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Pennell family papers

Register

Ms. Coll. 50

Pennell family papers

Ms. Coll. 50

Pennell family papers

Ms. Coll. 50

Pennell family papers

Ms. Coll. 50

Pennell family papers

Ms. Coll. 50

Pennell family papers

Ms. Coll. 50

Pennell family papers

Ms. Coll. 50

Pennell family papers

Ms. Coll. 50

Pennell family papers

Ms. Coll. 50

Pennell family papers

Ms. Coll. 50

This is a finding aid. It is a description of archival material held at the University of Pennsylvania. Unless otherwise noted, the materials described below are physically available in our reading room, and not digitally available through the web.

Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Pennell, Elizabeth Robins, 1855-1936
Creator:
Pennell, Joseph, 1857-1926
Title:
Pennell family papers
Date:
circa 1882-1951
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 50
Extent:
21 boxes (+ 3 map drawers)
Language:
English
Abstract:
The Pennell family papers comprise personal correspondence of both Pennells; drafts and galleys for some of their publications; contracts; royalty statements; trust fund account statements; copies of wills; publicity materials; photographs; newspaper clippings; memorabilia; exhibition catalogs, awards, original sketches, watercolors, and prints by Joseph Pennell; and a few works by other artists.
Cite as:
Pennell family papers, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: University Archives and Records Center
Creator:
Frazer family.
Creator:
Frazer, John Fries, 1812-1872
Creator:
Frazer, John, 1882-1964
Creator:
Frazer, Persifor, 1736-1792
Creator:
Frazer, Persifor, 1844-1909
Title:
Frazer Family Papers
Date [bulk]:
1860-1960
Date [inclusive]:
1776-2004
Call Number:
UPT 50 F848
Extent:
55 Cubic feet
Language:
English
ABSTRACT:
The Frazer Family Papers span over 200 years of an American family. The collection provides insight into five generations of University of Pennsylvania alum as well as three generations of educators, all in the field of chemistry, at the University of Pennsylvania and contains the papers of Persifor Frazer, Robert Frazer, John Fries Frazer, Persifor Frazer, Robert Frazer, John Frazer, John Frazer, Jr., and Tench Frazer, as well as a range of other family members and relatives. The collection is particularly strong in representing the professional and personal activities of Persifor Frazer (1844-1909) and his son John Frazer (1882-1964) from the 1860s to the 1950s.
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Williams, Francis Howard, 1844-1922
Title:
Francis Howard Williams papers
Date [inclusive]:
1880-1909
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1193
Extent:
0.2 linear foot (1 box and 1 oversized folder)
Language:
English
Language Note:
Two documents written fully in French and one written partially in French.
Abstract:
Francis Howard Williams (1844-1922) was a Philadelphia literary critic and author whose works were featured in publications such as The Atlantic Monthly,  Harper’s Weekly,  Lippincott’s Magazine, and  The Independent. He was the known friend of several literary greats including Walt Whitman, Louisa May Alcott, and George W. Cable and was part of a large circle of contemporary poets, writers, editors, and publishers of the time period. The collection includes letters to Williams, writings, and ephemera.
Cite as:
Francis Howard Williams papers, 1880-1909, Ms. Coll. 1193, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Repplier, Agnes, 1855-1950
Title:
Agnes Repplier papers
Date:
circa 1870-1960
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 18
Extent:
3.8 linear feet (13 boxes)
Language:
English
Abstract:
Philadelphia-born Agnes Repplier was an essayist and biographer with a writing career that spanned sixty-five years, during which she developed friendships with a number of noted writers, artists, and scholars. The Papers comprise six series: Incoming Correspondence; Outgoing Correspondence; Writings by Agnes Repplier; Biographical Material; Agnes Repplier and Repplier Family Personal Papers; and Memorabilia.
Cite as:
Agnes Repplier papers, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Gág, Wanda , 1893-1946
Title:
Wanda Gág papers
Date [inclusive]:
1892-1968
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 310
Extent:
40 boxes
Language:
English
Abstract:
Personal papers of Wanda Gág, including correspondence to and from Wanda, as well as letters to and from Alma Schmidt Scott, a biographer of Gág, and letters among Gág family members; writings, such as diaries, children’s books, autobiographical works, and juvenilia; notes for talks and for writings; artwork; exhibition catalogs and related publicity material; writings about Gág, including obituaries, biographical pieces, and book reviews; financial records; materials regarding the Estate of Wanda Gág; newspaper clippings; memorabilia; photographs; and examples of Happiwork, a product for children created by Gág.
Cite as:
Wanda Gág papers, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Bradley, Sculley, 1897-
Title:
E. Sculley Bradley papers
Date [bulk]:
1944-1962
Date [inclusive]:
1876-1970
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1083
Extent:
2.5 linear feet (6 boxes)
Language:
English
Abstract:
Edward Sculley Bradley (1897-1987) was a scholar, author, educator, and administrator at the University of Pennsylvania. He was a prolific writer and editor, serving as editor of the General Magazine and History Chronicle, Philadelphia, 1945-1956. He published biographies of literary figures George Henry Boker and Henry Charles Lea, as well as editions of works by Mark Twain, Stephen Crane, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Walt Whitman. Bradley was considered an international expert on Whitman, editing several important editions of the poet's  Leaves of Grass. The Sculley Bradley papers include his personal and professional correspondence dating from 1923 to 1962, material from several literary censorship cases for which he testified, corrected drafts of his manuscripts for the  Comprehensive Reader's Edition,  Norton Critical Edition, and  Variorum edition of  Leaves of Grass, ephemera and graphics associated with Walt Whitman, and a small amount of material on other authors.
Cite as:
E. Sculley Bradley papers, 1876-1970 (bulk: 1944-1962), Ms. Coll. 1083, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: University Archives and Records Center
Creator:
Li, Hui-Lin, 1911-
Title:
Hui-lin Li Papers
Date [inclusive]:
1831-2002
Call Number:
UPT 50 L693
Extent:
20 Cubic feet
Language:
English
ABSTRACT:
Hui-lin Li was educated at Soochow University and Yenching University in China and received his PhD in biology from Harvard University in 1942. After holding a number of research fellowship positions in both the United States and Taiwan, he came to the University of Pennsylvania as a research associate in 1952 and became a faculty member in the field of botany in 1963. The collections documents the professional career and life of Dr. Li as a professor of botany and researcher.
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: University Archives and Records Center
Creator:
McKenzie, R. Tait, (Robert Tait), 1867-1938
Title:
R. Tait (Robert Tait) McKenzie Papers
Date [inclusive]:
1880-1940
Call Number:
UPT 50 MCK37
Extent:
48 Cubic feet
Language:
English
ABSTRACT:
R. Tait McKenzie, physician, physical therapist, physical educator, and sculptor, served the University of Pennsylvania as its first Professor of Physical Education, 1904 -1929. Wishing to be relieved of the administrative work required of his position, McKenzie took a year's leave of absence in 1929-1930 and in 1931 was appointed J. William White Research Professor of Physical Education. His new post permitted him to focus his efforts almost exclusively on his sculpture. The collection of R. Tait McKenzie documents the entire span of his career, as physician, educator, and sculptor.
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Title:
Miscellaneous Manuscripts
Date:
1320-2005
Call Number:
Misc Mss
Extent:
22 boxes
Language:
English
Abstract:
The Miscellaneous Manuscripts collection contains a myriad of materials spanning dates from 1320 to 2005. The materials in this collection can range from a single item in one folder to a brief exchange of correspondence containing several leaves in multiple folders. There are multiple languages including English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish. Examples of items found in this collection are letters, poems, photographs, small diaries, property transactions, legal documents, and historical curiosities. Some of the items relate to larger collections within the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts. Each distinct item has been assigned a title, box number, and folder number. This collection is added to as items are acquired.
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Summary Information

Repository:
University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Creator:
Leland, Charles Godfrey, 1824-1903
Title:
Charles Godfrey Leland letters to George Henry Boker
Date [bulk]:
1869-1870
Date [inclusive]:
1861-1937
Call Number:
Ms. Coll. 1070
Extent:
0.2 linear feet (1 box)
Language:
English
Abstract:
Charles Godfrey Leland (1824-1903) was a humorist and folklorist from Philadelphia. The collection consists of fourteen illustrated letters written to George Henry Boker which document one year of Leland's trip to Europe from 1869 to 1870; transcriptions of the letters; and an article by donor and scholar Sculley Bradley about the collection.
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Biography/History

The marriage of Joseph Pennell (1857-1926) and Elizabeth Robins Pennell (1855-1936) was one of equals and complements, bringing together two talented individuals with keen minds, ambition, and a love of work. Elizabeth Robins published her first essay, "Mischief in the Middle Ages," in the  Atlantic Monthly in July 1881, and wrote travel books, biographies, a novel, art criticism, and essays up until the time of her death in 1936. Her first book,  Life of Mary Wollstonecraft (Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1884) was published the year she married. Joseph Pennell was an illustrator (as he said,  "a born illustrator" ), an etcher, lithographer, and a writer as well, noted for his ho nesty, invective, and sense of humor. They began their acquaintance in 1881 while collaborating on an article for  The Century Magazine. She was assigned to write the text to accompany some of his etchings of Philadelphia sites; the result was  "A Ramble in Old Philadelphia," published in the March 1882 issue. The collaboration continued throughout their marriage producing over 230 books as author, joint author, and/or illustrator, plus hundreds of essays and articles. See Free Library of Philadelphia.  "Checklist of Books and Contributions to Books by Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell, issued in connection with a Pennell exhibition in the Free Library of Philadelphia, June-August 1945," by Victor Egbert.

In his extremely productive career as an artist Joseph Pennell made over 1800 prints, many as illustrations for magazines and for the books of prominent authors including F. Marion Crawford, Andrew Lang, William Dean Howells, and Henry James.

Both Pennells were natives of Philadelphia. Elizabeth Robins was born to a prosperous banking and finance family. Her grandfather, Thomas Robins, whose family was originally from Virginia and the eastern shore of Maryland, was a trustee of the First Pennsylvania Bank and later president of the Philadelphia Bank at Fourth and Chestnut Streets. Her father, Edward Robins, worked as a broker on the Philadelphia Stock Exchange but lost money following the Civil War, leaving the family with limited resources. Elizabeth's mother died when she was very young, and she and her sister were sent by their father to the convent of the Sacred Heart in Torresdale, just north of Philadelphia. Their life at the school was documented by Elizabeth's classmate Agnes Repplier (1855-1950) in her book In Our Convent Days (1905). Elizabeth also wrote of the experience in  Our Philadelphia (1914). Her father was a convert to Catholicism, and Elizabeth writes of how her convent experience and the class prejudice against Catholics in nineteenth-century Philadelphia made it difficult for her to become a part of Philadelphia society when she left the convent at age seventeen:  "In France, in Louisiana, in Maryland, to be a Catholic was to be at the top of the social scale, approved by society; in Pennsylvania, it was to be at the bottom, despised by society,"  Our Philadelphia, 175).

She went to live in her father's home. By this time he had remarried and she had younger siblings. Elizabeth found inspiration in the work of her uncle, the author Charles Godfrey Leland (1824-1903), who was a stimulating companion, introducing her to other writers, including his friends Walt Whitman (1819-1892) and George H. Boker (1823-1890). Leland took her with him on his visits to gypsy encampments in New Jersey and Pennsylvania for his book The Gypsies. He encouraged her to write and gave her introductions in the offices of Philadelphia's newspapers. Elizabeth needed her own income and was excited by the challenge of work, which transformed her view of her world, up until then limited by what she calls  "the social adventure."

Joseph Pennell was born in Philadelphia at 603 South 9th Street on 4 July 1857 but was raised on Lombard Street by his Quaker parents, Larkin Pennell and Rebecca A. Barton. He attended the Select Boys' School, now Friends Select School. In 1870 the family moved to Germantown, where he attended Germantown Friends Select School. He spent much time drawing, a skill not appreciated in his school, but he did receive some instruction in drawing there from James R. Lambdin. After graduating, he worked in an office of the Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company. His application to the newly opened school of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts was rejected in 1876, and he attended the School of Industrial Arts at night. He was expelled from this school in 1879 (Pennell says for encouraging a mutiny among the students), but recognizing his ability, his professor, Charles M. Burns, gained admittance for Pennell to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where he studied under Thomas Eakins and others. Pennell's talents lay in graphic arts, not in painting, and his abrupt personality contributed to some difficulties he experienced during uneasy years at the Academy. He was determined to work as an artist and opened his own studio (shared with Henry R. Poore) in 1880. Pennell also loved cycling and was captain of the Germantown Bicycle Club. Some of his early commissions as an illustrator were for articles on cycling. From the start he succeeded in landing many commissions for Harper's and  Scribner's (later  The Century Magazine) and then a host of other publications. In 1883 he was sent by  Century to Italy to work on illustrations for a series of articles by William Dean Howells. In his letters to Elizabeth from Florence he used endearments from the gypsy cant they had both picked up while traveling with Charles Godfrey Leland; and Pennell expressed his desire that she join him in Italy.

In the summer of 1884, following their wedding which took place on June 4 in the parlor of Elizabeth's grandfather's house at 1110 Spruce St. in Philadelphia, Life and Letters of Joseph Pennell, v. 1, p. 114.

The Pennells moved to London, remaining there for thirty years. They traveled throughout Europe in the summers by tricycle, by bicycle, and on foot, writing and illustrating a large number of travel books together. Both agreed from the start not to let their marriage interfere with their work. As Elizabeth wrote: "After Canterbury [the publication of their first book, A Canterbury Pilgrimage in 1885] the opportunity came to test the resolution reached before our marriage, not to allow anything to interfere with his drawing and my writing. Should they call us in different directions, each must go his or her way."  Life and Letters of Joseph Pennell, v. 1, p. 123. And while they spent a great deal of time traveling together, Joseph Pennell pursued his work wherever it took him, writing long letters to Elizabeth, who sent him the same. In London they became friends with Robert Louis Stevenson, Andrew Lang, Edmund Gosse, Dr. Frederick James Furnivall, and Walter Crane. Their relationships with William Morris, John Galsworthy, James McNeill Whistler, Henry James, George Bernard Shaw, Aubrey Beardsley, William Heinemann, John Lane, Fisher Unwin, and a number of other writers, artists, and publishers are documented in their books, particularly in Elizabeth Robins Pennell's  Nights: Rome, Venice in the Aesthetic Eighties; London,  Paris in the Fighting Nineties (1916), an account of the lively Thursday night salon they hosted.

In 1887 Joseph Pennell began writing a column of art criticism for the Star in London, a column started by George Bernard Shaw, who had abandoned it to write a column on music. Pennell was outspoken, upsetting both the academy and artists; soon the editor H. W. Massingham engaged Elizabeth R. Pennell to do the work as understudy and thus she began a career writing art criticism.

James McNeill Whistler had a profound influence on Joseph Pennell. They met in London in 1884. When Whistler moved to Paris in 1892, Pennell followed in 1893 and spent a period working with Whistler in his studio. The Adventures of an Illustrator, p. 242.

The Pennells began collecting materials for an authorized biography of Whistler's life, first published in 1908. The biography generated a lawsuit over the issue of whether in fact it had been authorized by Whistler, and whether the Pennells had the right to use the Whistler letters they had collected. The Pennells won the lawsuit but not the rights to publish the letters.

Joseph Pennell's books, particularly the earliest, were written as he dictated them to his wife Elizabeth, Life and Letters of Joseph Pennell , v. 1, pp. 191-192. It was she who polished the writing and went over the proofs with him. They included  Pen Drawing and Pen Draughtsmen (1889),  The Illustration of Books (1895),  The Work of Charles Keene (1897),  Joseph Pennell's Pictures of War Work in America (1918),  Etchers and Etching (1920), and  The Graphic Arts (1920), among others.

After spending part of 1914 in Berlin, Joseph Pennell managed to get to London just as the war was declared. He drew and sketched munitions factories and other war works for the British Government and then was invited to do the same for France. What Pe nnell experienced in France horrified him. As a Quaker, he abhorred the war and the destruction of cities, towns, and ways of life he had known. Through H.-D. Davray he had been given a French government permit to go to Verdun to illustrate the war at the front lines. He traveled there as part of a press corp but could not bear to remain, returned to England, and shortly afterwards to the United States, writing "I had had my sight of War and felt and knew the wreck and ruin of War, the wreck of my life and my home-and that has never left me since."  The Adventures of an Illustrator, pp. 356-357.

The Pennells spent time in Philadelphia but never settled there. Joseph Pennell traveled, lectured, and worked in Washington, D.C., organizing his Whistler collection for the Library of Congress. In 1921 the couple moved to Brooklyn, New York.

Near the end of his life Joseph Pennell recognized that his 40-year career had coincided with "The Golden Age of Illustration" at one of the leading illustrated magazines in the United States,  Century Magazine. The magazine's art editor, A. W. Drake, and editor, R. U. Johnson, remained close friends of the Pennells. In her letters to Emily Robins, Elizabeth describes birthday parties and Christmases at the Johnson's home in New York.

Joseph Pennell worked, teaching students at the Art Students League, up until a week before his death. He contracted influenza which developed into pneumonia and he died at home in the Hotel Margaret in Brooklyn Heights on 23 April 1926. Edward L. Tinker reports that "just before he died he begged to be carried to his window for one last look at the view of Manhattan that he loved and had often sketched and painted. The doctor thought it unwise, but I have always regretted that Mr. Pennell was deprived of this last pleasure." Edward Larocque Tinker,  The Pennells, p. 24

Elizabeth moved into Manhattan in October 1926, to an address at 449 Park Avenue where the Pennells' friends, Edward L. and Frances Tinker lived downstairs. She remained there for the rest of her life, maintaining her friendship with dozens of artists including her husband's students. Always true to her interest in dinners and dining, she entertained at home with her famous “little dinners.” Childe Hassam, Ernest Lawson, and the sculptor John Flanagan were among her guests. She died on Friday, 14 February 1936, at her apartment in New York City.

The Pennell Family Papers at the University of Pennsylvania Library contain scores of tributes to Joseph Pennell written after his death in April 1926. This letter written by artist Gifford Beal and published in the Hartford Courant, 12 June 1926, is also a tribute to Elizabeth R. Pennell and to the Pennells' marriage:

The keynote of his life was service to the cause of art and the clearing out of dark corners where sham and pretense lurked in the guise of beauty. His kindness to those around him in everyday life was unbounded and I will mention but one instance that I know of: At the exhibition of his students' work at the Anderson Galleries, he bought more than half of the exhibit just to encourage them.... But I often think that the greatest things in life spring from that harmony known only to those who have live d lives like Mr. and Mrs. Pennell--a husband and wife equally great in different ways with a mutual love and understanding until the end.

Elizabeth Pennell's life inspired affection and tributes as well. Included in this collection are two letters written by British author Violet Hunt (1862-1942) in 1939. Hunt was suffering from illness and distressed not to hear from her friend Elizabeth, whom she had known for many years in London. After learning of Elizabeth Pennell's death, she wrote to Frances Tinker:

I loved Elizabeth as I am sure I told you. (No harm in telling you again) and I feel as if I should soon join her if [it] were permitted. I loved her.

26 February 1939

Biography/History

Persifor Frazer, 1736-1792 Persifor Frazer, the son of John and Mary Smith Frazer, was born on August 9, 1736 in Newtown Township, Pennsylvania. Frazer served as Captain of Company A, Fourth Pennsylvania Battalion and as Lieutenant Colonel of the Fifth Pennsylvania Line under Anthony Wayne. He was later appointed Brigadier General in the Pennsylvania State Militia. Frazer was an iron manufacturer and merchant. He married Mary Worrall Taylor on October 2, 1766. They had ten children: Sarah (1769-1841); Robert (1771-1821); Mary Anne (1774-1845), who married Jonathan Smith; Persifor (1776-1798); Martha (1778) ; Mary (1780-1862), who married Joseph Smith; John (1781-1783); Martha (1783-1867), who married William Morris; Elizabeth (1786-1788); Elizabeth (1788-1857), who married Henry Myers. Persifor Frazer died on April 24, 1792.

Robert Frazer, 1771-1821 Robert Frazer, son of Persifor and Mary Worrall Taylor Frazer, was born on August 30, 1771 in Middletown, Pennsylvania He entered the University of the State of Pennsylvania in 1786, receiving his A.B. in 1789 and semi-honorary A.M. in 1792. Upon receiving his A.B. from the University, Frazer studied law with Jared Ingersoll and later was admitted to the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas in 1792. He served as a member of the House of Representatives in 1795 and as the District Attorney for Delaware County, Pennsylvania He married first in 1798 to Mary Ball (1778-1798); second, in 1803 to Elizabeth Fries (1778-1815); and third, in 1818 to Alice Pennell Yarnall (1778-1830). Robert had six children by his second wife: John (1804-1805); Jacob Taylor (1806); Anne Fries (1807-1837), who married Dr. John Rhea Barton; Persifor (1809-1880); John Fries (1812-1872); Mary Worrall (1814). He also had one child by his third wife: Joseph Pennell (1818-1878), who was renamed Robert upon his father's death. Robert Frazer died on January 20, 1821

John Fries Frazer, 1812-1872 John Fries Frazer, the son of Robert and Elizabeth Fries Frazer, was born on July 8, 1812 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania He received his early education at Parrott's Military and Classical Institute. As a result, Frazer retained a love for the military throughout his life, and later served in the Philadelphia riots of 1844 with the First City Troop. He entered the University of Pennsylvania's Junior Class in 1828 and received his A.B. in 1830 and semi-honorary A.M. in 1833. Frazer studied under Alexander Dallas Bache, and after graduating, acted as lab assistant to Bache and Robert Hare, M.D. He was appointed Assistant in the Geological Survey of Pennsylvania under Henry D. Rogers in 1836. In 1837 Frazer resigned from survey work to study law under William M. Meredith, although in later years he never practiced law. From 1836 to 1844, Frazer held the position of Professor in the High School of Philadelphia (now Central High School). When Alexander D. Bache resigned from the University of Pennsylvania in 1844, it was Frazer who was chosen to fill his seat. Frazer was appointed Professor of Natural Philosophy and Chemistry at the University and was the first person specifically appointed to teach chemistry. He received an honorary Ph.D. in 1854 from the University of Lewisburg, now Bucknell University, and in 1857 was awarded an LL.D. from Harvard University. From 1855 until 1868, Frazer served as the Vice-Provost of the University of Pennsylvania, and from 1859 to 1860 as acting Provost.

In addition to his long service with the University of Pennsylvania, Frazer was very active in the American Philosophical Society, the Academy of Natural Sciences, the National Academy of Science, and the Franklin Institute, editing the Journal of the Franklin Institute from 1850 to 1866. Ill health in 1856 forced a restorative sabbatical in Europe for four months and again in 1866 for eighteen months.

John Fries Frazer married Charlotte Jeffers Cave (1815-1881), the daughter of Thomas and Sarah Hollinshead Cave in 1838. They had three children: Anne (1839-1914), who married Rev. Thomas Kittera Conrad; Sarah (1841-1918), who married Richard Lewis Ashhurst in 1861; Persifor (1844-1909). John Fries died suddenly on October 12, 1872 while giving a tour of the physical laboratory of the University on the day the new buildings in West Philadelphia were first opened to public inspection.

Persifor Frazer, 1844-1909 Persifor Frazer, the son of John Fries and Charlotte Jeffers Cave Frazer, was born on July 24, 1844 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Frazer attended the school of St. Luke's Episcopal Church and then the classical school of Samuel Arthur. In 1858, he entered the University of Pennsylvania and graduated in 1862 with an A.B. He was commissioned in the United States Coast Survey and assigned to a South Atlantic squadron under Dupont. At the beginning of the Civil War, he requested a leave of absence to serve in the First City Troop and fought in Gettysburg Campaign. In 1864, he served as acting ensign in the Mississippi squadron. Frazer received special commendation for the survey he took of the Charleston, S.C. harbor for preparation of the attack on Fort Wagner while under fire from Confederate boats. He was honorably discharged in 1865. That same year Frazer received his semi-honorary A.M. degree from the University of Pennsylvania.

At close of Civil War, Frazer studied six months in the laboratory of Booth and Garret in the study of practical chemistry. In May of 1866 until 1869, he attended the Royal Saxon School of Mines in Freiberg, Germany. Frazer passed with distinction in the examination on Mineralogy. He returned to the United States in 1869 and was appointed Assistant Geologist of Pennsylvania. As Assistant Geologist, he wrote the report on Mining and Mineralogy of Colorado and Wyoming. In 1870, Frazer was appointed Instructor in Natural History and Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania. He was promoted to Assistant Professor in 1871 and to Professor of Chemistry in 1872, serving until 1874.

In addition to his tenure at the University, Frazer served as Assistant on the Second Geological Survey of Pennsylvania, 1874-1882. In 1889, he was appointed Professor of Chemistry of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. He filled the Chair of Chemistry at Franklin Institute from 1891 to 1893. He was a founding member of Society of American Geologists and of the Franklin Institute Journal. Frazer was the first foreigner to receive the Docteur és Science Naturelles from the University of France, which was awarded to him in 1882. He was also awarded the decoration of the Golden Palms of the Academy from the French Government in July 1890, for public instruction.

