear feet
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was the first city in the United States to provide water as a public utility and was known for its advances in water distribution technology, such as using a centralized distribution system and employing the use of hydropower for pumps. The Philadelphia Water Department (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) traces its roots to 1799 when the Joint Committee on Supplying the City with Water (known as the Watering Committee) was established by the city council in response to pressure from the city's residents to provide them with clean water for drinking, fire fighting, and cleansing the streets following a series of yellow fever epidemics. The Fairmount Water Works (FWW), Philadelphia's second water works, began operating in 1815 and remained in use until 1909. Regarded as a significant achievement in civil engineering, FWW was also an important Philadelphia landmark and tourist attraction. In the early twenty-first century, Philadelphia operates three water treatment plants that supply the city and surrounding suburban communities: Baxter in Northeast Philadelphia, Queen Lane in East Falls, and Belmont in West Philadelphia. Philadelphia Water Department records and collection on Fairmount Water Works, 1801-1980, consist primarily of volumes that contain printed reports and statements from the Watering Committee of Philadelphia, and later, the Philadelphia Water Department. There are also pamphlets, glass plate negatives, photographs, prints and illustrations, mechanical and other technical drawings, and other materials related to the Water Works. (View full finding aid.)
title
Philadelphia Water Department records and collection on Fairmount Water Works
creator
Philadelphia (Pa.). Water Department
id
FI.01
repository
extent
6.33 linear feet
inclusive date
1801-1980
bulk date
abstract/scope/contents
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was the first city in the United States to provide water as a public utility and was known for its advances in water distribution technology, such as using a centralized distribution system and employing the use of hydropower for pumps. The Philadelphia Water Department (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) traces its roots to 1799 when the Joint Committee on Supplying the City with Water (known as the Watering Committee) was established by the city council in response to pressure from the city's residents to provide them with clean water for drinking, fire fighting, and cleansing the streets following a series of yellow fever epidemics. The Fairmount Water Works (FWW), Philadelphia's second water works, began operating in 1815 and remained in use until 1909. Regarded as a significant achievement in civil engineering, FWW was also an important Philadelphia landmark and tourist attraction. In the early twenty-first century, Philadelphia operates three water treatment plants that supply the city and surrounding suburban communities: Baxter in Northeast Philadelphia, Queen Lane in East Falls, and Belmont in West Philadelphia. Philadelphia Water Department records and collection on Fairmount Water Works, 1801-1980, consist primarily of volumes that contain printed reports and statements from the Watering Committee of Philadelphia, and later, the Philadelphia Water Department. There are also pamphlets, glass plate negatives, photographs, prints and illustrations, mechanical and other technical drawings, and other materials related to the Water Works.
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