Very active professionally, Frazer's publications include: Tables for the Determination of Minerals by the Physical Properties Ascertainable with the aid of a Few Field Instruments, Based on the System of Prof. Dr. Albin Weisbach, 1891;  Biographical Catalogue of the Matriculates of the University of Pennsylvania, 1749-1893, 1893;  Bibliotics, or Study of Documents, 1894;  Cross Reference Catalogue of the Works of the Late E.D. Cope; "Search for the Causes of Injuries to Vegetation in an Urban Villa Near a Large Industrial Establishment Together with a Bibliography on the Subject," 1907. He was editor of the  Franklin Institute Journal, 1881-1892. Some of the organizations and associations of which Frazer was a member include the American Philosophical Society, the Academy of Natural Sciences, the Society of American Geologists, the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, the General and Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution, the Society of the War of 1812, the Society of Colonial Wars of Pennsylvania, the British Association for the Advancement of Science, the New York Academy of Science, and the Reichsanstalt of Vienna. He served as the Secretary of the American Committee to the Congrès Géologique International in Berlin (1885), and as Vice President, representing the United States to the Congrès in London (1888) and in St. Petersburg (1897).

Frazer was internationally respected as an expert on handwriting. He devised a process for detecting forgeries through composite photography which led to closer study of handwriting. By powerful, microscopic viewing of handwriting, Frazer found that tremors or quivers appear uniformly throughout a person's handwriting. He linked these tremors or quivers to the nerve state of the penman. Therefore, by careful, microscopic examination, forgeries can be detected by matching these tremors from one example to another. He first published his findings in his work Bibliotechs, or the Study of Documents in 1894, which went many later revisions. His discovery resulted in a demand for his expert opinion on handwriting. He gave testimony at several big trials, in particular the Molineaux murder case in New York and the Miers-Tilton case in Camden. In the latter case, Frazer would not swear to his belief in the existence of God and was thrown out as a reliable witness. Frazer filed suit and subsequently published his reaction in his "Expert Testimony: Its Uses and Abuses," in which Frazer attacked the attitudes of the judges on the bench to expert witnesses.

Persifor Frazer married Isabella Nevins Whelen, daughter of Isabella Hubbard and Edward Siddons Whelen Sr. of Philadelphia; they had four children: Charlotte (1872-unknown) who entered the Catholic Society of the Sisters of the Assumption; Persifor Frazer, Jr. (1874-1925); Laurence (1878-1881); Dr. John Frazer (1882-1964).

Persifor Frazer died on April 7, 1909. On the day after his death, a bill was passed by the Pennsylvania State Senate which allowed agnostics to testify as competent witnesses on affirmation.

Robert Frazer (1849-1937) Robert Frazer, the son of Robert (Joseph) and Jane Biddle Wood Frazer, was born on July 22, 1849 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He entered the University of Pennsylvania in 1863 as a member of the Class of 1867. He was a member of the Philomathean Society and the Delta Psi and Phi Beta Kappa fraternities. In addition to an A.B. earned in 1867, Frazer also earned an A.M. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1870. A civil and mining engineer, he worked for several companies throughout his professional life, including: the Camden and Atlantic Railroad Co., Lehigh Valley Coal Co., Nelsonville Coal and Land Co., Reliance Trust Co., and Empire Coal Co. When he retired, he was president of the Bellefonte Central Railroad Co. Frazer also had an avid interest in literature and wrote "The Silent Shakespeare", in which he explored the possible identities of playwrights whose work had been attributed to William Shakespeare.

Robert Frazer married Elizabeth McKibbin (1854-1920), daughter of Dr. David James KcKibben (Class of 1849), in 1876. They had two children: Robert (1878-1947) and Margaret (1880-1955). They were divorced in 1897. He married a second time, to Harriet P. Scheafe (1856-1929), in 1897. Robert Frazer died on October 27, 1933.

John Frazer, 1882-1964 John Frazer, son of Persifor and Isabella Nevins Whelen Frazer, was born on February 5, 1882 in Paris. He received his early education at Episcopal Academy in Philadelphia and at St. Paul's School in Concord New Hampshire, graduating in 1899. In 1899, Frazer entered the University of Pennsylvania receiving his B.S. in 1903, his A.M. in 1904, and his Ph.D. in 1907. His thesis was entitled "The Application of the Rotating Anode to Certain Electrolytic Separations, and An Investigation of the Electro-Deposition of Indium by the Rotating Anode." As a student at the University he participated in several clubs and fraternities including: Mask and Wig, Delta Psi, Sigma Xi, Phi Beta Kappa, St. Anthony, and Sphinx Senior Society.

In the Fall of 1904, Frazer joined teaching staff of the Chemical Department of the College of the University of Pennsylvania. He was appointed Assistant Professor of Chemistry in 1910. He was promoted in 1921 to the rank of Professor; he served as the Dean of the Towne School from 1912 to 1928. From 1922 to 1923 Frazer was the Exchange Professor of Applied Science to the French Universities of Grenoble, Lyon, Marseilles, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Strasbourg, Nancy, Paris, Sorbonne, Lille, Rennes, Conservatoire des Arts et Metiers, and the école de Physique et Chemie, Paris.

During World War I, Frazer served as a Captain in the Chemical Warfare Service, American Expeditionary Force; he was attached as Assistant Gas Officer in the First Army Corps, 78th and 6th Division in Argonne.

Dr. Frazer belonged to several organizations and professional societies. Some of these included the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemist Society, the Franklin Institute, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the Societé de Chemie Industrialle, the Society of the War of 1812, the Pennsylvania Prison Society, the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, the Society of Colonial Wars of Pennsylvania, and the Pennsylvania Society of the Sons of the Revolution.

He married Mary Foxley Tilghman (1886-1976), daughter of Oswald Tilghman, on June 9, 1915. Their children include: Tilghman (1916-1925), Isabel (1920-2008), John Jr. (1922-2011), and Tench, 1927-1990.

John Frazer, Jr., 1922-2011 John Frazer, the son of John and Mary Foxley Tilghman Frazer, was born on October 11, 1922 in Paris, France. He received his early education at St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire, graduating in 1940. He entered the University of Pennsylvania in the fall of 1940 as a member of the Class of 1944 and, like his father, joined the Delta Psi fraternity. After his junior year, however, he enlisted in the Army and served in the European theater. For his service, he was recommended for a Bronze Star in 1945. Frazer returned to the United States and the University of Pennsylvania and earned his B.A. in 1947. He again served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War, this time as an intelligence officer stationed in Tokyo, Japan. In the years following, he worked for Radio Free Europe in New York City whilst also working as a professional genealogist, which had been a passion of his since his early teen years. Frazer also created an index which was used as a vital tool in the creation of the National Portrait Gallery. He was also a member of the Society of the Cincinnati, the Society of Colonial Wars, and the Huguenot Society.

John Frazer, Jr. died on July 7, 2011 at his home in Annapolis, Maryland.

Tench Frazer, 1927-1990 Tench Frazer, the youngest son of John and Mary Foxley Tilghman Frazer, was born on September 26, 1927 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He received his early education at Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia and at St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire, graduating from the latter in 1945. He entered the University of Pennsylvania in 1945 and was a member of the Delta Psi fraternity and served as a delegate to the Interfraternity Council during his junior and senior years; he received his B.A. in 1949. During the Korean War 1950-53, Frazer served in the U.S. Army's 4047th Strategic Intelligence Research Analysis (SIRA) team at Fort Reilly, Kansas, where he assisted in the creation and teaching of courses at the Army Intelligence School. He was discharged honorably in 1952 to accept a commission in the U.S. Navy Reserve's Air Wing Staff. A graduate of the University of Virginia Law School in 1956, he worked for the First Pennsylvania Banking and Trust Co., the Sarasota, Florida Bank and Trust Co., and the Treasurer's Office at the University of Pennsylvania. During his later years, Frazer was an avid supporter of the University of Pennsylvania's Mask and Wig Club and he was made an honorary member.

Tench Frazer died on September 20, 1990 at his home in Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia.

Other Family Members and Relations

Richard Lewis Ashhurst (1838-1911): Earned an A.B. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1856, also an A.M. and LL.B. in 1859. He served in the Army of the Potomac during the Civil War until being honorably discharged after being wounded in the Battle of Gettysburg. He was named Postmaster of Philadelphia in 1906, a position he held until his death. He married Sarah Frazer (1841-1918), daughter of John Fries and Charlotte Jeffers Cave Frazer, in 1861. They had five children: Harriet (1862-1938), Richard Lewis Jr. (1865-1870), Frazer (1867-1892), Mabel (1869-1955, Mrs. Frederic Stimson), and Roger (1876-1903, 1895 A.B., 1898 LL.B.). Richard Lewis Ashhurst disappeared mysteriously from an Atlantic City pier in 1911.

Thomas Cave (1788-1845): Father of Charlotte Jeffers Cave Frazer (Mrs. John Fries Frazer). Was a Philadelphia merchant and Apothecary General during the War of 1812. He married Sarah Hollinshead (1795-1864), daughter of Major John Hollinshead of New Jersey, an officer in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. Besides Charlotte, he and Sarah also had two sons, Henry C. and Thomas Hollinshead Cave.

Mary Ann Rhodes Denny (1811-1872): Maternal Grandmother of Patty Belle Harrison.

Sarah Toombs Fortson (1856-1953): Mother of Mildred Fortson (1893-1962, Mrs. Samuel Harrison Tilghman). Married Thomas E. Fortson in 1878 and resided in Wilkes County, Georgia. In addition to Mildred, their children included: Eugene Palmer (1879-1971), Blanton Erwin (1882-1968), Edward Norral (1884-1971), Mary (1886-unknown), Lawrence Ogilvie (1889-1955), and Robert Malcolm (1890-1974).

John Fries (1744-1824): Father of Elizabeth Fries (1778-1815), second wife of Robert Frazer (1771-1821).

Harrison Family Dr. Samuel Alexander Harrison (1822-1890), resident and local historian of Talbot, Maryland, married Martha Isabella Denny (1822-1909) in 1847. They had two daughters, Mary Spencer (1848-1943) and Patty Belle (1851-1931). Mary Spencer married Horace Noble (c. 1840-1916), a veteran of the Civil War. They had two children: Harrison Winship (1870) and Katharine Belle (1873-1950, Mrs. Ernest Simondetti). Patty Belle married Col. Oswald Tilghman (1841-1932) in 1884. They had two children: Samuel Harrison (1885-1961), who married Mildred Fortson, and Mary Foxley, who married John Frazer in 1915.

Tilghman Family The Tilghmans of Talbot County, Maryland, were descendants of Col. Tench Tilghman, an aide de camp of George Washington during the Revolutionary War. Col. Oswald Tilghman (1841-1932) was the son of General Tench Tilghman (1810-1874) and Henrietta Maria Kerr (1812-1874), daughter of John Leeds Kerr, Unites States senator from Maryland 1841-1843. General Tench and Henrietta Maria Kerr Tilghman also had another son, John Leeds Tilghman (1837-1862). Col. Oswald Tilghman married Patty Belle Harrison (1851-1931) in 1884 and had two children, Samuel Harrison (1885-1961), who married Mildred Fortson, and Mary Foxley (1886-1976), who married Dr. John Frazer (1882-1964) in 1915.

Biography/History

Francis Howard Williams was born into a Philadelphia Quaker family on September 2, 1844. He was a Philadelphia literary critic and author whose works were featured in publications such as The Atlantic Monthly,  Harper’s Weekly,  Lippincott’s Magazine, and  The Independent. He was the author of  The Princess Elizabeth: A Lyric Drama (1880),  Theodora: a Christmas Pastoral (1882),  A Reformer in Ruffles: a Comedy in Three Acts (1883),  The Bride of the White House (1886),  Master and Man: a Play in a Prologue and Four Acts (1886),  The Flute Player and Other Poems (1894),  The Burden Bearer: an Epic of Lincoln (1908), and several others.

On May 30, 1865, Williams married Mary Bartholomew Houston in Germantown, Pennsylvania and they had four children: Francis Churchill Williams, Mary De Solms Williams, Joseph John Williams, and Aubrey Howard Williams. Their Germantown home appears to have been a frequent meeting place for Williams and his friends, who included Walt Whitman, Louisa May Alcott, George W. Cable, George Riddle, Edmund Clarence Stedman, and many other poets, writers, editors, and publishers. Williams was a member of the Historical Pageant Committee which helped plan the 225th Anniversary of the founding of Philadelphia. For this 1912 event, Williams wrote some of the dialogue for some of the theatrics performed. He also served as treasurer for the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, as vice-president of the Franklin Inn Club, and a member of the Welcome Society. Williams died on July 1, 1922.

Biography/History

Agnes Repplier was an essayist and biographer who was admired for her common sense, courage, and sense of artistry in crafting an essay. Independent-minded, well-read, and with an incisive sense of humor, she had a writing career that span ned sixty-five years, during which she developed friendships with a number of noted writers, artists, and scholars.

Born in Philadelphia on 1 April 1855, she was the daughter of John George Repplier (of Alsatian descent) and his second wife, Agnes Mathias (of German descent). As a child she had a phenomenal memory and could recite lengthy poems which her mother had taught her viva voce. Her mother also tried to teach her to read— unsuccessfully for years. Agnes taught herself to read at the age of ten and read extensively from that time on. At twelve she was enrolled in Eden Hall, the Convent of the Sacred Heart in Torresdale, north of Philadelphia. The pleasures of her two-year stay are captured in her memoir,  In Our Convent Days (1905), written more than thirty years later and dedicated to he r closest friend there, Elizabeth Robins Pennell. It is not clear why she was asked not to return to Eden Hall after her second year there, except that her willfulness and independent spirit were to blame. She was enrolled in Agnes Irwin's West Penn Square Seminary for Young Ladies. This school required serious scholarship and strict discipline: it was not merely a finishing school. Agnes Irwin recognized Repplier's intelligence and wit, and their relationship later developed into a strong mutual friendship; however, Agnes Repplier completed only three terms at Miss Irwin's school when she was dismissed for rebelling against the headmistress's authority. Miss Irwin maintained contact with Repplier and was ambitious for the success of Repplier's writing career. Agnes Repplier wrote a short biography of Agnes Irwin after Irwin's death in 1914.

At the age of twenty Agnes Repplier began to write and publish stories. When her father lost all his money in an unsuccessful business venture, her mother determined that Agnes's writing would contribute to the family income, as did the teaching job of Agnes's older sister Mary. Repplier began writing essays after meeting Father Isaac Thomas Hecker, the founder of the Paulist order and editor of the Catholic World, where some of her early poems and stories had been publ ished. He advised her that she was not equipped for writing fiction, for she was  "more a reader than an observer" (Stokes, p. 59). Repplier recognized this as one of most valuable pieces of advice that she received in her life, and from then on she cult ivated her particular talent for the short essay.

As a writer and a Catholic, Repplier was at times called upon to write on Catholic subjects. For example, in 1936 she was asked by the Philadelphia Inquirer to write some lines on the death of the pope. Towards the end of her writing career Repplier was asked to write biographies of three Catholic figures, Mère Marie of the Ursulines, Père Marquette, and Junípero Serra. Repplier's biographers have noted how her independence of mind was not in the least compromised by t he conservatism of the Catholic church, but rather strengthened by its intellectual traditions.

The year 1886 marked the point at which Repplier achieved literary success with the publication of her essay, "Children, Past and Present," in  The Atlantic Monthly. Afterwards she published regularly in  The Atlantic Monthly until 1940. She published numerous essays as well in  Life, Appleton's Magazine, The New Republic, McClure's, Harper's Monthly Magazine, Commonweal, America, Century Magazine, and  The Yale Review. She was invited to Boston to meet the literary circle of Lowell and Holmes, the arbiters of literary taste for the country at that time.

Recognition of Repplier's literary accomplishments led to speaking engagements and travel. Agnes Repplier enjoyed the company and conversation of men. She developed close relationships with those she called her "literary friends," among them Dr. S. W eir Mitchell; Horace Howard Furness, Jr.; Harrison S. Morris (later editor of Lippincott's Magazine); author Owen Wister; book collector A. Edward Newton; physician J. William White; and British author, Andrew Lang. Repplier 's friendships with women were warm and long-lasting: among these friends were Cornelia Frothingham; Helen Jastrow; artist Cecilia Beaux; poet Amy Lowell; Mrs. Schuyler Warren, mistress of a literary salon in New York; and Frances Wister, Philadelphia patroness of the arts; and many others.

As soon as proceeds from the sales of her books and essays permitted, Repplier traveled to Europe for extended visits and wrote of her experiences there. She was a founding member of the Cosmopolitan Club in Philadelphia in 1886 and a member of the Acorn Club. She received honorary doctor of letters degrees from the University of Pennsylvania, Temple University, Yale, Princeton, and Columbia.

In later life, Repplier, who never married, lived with and cared for her older sister Mary and brother Louis, who suffered from partial paralysis and poor health. She was close to her niece, Emma Repplier Witmer (wife of the psychologist, Lightner Witmer). Emma Repplier Witmer was the daughter of J. George Repplier, one of two sons of the first marriage of Agnes's father. After her mother's death, Agnes sought out her older brothers and then established a warm relationship with her niece, Emma.

The press visited Agnes Repplier at home in Philadelphia as she passed one milestone birthday after another through her eighties and into her nineties. They always exclaimed over her nimble mind, witty repartee, and fresh views on political situations . She died in Philadelphia at the age of ninety-five.

Her published books include Books and Men (1888);  Points of View (1891);  Essays in Miniature (1892);  Essays in Idleness (1893);  In the Dozy Hours (1894);  Varia (1897);  Philadelphia: The Place and the People (1898);  The Fireside Sphinx (1901);  Compromises (1904);  In Our Convent Days (1905);  A Happy Half Century (1908);  Americans and Others (1912);  The Cat ( 1912);  Counter Currents (1915);  J. William White, M.D.; a Biography (1919);  Points of Friction (1920);  Under Dispute (1924);  Life of Père Marquette (1929);  Mère Marie of the Ursulines (1931);  To Think of Tea (1931);  Times and Tendencies (1931);  Junípero Serra (1933);  Agnes Irwin (1934);  In Pursuit of Laughter (1936); and  Eight Decades (1937).

Biography/History

Artist, illustrator, and writer Wanda Gág was born Wanda Hazel Gag on 11 March 1893 in the town of New Ulm, Minnesota, a German-speaking community of freethinking artisans and farmers. She was the oldest of seven children born to Anton Gag, a painter, photographer, and decorator, and his wife Elisabeth Biebl, also from an artistic family who made their living through cabinet making, photography, and farming. Gág described her parents, Anton and Lissi, as "iconoclasts" who did not practice the Catholicism of their Bohemian ancestors and raised their children in a home where drawing, painting, music, gardening, and sewing were the chief occupations of parents and children. Lissi designed and made her children's stylish clothes, a skill her daughters learned. As an older child Wanda Gág was amazed to discover that there were people who did not know how to draw--she and her brother and sisters were drawing before they entered school.

Wanda Gág's earliest teacher was her father Anton. He painted church interiors and decorated houses as partner in the firm Heller & Gag. On Sundays he painted in his attic studio in their home. One of his paintings of the 1862 Indian Massacre in New Ulm (now referred to as the Dakota conflict of 1862) was exhibited at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893; others are in private collections, museums, and historical societies in Minnesota and elsewhere. Anton Gag was an immigrant, born near Neustadtbei Heide, Bohemia. Lissi Biebl was born in Pennsylvania of Bohemian parents, both families moved to New Ulm around the same time. After moving to New York, Wanda Gág altered the family name by adding an accent to it, because people so often mispronounced her name. Some of Wanda's siblings adopted this change in their name after Gág became well known. (See Gág's note in Growing Pains, hereafter  GP, 471.)

When her father was on his deathbed in May 1908 at the age of 48, he called Wanda to his side and told her "Was der Papa nicht thun konnt' muss die Wanda halt fertig machen" (What Papa couldn't do, Wanda will have to finish). Wanda was fifteen years old, her youngest sister Flavia was one year old, her mother was ill and often unable to do housework and they were left very little beyond their home at 226 Washington Street, New Ulm, and life insurance of $1200 which was made to last over the next six years.

In October of that year, 1908, Wanda began keeping a record of her earnings, expenses, and events of her life in a ledger book that had belonged to her father. This was the start of her habit of keeping diaries, which she continued until her death. With her mother's approval, Wanda decided not to take work as a clerk or housekeeper. Instead she was determined to earn as much as she could by her art work--drawing bookmarks, place cards, and postcards (at 5 cents each) which she sold locally. She illustrated her own stories and poems for submission to the Minneapolis Junior Journal, which paid a dollar for each published work. A year later, she was holding drawing classes in her home to earn money for the family. Wanda also decided that she and her sisters and brother would each finish high school. Her attendance at school was often interrupted by having to tend the baby at home when her mother was sick, and by doing the washing, cleaning, cooking, chopping firewood, and other chores. The story of these years and her earliest studies at art schools in St. Paul and Minneapolis is told in Wanda Gág's book  Growing Pains, comprising excerpts from her diaries and letters from 1908 to 1917 and published in 1940.

Wanda balanced her sense of obligation to her siblings, who remained close to her throughout her life, and her desire to pursue art. The Wanda Gág Papers at the University of Pennsylvania include a significant amount of family correspondence plus Gág's writings about her family. Her siblings were her sisters Stella Gag Harm (1894-1962); Thusnelda Gag Stewart ( "Tussy,"  "Nelda" ) (1897-1973); Asta Gag Treat (  "Drift" ) (1899-1987); Dehli Gag Janssen (  "Dale,"  "Deli" ) (1900-1958); her brother, Howard Gag (1902-1961); and baby sister Flavia Gág (  "Flops" ) (1907-1978) who also became an author and illustrator of children's books (see Winnan, 78). Her mother's family, the Biebls, whom Wanda called  "Grandma folks," were especially close to her. They included her grandmother; her uncle Joe (  "Josie" ) Biebl; her Aunts Mary and Magdalena (  "Lena" ) Biebl; and her uncle Frank Biebl, a woodcarver, cabinet maker, photographer, and musician.

Wanda had a keen appreciation for music, learned from her family. She played the piano, sang in the Glee Club, arranged the school song in four parts, and was happy when her uncle Frank, who also made musical instruments, came to their house and played his guitar. She played duets at the piano with her friend Alma Schmidt ( "Schmidty," later Alma Schmidt Scott), who maintained a lifelong friendship with the Gág family and wrote a biography of Wanda, published in 1949. They graduated together from high school in New Ulm in 1912.

During the summer she returned to New Ulm and was visited by Charles Weschcke of St. Paul, who had known her father and was interested in Gág's talent. He offered to send her to the St. Paul Institute of Arts and Sciences and to pay her board at t he Y.W.C.A. Her sister Stella was able to teach school that year to support the family and in the fall of 1913 Wanda began classes, preparing for a career in illustration and commercial art.

Wanda received early support from a number of individuals in St. Paul and Minneapolis. Among them was Arthur J. Russell, journalist and editor at the Minneapolis Journal and  Minneapolis Junior Journal, where Wanda had submitted her stories and drawings since she was in her early teens. She wrote to him about her compulsion to draw, which she referred to as  "fierce drawing moods" or  "drawing fits" and her  "myself and many me's" which occupied her thoughts in her diaries:

Myself is the part of me that sees its way out of my "self-to-me" arguments, as for instance the one above about cleverness; and Me is that part that writes things in diaries in angular words, angular phrases and angular thoughts. Like this :-Myself is inside, and  Me is trying to sort of fit around the outside only it can't very well because it's so angular, you see, and can do no more than touch  myself and feel that myself is there.

-- GP, 212-213

Russell gave her books to read and wrote to her for over thirty years encouraging her to pay attention to her unique view of her world and her work:

I am sure your me's will not worry you for you know now they are deciduous, if that is the word, or in other words they are crops of leaves that you are shedding as the seasons go. The real tree of you stands and will stand.

--Russell to Gág, 24 November 1914

Wanda first met Arthur Russell on 28 November 1914. He introduced her to his editor, Herschel V. Jones, who was so excited by her work that Jones offered to pay Wanda's tuition, room, and board at the Minneapolis School of Art on the spot. Wanda considered this and then accepted and moved to Minneapolis in December 1914. She returned home to New Ulm for the Christmas holidays, where Dehli was recovering from a serious illness. Christmas was an important part of Gág's life. In New Ulm the holiday began with St. Nicholas's Day, December 6, but the tree trimming did not take place until December 24, and in the intervening weeks much effort went into making presents for every member of the family. The family practice of writing verses and riddles attached to Christmas gifts persisted throughout their lives and a large number of these have been preserved in Gág's Papers.

After Wanda's return to Minneapolis in January 1915, she frequently mentions one of her classmates, artist Adolf Dehn (spelled Adolphe or Adolph in his letters to Gág). They became close friends, discussing immortality, art, books, and religion, and after a few years, the pros and cons of marriage. Although she greatly enjoyed the company of men, Wanda had always said that art came first in her life, and from her teenage years she thought seriously about remaining single. Dehn's declaration of his love for her in 1916 drove her to think about the question almost constantly.

In January 1917, after she had returned to Minneapolis following the Christmas holidays in New Ulm, she received a message from Stella that she should return home immediately. Her mother had been ill over the holidays. The weather was bitterly cold and Wanda kept the fires and furnace going and tried to keep a normal routine for the youngest children. Two neighbors and the doctor were with Gág at her mother's bedside when she died early in the morning of January 31. Her mother was 48, the same age her father had been when he died almost ten years earlier. After a few months Wanda decided that the best chance of keeping the family together (some local families wanted to adopt the youngest children) and of giving them opportunities for education would be to sell their home in New Ulm and move to Minneapolis. In April of the same year Wanda Gág and Adolf Dehn both received notice that they were among twelve students nationwide who had won scholarships to the Art Students League in New York. Agai n, Herschel V. Jones offered to pay Gág's room and board, this time in New York.

During the summer of 1917, Wanda, her sisters, and Adolf Dehn painted the house in New Ulm to ready it for sale and they sold most of their household goods. By the end of September the house had not sold and through that winter Asta stayed with the youngest children in New Ulm, while Stella and Nelda worked to support them in Minneapolis. Wanda borrowed $150 for the children from Jean Sherwood Rankin for whom she illustrated A Child's Book of Folk-lore: Mechanics of Written English (1917) a guide to assist immigrants in learning the English language. Wanda Gág, Adolf Dehn, and their classmate Arnold Blanch went to New York together at the end of September 1917.

At the Art Students League Gág studied with Frank Vincent DuMond, Kenneth Hayes Miller, and Robert Henri. She took a class in etching from Mahonri Young, while attending lectures and classes with a number of other instructors including John Sloan. She roomed at the Studio Club of the Y.W.C.A. but moved to a room at 859 Lexington Avenue to save money to send home to New Ulm where the children were having a difficult winter. Gág began looking for commercial art jobs to earn extra money.

Gág returned to New Ulm for the summer of 1918, sold their house and moved her family to Minneapolis. Wanda returned to New York with an art school classmate, Lucile Lundquist, who had roomed with Stella in Minneapolis. Although her scholarship had been renewed, Gág was not able to study full time, and spent much effort trying to interest publishers in her work; trying to obtain work making covers for sheet music; and becoming involved in fashion advertising, which she hated. In her diary she describes the celebration at the end of World War I in New York City when the news came of Germany's surrender, with bits of paper falling everywhere from the sky. That November she took a job decorating lampshades for 25 cents an hour for a Danish woman named Mrs. Lund.

Adolf Dehn had been drafted into the Army in June 1918, and served as a conscientious objector in a guard house in Spartanburg, South Carolina. While still in the Army, Adolf was able to visit Wanda in New York in January 1919. She described their meet ing in detail and wrote in her diary, "Adolphe, of course, is not greatly in favor of marriage, neither am I, but being a woman, & being also very fond of children, free love has as many disadvantages as marriage for me" [Diary 35, 1 February 1919]. She often wrote of the disadvantages of being a woman. When Dehn and sculptor and fellow Minnesotan John B. Flannagan wanted to hire on as deck hands on a merchant ship to China, Gág was very upset that Dehn didn't ever consider that it would be impossible for her to take the trip with him because she was a woman [Diary 36, 16 December 1919]. They did plan to travel to Europe together and began saving money for this.

During the period 1920 to 1922 Gág was becoming more successful earning money through commercial art. In her diaries she was preoccupied with her relationship with Adolf, worried about the effects of her unsatisfied desires on her health and about his self-described "promiscuity." She investigated methods of birth control and exchanged information about sex with her roommate Lucile Lundquist, who was involved in a relationship with Arnold Blanch. Dehn and Gág became lovers but con tinued to “torture” (her word) each other and when he persisted with his wish to travel to Europe in October 1921 she did not go with him. At this time Gág was undertaking a business venture called  "Happiwork," a series of activity kits for children. Gág designed and wrote stories for these; her partners were Janet and Ralph Aiken who lived in Connecticut.

Gág still thought about joining Dehn in Europe once Happiwork was established. She wanted to travel to her ancestors' homelands in Austria and Czechoslovakia, in addition to spending time in Paris. But she became involved with Earle Marshall Humphreys, a friend of Adolf Dehn, who had been interred with him as a conscientious objector in South Carolina during the war. Earle Humphreys, a bookseller and writer, was born in Philadelphia and had graduated magna cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania. Meanwhile Dehn wrote to Gág on 24 February 1922 that he had fallen in love with Mura Ziperovitch, a young dancer, but that he wanted Gág to join him soon in Vienna. Gág obtained her passport on 11 March 1922, but never departed for Europe.

Wanda Gág had her first art exhibition at the New York Public Library's East 96th Street Branch from 15 February to 1 April 1923. Her work was well received by fellow artists and she received notices in the press. Among her admirers was Carl Zigrosser, a founder of the Weyhe Gallery in New York, which specialized in prints. Throughout the 1920s Zigrosser encouraged her, wrote to her, sent books to her, and bought all her completed prints for Weyhe so that she would have some money to live on. Zigrosser organized her first exhibition at Weyhe, 1-20 November 1926, which was a critical success.

In 1923 the Happiwork venture failed. Gág did not like the pace of living in New York City year round and prized the times she had been able to spend in the country--at Mohegan Lake, New York in the summer of 1919 and in Connecticut with the Aiken family. Although she had a steady income from commercial art, her real desire was to make art for herself. She made the decision in 1923 to "go native" as she called it, to give up fashion drawing and go to the country to pursue art. She spent the summer and autumn of 1923 and 1924 in the country near Ridgefield, Connecticut and long summers from 1925 through 1930 at a rented farmhouse near Glen Gardner, New Jersey which she called  "Tumble Timbers." Here she was able to plant a garden, to study the growth of nature and forms of the landscape, and to draw and paint every day. Gág sometimes expressed her experiences of the fundamental forces of nature by using musical analogies. In one diary entry she describes the forms of trees and masses of foliage as a symphony, the sound comprised not just of wavelengths, but volume [6 July 1923, Diary 40]. She wrote to Carl Zigrosser about her work and her determination.

...once and for all to get at the bottom of the principle which governs all this [the forms of hills, planes, conflicting fragments, big forms].... My aesthetic existence teems with forms which project themselves tauntingly toward me, recede elu sively from me, bulge, flow - and, worst of all, turn triumphantly over the edge of things, leaving me to wonder what's going on beyond. But of course that's exactly the place where I can't afford to give up...

--Gág to Zigrosser, 10 May 1926

Her companions in the country and during the winter at their apartments in New York City were Earle Humphreys and her sisters and brother. Thusnelda moved to New York in 1922, Asta in 1924, Dehli and Flavia (who had been living with Stella, now married in Minneapolis) in 1926, and Howard in 1927. Nelda, Asta, and Dehli married, but Flavia remained unmarried and spent a number of years living with Gág, as did her brother Howard, who supported himself as a musician at clubs in New York.

Gág was involved in a number of collaborative efforts with artists in New York, including William Gropper, with whom she founded a magazine without an editor entitled Folio in 1924. Carl Zigrosser invited her to parties and exhibition openings, some of which she accepted, but many she turned down, preferring to spend her time working uninterrupted. She did accompany Zigrosser to Lake George, New York for a weekend in August 1928--an invitation from Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O'Keeffe. Stieglitz admired her work and an autobiographical article she had written for  The Nation titled  "These Modern Women: A Hotbed of Feminists" (22 June, 1927) and Gág enjoyed Georgia O'Keeffe's company.

In 1928 Gág became nationally known with the publication of her first illustrated children's book, Millions of Cats. She followed this the next year with another book,  The Funny Thing. Gág had been writing stories for children since her teens and had attempted to publish some of them during the early 1920s in New York. Her meeting with Coward-McCann editor Ernestine Evans at the time of Gág's exhibition at Weyhe Gallery in 1926 led to the publication of  Millions of Cats. The period from 1924 to 1928 had been especially productive for her as an artist. Her innovative lithographs from sandpaper plates and her ink drawings and watercolors on sandpaper were widely acclaimed. Her drawings appeared in  New Masses; her lithograph  Elevated Station was selected as one of the Fifty Prints of the Year (1926) by the American Institute of Graphic Arts, an honor she received during each of the next five years. She exhibited in a number of group exhibitions around the country, and had a second exhibition at the Weyhe Gallery, 19-31 March 1928. The royalties from her children's books gave her a substantial income for the first time in her life and when  "Tumble Timbers," became unavailable for rent in 1931, Gág and Humphreys began looking for a rural property to buy. She wrote to Jean Sherwood Rankin, who was trying to get Gág to collaborate on another book:

I am planning to get myself a little country place somewhere-one where I can stay all the year round. I have quite “gone native” and I like to go in hiding for the purpose of greater freedom and concentration in my work.

--Gág to Rankin, 16 November 1930

They bought a farm of 193 acres in the Musconetcong mountains near Milford, New Jersey in June 1931, and set to work renovating the old farmhouse and planting the garden. The following year, they built a studio on the property for Gág which she named "All Creation," the name later applied to the whole property. This work occupied nearly all of Gág's time (and Humphreys' and Howard Gag's) for the second half of 1931. Gág highly prized her personal freedom and privacy for her own work. She had once written to Zigrosser that:

These are the times-this winter being one of them-when I am so intensely absorbed in my work that a love-affair just cannot hold out against it. Maybe that's cruel, but that's me! Way back in my art school days I used to say, "Art comes first-and men, much as I like them and need them, must come second." I think no one believed me then, but I meant it, and I have practiced it, I think, pretty consistently throughout my life.

--Gág to Zigrosser, 28 January 1929

Humphreys moved to Virginia in 1932 to make time for himself to work on a manuscript for a book, an endeavor in which Gág supported him. He returned in the summer and traveled with Gág to Walden and Concord, Massachusetts. Gág worked on her wood engravings and lithographs during the 1930s, but the number of prints she produced was fewer than in the 1920s. In March of 1932 her friends the artists Howard Norton Cook and his wife Barbara Latham stayed with her at "All Creation" while Howard Cook taught her the techniques of aquatint. Barbara was reading Gág's diaries (and evidently upset by Gág's views on sex and creativity) and Gág wrote of this to Earle:

I think it is this part of it that Barbara [Latham Cook] failed to see. I tried to explain to her that sex to me was not a neurotic desire for many experiences, but that it was like the earth to me-growth, breadth, creation.... I am inclined to think t hat a great personal pleasure is more potent for the purposes of aesthetic re-birth than a trip to another country.

--Gág to Humphreys, 4 April 1932

Gág's circle of friends in the 1930s and 1940s included Hugh Darby and his wife Eleanor Muriel Kapp, Louis and Stella Adamic, Carl Van Doren, Mark and Dorothy Van Doren, Joe Freeman, Mike Gold, and Max Jacobs. Gág also had a close friendship with the writer Lewis Gannett and his wife Ruth Chrisman Gannett. In July 1934 she was invited by the Gannetts to a party for a Russian consul.

As soon as we got there, Ruth introduced me to a man who talked with me off & on for a great part of the evening. When I was about to go home I found out that it had been Morris Ernst. He was very different from what I expected him to be like. Theodore Dreiser was there too. I was introduced to him in passing. If I had known what to say I could easily have gotten into a conversation with him, I think, for he's not aloof.

--Gág to Humphreys, 16 April 1934

Gág was in demand as a lecturer. Her publisher, Coward-McCann, wanted her to produce more children's books and to give some time to promoting them. She was also asked to illustrate books for other authors. She refused most of these requests, but during the Depression, there was little demand for fine art; many of her artist friends were struggling (see, for example, letters from her friend J. J. Lankes) and her ability to earn a living and help support her siblings through the market for children' s literature was important. Between 1930 and 1940 she published seven more books, six for children plus her early diaries, Growing Pains, all for Coward-McCann. These included original stories by Gág and her illustrations and translations of the  Kinder- und Hausmärchen of the Brothers Grimm. Gág had grown up hearing traditional stories and spoke only German until she entered school. She continued to work on her German langauge skills while she was in Minneapolis-St. Paul. She enjoyed the project of working on the Grimms' Fairy Tales, and not coincidently, published her illustrated  Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs during the same year, 1938, that the Walt Disney movie was released.

Gág served on art juries for the New York World's Fair in 1939 and she applied for a Guggenheim Fellowship that year, obtaining letters of reference from Lewis Gannett, Rockwell Kent, Lewis Mumford, and Carl Zigrosser. Zigrosser applied for and received a fellowship in the same year, but in a different category from Gág's application, which was not funded.

In 1940 the Weyhe Gallery mounted a major retrospective of Gág's work, "Wanda Gág: 35 Years of Picture-Making," 21-31 October 1940. On this occasion the gallery published a special  "Gág Number" of  The Checkerboard, which includes a catalog of her works to date. She was also working in oils at this time. In her early career she had little experience with oils because she could afford neither paints nor canvas. The success of the autobiographical  Growing Pains(1940) prompted her to start work on a sequel.

Since 1939 Gág had been suffering from severe dizziness, poor eyesight, ringing in her ears, weight loss, and low energy which kept her from drawing and painting much of the time. She was still able to write, however, and continued her work on various writing projects. She was not able to get a clear diagnosis of her medical problems from the doctors she visited; they blamed her symptoms on menopause, dysentery, thyroid problems, and eventually on allergies. She had expressed concern about her hea lth as early as 1928 in a letter she wrote to Carl Zigrosser:

I'm not feeling at all well, and a certain trouble which I had hoped would decrease, has apparently increased instead. I did not tell you about this, because I do not like to talk about my ailments, and the worse they are, the harder it is to get me to tell about them. It was chiefly about this that I went to the naturopath. He told me it was an enlarged gland in my left breast-resulting probably from a strain. But I was not at all reassured, and now-after having been careful to use my left arm very li ttle-it seems to bother me more than formerly.

--Gág to Zigrosser, 28 May 1928

Zigrosser was alarmed and recommended a doctor, Dr. Burton J. Lee, whom Gág continued to see over the next several years. Stieglitz and Georgia O'Keeffe also recommended O'Keeffe's doctor. Evidently nothing substantive was done for Gág, and she continued to complain of pain in her side in her letters to Zigrosser in 1931 and 1934.

Gág was depressed by her health and by the state of the world at the approach of the second World War. She contributed a drawing to the American League for Peace and Democracy for its 1939 calendar. She was committed to anti-Fascism and to the liberal causes that many of her artist friends espoused. Her contributions consisted of donating her prints for auctions and other fundraisers plus some small cash contributions. She held memberships in the American Artists Congress, the League of American Writers, and the Authors' Guild of the Authors' League of America through which she contributed to the National War Fund during World War II.

Wanda Gág and Earle Humphreys were married at the end of August 1943, affirming their bond of more than twenty years. The church ceremony took place at the Central Baptist Church in New York City, on a rainy August 27, with Gág's brother-in-law Bob Janssen as witness. Robert Janssen, married to Wanda's sister Dehli, was very close to both Earle and Wanda. They married to quell criticism received by Earle at his defense job that he was living with an unmarried woman--criticism motivated by hos tility and distrust of Earle's union organizing activities in the plant. Although she felt all along that theirs had been a true and moral relationship, Wanda was positive about the marriage; she was glad to be able to be open about their relationship, particularly with Earle's family.

Gág's work continued to be exhibited in group shows and traveling exhibitions. In 1944 she was represented in the First Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Drawings at the National Academy of Design and was awarded the Joseph and Elizabeth R. Pennell Purchase Prize by the Library of Congress for her lithograph Barns at Glen Gardner.

By 1945 Wanda Gág was seriously ill, she wrote that she could not walk a block without panting and she frequently ran a fever. When she was hospitalized in February, several pints of fluid were removed from her left lung. X-rays and exploratory su rgery revealed that she was suffering from terminal lung cancer. Her doctors and husband, Earle Humphreys, decided not to inform her of this, the only people who were told were her brother Howard, Robert Janssen, and Carl Zigrosser. Wanda probably suspected the malignancy, she received radiation treatments and Earle determined that he would take care of her and make her as comfortable as possible, taking over all the maintenance of the household and garden so that she could continue to work.

Late in December of 1945, Earle and Wanda left New York City and drove to Florida where they hoped the warmer climate would make Wanda more comfortable. She continued to work on this trip, producing drawings and working on translations for her next col lection of Grimms' tales. Returning to "All Creation," on May 17, Earle and Howard Gag planted the garden. Wanda became critically ill in June and died at Doctor's Hospital in New York City, 27 June 1946 after a few days hospitalization. She was cremated and her ashes scattered at  "All Creation."

Gág's will was dated 13 December 1945. In it she named Humphreys and Zigrosser as co-executors. Earle Humphreys died 16 May 1950 of a heart attack before final settlement of the estate. His co-executor, Robert Janssen then represented the family in the final settlement. In accordance with Earle's instructions, Robert Janssen burned Humphreys' papers, including the manuscripts for his unpublished books. Her family's wish was that Wanda Gág's work be distributed widely and a number of memorial exhibitions of her work were held in New York, Philadelphia, and Minnesota. Few of Wanda's friends or colleagues had known how ill she was and her death at the age of 53 was a shock to the art world.

Biography/History

Edward Sculley Bradley (1897-1987) was a scholar, author, educator, and administrator at the University of Pennsylvania. Born in Philadelphia to Stephen Edward Bradley and Annette Evelyn Palmer, he received a B.A. in 1919, M.A. in 1921, and Ph.D. in 1925, all from the University of Pennsylvania. Bradley began his teaching career at Penn as an instructor of English, from 1919 to 1926. He was assistant professor from 1926 to 1937, associate professor from 1937 to 1940 and professor from 1940 to 1967. He served as vice provost of undergraduate education from 1956 to 1963. Bradley held several visiting professorships: at Duke University during the summers of 1932, 1937, and 1941; at Northwestern University in 1938; and at the University Southern California in 1940. He served as lecturer at the Ogontz School from 1926 to 1932; at Rosemont College from 1930 to 1933; at Upton School Drama in Philadelphia from 1930 to 1934; and at the Bread Loaf School of English at Middlebury College in 1945.

Sculley Bradley was a prolific writer and editor, serving as assistant literature editor of the Philadelphia Record from 1930 to 1931 and editor of the  General Magazine and History Chronicle in Philadelphia from 1945 to 1956. He published biographies of literary figures George Henry Boker and Henry Charles Lea, as well as several editions of the important and popular anthology,  The American Tradition in Literature. He also published editions of works by Mark Twain, Stephen Crane, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Walt Whitman. Bradley was considered an international expert on Whitman, editing several important editions of the poet's  Leaves of Grass, including the 1949 Rinehart edition, the Comprehensive Reader's Edition in 1965, a Norton Critical Edition in 1973 and  A Textual Variorum in 1980. He was also a general editor and contributed to the 14-volume  Collected Writings of Walt Whitman from 1961 to 1984.

While at Penn, Sculley Bradley maintained a long association with many important writers of his day. He was instrumental in the University acquiring numerous important literary collections, including the Walt Whitman collection, the James T. Farrell papers, the William Carlos Williams research collection, the George H. Boker papers, the Henry Charles Lea papers, and the Theodore Dreiser papers. He was a trustee of the Walt Whitman Foundation, and a member of the Franklin Inn Club, the Athenaeum of Philadelphia, Phi Beta Kappa, Delta Sigma Rho, and Alpha Chi Rho. He was a fellow of the Society of American Studies and the American Association of University Professors, and chairman of the American Literature Group of the Modern Language Association from 1937 to 1938. He was a member of the Society of Friends and was a founding member of Chestnut Hill Monthly Meeting, and served on the board of Germantown Friends School and Friends Hospital. He was married to Marguerite C. Bradley and had two daughters, Deborah B. Oberholtzer and Alison B. Wilhelm.

Biography/History

Hui-lin Li was born in Soochow, a city close to Shanghai, China, in 1911. Li earned his B.S. in Biology in 1930 from Soochow University, an American supported institution of higher learning. He earned his M.S. in Biology in 1932 from Yenching University, also an American supported university, but located in Peking. He joined the faculty at Soochow University in 1932 as an Instructor in Biology. He taught there for eight years. In 1940, he traveled to the United States, where he enrolled in the doctoral program in biology at Harvard University. He earned his Ph.D. in Biology from Harvard in 1942. A year later, Li won a Harrison Fellowship for Research at the University of Pennsylvania. From 1943 to 1946 Li studied at Penn under Francis Pennell of the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia and J. R. Schramm, Chairman of the Department of Botany at Penn.

In 1946 Soochow University appointed Li to the faculty position of Professor of Biology. Just one year later, the National Taiwan University in Taipei appointed him to a professorship in its Department of Botany. He remained in Taipei until 1950. In that year he returned to the United States and accepted a fellowship at the Blandy Farm of Research of the University of Virginia at Boyce, Virginia. In the spring of 1951, the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., appointed Li to the position of Research Associate.

In 1952, Li returned to Philadelphia to work on the cytotaxonomy of American azaleas. He was stationed at the Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania, which was headed by Dr. Schramm, his faculty director at Penn from 1943 to 1946. In 1958 the University of Pennsylvania promoted Li from Research Associate to Associate Professor and in 1963 promoted him again, this time to Professor of Botany. In 1971, Penn appointed him Acting Director of the Arboretum, and in 1972, promoted him to Director. He left the directorship in 1974, when Penn appointed him its first John Bartram Professor of Botany. He retired in 1979.

Li's research and publication spanned a period of more than fifty years. From 1932 to 1983, he published over 200 papers and nine books. Among the books were The Garden Flowers of China (1959), Woody Flora of Taiwan (1963), The Origin and Cultivation of Shade and Ornamental Trees (1964), Alkaloid-bearing Plants and their Contained Alkaloids (1970), Trees of Pennsylvania, the Atlantic States, and the Lake States (1972) and Flora of Taiwan (1975-1979). Flora of Taiwan was a six-volume work published by an editorial committee chaired by Li. This encyclopedia extends to the study of a total of 228 plant families, including 1,360 genera and 3,577 species.

Li was John S. Guggenheim Fellow in 1961, a Fulbright Fellow in 1968, and he won many other research grants from prestigious institutions, including the American Philosophical Society and the American Council of Learned Societies. From 1964 to 1965, he was visiting Professor of Biology and Director of University Biological Studies at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He was elected a member of the Academia Sinica (Taiwan) in 1964. After the normalization of the relations between China and the United States in 1979, Li was also invited to lecture at many institutions in mainland China.

Biography/History

R. Tait McKenzie, physician, physical therapist, physical educator, and sculptor, served the University of Pennsylvania as its first Professor of Physical Education, 1904 -1929. Wishing to be relieved of the administrative work required of his position, McKenzie took a year's leave of absence in 1929-1930 and in 1931 was appointed J. William White Research Professor of Physical Education. His new post permitted him to focus his efforts almost exclusively on his sculpture. In 1937 he became Professor Emeritus.

R. Tait McKenzie was born on May 26, 1867 to William McKenzie, a minister of the Free Church of Scotland, and Catherine Shiells McKenzie. His father died while McKenzie was a young boy of nine years. McKenzie spent his youth in the town of his birth, Almonte, Ontario. At the age of eighteen he entered McGill University and stayed nearly twenty years, as undergraduate, medical student, and after earning the M.D. degree in 1892, as Medical Director of Physical Training and Lecturer in Anatomy. It was in his undergraduate years that his interests in physical education and art first developed. James Naismith, inventor of the game of basketball, was a childhood friend of McKenzie's, who attended McGill with him. It was Naismith who kindled McKenzie's interest in gymnastic activities later, at McGill, McKenzie assisted Naismith in teaching gymnastics at the university. This not only gave McKenzie the opportunity to earn money to pay for his education, but served as the beginning of a career in physical education which would last more than fifty years. It was also at McGill where he developed his theories on physical education.

McKenzie believed that physical education and health activities had a beneficial relationship with the academic program in higher education. He taught that a full understanding of that relationship helped the student preserve health and physical efficiency, learn certain muscle skills, and to conduct himself as a gentleman in the social relationships of competitive games. McKenzie's theme was that exercise kept human beings well, serving as a preventative measure to illness. In 1904 he was appointed a full faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania. McKenzie was attracted to Pennsylvania by the newly constructed gymnasium at Franklin Field, and viewed this as an opportunity to test his theory of physical education as a vehicle of preventative medicine. He developed a physical education program which became part of the core curriculum at the University. His book, Exercise in Education and Medicine, (Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders Company, 1909), set forth the evolution of physical education in the United States and discussed exercise as a necessity for all individuals. As a staunch advocate of amateurism, McKenzie believed intercollegiate athletics should be an educational program fully controlled by the institution. His advocacy led to the "Gates Plan" at Penn, which brought the alumni-controlled Council of Athletics under the direction of the administration's Department of Physical Education. The Gates Plan was implemented in 1931 and subsequent years and placed the administration of student health, physical instruction, and intercollegiate athletics in McKenzie's Department of Physical Education. It brought McKenzie well-earned stature and prestige at the University, but also saddled him with an unrelenting demand for his administrative presence.

McKenzie's first efforts at sculpture resulted from his inability to find sculptured pieces that demonstrated points in lectures on anatomy. His series of four Masks of Facial Expressions (1902) was his first public endeavor in sculpture. In 1903, excited by the direction of the Society of College Gymnasium Directors and recognizing a need for illustrative art, he proceeded down the career path for which he would be best known, that of sculptor. His Sprinter (1902) and Athlete (1903) were initially inspired by the short lived, but internationally popular movement of anthropometry. The art world soon found much to criticize in this style and McKenzie turned his attention to the study of European masters. By this time, however, his earlier interest in anthropometry was well known and his formal training in medicine was viewed as an unorthodox, if not unsuitable preparation for the practice of fine art. The result was that many art critics viewed his early work unfavorably. McKenzie traveled to Europe for study in an attempt to address these criticisms. At the University of Pennsylvania, McKenzie was afforded a private studio in the tower of Weightman Hall, (reached only by bringing down a jointed ladder) and he was surrounded by athletic programs and their participants to serve as models for his artwork. It was his association with Percy Gardner and E. Norman Gardiner, scholars of Greek sculpture, that did much to rehabilitate and enhance his reputation and image as a sculptor. They used his work to illustrate their publications; his reputation further grew overseas with his art shown at the Roman Exposition of 1911.

As his sculpture began to receive recognition, his work in relief also received notice. McKenzie mastered the art of the medallion, creating both memorial pieces and awards. At the 1912 Olympics, his most acclaimed medallion, Joy of Effort, was set into the wall of the great stadium at Stockholm. His relief entitled, Passing the Baton, was inspired by the Relay Carnival at the University of Pennsylvania. He produced medals for the Intercollegiate Conference Athletic Association (ICAA) to commemorate tennis, swimming, track and field, gymnastics, fencing, and golf as well as dozens of medals of other academic and athletic organizations.

McKenzie maintained his private practice while working as an educator and artist and was particularly interested in preventative medicine. Yet he also developed an interest in rehabilitation. His tenure at Penn included the first appointment at any American university as a professor of physical therapy. The war intensified his efforts in this area, and he was later recognized by the Academy of Physical Medicine for his contributions in rehabilitation. McKenzie served as the medical officer in charge of Heaton Park, Manchester, England during World War I. His involvement in the war remained that of a physician, and in 1918 he published two books, Reclaiming the Maimed and A Handbook of Physical Therapy. The latter was adopted by British, Canadian, and American armed forces as the official manual of hospital rehabilitation.

McKenzie's only sculpture completed during this period was Blighty, a representation of a young Seaforth Highlander on leave in France. After the war McKenzie was commissioned to do a number of memorials, including the Call, the central figure of the Scottish-American war memorial; The Volunteer, in Almonte; Alma Mater, the Girard College memorial; and the Homecoming, the Cambridge memorial. It was in this post-war period that McKenzie's great reputation was achieved. His work was displayed at several major exhibitions, including a show at Gump's Gallery in San Francisco in 1923; Grand Central Art Galleries in New York in 1924; Georges Petit Galleries in Paris in 1924; New York in 1927; Toronto in 1928; the London Fine Arts Society in 1930; at the Olympic Games in Los Angeles in 1932 (where he won a prize for his Shield of Athletes); the Grand Central Art Galleries in New York in 1934; and the Olympic Games in Berlin in 1936.

Demands placed on him by art commissions and exhibitions, coupled with his many speaking engagements on his concern over the mounting professionalism in college sports, prompted McKenzie to submit his resignation from his position as Director of Physical Education in 1929. The University offered McKenzie a one year leave of absence and upon his return in 1931 appointed him the J. William White Research Professor of Physical Education, the first appointment of its kind. His works on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania include the Youthful Franklin, commissioned in 1911 by the Class of 1904 and installed in front of Weightman Hall; the Provost Edgar Fahs Smith statue, installed on Smith Walk; and the J. William White collection at Gimbel Gymnasium. McKenzie continued his work in sculpture until his death in April of 1938. His heart was buried in Edinburgh at the base of his Call, which he considered his best work. This was in keeping with his belief in a spiritual inheritance from the Greeks, who held that the heart was the seat of the soul. He married Ethel O'Neil of Dublin, Ireland in October of 1907. She was a musician and poet whose collected poems were published in Secret Snow. They had no children.

Biography/History

Charles Godfrey Leland (1824-1903) was a humorist and folklorist from Philadelphia. Born August 15, 1824, Leland was the son of Henry and Charlotte Frost Leland in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was educated in private schools, at Princeton University, and in universities in Heidelberg and Munich, and in Paris, where he became involved in the Revolution of 1848. After returning to the United States, he worked briefly in the field of law before moving towards a career in journalism. He wrote for many newspapers and eventually served as editor for the Philadelphia Press. A strong supporter of the Union during the Civil War, Leland enlisted in the Union Army and served at the battle of Gettysburg.

Leland was interested in folklore, folk linguistics, gypsies, fairies, and witches; and he published books and articles on American and European languages and folk traditions. He achieved recognition as the author of the comic Breitmann’s Ballads and  Arcadia, or the Gospel of the Witches, a classic of neo-Paganism.

In 1869, Leland's father died and Leland traveled to Europe, in part to supervise an official English edition of Breitmann’s Ballads in Great Britain where it had become a minor literary sensation. During the years 1869 to 1870, he wrote to his childhood friend, George Henry Boker. He returned to Philadelphia in 1879 and established the Industrial Art School. In 1888, he moved to Italy where he remained until his death on March 20, 1903.

Scope and Contents

The Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell Papers at the University of Pennsylvania are the integration of several gifts and deposits made during the 1950s by Edward Larocque Tinker and Elizabeth Pennell's sister-in-law, Emily Jewell Robins, augmented by a few later donations and purchases. Received separately, the papers are here combined for better access by researchers.

The Pennells bequeathed their collection of Whistleriana to the Library of Congress in 1917 although the papers remained in storage in London until the end of the war. Upon his death in 1926, Joseph Pennell bequeathed his own prints, papers, and estate to the Library of Congress, subject to provision made for Elizabeth's use of the estate until she died. Elizabeth was the manager of the couple's finances and kept the estate intact and growing even through the Depression. Upon her death the couple's papers, including Elizabeth's collection of cookery books and some papers of Charles Godfrey Leland, were transferred to the Library of Congress. Elizabeth left her personal papers and literary rights to her friends Edward L. and Frances Tinker, who donated some of these papers to the University of Pennsylvania in 1951 and later made a donation to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin in 1961.

The papers at the University of Pennsylvania Library comprise personal correspondence of both Pennells, drafts and galleys for some of their publications; contracts; royalty statements; trust fund account statements; copies of wills; publicity materials; photographs; newspaper clippings; memorabilia; exhibition catalogs, awards, original sketches, watercolors, and prints by Joseph Pennell; in addition to a few works by other artists.

There also are some letters and other materials about the Pennells generated by the two donors, who researched and wrote about the Pennells and actively promoted the granting of a posthumous doctorate to Joseph Pennell by the University of Pennsylvania in 1951.

Joseph Pennell's correspondence includes letters from the Art Club of Philadelphia, related to his resignation from that organization in 1918; correspondence with the Art Institute of Chicago where he lectured in 1919 and 1920; letters he wrote to fell ow artist John McLure Hamilton, many concerning work they did for world art expositions including the Louisiana Purchase Exposition at St. Louis in 1904; and letters he wrote to artist C. B. Falls while teaching at the Art Students League in the 1920s (th ese were a donation from Mrs. Falls in 1979). Also included is Pennell's correspondence with the Library of Congress in 1917 regarding his donation of Whistler manuscripts to the Library; correspondence with officials of the British government regarding P ennell's access to military sites in 1916-1917; and correspondence and royalty statements from his publishers.

Elizabeth Robins Pennell's correspondence includes letters from Edmund Gosse (1849-1928) and J. M. Barrie (1860-1937) regarding her war novel The Lovers (1917), plus a number of other letters in response to the novel. A lon g letter from Mary Franklin (Mrs. Daniel) Garber in 1925 discusses the education of women, the difficulties of domestic life, and artistic taste in America. Letters from Howard Coppuck Levis discuss wine and the collecting of cookery books. A number of le tters from Agnes Repplier (1855-1950) attest to the lifelong friendship between the two women. Letters from Dora Esther Yates (b. 1879) relate to the Gypsy Lore Society which Elizabeth R. Pennell served as honorary president in 1931. Correspondence to Edward Larocque Tinker spans the years of their friendship from 1922 to 1935. There is also correspondence with the Pennells' publishers regarding both Joseph and Elizabeth's books.

The bulk of the Elizabeth R. Pennell correspondence, however, comprises her letters to her brother Edward Robins, plus, in particular, her bi-weekly letters to her sister-in-law Emily Jewell Robins which span the years from 1922 to February 1936. In th ese letters Elizabeth discusses artists and the art world in New York and Philadelphia, plus news and gossip from Europe. Artists, art dealers and collectors, and writers mentioned in these letters include Wayman Adams, Clifford Addams, Paul Wayland Bartl ett, Gifford Beal, Irving Clark, Royal Cortissoz, John Flanagan, John Galsworthy, Ellen Glasgow, John McLure Hamilton, Childe Hassam, Arthur Mayger Hind, Violet Hunt, R. U. Johnson, Edward G. Kennedy, Emmet Kennedy, Ernest Lawson, John Frederick Lewis, Belloc Lowndes, Harrison S. Morris, Laurent Oppenheim, Agnes Repplier, R. H. Sauter, John Charles Van Dyke, H. G. Wells, Cadwallader Washburn, H. Devitt Welsh, James McNeill Whistler, Owen Wister, Catharine Morris Wright, and Sydney Longstreth Wright.

Elizabeth Robins Pennell's observations on people she had known well are often humorous, as she wrote to Emily:

Bernard Shaw seems to have a distressing fancy to exhibit his nakedness to the world. It was bad enough when he was young and posed as Rodin's Penseur but in his old age it is simply loathsome. He looks like one of those ho rrible holy men of India who spend most of their lives staring at their navel.

15 September 1928

She remained energetic and interested in world events until the end of her life. Her letters comment on United States politics, the music of Leopold Stokowski, the Catholic church and birth control, and world events, as in this example from a letter written when she was 78 years old:

Dear Emily, Isn't this a beautiful morning? It quite wakes me up, despite the fact that Hitler's last performance seems to bring us all to the verge of chaos. When he spoke over the radio yesterday. It's hard just to hear his voice and judge him by it, meaning to turn him off after a few minutes as I understand so little German nowadays that I felt there was no use to linger longer. But I could not stop listening. I never heard such rage and fury -- “hell, fire and damnation” sort of thing -- in a voice before. It was amazing and horribly alarming. Did you listen in by chance, and if you did, how did it strike you? If he has his way the whole world will be in a war within the next year or so, if not sooner.

15 October 1933

The Papers at the University of Pennsylvania include many of the photographs, proof sheets and some publicity for Joseph Pennell's memoirs, The Adventures of an Illustrator (1925). This was Pennell's last book before his death, although he planned and worked on the  Catalogues of his etchings and lithographs. Of interest to historians of the Society of Friends in Philadelphia are the eight daguerreotypes of Joseph Pennell and his family in Quaker dress, ca. 1860. Some of the images were used to illustrate Joseph Pennell's memoirs.

Also included are approximately 150 works of art by Joseph Pennell, most are etchings and lithographs, with a few sketches and watercolors. Subjects include historic sites and contemporary construction in Philadelphia, New York City, Washington, D.C., and some from Pennell's work in Europe. Portraits of Joseph Pennell include signed etchings by H. Devitt Welsh and Levon West, and reliefs by sculptors John Flanagan and R. Tait McKenzie, plus photographs by a number of noted photographers.

Related collections at the Library of the University of Pennsylvania are the Carl Zigrosser Papers, Ms. Coll. 6, and the Agnes Repplier Papers, Ms. Coll. 18, both of which include Pennell letters. Related collections of Joseph and Elizabeth Pennell let ters in the Philadelphia area may be found at the Free Library of Philadelphia, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Rosenbach Library. Many of these items were microfilmed by the Smithsonian Institution for its Archives of American Art project in 1984-1989 and are cataloged in both WorldCat and Franklin.

Scope and Contents

The Frazer Family Papers span over 200 years of an American family. The collection provides insight into five generations of University of Pennsylvania alum as well as three generations of educators, all in the field of chemistry, at the University of Pennsylvania and contains the papers of Persifor Frazer, Robert Frazer, John Fries Frazer, Persifor Frazer, Robert Frazer, John Frazer, John Frazer, Jr., and Tench Frazer, as well as a range of other family members and relatives. The collection is particularly strong in representing the professional and personal activities of Persifor Frazer (1844-1909) and his son John Frazer (1882-1964) from the 1860s to the 1950s.

Persifor Frazer's papers, 1776-1792, consist of correspondence, some of which was written during his time as a prisoner of war during the American Revolutionary War. There are also letters to Frazer from George Washington from the same time period; however these are not the original letters, but copies which were made at an unknown later date. There are also papers pertaining to Frazer's various military services, including court martial proceedings which Frazer presided over.

The papers for Robert Frazer, 1768-1834, consist of material of a both professional and personal nature. The professional material primarily consists of correspondence to and about Frazer's court cases and clients. The personal material also consists of a fair amount of correspondence, mainly between Frazer and family members. There are also certificates, receipts, diplomas, and a copy of Frazer's will.

The papers for John Fries Frazer, 1829-1871, are of greater scope. Included in this series are student notes, records, and activities, 1829-1830. As the first professor appointed to teach chemistry in the College, his professional papers include lecture notes on chemistry, [1840]-1848, geology, 1839-1848, mechanics, 1869, and topography, 1836. His research notes on his scientific interests including chemistry, geology, light, metallurgy, natural science, and steam engines are present. There are notes for other interests such as Blackstone's Commentaries on Law, literary quotations, and poetry. General correspondence, 1869, 1871 and some correspondence with his mentor, Alexander Dallas Bache, 1862-1867, are also included. Membership certificates, pamphlets and catalogs, 1830-1850, a receipt book, 1833-1834, minutes of a meeting of the Young Men Opposed to the Interference of Office Holders on Elections, 1834, and an estate inventory, 1885, finish out the series.

The bulk of the collection contains the Persifor Frazer papers, [1860]-1909. Correspondence, 1866-1909, covers a variety of topics related to Frazer's professional interests including: chemistry, minerals, anthracite coal, the Geological Survey, scientific apparatus, the Centennial, administrative and professional duties at the University of Pennsylvania, alumni efforts, and professional organizations. Some of the correspondents are Richard Lewis Ashhurst, Rachel L. Bodley, John Cadwalader, Edward Drinker Cope, James Dewight Dana, John Fulton, Joseph Smith Harris, Charles Custis Harrison, Alexander H. Holley, Joseph P. Kimball, George Augustus Koenig, J. Peter Lesley, Thomas McKean, William Metcalf, Silas Weir Mitchell, William Pepper, Bernhart Preu, Frederick Prime, Rossiter Worthington Raymond, Alfred Richard Cecil Selwyn, Stevens Institute of Technology, Herbert Welsh, Edward Siddons Whelen, James Nevins Whelen, and Henry Whelen. There is some personal correspondence scattered throughout largely related to family concerns, such as Anne Frazer's broken engagement in 1875 and his mother's illness and death in 1881. In addition there is also a file of correspondence on William Byrd Page. Letterpress books, 1870-1886, detail Frazer's professional and some personal activities.

Persifor Frazer's general files, [1860]-1869, 1880-1908, cover a wide range of topics. The professional activities and interests reflected in these files includes his involvement with the Academy of Natural Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Philosophical Society, Scientific Societies Conference, Congrès Géologique International, the Mexican mine tunnel enterprise, and his efforts to introduce German manufacturing processes to America. Frazer's activity as an expert handwriting analyzer is also well documented. Some personal interests included involvement with the First City Troop, the Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution, the Sons of the American Revolution, Franklin Chess Club, and the Philadelphia Fencing and Sparing Club. His papers reflect his personal interest in poetry (primarily romantic), religion and ethics, music, and sports. There is also a diary documenting his courtship of Isabella N. Whelen. A final subseries of books and pamphlets by Frazer and others finish out the collection.

The American Philosophical Society also holds a collection of Persifor Frazer's papers, the guide for which can be found here: http://www.amphilsoc.org/mole/view?docId=ead/Mss.B.F867-ead.xml;query=;brand=default.

Robert Frazer's papers, 1867-1933, consist of only a much smaller amount of mostly personal material, including his research about the Frazer family origins in Scotland and Ireland. There is also a manuscript of an unpublished second edition, dated 1932, of his book The Silent Shakespeare, the first edition of which was published in 1915.

John Frazer's papers, 1903-1955, deal primarily with his student days and his professional career, both at the University of Pennsylvania. His student papers, 1903-1907, consist of scrapbooks, printed ephemera, and notes on analytical chemistry, electro chemistry, industrial chemistry, organic chemistry, and physical chemistry. There are some laboratory notes and information on his Ph.D. and doctoral examination. His professional papers include his lecture notes on chemistry, 1923-1928, roll books, 1909-1928, laboratory notes, 1923-1934, and articles on his work with sulphur contents in plants. Correspondence and clippings offer insight into his work as well. His personal involvement with the Delta Alumni Association, 1942-1955 and the First City Troop, 1913-1915 can also be seen in the collection. Several annotated books and a large sampling of chemical instruments and apparatus complete the series.

John Frazer, Jr.'s papers, 1932-1982, contain correspondence for the most part, which is generally between Frazer and his parents, siblings, and cousin Persifor "Perky" Frazer (1921-2008). The correspondence covers Frazer's time spent in Europe during World War II and includes many detailed descriptions of his experiences while there. There is also a small amount of Frazer's professional genealogical work included in the papers.

The Tench Frazer papers, 1935-1986, also contain correspondence of a personal nature for the most part, as well as childhood journals. There is also a small amount of material pertaining to his education at the University of Virginia Law School during the early to mid-1950s.

The collection also contains documentation regarding several other members of the Frazer family and their relations, the contents of which range from personal correspondence to matters regarding property and investments. Most notable among these individuals is Col. Oswald Tilghman (1841-1932). Col. Tilghman was a veteran of the American Civil War, fighting for the Confederacy fighting in Company B, Terry's Texas Rangers of Washington County, Texas. He was captured at the Siege of Port Hudson in 1863 and was held as a prisoner of war on Johnson's Island in Lake Erie until the conclusion of the war. After the war, Tilghman became involved in Maryland politics and served on the state senate 1893-1897 and was Secretary of State of Maryland 1904-1908. Later in his life, Tilghman was president of the Board of Development of the Eastern Shore of Maryland, and was auditor of the circuit court of Talbot County for over twenty years.

The University of Delaware Special Collections Library holds a collection of Tilghman family papers, the finding aid of which can be found at the following URL: http://www.lib.udel.edu/ud/spec/findaids/html/mss0524.html.

The photographs in the collection consist of portraits from about the 1840s through the 1910s. Subjects living before or during the advent of photography tend to be represented here by undated photographs of paintings. More informal snapshots begin in the early 20th century and continue to the 1950s. There are also some photographs of family homes included.

Scope and Contents

This collection contains letters written to Williams, writings, and ephemera dating between 1880 and 1909. Eighty-five letters, arranged chronologically, relate to literature, personal matters and friendship, and publishing. Williams' correspondents were contemporary poets, writers, editors, and publishers from the time period. Williams’s most frequent correspondent was Edmund Clarence Stedman, the editor of An American Anthology, 1787-1900, a book of American poetry that included Williams’s "Walt Whitman," "Electra," and "Song" (neither of which are included in this collection). Overall, most of the letter writers, if they are not thanking Williams for sending him copies of his works or criticizing them, are making arrangements about getting together either at his house in Germantown or elsewhere, or philosophizing about their thoughts on poetry, or writing in general. There is also talk about the publishing houses or periodicals and magazines where the writers and poets submitted their works, or their efforts to help each other to get published. Correspondents include Henry Abbey, Thomas Bailey Aldrich, Lane Allen, Mary Anderson, R.M. Bache, J. Baldwin, Edwin N. Benson, W.F. Boothe, George Washington Cable, American novelist Winston Churchill, William Jermyn Conlin, Maurice Francis Egan, James T. Fields, Horace Howard Furness, Margaret T. Langston, Charles Godfrey Leland, Samuel Longfellow, Charles H. Luders, S. Weir Mitchell, William Vaughn Moody, Clara Moore, Charles Leonard Moore, Herbert Moreton, Joseph Pennell, Samuel W. Pennypacker, Agnes Repplier, Allen Thorndike Rice, George Riddle, Kate Douglas Riggs, Charles G. D. Roberts, Frank Dempster Sherman, Otis Skinner, Lloyd P. Smith, Edmund Clarence Stedman, Mary Virginia Terhune, Edith Matilda Thomas, Townsend Ward and Owen Wister. Despite Francis Howard Williams's known personal relationship with Walt Whitman, Whitman is not prevalent in this collection. His name is mentioned in a letter from Horace Howard Furness asking Williams where he might find a copy of the ceremonies of Walt Whitman's funeral and in a letter from Agnes Repplier.

The collection also includes writing by Williams such as poems, prose, and notes from talks he gave to various clubs and organizations. Among these are"De Profundis" (a talk given in Atlantic City in 1893), a ten page typed poem titled "Ave America: an ode," and prose pieces such as "The Clock that Struck Thirteen" and "The Tragic Touch." These are also numerous writings that are untitled which have been grouped together in a single folder.

Researchers will find miscellaneous notes and ephemera including several pages of science notes; an invitation to the Informals club and a newspaper clipping concerning the Informals club from 1896; a Crawford Shoe miniature notebook containing notes about Johannes Kelpius and sketches of the Kelpius Cave; a photograph possibly of Louisa May Alcott; a photograph of a tennis match and a photograph of a man walking towards a hedge, both by a photographer named D. Hinkle; and a copy of "Two Friends and the Inn" by Edwin N. Benson.

Scope and Contents

The two containers of correspondence in the Agnes Repplier Papers consist predominantly of correspondence addressed to Agnes Repplier. There are a number of letters from Shakespearean scholar, Horace Howard Furness, who enjoyed Miss Repplier's company at gatherings at his suburban home. The largest number of letters from a single correspondent are those from the British author, folklorist, and compiler of children's literature, Andrew Lang. Outgoing correspondence from Repplier is filed after the in coming correspondence and consists almost entirely of letters that Agnes Repplier wrote to her friend Helen Godey Wilson (these letters were a gift from Wilson to the University of Pennsylvania) and to her niece, Emma Repplier Witmer. Readers should be a ware that Repplier's letters to Horace Howard Furness are included in the Furness correspondence within the H. H. Furness Memorial Library manuscript collection in Special Collections, Van Pelt Library, University of Pennsylvania. Repplier's letters to A. Edward Newton are at Princeton University. Some of Repplier's correspondence with notable Philadelphians is located in the manuscript collection at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and Repplier's letters to editors of The Atlantic Monthly regarding the publication of her essays and of her books with Houghton Mifflin are in the Houghton Library at Harvard University.

The selection of items of correspondence that were saved appears to have been made by Agnes Repplier's niece, Emma Repplier Witmer, who wrote a memoir of her aunt. Some notations on the envelopes and manuscripts are in Repplier's hand, however, most a re in Emma Witmer's hand. Many of these are letters from well-known literary or political figures, for example, Edith Wharton and Theodore Roosevelt. A number of these letters praise Repplier's work or congratulate her for an achievement or award; in ot her words, the correspondence, with a few exceptions, tends to focus on highlights of her career rather than on her personal life or her works in progress.

The collection includes forty-one manuscripts of essays, speeches, and notes for Repplier's books plus one folder of manuscript fragments. The five Agnes Repplier notebooks in the collection are records of her notes on her reading and accounts of inco me that she received from her work. There is a small selection of published copies of some Repplier essays, followed by articles about Repplier and reviews of her work. The collection includes one book manuscript: Mère Marie of the Ursulines.

Memorabilia includes photographs of Agnes Repplier (with some of her cats), newspaper clippings, and two handmade commonplace books.

Scope and Contents

The Wanda Gág papers at the University of Pennsylvania are the primary repository for information on her personal and family life including, as they do, the nearly complete set of her diaries from 1908-1946. Gág's diaries were important to her. She had a compulsion to write that was as strong as her compulsion to draw. She read from her diaries to her close friends, she recopied long sections of them to use in later writings. In them she wrote about art, her family, her friendships, her lovers, her emotions, her ideals, women's roles in society, her health, marriage, money, education, and her passion for the natural world.

Gág's diaries are the primary source for understanding her creative process, her views on art and the work of her contemporaries. She had developed the habit of analyzing her thoughts, motives, morals, moods, and creativity early in childhood and her writings provide an unusually rich inner portrait of a talented and driven artist who was a perfectionist in her work.

The diaries incidently contain much of interest in regard to women's health, particularly women's reproductive health and treatment from the 1920s to the 1940s. Gág was frank in writing about her use of birth control, her sexual activity, and her suffering during menstruation (she suffered so severely from dysmenorrhea that she had to reschedule all her activities each month). In April and May of 1921, Gág feared that she was pregnant and went to see Margaret H. Sanger, whom she describes in her diary (she wasn't pregnant, but was given a regime to follow to induce her menstruation). There is also material related to the health of her sisters. Dehli suffered from depression and turned to Christian Science when she was eighteen, in part to gai n control over her thoughts. She saw a number of psychiatrists and other specialists after she moved to New York in 1926, with financial assistance from Wanda. Flavia, who became a successful author and illustrator of children's books by following Wanda's lead, also suffered from a number of health problems. The poor nutrition of the Gág family members in their childhood may have been responsible for at least some of their health problems later in life.

Correspondence in the Wanda Gág Papers is focused predominantly on personal and family relationships. Her extensive correspondence with Adolf Dehn, 1915-1943, documents his life in a guardhouse as a conscientious objector in World War I, but is primarily an extension of their conversations on art, love, and marriage. He continued to write to her from Europe in the 1920s and his letters contain information about artists they both knew. Gág's letters to Dehn are preserved in the Adolf and Virginia Dehn Papers and Dehn Family Papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Her correspondence with Earle M. Humphreys spans the years 1931-1943 (from about the time he and Wanda purchased their farm in Milford, New Jersey) and does not date from the earliest years of their relationship. Correspondence with Carl Zigrosser is extensive, dating from 1924 until weeks before Gág's death in 1946. Zigrosser's letters in the Wanda Gág Papers and his own papers, also held by the Universit y of Pennsylvania (Ms. Coll. 6) contain a wealth of information about artists and the art world in the United States and Europe for the first half of the century. The Wanda Gág Papers were donated to the University of Pennsylvania by Zigrosser in 197 2 with the donation of his papers, and include items, in addition to their correspondence, which were gifts from Gág to Zigrosser.

There are significant letters from each of Gág's siblings, and ongoing correspondence in particular with Dehli and with Flavia. Some of the earliest letters from her sisters Thusnelda and Stella to Wanda in New York show their struggles to feed the family and keep them warm in the harsh Minnesota winters after their mother died.

Letters from Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O'Keeffe reflect the high regard they both felt for Gág. Other artists, authors, and activists whose work and/or lives are represented or discussed in the papers include Egmont Arens, George Biddle, Roger N. Baldwin, Arnold Blanch, Lucile Lundquist Blanch, Louise Bogan, Howard Cook, Adolf Dehn, Max Eastman, John B. Flannagan, Lewis Gannett, Ruth Chrisman Gannett, Mike Gold, Harry Gottlieb, Emil Ganso, Horace Gregory, William Gropper, Max Jacobs, Frida Kahl o, Spencer Kellogg, Jr., Rockwell Kent, Julius J. Lankes, Harold Atkins Larrabee, Barbara Latham, Thomas Gaetano Lo Medíco, John Marin, Edith Whittlesey Newton, Anton Refregier, Diego Rivera, Arnold Ronnebeck, Grace Cogswell Root, Hyman J. Warsager, Anthony Velonis, and Art Young, among others.

The Papers include approximately 30 original drawings and watercolors, including a number of erotic drawings and paintings. The primary collection of Gág's prints is at the Philadelphia Museum of Art; representative prints were distributed by Zigrosser and Gág's family to a large number of museums around the world after her death. Exhibition catalogs and lists of Gág's works are not complete in these Papers, although lists of her work were compiled as part of the settlement of Gág's estate (Box 32).

Financial records for Wanda Gág are incomplete, comprising only four items. There are notes recording her earnings from commercial art in 1921-1922; one item is an account book in which she kept a strict record of shared household expenses; one is her bank book for a savings account, which shows a balance of $3000-$6000 during the Depression years; and the last item is a book in which she kept handwritten accounts of royalties from book sales.

These Papers include correspondence and partial records for the Estate of Wanda Gág, 1946-1968. Zigrosser and Earle Humphreys were co-executors of the Estate. Upon Humphreys's death in 1950, his co-executor (Wanda's brother-in-law) Robert Janssen became the family representative for Wanda Gág's estate.

Production materials for Gág's children's books were sold after her death. The primary repository for these is the Children's Literature Research Collection, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Some Gág family correspondence, Wanda Gág photo albums, and papers of Alma Schmidt Scott are also part of that collection. The papers of Alma Scott, including her correspondence and research materials for her biography of Wanda Gág, are located at the Minnesota Historical Society. The Gág and Biebl families donated family papers and artwork to the New Ulm Library in New Ulm, Minnesota.

Scope and Contents

The E. Sculley Bradley papers include his personal and professional correspondence dating from 1923 to 1962, material from several literary censorship cases for which he testified, corrected drafts of his manuscript for the Variorum edition of  Leaves of Grass, ephemera and graphics associated with Walt Whitman, and a small amount of material on other authors.

The correspondence consists of letters to Bradley (and sometimes copies of his replies) from colleagues and noted authors of his day, mostly on the topic of literature. Many of the letters concern the correspondents' publication in the General Magazine and History Chronicle, but also includes invitations to lecture at Penn or participate in conference programs. Researchers will find literary manuscripts included with the correspondence when they exist. Material in this series is filed by correspondent. Occasionally a secretary, wife or daughter would write on behalf of a correspondent; these have been filed under the name of the (usually) better known literary figure. Many of the files contain only a single letter from the correspondent, while others, especially those of James T. Farrell, David McCord, and Peter Viereck, are more extensive. Bradley's correspondence with Farrell spanned 14 years and is the largest single component of this series.

Bradley's association with James T. Farrell began when Bradley testified in support of Farrell's books in a Philadelphia censorship trial in 1948. Through the course of their professional and personal relationship, Bradley took a keen interest in Farrell's writing and published several of his works in the General Magazine and History Chronicle. Farrell often spoke of his money problems leading to his need for giving paid lectures (and which Bradley frequently helped to secure). There was significant discussion of Farrell's literary papers, which he had originally hoped would go to the Newberry Library in Chicago. Farrell decided to give (or sell) them to the University of Pennsylvania, and the correspondence is rich with descriptions of materials periodically arriving at Penn. During this period, Farrell and his second wife Hortense Alden divorced and he reunited with his first wife, Dorothy Butler. Bradley was involved in Farrell's son Kevin's decision to attend Penn, and there was periodic discussion of Kevin's academic progress as well as financial difficulties associated with his tuition.

From 1948 through 1966, Sculley Bradley was involved in a series of literary censorship trials, acting as a witness on the side of the authors, publishers, and/or booksellers. His first case involved the seizure of over 2,000 books confiscated from 50 different bookstores, department stores, and newsstands in Philadelphia, PA in 1948. Among the books seized were Studs Lonigan and  A World I Never Made by James T. Farrell;  Sanctuary and  The Wild Palms by William Faulkner;  God's Little Acre by Erskine Caldwell;  Raintree County by Ross Lockridge, Jr.; and  Never Love a Stranger by Harold Robbins. This case was notable as the first in Pennsylvania to be concerned with current literature in book form. In the following years, other censorship cases arose in Fall River, MA (focusing on the book  Duke, by Hal Ellison), Detroit, MI (  The Devil Rides Out, by John H. Griffin), Youngstown, OH (  Down All Your Streets, by Leonard Bishop), and additional cases brought in Philadelphia, PA as well as several other cities (for  The Tropic of Cancer, by Henry Miller). Bradley also signed on to an  amicus curiae brief prepared by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in defense of Ralph Ginzburg, who published the erotic journal  Eros and other works which were confiscated in the mail in 1962. Some of the cases Bradley was involved in made their way to the United States Supreme Court. In the files for these censorship cases, Bradley collected correspondence concerning his testimony, newspaper and magazine clippings, receipts for his consultative charges, and, in some cases, copies of legal briefs.

The series of Walt Whitman material begins with drafts for the three editions of Leaves of Grass that Sculley Bradley worked on: the  Comprehensive Reader's Edition (1965), the  Norton Critical Edition (1973), and the  Textual Variorum (1980). Drafts for the first two are less complete than for the Variorum and focus mainly on the “Excluded Poems and Passages” section. Drafts for the  Norton Critical Edition are grouped into sets labelled “copy 2” and “copy 3 and 4” following Bradley’s original organization of the papers.

The Variorum edition subseries contains an extensive run of corrected drafts. In 1955, on the 100th anniversary of the first printing of  Leaves of Grass, the  Collected Works of Walt Whitman was announced. It was to be published by New York University Press under the general editorship of Gay Wilson Allen and Sculley Bradley. Preparation of a  Variorum edition of  Leaves, which would collate and trace the six printed editions (and numerous impressions) issued during Whitman's lifetime, was overseen by Bradley and Harold W. Blodgett. Allen and Bradley produced a  Critical Reader's Edition of  Leaves in 1965, but the  Variorum was delayed and was not published until 1980. In the end, Bradley and Blodgett were not able to see it through to completion and the edition was completed by editors William White and Arthur Golden.

The Whitman ephemera assembled by Bradley includes brochures, printed maps, typed inventories and bibliographies, newspaper and magazine clippings (including a copy of Whitman’s “A Backward Glance O'er Travel'd Roads” published in The Critic in 1884), correspondence about Whitman, book reviews and book publication notices, manuscript texts and printed articles of other scholars, cards, invitations, a photostat of Whitman’s manuscript of “Good-Bye my Fancy,” and two Whitman family autographs (envelopes addressed in the hand of Whitman's mother and Whitman himself, respectively). Also included are notes by Bradley on Whitman.

The series of Whitman graphics includes engravings, photographs, and reproductions of paintings of Whitman, buildings associated with Whitman, and monuments to the poet. Also included are some negatives and postcards.

The final series on authors other than Whitman includes works of Ernest Hemingway translated into Japanese, copies of the American Literary Review in Japanese, a collection of American poems in French edited by Jacques Catel, clippings on Robert Frost, and a galley proof of three poems of e.e. cummings, with the poet's own annotations. Also in this file is an inventory of autograph manuscripts once owned by Bradley.

Scope and Contents

This collection documents the professional career and life of Dr. Hui-lin Li as a professor of botany and researcher.

The first series includes Li's correspondence related to both his professional activities and personal interest and spanning over nearly half a century from 1945 to 1994. The General Files concern institutions Li was affiliated with or subjects that interested him professionally and intellectually. This series includes an administrative file of the Morris Arboretum around his tenure as first Acting Director and then Director. The Research Files represent numerous projects Li undertook in botanical study. The forms of the material include manuscripts, drafts, notes, publishing correspondence, articles and books published, and reprints. Related to the Research Files is the series of Reference Publications, which cover a wide range of subjects, either directly related to his own research or appealing to him as a botanist with a global perspective as well as a multicultural background. The Photographs, Slides, Graphics and Scrapbooks series contains various forms of visual material which were gathered during Li's professional or research activities. This series includes a large collection of images, either in photograph prints or in slides, of plants from practically all parts of the world, but especially from North America and East Asia, the latter focusing on Taiwan, China, and Japan.

Scope and Contents

The collection of R. Tait McKenzie documents the entire span of his career, as physician, educator, and sculptor. The Papers series includes the correspondence of R. Tait McKenzie, 1880-1938; Ethel McKenzie's papers regarding the estate settlement, 1938-1940; the business and financial records of McKenzie, 1893-1938; personal records, 1907-1936; professional organizations and clubs, 1912-1938; University of Pennsylvania files, 1900-1938; lectures and speeches, 1884-1938; writings and manuscripts, 1891-1938; published reprints, 1882-1938; clippings and scrapbooks, 1880-1939; and books and printed ephemera, 1897-1925, n.d. The photographic series contain prints, lantern slides, glass negatives, and photo engraving blocks. Exhibition documentation, works on paper, and plaster casts, studies, and proofs represent the Art series. The Memorabilia series fills out the collection.

The Correspondence subseries detail the range of career interests of R. Tait McKenzie including art, athletics, physical education, anatomy, medicine, and physical therapy. Major correspondents with R. Tait McKenzie include: Marquis de Aberdeen, Burdick Cabinet Company, Stuart Campbell, William J. Cromie, William Henry Drummond, Lea and Febiger, Sir Andrew Macphail, Mill of Kintail staff, William O. Partridge, Edward R. Peacock, George P. Pilling, Samuel Scoville, Lord Seaforth, Harvey Smith, and Benton Spruance. Ethel McKenzie's Correspondence subseries largely deals with the estate settlement of her husband, the bulk of her papers include condolence letters from friends and colleagues. His Business and Financial subseries records include his early medical practice account books, 1893-1917 and card files of medical cases. Bills, receipts, and correspondence, 1902-1938, may also be found in this subseries and include exchanges with the American Association of Anatomists, the American Nurses Association, Anton Basky, James Bourelt and Sons, Ltd., Brown Brothers & Co., Bureau Brothers, Caproni & Bros., Vivian Chappel, College of Physicians, Compagnie der Bronzes, Desbarats & Co., Doll & Richards, Inc., Elliott & Fry, Ernest, Brown & Phillips, Florentine Art Plaster Co., Girard Trust Co., Gorham Silver, Library of Congress Copyright Office, Mackenzie & Company, Medallic Art Co., Harold Pratt, and Roman Bronze Company.

The Professional Organizations and Clubs in which he participated are also documented in the collection. These papers form the next subseries. They include the Academy of Physical Medicine, the American Olympic Association, the American Physical Education Association, American Posture League, Art Club, Athenaeum, British Great War Veterans of America, Canadian Club, Charakaa Club, Commission for the Study of Educational Problems, Contemporary Club of America, English Speaking Union, Fencer's Club, Lenape Club, Medical Society of the State of Pennsylvania, Middle Atlantic States Collegiate Athletic Conference, National Amateur Athletic Federation of America, National Collegiate Association, National Physical Education Association, National Sculptural Society, Philadelphia Sketch Club, Playgrounds Association of America, St. Andrews Society, St. George Society, Scottish-American Memorial Association, Society of Directors of Physical Education in Colleges, T-Square Club, and the YMCA.

The University of Pennsylvania subseries best documents his interests in physical education and physical therapy. The curriculum and educational theories promoted by McKenzie are reflected in his departmental correspondence, 1900-1928. Information on the Council of Athletics, 1921-1924, as well as the various activities of the department may be found in this subseries. McKenzie maintained files on annual reports, athletic demonstrations, boxing, courses, examinations, finances, football, the gymnasium, his sabbatical, student statistics, and apparatus design. In addition, the University's participation in the Association of American Colleges and the formation of the Gates Plan are present in this subseries. The records in this subseries richly document an important period in the history of fitness, physical health, and athletics.

The Lectures and Speeches subseries complements his University papers and are divided among his interests in physical education, medicine, and art. His earlier lectures, given in the period when he was McGill, 1884-1904, cover his interest in anthropometry, anatomy, personal hygiene. The work of his first years at the University of Pennsylvania and his focus on physical education are most prominent in his lectures and speeches from 1904 to 1928. Topics include physical education, physical efficiency of college students, physical training, and commencement addresses at various physical education programs. This period also includes several speeches and lectures on his war activities, and his interests in art begin to appear often in his lectures. By 1928 his speeches and lectures, while continuing to address physical education, are mainly focused upon his sculpture.

McKenzie's Writings and Manuscripts subseries include diaries and anecdotes on travel as well as several chapters of autobiography. Writings on physical education, physical therapy, and art appear throughout the subseries. Similarly his published reprints cover the range of his interest, but it is here that one will find the bulk of information on his war work. Third party Published Reprints is a subseries which includes biographical articles about R. Tait McKenzie, but the bulk serves as a comprehensive reference file on physical education from 1882 to 1940 and includes material from and information on schools across the nation, perhaps gathered in his advisory capacity to the Gates Plan. This subseries also offers information on the Kellogg, Sargent, and Seaver tables of measurement. The Clippings and Scrapbooks subseries documents his career from the 1890s to his death in 1938 and the burial of his heart in Edinburgh. Books and Printed Ephemera, the last subseries of the Papers Series, represent travel interests and guides used by McKenzie in his travels.

The Photographic series begins with images of R. Tait McKenzie, his family, his friends, and his colleagues. There are formal portraits, academic portraits, military portraits, college and childhood portraits, and snapshots of McKenzie. Ethel McKenzie, the extended McKenzie family, the Mill of Kintail, and the Philadelphia home are also represented in this series. His work during World War I is documented in an album and in loose snapshots, and these images range from war wounds to rehabilitation to the hospital grounds. The bulk of the photographic series documents the art of McKenzie. Images for most of his art work, both sculpture and relief, may be found in this series. Several works have been photographed from multiple angles and their files include these images. On occasion there are images of McKenzie with the work. Images of models for specific works have been retained with the corresponding file, but there are additional files of images of unidentified models and reference images within the series. Lantern slides, glass negatives, and photo engraving blocks fill out the series.

The Art series represents the largest series within the collection. The exhibitions of R. Tait McKenzie's work from 1906 to 1936 open the series and include documentation on shows with Doll & Richards of Boston, McClees Gallery of Philadelphia, the Art Association of Montreal, the Art Club of Philadelphia, Art Alliance of Philadelphia, the Fine Art Society of London, Ferargil Galleries of New York, Galeries Georges Petit, Grand Central Art Galleries, the Art Gallery of Toronto, Brookgreen Gardens of South Carolina, and the Dominion Memorial on Canada. Works on paper follow the documentation on exhibition. Included here are watercolors, drawings and crayon sketches from 1880 to 1938 and are largely landscapes, studies for sculpture, and other whimsical sketches. The bulk of the Art series is a collection of plaster casts, studies, and proofs of McKenzie's sculpture and medallions. There are sculpture studies for Dean West, busts of Andrew Flemming West and George Whitefield, William Haynes, the Pan Fountain, the George Whitefield statue, Girard College Alma Mater, and a man working at an anvil and another working on a canoe. More than sixty medallion studies and proofs are available from the collection.

Memorabilia including modeling tools, paint brushes, scrapers, a portable writing desk, a pair of moccasins, wooden bust stands, and a modeling tray with tools and three medals on the interior tray illustrate the artist's tools.

Cited in:

McGill, Jean. The Joy of Effort: A Biography of R. Tait McKenzie. Bewdley, Ontario: Clay Publishing, 1980.

Kozar, Andrew J. The Sport Sculpture of R. Tait McKenzie. Champaign, Illinois: Human Kinetics Books, 1975 (1st ed.), 1992 (2nd ed.)

Many contemporary works used the collection while still in the possession of R. Tait McKenzie. One of the more significant works is Christopher Hussey's Tait McKenzie: A Sculptor of Youth, (London: Country Life, Ltd., 1929).

Scope and Contents

In 1869, Charles Godfrey Leland took advantage of a small inheritance to resign his post as editor of the Philadelphia Press and go abroad. His health was poor, and on the verge of a nervous collapse, he set sail in May 1869.

According to Sculley Bradley:

It was only natural that he should correspond with George Henry Boker, who had been his bosom friend from boyhood, and who was now deeply concerned about his health. Boker had been instrumental in securing his appointment as editor of the Press and since Leland’s return to Philadelphia, they had been much together. The depth of their friendship is reflected in the intimacy of these letters, so frankly revealing of the natures of both men. These letters were not available for the use of Leland’s biographer, Mrs. Elizabeth Robins Pennell. They therefore shed new light upon the life and character of Hans Breitmann, who has recently been given increased attention both by critics of American poetry and by those interested in the development of American humor. Since Boker and Leland were intimately acquainted not only with the “Philadelphia Group,” but with most of the literary circle in the East, the references, casual or extended, to other literary men, are to be regarded as authentic and revelatory. There are many such references among these letters. This correspondence also has value as being a typical reaction of a cultivated and highly civilized American of his day to the culture, literature and social life of the European countries which he visited. His attitudes are in strong and interesting contrast to those of  Innocents Abroad. In this and in many other respects, the letters shed light on American social history. They are also of enormous interest in showing, in intimate correspondence, the attitudes and interests of two of the most cultivated Americans of that day. The points of view, the type of humor and the revelation of the personal lives of such men is reflected in a manner sometimes startling and always instructive. Another very interesting aspect of these letters lies in the intimate picture of various members of the London literary circle and literary people on the continent whom Leland met. The illustrations which Leland made for these letters are intrinsically valuable as works of art and derive additional value from Leland’s important connection in the development of the teaching of the arts and crafts in America.

There is, of course, a very interesting revelation of the differences between publishing conditions in America and in England, together with much detail bearing upon Leland’s own poetic work. The correspondence has a homogenous quality as the unified record of a single journey of the author over a period of one year. This journey is recorded as the last episode of Leland’s Memoirs, but the record of the letters is very much more detailed and intimate. (The above taken in its entirety from “Uncollected Letters of Charles Godfrey Leland,” an unpublished article by Sculley Bradley located in folder 5).

The collection consists of fourteen illustrated letters. The illustrations include beautiful and highly illuminated capital D’s in the salutations as well as fourteen sketches in pen and ink, of which a good many show fine color work. The collection also contains a transcription of the letters, probably completed by Sculley Bradley and an article written by Bradley entitled, "Uncollected Letters of Charles Godfrey Leland," which had been submitted for publication sometime before 1937.

ARRANGEMENT

The Frazer Family Papers, a collection documenting five generations of University of Pennsylvania alum, are arranged in ten series. They include: the Persifor Frazer (1736-1792) papers, the Robert Frazer (1771-1821) papers, the John Fries Frazer (1812-1872) papers, the Persifor Frazer (1844-1909) papers, the John Frazer (1882-1964) papers, the John Frazer, Jr. (1922-2011) papers, and the Tench Frazer (1927-1990) papers, and Other Family Members and Relations, Photographs, and Memorabilia. The Persifor Frazer papers contain two sub-series, correspondence and general files. The Robert Frazer papers contain three sub-series which are personal papers, professional papers, and books. The John Fries Frazer papers contain four subseries which include student papers, professional papers, and personal papers, and books. The Persifor Frazer papers are arranged in three subseries which include correspondence, general files, and books and pamphlets. The Robert Frazer papers contain a single sub-series, general files. John Frazer's papers are arranged in seven subseries which include student papers, professional papers, personal papers, military papers, personal papers, books, chemical instruments and apparatus, and office materials. The John Frazer Jr. papers contain three sub-series which are professional papers, personal papers, and memorabilia. The Tench Frazer papers contain one sub-series which is personal papers. The Other Family and Relations include material from the following individuals (arranged alphabetically according to the last name of the person): Richard Lewis Ashhurst (1830-1911), Thomas Cave (1788-1845), Mary Ann Rhodes Denny (1811-1872), Sarah Toombs Fortson (1856-1953), Charlotte Frazer (1872-unknown), Charlotte Jeffers Cave Frazer (1815-1881), Isabel Frazer (1920-2008), Isabella Nevins Whelen Frazer (1840-1929), Mary Foxley Tilghman Frazer (1886-1976), Persifor Frazer (1808-1880), Robert Frazer (1818-1878), Tilghman Frazer (1916-1925), John Fries (1744-1824), Martha Isabella Denny Harrison (1822-1909), Samuel Alexander Harrison (1822-1890), Mary Spencer Harrison Noble (1848-1943), Tench Tilghman (1810-1874), John Leeds Tilghman (1837-1862), Oswald Tilghman (1841-1932), Patty Belle Tilghman (1851-1931), Samuel Harrison Tilghman (1885-1961).

A part of the Frazer papers consist of approximately 500 photographs of Frazers and their relations, acquaintances, and homes. For simplicity's sake, these photographs have been arranged alphabetically according to the last name of the person or place pictured.

ARRANGEMENT

This collection has been organized into five series: Correspondence Files (including family correspondence); General Files; Research Files; Reference Publications; and Photographs, Slides, Graphics and Scrapbooks. With the exception of the Correspondence Files, which are arranged chronologically, all series have been arranged alphabetically.

ARRANGEMENT

Arranged in series: Papers, 1880-1940; Photographic, 1880-1938; Art, 1880-1938; and Memorabilia.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  1999

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: University Archives and Records Center,  1991

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2016 April 27

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  1992

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  1999

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2015 June 17

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: University Archives and Records Center,  2002

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: University Archives and Records Center,  1992, revised 2012

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2014

Publication Information

University of Pennsylvania: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts,  2015 May 6

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Maggie Kruesi

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Steven A. Banks and J.M. Duffin; later additions by Timothy H. Horning

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Kelin Baldridge

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Margaret Kruesi

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Maggie Kruesi, Christa Stefanski, and Jessica Dodson

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by John Anderies

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Kaiyi Chen

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Theresa R. Snyder, revised by Nicole Topich

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Donna Brandolisio

Finding Aid Author

Finding aid prepared by Clémence Scouten

Sponsor

The processing of the Pennell family papers and the preparation of this register were made possible by a grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

Sponsor

The processing of the Wanda Gág Papers and the preparation of this register were made possible by a grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

Revision Description

 2013

Access Restrictions

Access to collections is granted in accordance with the Protocols for the University Archives and Records Centers.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Access Restrictions

Access to collections is granted in accordance with the Protocols for the University Archives and Records Centers. Portions of the collection may be closed.

Access Restrictions

Access to collections is granted in accordance with the Protocols for the University Archives and Records Centers.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for research use.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

The Wanda Gág Papers are available for consultation by researchers in the Reading Room, Rare Book and Manuscript Library at the University of Pennsylvania. Permission to reproduce or publish materials from this collection must be obtained from a curator at the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, from the estate of Wanda Gág and/or from other holders of copyright for these materials.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Use Restrictions

Copyright restrictions may exist. For most library holdings, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania do not hold copyright. It is the responsibility of the requester to seek permission from the holder of the copyright to reproduce material from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

PROVENANCE

Gift of Isabel Frazer and John Frazer, Jr. (A.B. 1947), March 6, 1991; gift of John Frazer, Jr. (A.B. 1947), May 3, 2006, June 15, 2006, and October 9, 2008; purchased at auction December 21, 2006, December 14, 2011, March 20, 2012, May 30, 2012, and September 10, 2012.

PROVENANCE

Gift of Anne S. Li, on behalf of Hui-lin Li and Chih-ying Hsu Li, in July 2001.

PROVENANCE

Gift of Ethel O'Neil McKenzie, 1971. The collection was roughly processed and inventoried in 1979.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Edward Larocque Tinker, Emily Jewell Robins, and Mrs. C. B. Falls, 1951-1952, with purchased additions.

Source of Acquisition

Sold by Michael Brown Rare Books, 2016.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of Carolyn Ambler Walter and Helen Godey Wilson, 1986

 Mère Marie of the Ursulines, gift of Agnes Repplier

Source of Acquisition

Gift of E. Sculley Bradley.

Source of Acquisition

Gift of E. Sculley Bradley.

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Related Materials

Related Archival Materials note

At University of Pennsylvania:

Charles Godfrey Leland letters to George Henry Boker

Walt Whitman collection

William Carlos Williams research collection

George H. Boker papers

Related Archival Materials note

At Historical Society of Pennsylvania: Charles Godfrey Leland papers

At Princeton University: Charles Godfrey Leland Collection, 1841-1902

At the University of Pennsylvania: George H. Boker papers, 1837-1919, Ms. Coll. 661

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Controlled Access Headings

Family Name(s)
  • Pennell Family
Form/Genre(s)
  • Awards
  • Drawings (visual works)
  • Financial records
  • Legal documents
  • Lithographs
  • Manuscripts, American--19th century
  • Manuscripts, American--20th century
  • Photographs
  • Watercolors (paintings)
Subject(s)
  • Art
  • Art, American--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia
  • Artists
  • Authors
  • Families
  • Friendship
  • Illustration of books--United States
  • Illustrators
  • Women authors

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia.
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science.
  • American Philosophical Society.
  • British Association for the Advancement of Science.
  • Delta Alumni Association.
  • Franklin Chess Club.
  • Franklin Institute (Philadelphia, Pa.).
  • International Geological Congress.
  • Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States.
  • New York Academy of Sciences.
  • Penn Relay Carnival.
  • Pennsylvania. Militia. Troop of Philadelphia Cavalry, 1st.
  • Philadelphia Fencing and Sparring Club.
  • Society of American Geologists.
  • Society of Colonial Wars in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
  • Society of the Cincinnati in the State of New Jersey.
  • Sons of the Revolution. Pennsylvania Society.
  • Sons of the Revolution.
  • Stevens Institute of Technology.
  • University Club of Philadelphia.
  • University of Pennsylvania.
Personal Name(s)
  • Addison, William H.F., (William Henry Fitzgerald), 1881-1963.
  • Ashhurst, Richard Lewis, 1838-1911
  • Bache, A. D., (Alexander Dallas), 1806-1867
  • Bodley, Rachel L.
  • Brown, Amos P., (Amos Peaslee), 1864-1917
  • Cadwalader, John, 1842-1925
  • Cope, E. D., (Edward Drinker), 1840-1897
  • Dana, James Dwight, 1813-1895
  • Frazer, Jr., John
  • Frazer, Robert, 1771-1821
  • Fulton, John, 1826-1916
  • Harris, Joseph S., (Joseph Smith), 1836-1910
  • Harrison, Charles Custis, 1844-1929
  • Holley, Alexander H., (Alexander Hamilton), 1804-1887
  • Kimball, Joseph P.
  • Koenig, George Augustus, 1844-1913
  • Lesley, J. P., (J. Peter), 1819-1903
  • McKean, Thomas, 1842-1898
  • Metcalf, William, 1838-1909
  • Mitchell, S. Weir, (Silas Weir), 1829-1914
  • Page, W. Byrd, (William Byrd), 1866-1940
  • Pennypacker, Samuel W., (Samuel Whitaker), 1843-1916
  • Penrose, Boies, 1860-1921
  • Pepper, Edward, 1847-1913
  • Pepper, William, 1843-1898
  • Preu, Bernhard.
  • Prime, Frederick, 1846-1915
  • Raymond, Rossiter W., (Rossiter Worthington), 1840-1918
  • Robinson, Beverley, 1844-1924
  • Selwyn, Alfred Richard Cecil, 1824-1902
  • Togno, Rosalie Acelie Guillou.
  • Vossion, Louis, 1847-1906
  • Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915
  • Whelen, Edward Siddons, 1839-1884
  • Whelen, Henry.
  • Whelen, Isabella N.
  • Whelen, James Nevins, 1845-1901
Subject(s)
  • Chemistry--Study and teaching--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia.

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Memorabilia
  • Notes
  • Poems
  • Speeches
  • Writings (documents)
Personal Name(s)
  • Stedman, Edmund Clarence, 1833-1908
Subject(s)
  • American literature
  • Authors
  • Authors, American--19th century
  • Authors, American--20th century
  • Criticism, Textual
  • Literature
  • Poetry
  • Poets

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Manuscripts, American--20th century
  • Manuscripts, English--19th century
  • Memorabilia
  • Writings (document genre)
Subject(s)
  • Authors
  • Authors, American--20th century
  • Women
  • Women authors

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Diaries
  • Drawings (visual works)
  • Financial records
  • Photographs
  • Prints
  • Watercolors (paintings)
  • Writings (documents)
Subject(s)
  • Art
  • Artists
  • Authors
  • Authors, American--20th century
  • Children's literature
  • Children's literature, American
  • Women artists--United States
  • Women authors

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania--Faculty.
Form/Genre(s)
  • Articles
  • Clippings (information artifacts)
  • Correspondence
  • Legal documents
  • Notes
  • Photographs
  • Printed ephemera
Personal Name(s)
  • Farrell, James T. (James Thomas), 1904-1979
  • McCord, David Thompson Watson, 1897-1997
  • Viereck, Peter, 1916-2006
  • Whitman, Walt, 1819-1892
Subject(s)
  • Authors
  • Authors, American--20th century
  • Censorship--United States--20th century
  • Criticism, Textual
  • Literature
  • Literature--Study and teaching
  • Poetry
  • Poets
  • Trials (Obscenity)

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • University of Pennsylvania. Morris Arboretum.
Subject(s)
  • Botany--East Asia.
  • Botany--North America.
  • Botany.

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)
  • Academy of Physical Medicine.
  • American Olympic Association.
  • American Posture League.
  • Art Club.
  • Athenaeum.
  • British Great War Veterans of America.
  • Burdick Cabinet Company.
  • Canadian Club.
  • Charakaa Club.
  • Commission for the Study of Educational Problems.
  • Contemporary Club of America.
  • English Speaking Union.
  • Lea and Febiger.
  • Medical Society of the State of Pennsylvania.
  • Middle Atlantic States Collegiate Athletic Conference.
  • National Amateur Athletic Federation of America.
  • National Collegiate Association.
  • National Physical Education Association.
  • National Sculptural Society.
  • Philadelphia Sketch Society.
  • Playgrounds Association of America.
  • Scottish American Memorial Association.
  • Society of Directors of Physical Education in Colleges.
  • T-Square Club.
  • University of Pennsylvania. Lenape Club.
  • University of Pennsylvania. -- General subdivision--Sports.;
  • Y.M.C.A..
Occupation(s)
  • Physical therapists--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia.
  • Physicians--Biography.--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia
Personal Name(s)
  • Campbell, Stuart.
  • Cromie, William J.
  • Drummond, William Henry, 1854-1907
  • Macphail, Andrew.
  • Partridge, William O.
  • Peacock, Edward R.
  • Pilling, George P.
  • Scoville, Samuel.
  • Smith, Harvey.
  • Spruance, Benton.
Subject(s)
  • Physical education and training--Moral and ethical aspects.--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia
  • Physical education facilities--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia.
  • Physical education for women--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia.
  • Physical fitness--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia.
  • Physical therapy--Study and teaching--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia.
  • Rehabilitation technology--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia.
  • Rehabilitation.
  • Relief (Sculpture)--Canada.
  • Relief (Sculpture)--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia.
  • Sculpture, Modern--20th century--Canada.
  • Sculpture, Modern--20th century--Pennsylvania--Philadelphia.
  • War wounds.
  • World War, 1914-1918--War work--England--Manchester.

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Controlled Access Headings

Form/Genre(s)
  • Correspondence
  • Illuminations (visual works)
  • Sketches
Geographic Name(s)
  • Europe--Description and travel
Personal Name(s)
  • Boker, George H. (George Henry), 1823-1890
Subject(s)
  • Friendship
  • Voyages and travels

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Other Finding Aids

For a complete listing of correspondents, do the following title search in Franklin: Pennell Family Papers.

Other Finding Aids

For a complete listing of correspondents, do the following title search in Franklin: Agnes Repplier Papers.

Other Finding Aids

For a complete listing of correspondents, do the following title search in Franklin: Wanda Gág Papers.

Bibliography

Material for this biographical sketch has been drawn from John Lukacs' chapter on Repplier in his Philadelphia Patricians & Philistines, 1900-1950; from Agnes Repplier's autobiographical sketch in her  Eight Decades; from the memoir written by her niece, Emma Repplier Witmer, titled  Agnes Repplier: A Memoir; and from the biography  Agnes Repplier, Lady of Letters (1949) by George Stewart Stokes.

Bibliography

Pennell, Elizabeth. Joseph Pennell: An account by his wife Elizabeth Robins Pennell issued on the occasion of a memorial exhibition of his works. Library of Congress, 1927.

Pennell, Elizabeth. The Life and Letters of Joseph Pennell. 2 vols. London: Ernest Benn, Ltd., 1930.

Pennell, Elizabeth Robins and Pennell, Joseph. Our Philadelphia. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Company, 1914.

Pennell, Joseph. The Adventures of an Illustrator. Boston: Little Brown and Co., 1925.

Tinker, Edward Larocque. The Pennells. Privately printed. New York, 1951.

Wuerth, Louis A. Catalogue of the Etchings of Joseph Pennell, with an introduction by Elizabeth Robins Pennell. Boston: Little Brown and Company, 1928.

Wuerth, Louis A. Catalogue of the Lithographs of Joseph Pennell, with an introduction by Elizabeth Robins Pennell. Boston: Little Brown and Company, 1931.

Bibliography

Gág, Wanda. Growing Pains: Diaries and Drawings for the Years 1908-1917. New York: Coward McCann, 1940; reprint edition, St. Paul: Minnesota Historical Society Press, 1984.

Hoyle, Karen Nelson. Wanda Gág. New York: Twayne Publishers, 1994. Focuses on Gág's work as a writer and illustrator of children's books.

Scott, Alma. Wanda Gág, the Story of an Artist. Minneapolis, Minn.: University of Minnesota Press, 1949. Alma Schmidt Scott was a lifelong friend of Gág and her family. She based this biography on her own cor respondence and Wanda's diaries. Scott worked on this project with Gág in 1944 and 1945, but did not complete the biography until after Gág's death.

Winnan, Ardur H. Wanda Gág: A Catalogue Raisonné of the Prints. Washington, D. C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1992. This includes the most complete listing of Gág's exhibitions and publications; disc ussion of her printmaking techniques; a useful chronology of her life (which does, however, contain a few inaccuracies); excerpts from Gág's later diaries; a biographical sketch and information about her family members.

Books written / translated and illustrated by Wanda Gág

Batiking at Home. 1926. New York: Crowell Publishing.

Millions of Cats. 1928. New York: Coward-McCann.

The Funny Thing. 1929. New York: Coward-McCann.

Snippy and Snappy. 1931. New York: Coward-McCann.

Wanda Gág's Story Book [  Millions of Cats, The Funny Thing, and  Snippy and Snappy in one volume]. 1932. New York: Coward-McCann.

The ABC Bunny. 1933. New York: Coward-McCann.

Gone is Gone. 1935. New York: Coward-McCann.

Tales from Grimm. 1936. New York: Coward-McCann.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. 1938. New York: Coward-McCann.

Growing Pains. 1940. New York: Coward-McCann.

Nothing at All. 1941. New York: Coward-McCann.

Three Gay Tales from Grimm. 1943. New York: Coward-McCann.

More Tales from Grimm. 1947. New York: Coward-McCann.

Collection Inventory

I.  Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell Correspondence. 5 boxes.

Series Description

Correspondence is arranged alphabetically by correspondent, then chronologically within each folder. Outgoing and incoming letters are interfiled. The correspondence series for both Joseph and Elizabeth Pennell includes royalty statements of income fro m their books, filed under the name of the publisher. The container list provides only a brief description of the contents for the correspondence series; individual cataloging records for all correspondents have been entered into OCLC and Franklin. For a listing of the correspondents in WorldCat or Franklin, do the following title search: Pennell Family Papers.

A.  Joseph Pennell correspondence. 46 folders.

Description

Comprises 45 correspondents in 46 folders; outgoing letters from Joseph Pennell include letters to artists C. B. Falls and John McLure Hamilton, and to his brother-in-law Edward Robins.

Box Folder

Correspondents A-W.

1 1-46

B.  Elizabeth Robins Pennell correspondence. 105 folders.

Description

Comprises 59 correspondents in 105 folders, much is business correspondence with publishers, the bulk is personal correspondence to Elizabeth's sister-in-law, Emily Jewell Robins, and to her friend Edward Larocque Tinker.

Box Folder

Correspondents A-Z.

1-5 47-151

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II.  Joseph Pennell Writings and Artwork. 5 boxes (+ oversize).

A.  Writings, lecture notes, publications, and publicity.

Description & Arrangement

Arranged alphabetically by title of publication, where possible. Pennell's lecture notes for the Scammon lectures at the Art Institute of Chicago are filed under their publication title, The Graphic Arts. Includes publicity materials for Pennell's books and for his lectures and promotion of J. M. Whistler's reputation.

Box Folder

Adventures of an Illustrator, specimen pages. One set autographed by Joseph Pennell, the second set with color, 1925.

6 152

Adventures of an Illustrator, title page and frontispiece (portrait of J. Pennell by William Strang (1859-1921), in color). Proof for invitation to the private view for  Adventures of an Illustrator at the Anderson Galleries, 4 December 1925.

6 153

Adventures of an Illustrator, chapter 3, “Friends School in Germantown,” reprinted in the  Germantown Crier, vol. 2, no 4, pp. 20-23.ttitle>, (December 1950).

6 154

Glory of New York, forthcoming publication notice, William Edwin Rudge, Society of Illustrators notice re Pennell's Pen Drawing and Pen Draughtsmen, ca. 1926 and 1932. 2 items.

6 155

The Graphic Arts, modern men and modern methods. Scammon Lectures for the Art Institute of Chicago. Holograph lecture notes and copy, [Published in 1921 by the University of Chica go Press]., circa 1918-1920.

6 156-158

"The Lost Art of American Illustration" , holograph. 33 leaves.

6 159

"The Lost Art of American Illustration," typescript, 2 copies, 1 copy with ms. corrections by Joseph Pennell. 28 leaves.

6 160

Ms. descriptions of lithographs [?]. Descriptions or annotations for a number of J. Pennell's lithographs, possibly intended for, but not published in the Catalogue of the Lithographs of Joseph Pennell. 16 leaves.

6 161
Publicity. 2 items (3 leaves).
Contents

* Publicity for International Memorial to James McNeill Whistler, sponsored by the International Society of Sculptors, Painters, & Gravers, London, ms. note to A. A. Pope from Joseph Pennell requesting a contribution to the memorial sculpted by Auguste Rodin, 1907

* Publicity for Joseph Pennell's lecture on  "James McNeill Whistler, His Art and Life" sponsored by the Author's League Fund, New York, for 31 March 1922

6 162

B.  Prints, sketches, graphic design, and related artwork.

Description & Arrangement

Arranged chronologically, with reference to Louis A. Wuerth, Catalogue of the Etchings of Joseph Pennell. Approximately 22 of the 150 Pennell prints and sketches are filed in Box 6, the remainder are in Oversize Drawers 65, 66 and 51. Related artwork includes proof sheets of Joseph Pennell artwork published in both Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell's books.

Box Folder
"Views on the old Germantown Road," etchings by Joseph Pennell for article by Townsend Ward for  Journal of the Pennsylvania Historical Society, Vol. 5, 1880-1881. 11 items.
Contents

* The Fox Chase Inn, 1880 (Wuerth 9)

* The Old Stone Bridge at Nicetown, 1880 (Wuerth 11)

* Fair Hill Mansion, 1880 (Wuerth 12)

* Wakefield Fisher's Lane, 1880 (Wuerth 14)

* Roberts Mill, 1880 (2 proofs, marked No. 2) (Wuerth 15)

* Little Wakefield, 1880 (Wuerth 16)

* Germantown Academy, 1880 (Wuerth 23)

* Wister's House, on the Main St. opp. Queen, 1881 (Wuerth 24)

* Stenton. From the South West, 1881 (Wuerth 25)

* Wakefield Mills, 1881 (Wuerth 26)

6 163
Etchings of Philadelphia sites by Joseph Pennell, 1879-1920. 7 items.
Contents

* "Fort Wilson," S. W. Cor of 3rd and Walnut St. Phila. 1879 (Wuerth 8)

* Plynlimmon Court, Philadelphia, 1880 (Wuerth 13)

* Black Horse Inn Yard, 352-354 N. 3nd St., 1880 (Wuerth 22)

* Independence Square, Philadelphia, 1920 (Wuerth 767) 4 proofs

6 164
Series of postcards of the Rouen Cathedral, lithographed, 1 missing according to note by Elizabeth Pennell in folder. Some previous water damage to postcards, circa 1907. 11 items.
Contents

* Facade. The West Front

* Veille Rouen. An Old Street

* La Nef. The Nave, from Choir

* Transept. Transept du Nord

* Portail des Libraires. Screen Before the North Transept

* Rouen, St. Maclou, Stairs to Organ. Escalier de l'Orgue

* Rouen, St. Maclou, Spire of the Church. La Fleche

* Portail de la Calende. Doorway to the South Transept

* Tour de Beurre. Butter Tower

* Rue de la Grosse Horloge. Street of the Great Clock

* Les Tombeau. Tombs in Lady Chapel

6 165
Sketches for Liberty and Victory Loans, circa 1918. 6 items.
Contents

* Sketches for Liberty Loan Posters. 2 items, 1 pencil sketch, 1 pen & ink, "What Your Liberty Bonds Buy," pamphlet ill. By J. Pennell, undated

*  "I Am New York and This Is My Creed," by Bruce Barton, pamphlet published by Bankers Trust Company for the Victory Loan, cover illustration [Statue of Liberty] by J. Pennell, circa 1918, 4 items

6 166

Printed prospectus for "Walt Whitman" An Essay by Gabriel Sarrazin, translated by Harrison S. Morris, and to include an etching of Whitman's home by J. Pennell, 1919. 1 item (1 leaf).

6 167

Page proofs for The Gardens of Aphrodite by Edgar Saltus (1855-1921). Privately printed for the Pennell Club, Philadelphia, With layout corrections marked by J. Pennell on title page and 3 -5, 1920. 1 item (5 leaves).

6 168

Joseph Pennell in Etching by H. Devitt Welsh (Horace Devitt Welsh, b. 1888). Signed by Welsh, number 7/50, 1923.

6 169

Landscapes by Joseph Pennell, ink wash sketches, undated. 2 items.

6 170

Page proofs of J. Pennell's artwork for publication, including pastels and watercolors in color, undated. 1 item (16 leaves).

6 171

Page proofs of J. Pennell's lithograph, Searchlights Behind St. Paul's (Wuerth L398), 1914. 6 copies (6 leaves).

6 172

Page proofs of illustrations for The Life and Letters of Joseph Pennell, with captions in the hand of the author, Elizabeth Pennell, circa 1929. 1 item (39 leaves).

6 173-174

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III.  Elizabeth Robins Pennell Writings. 3.5 boxes.

A.  Writings.

Description & Arrangement

Arranged chronologically, Elizabeth R. Pennell's writings in these papers are focused almost exclusively on the life and work of her husband, the exception is her article on William Ernest Henley.

Box Folder

Biographical sketch of Joseph Pennell. "Mr. Joseph Pennell is the well-known American artist..." holograph, circa 1922. 1 item (6 leaves).

6 175
"Joseph Pennell" : Introduction for Memorial Exhibition of Joseph Pennell's work at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, held 9 Nov. 1926-27 Jan. 1927.
Contents

* Typescript with corrections signed by ERP, 24 August 1926. 1 item, 23 leaves

* Typed and annotated copy of exhibition checklist sent by ERP to E. L. Tinker, 9 August 1926 1 item, 5 leaves

6 176
Introduction to The Glory of New York, Sept. 1926. 1 item (17 leaves).
Description

Typescript with corrections signed by ERP

6 177

Notes regarding Joseph Pennell's will, circa 1926. 1 item (7 leaves).

6 178
Introduction to Catalogue of the Lithographs of Joseph Pennell by Louis A. Wuerth, August 1930. 1 item (24 leaves).
Description

Typescript with corrections, inscribed "For Edward L. Tinker from Elizabeth Robins Pennell," corrected

6 179
"William Ernest Henley: Lover of the Art of Bookmaking," for the  Colophon , January 1931. 3 items (30 leaves).
Description

Typescript, corrected, signed and Galley and page proofs

6 180

Sample binding. A Guide for the Greedy.

6 181

Sample binding. The Life and Letters of Joseph Pennell.

6 182

B.  Galleys.

Description

With corrections by Elizabeth Robins Pennell, these are galleys for her introductions to catalogs of Joseph Pennell's works by Louis A. Wuerth, and her biography of Joseph Pennell.

Box Folder
Introduction to Catalogue of the Etchings of Joseph Pennell by Louis A. Wuerth, 1928.
Description

Marked galleys.

7 183
Introduction to Catalogue of the Lithographs of Joseph Pennell by Louis A. Wuerth, 1931.
Description

Marked galleys.

7 184-186
The Life and Letters of Joseph Pennell Galleys, 12 July 1929.
Description

Duplicate proofs.

8 187-191
The Life and Letters of Joseph Pennell Galleys, 23 August - 13 September 1929.
Description

Author's proofs.

9 192-197

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IV.  Pennell Financial and Legal Papers. 1 box.

Series Description

Arranged chronologically within each subseries, the financial and legal papers of both Pennells are filed together here.

A.  Contracts.

Description

Comprises 17 drafts and contracts with publishers.

Box Folder
Agreements. Macmillan Company and Joseph Pennell, 1904-1925. 5 items.
Contents

* History of American Etching, Engraving and Illustration (never published), 1904

*  Etching, 1919

*  Pen Drawing and Pen Draughtsmen (revision), 1920

*  Etchers and Etching (revision), 1924

*  Etchers and Etching (agreement re royalties), 1925

10 198
Agreements. J. B. Lippincott Company and Joseph Pennell, 1912-1918. 3 items.
Contents

* Joseph Pennell's Pictures of the Panama Canal (signed by J. Pennell), 1912

*  Pictures of War Work in America (2 copies), 1917

*  Joseph Pennell's Fourth Liberty Loan Poster(2 copies), 1918.

10 199
Agreements. J. B. Lippincott Company and Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell, 1912-1920. 3 items.
Contents

* Our Philadelphia, 1912

*  Whistler Journal, 1919, 1920

10 200
Agreements. J. B. Lippincott Company and Elizabeth Robins Pennell, 1915-1929. 3 items.
Contents

* Nights, 1915

*  Joseph Pennell's Pictures of Philadelphia, 1926

*  Whistler the Friend, 1929

10 201
Agreement. Art Institute of Chicago and Joseph Pennell, 1920. 2 items.
Contents

The Graphic Arts (draft of agreement and copy signed by J. Pennell)

10 202
Agreement. Little, Brown, and Company and Joseph Pennell, 1924. 1 item.
Contents

"Reminiscences" ,  The Adventures of an Illustrator (signed by J. Pennell)

10 203

B.  Accounts.

Description

Comprises statements of investments in stocks, bonds, and real estate managed by the Provident Trust Company of Philadelphia for both Pennells.

Box Folder

Provident Life and Trust Company of Philadelphia. Statement of Account, Joseph Pennell., April 1921 - July 1935.

10 204-206

Provident Trust Company of Philadelphia. Statement of Account, Elizabeth R. Pennell, January 1928 - June 1935.

10 207

C.  Wills and estates.

Description

Original will made by Joseph Pennell, with many revisions. There is no complete copy of Elizabeth Robins Pennell's will.

Box Folder

Joseph Pennell will. Original, drafts, codicils, and revisions, 1892-1924.

10 208-215

Re Estate of Joseph Pennell. Transfer tax form for the state of New York, 1926.

10 216

Re Estate of Joseph Pennell. Inventory and appraisal [of artwork and materials on hand] by Louis Wuerth and Edward L. Tinker, 3 August 1926.

10 217
Philadelphia County Orphans' Court. Re Estate of Ambrose White, 4 April 1929.
Description

Final account of Howard W. Page, substituted trustee of Alexander Henry White. Elizabeth R. Pennell was a great granddaughter of Ambrose White and a beneficiary of the estate.

10 218

Elizabeth Robins Pennell will. Drafts, codicils, unsigned, 1927-1933.

10 219-220

Elizabeth Robins Pennell will. Probate notice, carbon copy, 1936.

10 221

D.  Family documents and memorabilia.

Description

A few items, including Joseph Pennell's passport for 1915-1917, these range in date from 1830 to the 1930s. See also Oversize, Drawer 51.

Box Folder

Philadelphia. Receipt for water rent from Joseph Pennell, 3 December 1830.

10 222

U.S. passport for Joseph Pennell, 1915-1917.

10 223

Elizabeth R. Pennell. Membership cards in N.Y. City clubs, undated. 5 items.

10 224

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V.  Newspaper Clippings. 1 box.

Series Description

The bulk of the newspaper clippings are obituaries and appreciations of Joseph Pennell's life and work, written just after his death. There are a few reviews of the works of both Pennells, but very few items about Elizabeth Robins Pennell.

Please note, most of the clippings are extremely brittle.

Box Folder

Work by and about the Pennells, 1881-1924.

11 225

Joseph Pennell, obituaries, tributes, and articles concerning his will and bequest to the Library of Congress, April-July 1926.

11 226-232

Joseph Pennell exhibitions, 1923-1926.

11 233

Pennell's students and friends, 1926.

11 234

Reviews of Joseph Pennell books, circa 1917-1934.

11 235

Reviews of Elizabeth R. Pennell books and articles, circa 1917-1930.

11 236

About James McNeill Whistler, circa 1926-1936.

11 237

About other artists and writers, circa 1926-1938.

11 238

Elizabeth R. & Joseph Pennell bequest to Library of Congress, 1936.

11 239

Joseph Pennell, posthumous honorary degree, 1951.

11 240

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VI.  Edward Larocque Tinker, Frances Tinker, and Emily Jewell Robins collections. 1 box.

A.  Correspondence about Joseph and Elizabeth R. Pennell.

Description & Arrangement

Arranged alphabetically by correspondent, this series comprises 23 correspondents in 23 folders, a few are addressed to Frances Tinker, E. L. Tinker's wife, and one folder is addressed to Emily Jewell Robins. The bulk is correspondence of E. L. Tinker, in some cases acting on behalf of Elizabeth Robins Pennell, particularly in regard to her husband's bequest to the Library of Congress. This correspondence is cataloged in RLIN and may be searched in the Eureka database. Not cataloged are two folders of letters written to E. L. Tinker and to Emily Jewell Robins thanking them for copies of Tinker's memoir of the couple, The Pennells (1951).

Box Folder

Correspondence A-W.

12 241-263

Letters to E. L. Tinker re receipt of his essay,  The Pennells, 1951. 39 items.

12 264

Letters to Emily Jewell Robins acknowledging receipt of Tinker's essay The Pennells , 1951. 19 items.

12 265

B.  Writings and research about the Pennells.

Description

Comprises 5 folders of Edward Larocque Tinker's writings about the Pennells, and his work preparing an exhibition about the Pennells for the Grolier Club in 1935.

Box Folder

Typescript copy of a review, "Pennell's Sketches, the Verhaeren of the pencil" , in  La Voz de Guipuzcoa, 9 August 1918.

12 266

Mr. Pennell's description & sketch of how Whistler developed the butterfly signature from his initials J. M. W., 30 March 1924. 1 item (1 leaf).

12 267
"Joseph Pennell's gift to the nation" by E. L. Tinker Press release, holograph and corrected typescript,, 1927. 18 leaves.
Contents

12 267

"The Graphic and Literary Work of Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell" Ts. description of exhibition at the Grolier Club, 18 April-9 May 1935.

12 268
Privately printed essay The Pennells, 1951. 2 items (copies).
Description

Proof sheets of illustrations for this work.

12 269

"The wonder of work" by E. L. Tinker, in  Think 17, no. 9, pp. 18-19, 36, September 1951.

12 270

C.  Research and lists.

Description

Comprises 3 folders of lists, including lists of Pennell artwork and articles for the serials Harper's, Portfolio, The Magazine of Art, Art Journal, The Studio, and  The Century Magazine . Also includes an exhibition list of Joseph Pennell work exhibited at the Royal Society of Painters-Etchers in 1885-1887.

Box Folder

List of works exhibited by Joseph Pennell at the Royal Society of Painter-Etchers, London, 1885-1887.

12 271

Lists of articles in serials by or about the Pennells, 1883-1927.

12 272

List of Elizabeth Pennell's publishers.

12 273

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VII.  Photographs. 2 boxes.

A.  Joseph Pennell family photographs.

Description

Daguerreotypes of Joseph Pennell as a child, his father, mother[?], aunt[?] and unidentified children.

Box

Joseph Pennell as a child, circa 1860.

13

Joseph Pennell as a child. Photograph by Root Gallery, Philadelphia, circa 1860.

13

Larkin Pennell, (1819-1890), father of Joseph Pennell. Photograph by McClees and Germon, Philadelphia.

13

Unidentified woman.

13

Unidentified young woman, in leather case, 24 December 1850.

13

Unidentified mother and child.

13

Young boy.

13

Young boy with two siblings.

13

B.  Photographic portraits of the Pennells.

Box Folder

Photograph of Charles Godfrey Leland, Elizabeth Robins, and Joseph Pennell, undated, circa 1883 .

14 274
Photograph of young Elizabeth Robins Pennell, circa 1896.
Description

Inscribed on reverse, "With love and best wishes for you both from Elizabeth," Christmas, Photograph copied by Fred Hollyer, 9 Pembroke Sqr. Kensington W [London].

14 275
Photograph of Joseph Pennell in his studio, undated. 2 items (copies).
Description

One copy is inscribed "Joseph Pennell in his studio which was a real studio. To Mrs. Tinker. Joseph Pennell."

14 276

Photograph of Joseph Pennell by Ellis, circa 1925.

14 277

Photograph of relief portrait of Elizabeth Robins Pennell by John Flanagan, 1934. 2 prints plus 1 negative.

14 278

C.  Photographs of illustrations for Joseph Pennell's memoirs, Adventures of an Illustrator (1925).

Box Folder
Photographs of images of Joseph and Elizabeth Pennell and the J. Pennell family, circa 1860 and 1885.
Contents

* Larkin Pennell

* J. Pennell, circa 1860

* Portrait of J. Pennell in his studio by John McLure Hamilton

* Drawings of J. Pennell by J. M. Whistler

* Elizabeth Pennell drawn by J. Pennell in 1885

* Unidentified portrait of J. Pennell

14 279
Photographs of artists, writers, and public figures.
Contents

* Portraits of George Washington Cable

* Timothy Cole

* William Dean Howells

* Busts of R. W. Gilder and George Bernard Shaw

* Photograph of George Bernard Shaw with the bust of him by Auguste Rodin

* Photos of two unidentified portraits

14 280

Photoprints of documents and J. Pennell drawings.

14 281

Glass dry plate photograph of relief portrait of Joseph Pennell by John Flanagan, 1919.

14 282
Photograph of J. Pennell lithograph The Cut Toward Culebra , 1912. 4 items (3 photoprints, 1 metal photographic plate).
Description

Gaillard Cut, Panama Canal.

14 283

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VIII.  Joseph Pennell Awards and Exhibitions. 2 boxes.

A.  Awards. 1 box.

Description & Arrangement

Listed by name of the institution or exposition and arranged chronologically, these 20 medals awarded to Joseph Pennell during his career document the international reputation he achieved and his contributions to many world expositions of art near the turn of the century. They contain examples of some of the fine work of noted sculptors and medalists through 1922.

Box
Art Club of Philadelphia, 1892.
Description

Architectural exhibition, Medal in case. Sculptor: E. A. Stewardson.

15
World's Columbian Exposition (Chicago, Ill.), 1893.
Description

Award medal and aluminum case made by Scovill Manufacturing Company, Waterbury, Conn. Sculptors: C. E. Barber and Augustus Saint-Gaudens.

15
Exposition universelle internationale de (Paris, France), 1900.
Description

Bronze medal in case. Sculptor: J. C. Chaplain.

15
Internationale Kunstausstellung zu Dresden (Dresden, Germany), 1901.
Description

Bronze, in case, sculptor unidentified.

15
Pan-American Exposition (Buffalo, N.Y.), 1901.
Description

Bronze medal in case. Sculptor: Hermon MacNeil.

15

Louisiana Purchase Exposition (Saint Louis, Mo.), 1904. 3 items.

15
Bronze medal in case.
Description

Grand prize. Sculptor: A. A. Weinman.

15
Bronze medal in case.
Description

Gold medal. Sculptor: A. A. Weinman.

15
Bronze medal in case.
Description

Commemorative medal. Sculptor: A. A. Weinman.

15
Exposition internationale des beaux arts (Liege, Belgium), 1905.
Description

Medal in case (medal preserved with varnish?). Sculptor: G. Devreese.

15
Exposition internationale de Milan, 1906.
Description

Presented by the British Commission.

15
Bronze medal in case.
Description

Sculptors: Ciannino and S. Johnson.

15

Exposicion Internacional de Barcelona, 1907.

15
Bronze medal in case.
Description

Sculptor: E. Arnau.

15
Exposition universelle et internationale (Brussels, Belgium), 1910.
Description

Cast aluminum (?) medal in box. Sculptor: G. Devreese.

15
Exposicion Internacional de Bellas Artes: Centenario de Chile, 1910.
Description

Medal in leather case. Sculptors: F. Thauby and Lortscher.

15

Royal Society of Arts (Great Britain).

15

"For his paper on the pictorial possibilities of work, 1912-1913" .

15

Silver medal in case. Sculptor: B. M.

15

Anglo-German Exhibition (London, England), 1913.

15

Bronze medal in case. Elkington & Co.

15

Panama-Pacific International Exposition (San Francisco), 1915. 3 items.

15

In commemoration. Large medal in case. Shreve & Co.

15

Commemorative medal. Small medal in case.

15
Souvenir de la Republica Argentina.
Description

Small silver medal in box.

15

Woodrow Wilson Medal, 1917.

15
Bronze medal in case.
Description

Sculptor: Pierre Gregoire.

15

Academie royale des sciences, lettres et beaux-arts de Belgique, 1922.

15
Bronze medal in box.
Description

Sculptor: Victor Rousseau.

15

B.  Exhibition catalogs. 1 box.

Description & Arrangement

Listed by name of the sponsoring institution or gallery, arranged chronologically.

1.  Works by Joseph Pennell.

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically.

Box Folder
Frederick Keppel & Co., New York, N.Y., 1906. 1 item.
Description

"Mr. Pennell's Etching of London" by Walter Conrad Arensberg reprinted, by permission, from  The Evening Post, To which is appended  "Mr. Pennell as a printer" by Frederick Keppel written on the occasion of an exhibition of Mr. Pennell's new etchings of London. Illustrated. The De Vinne Press.

16 284

Grolier Club, New York, N.Y. Catalogue of Etchings by Joseph Pennell, 6-21 November 1908. 1 item.

16 284
Cartwright Hall, Bradford (Bradford, England), 1913. 1 item.
Description

Catalog of an exhibition of lithographs and etchings by Joseph Pennell of the wonder of work with an introduction and notes by the artist. Illustrated.

16 285
National Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C., 1- 24 November 1917. 1 item.
Description

Catalogue of an exhibition of lithographs of war work in Great Britain and the United States by Joseph Pennell.

16 286
Rosenbach Galleries, Philadelphia, Pa., undated and 1918. 4 items.
Description

Catalog of an exhibition of original drawings and lithographs of war work in America made by permission of the United States government and exhibited by consent of the War and Navy Departments by Joseph Pennell with an introduction and notes by the artist. Number One. 2 copies. Number Two. 2 copies.

16 287
Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 14 January - 18 February 1918. 1 item.
Description

Joseph Pennell lithographs of war work in England and America.

16 288
Frederick Keppel & Co., New York, N.Y., 1918-1919. 1 item.
Description

Catalogue of an exhibition of etchings by Joseph Pennell of railroad activities done during the years by permission of the United States Railroad Administration and other various subjects.

16 289
Anderson Galleries, New York, N.Y., 4-20 December 1925. 1 item.
Description

The Adventures of an Illustrator by Joseph Pennell. The making of the book.... Illustrated, printed by William Edwin Rudge.

16 290
Memorial Hall, Philadelphia, Pa., 1-31 October 1926. 1 item.
Description

Memorial exhibition of the works of the late Joseph Pennell held under the auspices of the Philadelphia Print Club and the Pennsylvania Museum, in Memorial Hall, Fairmount Park Philadelphia. Catalogue of etching s, lithographs, water colors, drawings and books. Illustrated, bound. Printed by J. B. Lippincott Company.

16 291
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., 9 November 1926 - 2 January 1927. 4 items.
Description

Joseph Pennell, an account by his wife Elizabeth Robins Pennell issued on the occasion of a memorial exhibition of his works. Illustrated. 2 copies, one marked 1st ed., the other marked 2nd ed. [in pencil], plus 2 copies inscribed by Elizabeth R. Pennell to Frances Tinker and to Edward Larocque Tinker.

16 292
Frederick Keppel & Co., New York, N.Y., 23 November - 31 December, 1926.
Description

Catalogue of an exhibition of etchings by Joseph Pennell, introduction by David Keppel.

16 293
American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York, N.Y., 1 March - 1 April 1927.
Description

A catalogue of a memorial exhibition of the works of Joseph Pennell (kindly lent by Mr. John F. Braun of Philadelphia). Introduction by John C. Van Dyke. (Academy publication no. 56). 2 copies, 1 inscribed by Elizabeth R. Pennell to Edward Larocque Tinker.

16 294
American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York, N.Y., 1927.
Description

Commemorative tributes to Cable by Robert Underwood Johnson; Sargent by Edwin Howland Blashfield; Pennell by John Charles Van Dyke. (Academy publication no. 57). 2 copies, 1 inscribed by Elizabeth R. Pennell to Frances Tinker.

16 294
Library of Congress, Washington, D. C., 1927. 4 items.
Description

Joseph Pennell Memorial Exhibition Catalogue. Foreword by Herbert Putnam, Illustrated with portrait of Pennell. 2 copies. Joseph Pennell, an account by his wife Elizabeth Robins Pennell issued on the occasion of a memorial exhibition of his works. Illustrated. 2 copies.

16 295
Victoria and Albert Museum. South Kensington, London, England, 14 May - 22 June 1929. 1 item.
Description

Exhibition of contemporary American prints. Illustrated. Press of Byron S. Adams, Washington, D.C. Ten of the 432 works exhibited were by Joseph Pennell.

16 296
Frederick Keppel & Co., New York, N.Y., 29 October - 23 November, 1929. 1 item.
Description

Lithographs by Raffet, Delacroix, Ingres, Daumier, Corot, Whistler, Fantin, Degas, Redon, Lautrec, Matisse, Bellows, and others. Introduction by Gordon K. Allison. Four of the 104 works exhibited were by Joseph Pennell.

16 297
Frederick Keppel & Co., New York, N.Y., April 1931. 1 item.
Description

Etchings by Joseph Pennell, with an introduction by Elizabeth Robins Pennell. Illustrated.

16 297

2.  Works by other artists.

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically.

Box Folder
Rosenbach Galleries, Philadelphia, Pa., 6-20 November 1911. 1 item.
Description

Portraits of James McNeill Whistler and landscapes by Walter Greaves. Illustrated.

16 298
Library of Congress, Washington, D. C., 1921.
Description

The Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell Collection of Whistleriana, shown in the division of prints, Library of Congress. Illustrated with portrait of J. M. Whistler. 2 copies.

16 299
American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York, N.Y., 21 April - 21 October, 1927. 1 item.
Description

A Catalogue of the works of Childe Hassam. Foreword with letters from John Gellatly and Joseph Pennell to Hassam. Illustrated. (Academy publi cation no. 58).

16 300
M. Knoedler & Co., New York, N.Y., 16 October - 17 November 1934. 1 item.
Description

A Whistler Centenary (etchings and dry-points). Introduction by Howard Mansfield.

16 301

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IX.  Relief portraits of Joseph Pennell. 3 boxes.

Box

Plaster, 24 × 31 cm. Sculptor: R. Tait McKenzie.

17

Sculptor: John Flanagan, 1919. 4 items.

17

Bronze, 26 cm. diameter.

17

Bronze, 12 cm. diameter, mounted on wood.

17

Bronze, 12 cm. diameter.

17
Plaster, 12 cm. diameter.
Note

For photographs of John Flanagan's portraits, see Folders 278, 282 and Oversize Drawer 51.

17

Plaster, unsigned, ca. 31 cm. diameter.

18

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X.  Memorabilia. 2 boxes.

A.  Printer's cuts for illustrations for E. L. Tinker's The Pennells , 1951.

Box

Printer's cuts. 8 items.

19

B.  Joseph Pennell's toolbox and easel.

Box

Wooden toolbox (broken).

20

Engraver's and lithographer's tools. 17 items.

20
Oversize

Joseph Pennell's easel.

--

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XI.  Oversize. Prints, drawings and watercolors by Joseph Pennell.

Series Description

Arranged chronologically, identified by titles and numbers used in Louis A. Wuerth's Catalogue of the Etchings of Joseph Pennell (1928) and  Catalogue of the Lithographs of Joseph Pennell (1931). With oversize photographs of Elizabeth and Joseph Pennell and a few items of oversize memorabilia.

A.  Joseph Pennell etchings.

Description

Title, date and number from Louis A. Wuerth, Catalogue of the Etchings of Joseph Pennell.

Drawer

Bridge at Harrisburg, (Wuerth 40), 1882.

65

San Georgio, Venice, (Wuerth 71), 1883.

65

Le Puy, third plate (Wuerth 208), 1894.

65

Thames Below the Bridges, Night, (Wuerth 217), 1894.

65

St. John's Gate, Clerkenwell, (Wuerth 273), 1903.

65

Rainy Night, Charing Cross Shops, (Wuerth 274), 1903.

65

Windsor from Eton, (Wuerth 282), 1903.

65

Doorway - Henry VII's Chapel, (Wuerth 310), 1904.

65

Sunlight Soap, (Wuerth 385), 1905.

65

Cowley Street, Westminster, (Wuerth 437), 1906.

65

Rouen, from Bon Secours, (Wuerth 464), 1907.

65

Grosse Horloge, Rouen, (Wuerth 466), 1907.

65

The West Front, Rouen Cathedral, (Wuerth 470), 1907.

65

Among the Skyscrapers, (Wuerth 494), 1908.

65

Palisades and Palaces, (Wuerth 496), 1908.

65

Wren's City, (Wuerth 504), 1909.

65

Edgar Thomson Works, Bessemer, (Wuerth 517), 1909.

65

On the Way to Bessemer, (Wuerth 520), 1909.

65

Coal Wharves, Staten Island, No. II, (Wuerth 538), 1909.

65

Low Moor, Bradford, (Wuerth 554), 1909.

65

The Grip, Serang, (Wuerth 609), 1910.

65

St. Peter's from the Pincian Gardens, Rome, (Wuerth 624), 1911.

65

Sacramento Street. The Way Up to the Fairmount, San Francisco, (Wuerth 633), 1912.

65

The Falls, Yosemite Valley, (Wuerth 649), 1912.

65

New York from Governor's Island, (Wuerth 668), 1915.

65

The Bridge at Hell Gate, (Wuerth 670), 1915.

65

Sunset from Williamsburg Bridge, (Wuerth 674), 1915.

65

The Woolworth Building, (Wuerth 675), 1915.

65

The Ferry House, The Cortlandt Street Ferry from the Jersey City Side, (Wuerth 676), 1919.

65

St. Paul's, New York, (Wuerth 678), 1915.

65

The Approach to the Grand Central, New York, (Wuerth 692), 1919.

65

The Clock, Grand Central, New York (Wuerth 695), 1919.

65

Pennsylvania Station, New York, (Wuerth 699), 1919.

65

Within the Ferry, Cortlandt Street, New York, (Wuerth 700), 1919.

65

The Trains that Come, and the Trains that Go. Pennsylvania Railroad, Philadelphia, (Wuerth 712), 1919.

65

The Commuters. Pennsylvania Station, Philadelphia, (Wuerth 718), 1919.

65

The Castle State in Schuylkill, (Wuerth 736), 1919.

65

The State in Schuylkill, (Wuerth 737), 1919.

65

Stock Exchange, Philadelphia, (Wuerth 741), 1920.

65

Christ Church, Philadelphia, (Wuerth 752), 1920.

65

Polo Grounds, New York, (Wuerth 768), 1921.

65

Excavations, 42nd Street and Park Avenue, New York, (Wuerth 769), 1921.

65

Not Naples, But New York, (Wuerth 776), 1921.

65

Archway, Municipal Building, (Wuerth 778), 1921.

65

The Woolworth, Through the Arch, (Wuerth 785), 1921.

65

The Elevated, (Wuerth 789), 1921.

65

Brooklyn Bridge at Night, (Wuerth 790), 1922.

65

Trinity Churchyard, (Wuerth 792), 1921.

65

Snow, from Brooklyn Heights, (Wuerth 796), 1921.

65

New Fish Market, (Wuerth 797), 1921.

65

The White Way, (Wuerth 798), 1928.

65

The Cliffs, Night, (Wuerth 799), 1922.

65

New York Stock Exchange, (Wuerth 802), 1923.

65

Madison Avenue, (Wuerth 811), 1923.

65

The Times Annex, From 40th Street, (Wuerth 812), 1923.

65

Rebuilding Broadway, Standard Oil Building, (Wuerth 814), 1923.

65

Standard Oil Building, (Wuerth 817), 1923.

65

The Nave, Washington Cathedral, (Wuerth 819), 1923.

65

The Foundations at the Cathedral, Saks Building, (Wuerth 820), 1923.

65

Washington Cathedral, From the Park, (Wuerth 822), 1923.

65

The Telephone and Telegraph Foundation, (Wuerth 827), 1924.

65

Hotel Margaret, Brooklyn, (Wuerth 830), 1924.

65

The Docks, from Columbia Heights, (Wuerth 831), 1924.

65

Montague Terrace, Children Skating (Wuerth 832), 1924.

65

New York, from Grace Court, (Wuerth 836), 1924.

65

The Deserted Ferry, (Wuerth 838), 1924.

65

Pierrepont Place, Montague Terrace, (Wuerth 839), 1924.

65

Willow Street, Brooklyn, (Wuerth 840), 1924.

65

From Clark Street to Wall Street, (Wuerth 842), 1924.

65

Grace Church and Court, (Wuerth 843), 1924.

65

The Tunnel, Montague Terrace, (Wuerth 845), 1924.

65

Fall River Boats Going Out, (Wuerth 846), 1924.

65

Front Street, Brooklyn, (Wuerth 848), 1924.

65

Walt Whitman's House, Camden, New Jersey, (Wuerth 851), 1924.

65

United Fruit Boat, (Wuerth 852), 1925.

65

Caissons on Vesey Street, (Wuerth 854), 1924.

65

B.  Joseph Pennell lithographs.

Description

Title, date and number from Louis A. Wuerth, Catalogue of the Etchings of Joseph Pennell.

Drawer

Apartments of Washington Irving, In the Alhambra, (Wuerth L11), 1896.

66

Lions of the Mosque, (Wuerth L23), 1896.

66

The Garden of the Generalife, (Wuerth L37), 1896.

66

The Shop of the Little Cat, (Wuerth L39), 1896.

66

The Little Inn, (Wuerth L42), 1896.

66

Posada de las Tabladas, (Wuerth L48), 1896.

66

Pots and Pans, (Wuerth L51), 1896.

65

The Rocky Valley, Tintagel, (Wuerth L88), 1897.

66

Lynmouth, from Lynton, (Wuerth L90), 1897.

66

Looking Towards Westward Ho, (Wuerth L102), 1897.

66

Norwinston Church, (Wuerth L105), 1897.

66

Restormel Castle, (Wuerth L115), 1897.

66

Slaughter Bridge, (Wuerth L117), 1897.

66

High Street, Totnes, (Wuerth L119), 1897.

66

Earl's Court Exhibition, (Wuerth L142), 1900.

66

The Inauguration Steps, (Wuerth L265), 1912.

66

Early Morning in the Capitol Grounds, (Wuerth L266), 1912.

66

From the Library Steps, (Wuerth L267), 1912.

66

The Dome of the Capitol, (Wuerth L268), 1912.

66

The House, or The Facade, (Wuerth L269), 1912.

66

The Steps up to the Capitol, (Wuerth L270), 1912.

66

The Way up to the Capitol, (Wuerth L271), 1912.

66

The Avenue, (Wuerth L272), 1912.

66

Broad Street Station, Philadelphia, (Wuerth L273), 1912.

66

The City Hall and Bridge Across Market Street, (Wuerth L275), 1912.

66

City Hall Square and Wanamaker Building, (Wuerth L276), 1912.

66

Down Sansom Street from Eighth Street, (Wuerth L278), 1912.

66

Girard Street, (Wuerth L279), 1912.

66

The Tunnel in the Park, (Wuerth L280), 1912.

66

Old Fairmount Water Works and Basin, (Wuerth L283), 1912.

66

Independence Square and the State House, (Wuerth L288), 1912.

66

Liberty Bell, (Wuerth L292), 1912.

66

The Elevated, at Market Street Wharf, (Wuerth L293), 1912.

66

Philadelphia, from Belmont, (Wuerth L294), 1912.

66

Upsala, Germantown, (Wuerth L295), 1912.

66

Morris House, Germantown, (Wuerth L296), 1912.

66

Cliveden, The Chew House, (Wuerth L297), 1912.

66

Book Room, at Dr. Wister's, (Wuerth L298), 1912.

66

Doorway, Wyck, (Wuerth L299), 1912.

66

Main Street, Germantown, (Wuerth L300), 1912.

66

The Hall, at Cliveden, (Wuerth L301), 1912.

66

Hallway, at Dr. Wister's, (Wuerth L302), 1912.

66

Drawing Room, at Cliveden, (Wuerth L303), 1912.

66

Upper Room, Stenton, (Wuerth L304), 1912.

66

The Hall, Stenton, (Wuerth L305), 1912.

66

The Dining Room, Stenton, (Wuerth L306), 1912.

66

Bed Room, Stenton, (Wuerth L307), 1912.

66

Hallway to Bed Room, Stenton, (Wuerth L308), 1912.

66

The Garden Front, Stenton, (Wuerth L309), 1912.

66

Skyscrapers, from the Gladstone, (Wuerth L312), 1912.

66

C.  Sketches and water colors by Joseph Pennell.

Drawer

"Billy" Deck Hand Roustabout on the Mark Twain, monochrome, [engraved for illustration in  Adventures of an Illustrator], 1882.

51

Old Villa on Bayou, wash drawing for The Creoles of Louisianaby G. W. Cable [engraving used as illustration in  Adventures of an Illustrator], 1882.

51

Skye (Sketch of a peasant's cottage) ink wash drawing, circa 1888.

51

Study for "Tower of St. Ouen, Rouen," charcoal, 1907.

51

Brooklyn Bridge, water color, circa 1919.

51

D.  Oversize photographs and artwork by other artists, for other photographs see Boxes 13 and 14.

Drawer

Joseph Pennell. Photograph by Pirie MacDonald (1867-1942). New York, N.Y., undated. 1 item.

51

Joseph Pennell. Photograph by Arnold Genthe (1869-1942). New York, N.Y., undated. 1 item.

51
Joseph Pennell by Ellis, Philadelphia, Pa., undated. 5 items.
Description

2 copies of one print are inscribed "To Frances Tinker from Elizabeth Robins Pennell."

51

Elizabeth Robins Pennell by Frederick Gutekunst (1831-1917), Gutekunst Studio, Philadelphia, Pa., undated. 1 item.

51

Elizabeth Robins Pennell by Kaiden Studios, New York, N.Y., undated [192-]. 3 items (3 photoprints of portrait in 2 sizes).

51

Photograph of relief portrait of Joseph Pennell by John Flanagan (1865-1952), 1919.

51

Photograph of relief portrait of Joseph Pennell by Adam Pietz, (mounted on board), 1920.

51
Portrait of Joseph Pennell, etching by Levon West (1900-1968), signed and numbered 6/45.
Description

Inscribed "To Edward Larocque Tinker with Christmas Greetings from Elizabeth Robins Pennell, Christmas, 1929."

51
Reproductions of caricatures of Joseph Pennell. 4 items.
Description

3 items inscribed to the Tinkers from ERP.

51

E.  Memorabilia.

Drawer
Susquehannah (Ship), 23 August 1845. 1 item (1 leaf).
Description

Presidential order for safe passage for the Ship Susquehannah of Philadelphia, master and commander Albert Farley [?], signed by President James K. Polk and by James Buchanan, Secretary of State of Pennsylvania, H. & A. Cope & Co. written on verso. Parchment, with 2 engravings at the top, one of a sailing ship, the other of a harbor with lighthouse in the foreground; with presidential seal. This item apparently belo nged to the Pennell family, perhaps to one of Joseph Pennell's relatives in West Chester, Pa.? [see S. Pennell in Correspondence Folder 34] or to Joseph Pennell's father, Larkin Pennell, who worked for the Philadelphia shipping firm of H.& A. Cope & Co.

51

Poster for Memorial Exhibition of the artwork of Joseph Pennell held at Memorial Hall, Philadelphia, 1926. 1 item (5 copies).

51

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Collection Inventory

PERSIFOR FRAZER, 1736-1792.

Biographical Material.
Box Folder

n.d.

30 1
Correspondence.
Box Folder

1777-1779.

30 7

As a Prisoner of War, 1777-1778.

30 8

Copies of Letters from George Washington in 1777, n.d.

30 9

Re: Fort Ticonderoga, 1776.

30 10
General Files.
Box Folder

Court Martials, 1776.

30 2

Fifth Pennsylvania Regiment, 1776.

30 3

Miscellaneous, 1779-1780.

1 1

Pennsylvania Militia, 1782.

30 4

Reciepts, 1776-1792.

30 5

Regiment Papers, 1777-1782.

30 6

ROBERT FRAZER, 1771-1821.

Professional Papers.
Court Cases and Legal Opinions.
Box Folder

Alice Yarnall v. Walker Yarnall, 1814.

30 69

Brief of Joseph Taylor's Title to Longhook Island, 1768.

30 70

Indenture of Marian Mayer, 1817.

30 71

Judicial System, 1804-1820.

30 72

Mercer County Land, 1786-1834.

30 73

Newton Farm, 1815-1819.

30 74

Walker Yarnall v. Robert Fairlamb, 1817.

30 75
Legal Correspondence.
Box Folder

1790, 1795-1796.

30 43

1797.

30 44

1798.

30 45

1799.

30 46

1800.

30 47

1801.

30 48

1802.

30 49

1803.

30 50

1804.

30 51

1805.

30 52

1806.

30 53

1807.

30 54

1808.

30 55

1809.

30 56

1810.

30 57

1811.

30 58

1812.

30 59

1813.

30 60

1814.

30 61

1815.

30 62

1816.

30 63

1817.

30 64

1818.

30 65

1820.

30 66

1821.

30 67

Undated.

30 68
Personal Papers.
Box Folder

Ancestoral Information, n.d.

30 76
Correspondence.
Box Folder

1789.

30 11

1790.

30 12

1791.

30 13

1792.

30 14

1793.

30 15

1794.

30 16

1795.

30 17

1796.

30 18

1797.

30 19

1798.

30 20

1799.

30 21

1800.

30 22

1802.

30 23

1803.

30 24

1804.

30 25

1805.

30 26

1806.

30 27

1807.

30 28

1808.

30 29

1809.

30 30

1810.

30 31

1811.

30 32

1812.

30 33

1813.

30 34

1814.

30 35

1815.

30 36

1816.

30 37

1817.

30 38

1818.

30 39

1819.

30 40

1820.

30 41

1821.

30 42
Oversize

Deed, Mary Worral Taylor to Robert Frazer, 1817.

6
Diplomas and Certificates.
Box Folder

Academy of Natural Sciences, 1814.

1 1
Oversize

Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, 1795.

1

Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Certificate of Admission, 1792.

1
Box Folder

United States District Court, Middle Circuit Certificate of Admission, 1800.

1 1
Oversize

University of Pennsylvania, A.B., 1789.

1
Box Folder

University of Pennsylvania, A.B., 1789 (photograph of original), n.d.

33 1
Oversize

University of Pennsylvania, A.M., 1792.

1
Box Folder

University of Pennsylvania, A.M., 1792 (photograph of original), n.d.

33 2
Box Folder

Inventory of Library, 1821.

30 77

Marriage License, Alice Yarnall, 1818.

30 78

Mortgage, Elihu Chauncey, 1808.

30 79

Notice of Election to Pennsylvania House of Representatives, 1799.

30 80

Poetry, 1780-1802.

30 81

Receipts, 1792-1799.

30 82

Receipts, 1800-1809.

30 83

Receipts, 1810-1821.

31 1

Typed Summary of Receipts from 1794-1818, n.d.

31 2

Will, 1820.

31 3
Books.
Box

The Holy Bible: Containing the Old and New Testaments. Philadelphia: Matthew Carey, 1803.

51

Raymond, Sir Thomas. Reports of Divers Special Cases Adjudged in the Courts of King's Bench, Common Pleas, and Exchequer, in the Reign of King Charles II. Second Edition. 1743.

50

JOHN FRIES FRAZER, 1812-1872.

Student Papers.
Box Folder

Committee of the Senior Class, 1830.

1 10
Course Notes.
Box Folder

Classical Scrap Book, 1829-1830.

1 2

Mathematics, 1828-1829.

1 3

Mathematics, Dr. Robert Adrain, 1830.

1 4

Memoranda, 1829.

1 5

Natural Philosophy, 1829.

1 6

Natural Philosophy, Dr. Alexander D. Bache.

1 7

Senior Essays, 1829.

1 8
Box Folder

Student Record Reports, 1829-1830.

1 9
Professional Papers.
Lecture Notes.
Box Folder

Chemistry, [1840].

1 11

Chemistry, 1841-1848.

1 12

Chemistry and Metals, Vol. 2, 1842.

1 13

Examination Question, Univ. of Pa., 1871.

1 14

Geology, Franklin Institute, 1839-1840.

1 15

Geology, Franklin Institute, 1840-1841.

1 16

Geology, 1841-1848.

1 17

Geology, 1844.

2 1

Mechanics, 1869.

2 2

Mechanics, 1869.

2 3

Miscellaneous.

2 4

Topography, 1836.

2 5
Notes.
Box Folder

Blackstone's Commentaries on Law.

2 6

Chemistry.

2 7

Chemistry.

2 8

Chemistry, 1841.

2 9

Chemistry and Geology, 1840s.

2 10

Chemistry Laboratory, 1838.

2 11

Geological Expedition.

2 12

Geology.

2 13

Light.

2 14

Literary Quotations, 1832.

2 15

Metallurgy of Iron by Karsten.

2 16

Natural Science Quotations.

2 17

Poems and Translations from Classics, 1831, 1834.

3 1

Steam Engines.

3 2

Tables, etc.

3 3
Personal Papers.
Correspondence.
Box Folder

1862-1867, Bache, Alexander Dallas.

3 5

1867-1868.

33 5

1869, 1871.

3 4
Diplomas and Certificates.
Oversize

Academy of Natural Sciences, 1835.

2

Franklin Institute, 1835 (2 copies).

2

Harvard University, LL.D., 1857.

2
Box Folder

Miscellaneous Membership Certificates, 1835-1869.

3 7
Oversize

National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 1863.

2

Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, 1869.

2

Philomathean Society, 1830.

2

Resolutions Passed by the Franklin Institute, 1872.

2

University of Pennsylvania, A.B., 1830.

2
Box Folder

University of Pennsylvania, A.B., 1830 (photograph of original), n.d.

33 3
Oversize

University of Pennsylvania, A.M., 1833.

2
Box Folder

University of Pennsylvania, A.M., 1833 (photograph of original), n.d.

33 4
Box Folder

Estate, Inventory and Account, 1885.

3 6

Meeting of Young Opposed to the Interference of Office Holders in Elections, Correspondence, 1833-1834.

3 11

Meeting of Young Opposed to the Interference of Office Holders in Elections, Minutes, 1834.

3 10
Pamphlets and Catalogues.
Box Folder

Coastal Survey Report, 1850.

3 9

Coastal Survey Report, ca. 1830s.

3 8

Miscellaneous.

3 7
Box Folder

Passport, 1867.

33 6

Photographic Wood Block Portrait.

3 13

Receipt Book, 1833-1834.

3 12

Receipts, 1850-1851.

33 7
Books.
Box

Frazer, John Fries. Personal Library Catalogue, 1840.

51

Chalmers, Rev. Thomas. The Evidence and Authority of the Christian Revelation. Seventh Edition. Hartford: G. Goodwin and Sons Printers, 1822.

50

PERSIFOR FRAZER, 1844-1909.

Correspondence Files.
Box Folder

1866.

3 14

1868.

34 14

1870.

3 15

1872.

3 16

1873.

3 17

1874.

3 18

1875.

3 19

1875.

34 15

1876.

3 20

1876, Ashhurst, Richard L.

34 16

1877.

3 21

1878.

3 22

1879.

3 23

1880, A-F.

3 24

1880, G-Z.

3 25

1881.

3 26

1881.

34 17

1882.

34 18

1882.

3 27

1883.

34 19

1883, A-H.

3 28

1883, I-Z.

3 29

1884.

34 20

1884, A.

4 1

1884, B.

4 2

1884, British Association for the Advancement of Science.

4 3

1884, C-F.

4 4

1884, G-K.

4 5

1884, L-M.

4 6

1884, Miscellaneous.

4 12

1884, N-P.

4 7

1884, Pepper, William.

4 8

1884, R-T.

4 9

1884, Telegrams.

4 11

1884, U-Z.

4 10

1885.

34 21

1885, A-E.

4 13

1885, F-L.

4 14

1885, M-P.

4 15

1885, Q-Z.

4 16

1886.

34 22

1886, A.

4 17

1886, B.

4 18

1886, C-E.

4 19

1886, F.

4 20

1886, G-H.

4 21

1886, I-L.

4 22

1886, Miscellaneous.

5 2

1886, M-O.

4 23

1886, P.

4 24

1886, Q-S.

4 25

1886, T-Z.

5 1

1887, A-B.

5 3

1887, Bennet, Samuel C.

34 23

1887, C-E.

5 4

1887, F-J.

5 5

1887, K-O.

5 6

1887, Miscellaneous.

5 11

1887, Page, William Byrd.

5 7

1887, P-R.

5 8

1887, S-T.

5 9

1887, U-Z.

5 10

1888, A-D.

5 12

1888, E-G.

5 13

1888, H-L.

5 14

1888, M-S.

5 15

1888, T-Z.

5 16

1888, W.

34 24

1889, A-B.

5 17

1889, C-D.

5 18

1889, E-G.

5 19

1889, H-J.

5 20

1889, K-O.

5 21

1889, P-Q.

6 1

1889, R-T.

6 2

1889, U-Z.

6 3

1890, A-F.

6 4

1890, G-K.

6 5

1890, L-M.

6 6

1890, N-R.

6 7

1890, S-Z.

6 8

1891, A-E.

6 9

1891, F-L.

6 10

1891, M-O.

6 11

1891, P-R.

6 12

1891, S-Z.

6 13

1892, A-E.

6 14

1892, F-L.

6 15

1892, Miscellaneous.

7 2

1892, M-S.

6 16

1892, T-Z.

7 1

1892, Pepper, William.

6 17

1893, A-D.

7 3

1893, E-J.

7 4

1893, K-M.

7 5

1893, N-Q.

7 6

1893, R-S.

7 7

1893, T-Z.

7 8

1894, A-C.

7 9

1894, D-F.

7 10

1894, G-L.

7 11

1894, M-R.

7 12

1894, S-Z.

7 13

1895, A-C.

7 14

1895, D-F.

7 15

1895, G-K.

7 16

1895, L-M.

8 1

1895, N-R.

8 2

1895, S-Z.

8 3

1896, A-B.

8 4

1896, C-E.

8 5

1896, F-G.

8 6

1896, H-L.

8 7

1896, M-P.

8 8

1896, Q-T.

8 9

1896, U-Z.

8 10

1897.

8 11

1898, A-E.

8 12

1898, F-H.

8 13

1898, I-Z.

8 14

1898, Pepper, Mary.

34 25

1899, A-B.

8 15

1899, C-E.

8 16

1899, F-G.

8 17

1899, H-L.

9 1

1899, M-P.

9 2

1899, Q-S.

9 3

1899, T-V.

9 4

1899, W-Z.

9 5

1900.

34 26

1900, A-D.

9 6

1900, E-K.

9 7

1900, L-O.

9 8

1900, P-R.

9 9

1900, S-Z.

9 10

1901, A-C.

9 11

1901, D-F.

9 12

1901, G-M.

9 13

1901, N-S.

9 14

1901, T-Z.

9 15

1902, A-B.

9 16

1902, C-E.

9 17

1902, F-G.

10 1

1902, H-J.

10 2

1902, K-L.

10 3

1902, M-O.

10 4

1902, P.

10 5

1902, Q-R.

10 6

1902, S-T.

10 7

1902, U-Z.

10 8

1903, A.

10 9

1903, B-C.

10 10

1903, D-F.

10 11

1903, G-H.

10 12

1903, I-K.

10 13

1903, L-M.

10 14

1903, N-Q.

10 15

1903, R.

11 1

1903, S.

11 2

1903, T.

11 3

1903, U-V.

11 4

1903, W-Z.

11 5

1904.

34 27

1904, A-B.

11 6

1904, C-E.

11 7

1904, F-G.

11 8

1904, H-L.

11 9

1904, M-O.

11 10

1904, P-R.

11 11

1904, S-T.

11 12

1904, U-Z.

11 13

1905, A-B.

11 14

1905, C-E.

11 15

1905, F-G.

11 16

1905, H-L.

11 17

1905, M-P.

11 18

1905, Q-T.

11 19

1905, U-Z.

12 1

1906, A-C.

12 2

1906, D-F.

12 3

1906, G-K.

12 4

1906, L.

12 5

1906, M.

12 6

1906, Miscellaneous.

12 12

1906, N-P.

12 7

1906, Ra.

12 8

1906, Re-S.

12 9

1906, T.

12 10

1906, U-Z.

12 11

1907, A-B.

12 13

1907, C.

12 14

1907, D.

12 15

1907, F-G.

12 16

1907, H-K.

12 17

1907, L-M.

12 18

1907, Miscellaneous.

13 5

1907, N-P.

12 19

1907, R.

13 1

1907, S.

13 2

1907, T.

13 3

1907, U-Z.

13 4

1908.

34 28

1908, A-B.

13 6

1908, C-E.

13 7

1908, F-G.

13 8

1908, Frazer, John.

34 29

1908, H-L.

13 9

1908, M-P.

13 10

1908, R-T.

13 11

1908, U-Z.

13 12

1909.

34 30

1909, A-Z.

13 13

1909, Calling Cards at PF's Funeral.

13 16

1909, Letters of Condolence.

13 14

1909, Letters of Condolence.

13 15

Undated.

34 31
Letter Press Books.
Box Folder

1870-1884.

14 1

1872-1876, indexed.

14 2

1876-1883.

14 3

1882.

14 4

1883-1886.

14 5
General Files.
Box Folder

Academy of Natural Sciences.

15 1

American Association for the Advancement of Science, Meeting 1884.

15 2

American Naturalist.

15 3

American Philosophical Society.

15 4

Bar Harbour, Maine.

15 5
Barbet Distilling Apparatus.
Box Folder

A-B.

15 6

C-Z, Miscellaneous.

15 7
Box Folder

Biographical Sketches, Obituaries.

15 8

Book Solicitations, Academic and Scientific.

15 9

Book Solicitations, Genealogical.

15 10
Books.
Box Folder

Illustrations for Persifor Frazer's Descendants, Vol. 2.

15 11

Letters Relating to 1894 Book.

15 12

Newspaper Clippings of Reviews, etc., 1894-1900.

15 13
Box Folder

Charity Organizations.

15 14
Class of 1862.
Box Folder

Book Proofs.

15 16

Class of 1862.

15 15
Box Folder

Clubs.

15 17

Cope, Edward Drinker, Altercation.

15 18
Death.
Box Folder

Autopsy Report by Dr. R.S. Lavenson, 1909.

31 30

Clippings.

31 31

Examination of Brain by E.A. Spitzka, 1909.

31 32
Diaries, Journals.
Box Folder

Diaries, journals (General).

15 19

Dr. Hayden's Corp, Wyoming, 1869.

15 20

Dr. Hayden's Corp, Wyoming, 1869.

15 21

Trip to Colorado, 1880.

15 22
Box Folder

Dinner Invitations.

15 23

Distribution Lists of Publications.

15 25

Essays.

15 26

Exhibitions and Expositions.

15 27

Family, Children.

15 28

Financial Material.

15 29

First City Troop, Civil Action.

15 30

Franklin Chess Club.

15 31

Geological Societies.

15 32

Geological Surveys.

15 33
German Patents.
Box Folder

A-M.

16 1

P.

16 2

R-Z.

16 3

Specifications, etc.

16 4
Box Folder

Graphotypique.

16 5

Handwriting.

16 6
Handwriting Testimony.
Box Folder

April 1896.

16 8

May 1896.

16 9

May 1896, Joseph Holt Will.

16 10

May 1896, Joseph Holt Will, Photographs.

16 11

1896, Miles, F. Basil.

16 7

June 1896.

16 12

September 1896.

16 13

1897.

16 14

1898.

16 15

January-April 1899.

16 16

April-September 1899.

16 17

October-November 1899.

16 18

December 1899-1903.

16 19

Miscellaneous and No Date.

16 20
International Congress of Geologists.
Box Folder

1885.

16 22

1886.

16 23

1886-1888.

31 37

1887.

16 24

1888, January-June.

16 25

1888, June-December.

17 1

1897.

17 2

n.d.

16 21

American Committee, 1885-1887.

17 3
American Committee Report, 1886.
Box Folder

A-D.

17 4

E-H.

17 5

I-O.

17 6

P-T.

17 7
Box Folder

American Committee Report, 1887-1890.

31 36

Archeon Circular Replies.

17 8
Geological Map of Europe.
Box Folder

1886.

17 9
Geological Map of Europe, Subscriptions.
Box Folder

General.

17 10

1886-1888.

17 11

1887-1888.

31 35

1890.

17 12

1896-1897.

17 13

1899.

17 14
Miscellaneous Reports.
Box Folder

(1).

17 15

(2).

17 16

1886.

31 38
Notes on Third Session, 1886.
Box Folder

Administration.

17 19

General.

17 17

General.

17 18
Box Folder

Inventions, 1881, n.d.

31 39

Jamestown Exposition, 1907.

17 20

Knots, n.d.

31 40
Oversize

Ledger Book of Scientific Exchanges, 1885-1892.

2

Letter of Thanks, International Electrical Exhibition, Franklin Institute, 1884.

2
Box Folder

Literary Essays, c. 1901.

31 41

Manuscript, Reminiscences in Philadelphia and Washington and Naval Hydrography in Time of War during 1860 and 1861, 1891.

31 43

Manuscript, Reminiscences of the Mississippi Squadron in 1864-65, 1895.

31 42

Medical Examinations, 1906-1907.

31 44

Memorials.

17 21

Student Record from Freiburg.

17 20
Mexican Tunnel Enterprise.
Box Folder

1890-1891.

18 1

1899.

18 2

1902-1903.

18 3

August 1889.

17 26

Financial Statements, 1889.

18 4

January-May, 1889.

17 23

July, 1889.

17 25

June, 1889.

17 24

Miscellaneous.

18 5

n.d.

17 22

November-December, 1889.

17 29

October, 1889.

17 28

Receipts, 1889.

18 6

September, 1889.

17 27
Box Folder

Miscellaneous, 1888-1892.

31 46

Miscellaneous.

18 7
Music.
Box Folder

"Ella" Plates.

18 9

"Ella" Plates.

18 10

"The Guiding Star" Copyright Certificate, 1907.

31 45

"Le Retour de Paris" Plates.

18 11

"Le Retour de Paris" Plates.

18 12

"Le Retour de Paris" Plates.

18 13

"Le Retour de Paris" Plates.

18 14

Music, General.

18 8
Box Folder

Naval Post, GAR.

18 15

Pachucha, Mexico, Mining Operation, 1889.

18 16

Pan-Republic Congress, 1890-1891.

31 47

Passport, 1897.

31 48
Pennsylvania Fencing and Sparring Club.
Box Folder

A-D.

18 23

E-Z.

18 24

General, 1861-1898.

18 25
Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution.
Box Folder

(General).

18 17
4th of July Celebration, 1891.
Box Folder

A-L.

18 18

M-Z, Bills.

18 19

Clippings.

18 20